Location: Marshfield massachusetts usa designing a fast rowboat I live in New England (USA) and we have a growing sport of open water ocean rowing racing. Location: Lake Michigan I don't claim to be an expert, but for speed, little to no rocker is good.
A race boat would have to be longer (the longer the better) and a bit wider (but not much wider).
Location: Cornwall, England Take a look at a gig, they don't come any faster or sweeter (but I'm biased, we've raced 'em in Cornwall for the past couple of hundred years! Location: Eustis, FL Build her light and put some foils on her, so you can spank the fleet.
Location: Marshfield massachusetts usa Safewalrus, We have the gigs here too. Location: Marshfield massachusetts usa Terhohalme, Very interesting piece of work, I'd be interested to find out more about your boat. Location: Trondheim, NORWAY I think you could try minimum wetted surface, long waterline and optimize the Cp for your speed. Location: Marshfield massachusetts usa Safewalrus, That Flashboat, VERY interesting can you point me to plans? Length must be an important part of the speed equation,a long narrow boat will always be faster than a short wide one. 1 ) A fast rowboat will probably be as long as possible and because of its length will be able to have as narrower beam as permitted by the required displacement.
Bow steering ,yes like you guys I am concerned about bows digging in and directing the issue.
There must be a point where the trade off between wave making and wetted surface is at an optimum.. When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals.
If it's not you, and it's not public domain, then posting plans is a violation of copyright. Location: New York That plan is one from the Smithsonian's collection of plans, maintained by the History of Technology Division of the National Museum of American History. Location: Sweden I can agree with marshmat and Robert but I have two questions regarding this. Are designers today exposed to the same problem as the "problem of illegal downloading" as the music or film industry?
Location: Cathlamet, WA Where is the proof that Chapelle got permission to draw those lines etc. Originally Posted by Gilbert Where is the proof that Chapelle got permission to draw those lines etc. If it?s of interest to you read the notes that go with the source material for the drawings. Location: Eustis, FL Having met and discussed boat design at length with the very man that drew those plans I can assure you he didn't sneak around, pulling lines from vessels, by flashlight probably, in the middle of the night. His process was quite simple, to preserve the lines of types that would soon become extinct (his assumption, usually quite accurately so). I met him at the end of his life, when he wished he had more time to catalog the craft he felt he missed, but was no longer the man able to perform this task. Buy the plans Boreas, they're very inexpensive and he'd loved the idea they were doing what he hoped it would, spark interest in a type long gone. I said, ?He didn?t get permission but instead he snuck around in the middle of a moonless night and stole them.? and I thought it was extreme enough that nobody would take it seriously. Location: Cathlamet, WA The point I tried to make was that Chapelle likely had no permission from the designer or the builder to make those drawings in most cases. Originally Posted by Gilbert The point I tried to make was that Chapelle likely had no permission from the designer or the builder to make those drawings in most cases. Location: Trondheim, NORWAY It's a complicated question with no simple answers. If the design office is still in business or the boat is still in production, you have to ask.


I'd like one sized for a kayak that would be good for for positioning the boat while fishing. Guest625101138 Previous Member   There are some really nice RC motors, controllers and batteries around these days. You could also look at a Hobie Mirage or Wavewalker if you are not inclined to build a drive frame. Location: Oregon Thanks Rick, but I'm not looking for this to be the main source of propulsion, just positioning the boat and moving slowly while fishing along the shore 2-3 mph would be plenty fast. I figure the simplest would be a motor that could be submerged like a regular trolling motor.
Fiddling around trying to waterproof motors when you can get something like the Endura would simply be a waste of effort and money. A length of machinable aluminium or high strength stainless will make a workable curved shaft. You can get cheap metal props that are used for stirrers from McMaster that would be stronger but a 10X8 model plane prop is certainly worth a try. I expect we will see a lot more of this stuff coming out with lithium batteries in the next few years that will kill small ICE outboards in price and performance.
If the weight is still to much for you, since you are running way below the 34lb Endura rating, you might be able to turn down the motor body exterior. If you wanted to spend a little more, you could buy (2) smaller 12 volt batteries and a scooter motor controller + throttle (about $35 at TNC scooters) and get variable speed at about the same weight. Antique drive question » Thread Tools Show Printable Version Email this Page Display Modes Linear Mode Switch to Hybrid Mode Switch to Threaded Mode Search this Thread Advanced Search Similar Threads Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post Trolling Jet Motor?
Location: Texas Performance Pontoon Catamaran I am sure that I am missing the obvious, but why couldn't you use a set of aluminum pontoons to recreate a bigger metal version of one of these inflatable catamarans? The inflatable versions originated as surf rescue craft in South Africa, and have become popular racing sport boats.
Does this sound more sound, or am I going to have another "what was I thinking" epiphany when my hangover goes away?
Location: Austin TX Recycled Hulls I like your idea of using the G-Cat hulls. Location: Milwaukee, WI I am not sure an aluminum pontoon is heavier than an inflatable. I'm looking for my next boat building project, and reading some of the recent threads have become interested in the idea of building something like a scow moth. I love the idea of a light car toppable quick to rig boat that will give some real fun on my local estuary.
CT 249, your scow having 18Kg hull weigt must be a fun boat, nice and low to the water, it must give a great feeling of speed! Location: Australia I've thought of doing the same for a while but I'm also interested in a new dinghy design I saw in the latest edition of Wooden Boat. Originally Posted by CT 249 The Australian Moth association may still have Snubby plans; I think the webmaster (John McAteer?) found a set a while ago IIRC. They sell copies at a very reasonable price and it would be both safer and more polite to buy a set instead of using a photocopy. Is a copyright valid forever, or is it like the music buisness, something like 50 years after the rightholders death.
What aould be the legal consequece if you build a boat after someones drawings without paying a royalty? It contains the known background and written interviews with the owner and other interested parties. He was a unique work of art, a true artist, historian, fine draftsman, builder and yacht designer.
They are intended for short duration so have to be derated for continuous use but are certainly capable of over 1kW sustained if properly cooled. I have not dissembled an Endura yet (will do so as soon as one fails) but if the skeg is solid, it might be sawed off.
Looks like quite a simple boat to build, has a range of interesting rig options and should perform a little better than the old Mk II Moth.


Looks like a very fine entry and straight run with a lot of flare in the mid sections to get enough spread for oars on gunnels ( a requirement in our class). I think there is no copyright on plans held by the Smithsonian but I think the book you copied from does have a copyright held by W.W.
Is it legal to create and build a "replica" built on limited information like a line drawing found on internet? In fact there is a published book that details how to document historic boats and what paperwork needs to be prepared and also covers the necessary permissions. It was also his hope, that his drawings (generally, not a complete plan set, but enough for an experienced builder or designer, needing reference material) would continue to foster recreations, evolutions of the type, restorations and reproductions. He took liberties, at times, a lot of heat over the USS Constellation (he was right after all, long before anyone would admit it publicly) was an opinionated, stubborn and grouchy individual, but I loved him, just because he wouldn't conform, if for no other reason (it was the late 60's and non-conformity was a thing for me at the time). People that work hard to document old designs before they vanish are normally paid by museums. And while repairing holes or tears in the tubes is fairly straight foward, build a set of tubes from scratch is beyond the ability of mere mortals. I have found some information on the International Moth sites but no up to date detailed plans for a scow, only the skiff style hull. My ideas come from eight years of racing and constant observation of our own two boat as well as the boats we race against.
Weather prediction for our 4 mile race on Saturday is for temps to be 53 degrees F and winds to be 10-15 kts.
This work is usually paid for by a grant from someone and the paperwork to document both the boat and the use of the money is beyond belief. He thought I was a brash young pup, that needed a good *** whipping, though he liked my sailing skills, particularly against the blue bloods.
So it make sense to buy plans from the museum, even if it's just for the wall in your workshop. The later scows like Wardie's Effineffable etc had narrower sterns which allow you to sink the stern and lift the bow up, greatly reducing the nosediving problem. Rules are almost non existant and are limited to number of oarsmen,fixed or sliding seat, or general clasification ie: work boat or livery boat.
I had hoped that this thread would bring out the real designers and a discussion of general design theory. Not as fast as a Magnum type fat skiff until about 12-18 knots but much easier to handle, and better than a Magnum sailed by the average sailor. To win, a boat must be able to stand up to some tough conditions yet have enough speed to achieve 6 knots+ in calm conditions.
I'm learning a computer program for boat design and have a couple of promising sketches worked up. Might put a look of dismay on the Cornish boys faces - to be beaten by a yankee 'flashboat' 'specially if they don't know you have one! Tad Roberts,a designer in Washington State, a forum contributor, was kind enough to send me a set of limes showing his concept of a fast row boat, and they gave me a lot to think about. I might also add that some things aren?t copyrighted and old boats aren?t likely to have been copyrighted at all.
I would appreciate a general discussion of design factors from people who are more knowledgeable than myself. A large part of his ideas will show up in my next boat if I can just get the station molds to print out on my program. Whatever she does, it's a fast boat (good crew too ) Does semi-planing happen, is it good or bad? Current plans are to put some rocker in forward to reduce bow steer and reduce wetted surface.




Pontoon boat for sale crystal river outfitters
Boat trailers for sale hawaii
Boat dealer in iowa falls iowa