One of only three ships in the Core Collection of the National Historic Ships Register, the legendary Cutty Sark makes a dashing addition to any room’s nautical decor. Built to be one of the fastest ships on the sea, in order to command the tea trade between England and China, the legendary Cutty Sark is brought to life in stunning detail with this handsome toy model ship.
We build and offer more model ships than anyoneLooking for the perfect gitt for a client or associate?How about that hard-to-shop for family member? 100% Money Back GuaranteeHandcrafted Model Ships guarantees your every satisfaction with our models.
Knowledgable Live Customer ServiceOur customer service team consists of real people right here in Southern California awaiting to assist you. On the afternoon of Monday, 22nd November 1869, a beautiful little clipper ship of 963 tons gross was launched at Dumbarton on the River Leven. Cutty Sark was built for John 'Jock' Willis, a seasoned sailing ship master who had taken over his father’s firm of ship owners in the port of London. The ship was designed by Hercules Linton, a partner in the Dumbarton firm of Scott & Linton. The ship was towed to Greenock for final work on her masts and rigging. She was then brought to London to load her first cargo for China.
In January 2006, letters written by Clarence Ray (apprentice on board the Cutty Sark in 1894) were brought to light by Dick Ray, his great-nephew. As steam-ships moved further into the wool trade in the 1890s, the Cutty Sark began to make less money for her owner.  After the ship returned to the UK from Brisbane in 1895, Jock Willis sold her to a Portuguese firm, J.
By January 1922 Ferreira ran into a Channel gale, and the captain put into Falmouth harbour to repair the damage. In 1923 her old name and nationality was restored; the Cutty Sark had returned to British ownership. After saving the Cutty Sark for the nation, Wilfred Dowman restored the ship to a close approximation of her appearance as a tea and wool clipper.  This was a considerable feat, due to the shortage of necessary materials caused by the First World War.
However, Captain Dowman died in 1936, and his widow decided that she was unable to maintain the ship at her own cost.  Therefore, the Cutty Sark was sold to the Incorporated Thames Nautical Training College, Greenhithe, and left Falmouth in 1938 accompanied by cheers from well-wishers and hoots from vessels in the harbour. In 1951, the ship was sent to London, to be moored in the Thames as part of the Festival of Britain celebrations.  Returning to Greenhithe, it was not long before her plight became noticed by those determined to save her from the scrap-yard. The Cutty Sark Society was formed by Frank Carr, Director of the National Maritime Museum, and patronised by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh.  In a special ceremony, just before the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip took possession of Cutty Sark on behalf of the the society. Built with the expressed intent to out-sail the Thermopylae, her closest competitor in the tea trade, the Cutty Sark quickly became one of the fastest ships on the sea.
Cutty Sark was destined for the tea trade, then an intensely competitive race across the globe from China to London, with immense profits to the ship to arrive with the first tea of the year.
In the end, clippers lost out to steamships, which could pass through the recently-opened Suez Canal and deliver goods more reliably, if not quite so quickly, which proved to be better for business. The ship is in the care of the Cutty Sark Trust, whose president, the Duke of Edinburgh, was instrumental in ensuring her preservation, when he set up the Cutty Sark Society in 1951. Cutty Sark station on the Docklands Light Railway is one minute's walk away, with connections to central London and the London Underground.
On the morning of May 21, 2007 the Cutty Sark, which had been closed and partly dismantled for conservation work, caught fire, and burned for several hours before the London Fire Brigade could bring the fire under control. Aerial video footage showed extensive damage, but seemed to indicate that the ship had not been destroyed in its entirety.
As part of the restoration work planned before the fire, it was proposed that the ship be raised three metres, to allow the construction of a state of the art museum space beneath. For a long time, there had been growing criticism of the policies of the Cutty Sark Trust and its stance that the most important thing was to preserve as much as possible of the original fabric. In addition to explaining how and why the ship is being saved, the exhibition features a new film presentation, a re-creation of the master's saloon, and interactive exhibits about the project. The design for the renovation project by Youmeheshe architects with Grimshaw architects and Buro Happold engineers involves raising the ship out of her dry berth using a Kevlar web, allowing visitors to pass under the hull.


Oscar-winning producer Jerry Bruckheimer has aided in the repair and restoration of the Cutty Sark.
The Cutty Sark is one of only three surviving ships of its time that has a composite wrought iron frame structure covered by wooden planking.
On Thursday May 24, 2007, Jonathan Ross revealed that he had missed the recent BAFTAs and failed to pick up his award because he was on a family trip to Cutty Sark.
The following day, during an episode of Have I Got News for You, Paul Merton kept insisting that the Duke of Edinburgh had burnt down the ship, an allusion to the conspiracy theory that the duke was involved in the death of Diana, Princess of Wales. Slightly more obscurely, the magazine of the University of Greenwich student union - the main campus of which is immediately next to the ship, comprising the majority of buildings of the Royal Naval College - is also named after the ship; the Sarky Cutt. Journalist Robert Fisk's grandfather was a first-mate aboard the Cutty Sark and mentioned in The Great War for Civilisation: The Conquest of the Middle East.
One of the fastest clipper ships of the late 19th Century, some say even the fastest of its kind, the Cutty Sark was an impressive vessel in the tea trade between China and London. Built for speed on the open ocean, this amazing clipper ship was considered the fastest of any her size, rumored to have once outrun a more modern steam ship. Perfect for any child, or nautical enthusiast, this 7" model ship is both historically accurate and pleasantly aesthetic. On that day, she was given a name that was to become renowned throughout the seafaring world. It is believed that he moulded the bowlines of Willis's earlier vessel, The Tweed into the midship attributes of Firth of Forth fishing boats, creating a beautiful new hull shape that was stronger, could take more sail, and be driven harder than any other. Moore and his Mate were transferred from the Blackadder to the Cutty Sark and it was under his command that the ship embarked upon her most successful period of working life. This important archive reveals how a fifteen year old boy lived and worked alongside his shipmates. Wilfred Dowman, a retired windjammer skipper and owner of the training ship Lady of Avenel, saw the ship and set out to buy her.  However, she returned to Lisbon without further mishap and was sold to a new Portuguese owner who changed her name to Maria do Amparo.
She was also the first historic vessel since Drake’s Golden Hind in the sixteenth century to be opened to the public, and oral history interviews have revealed how boatmen used to take many visitors out to the ship.
With a long and fascinating history, now on dry dock display in Greenwich, London the Cutty Sark is a world renowned vessel that commands respect and admiration. Built in 1869, she served as a merchant vessel (the last clipper to be built for that purpose), and then as a training ship until being put on public display in 1954. This was the nickname of the fictional character Nannie (also the name of the ship's figurehead) in Robert Burns' 1791 comic poem Tam o' Shanter. However, she did not distinguish herself; in the most famous race, against Thermopylae in 1872, both ships left Shanghai together on June 18th, but two weeks later Cutty Sark lost her rudder after passing through the Sunda Strait, and arrived in London on October 18th, a week after Thermopylae, a total passage of 122 days. In 1916 she was dismasted off the Cape of Good Hope, sold, re-rigged in Cape Town as a barquentine, and renamed Maria do Amparo. She is located near the centre of Greenwich, in south-east London, close aboard the National Maritime Museum, the former Greenwich Hospital, and Greenwich Park.
Greenwich Pier is next to the ship, and is served by scheduled river boats from piers in central London. Initial reports indicated that the damage was extensive, with most of the wooden structure in the centre having been lost. Doughty expressed that the trust was most worried about the state of iron framework to which the fabric was attached. After initial analysis of the CCTV footage of the area suggested the possibility of arson, further investigation over the following days by Scotland Yard failed to find conclusive proof that the fire was set deliberately. The fire damage has been put forth as a reason for the Cutty Sark to be rebuilt in a manner that would allow her to put to sea again by proponents of the idea. Live webcam views of the conservation work allow the visitor to see remotely the work being carried out on the ship. A collection of photos taken by Bruckheimer went on display in London in November 2007 to help raise money for the Cutty Sark Conservation Project.


An image of the ship appears on the label, and the maker formerly sponsored the Cutty Sark Tall Ships' Race. He was assigned to the then very lucrative and competitive tea trade with a race around the world to be the first to unite China every year to London. It is popular for its good quality and the customers often buy it as a valuable and nice gift.
Give this handsome and sleek ship replica as a gift, or place one in your home for a distinct and historic nautical flare. Place one upon your desk, in your child's room, or in your office, and enjoy the warm nautical charm it brings. Place one upon your desk, in your child's room, or in your office, and enjoy the warm nautical charm it brings. His ambition was for Cutty Sark to be the fastest ship in the annual race to bring home the first of the new season's tea from China.
Place one of these fabulous model ships above the fireplace, in the den, or in your office, and imagine the glorious days when she once glided through the waves. She is preserved in dry dock at Greenwich in London, but was damaged in a fire on May 21, 2007 while undergoing extensive restoration.
She was wearing a linen cutty sark that she had been given as a child, therefore it was far too small for her.
Her legendary reputation is supported by the fact that her captain chose to continue this race with an improvised rudder instead of putting into port for a replacement, yet was only beaten by one week.
Under the respected Captain Richard Woodget, she did very well, posting Australia-to-Britain times of as little as 67 days. In 1922 she was bought by Captain Wilfred Dowman, who restored her to her original appearance and used her as a stationary training ship.
The bow section looked to be relatively unscathed and the stern also appeared to have survived without major damage.
However, the Cutty Sark Trust have found that less than 5% of the original fabric was lost in the fire, as the decks which were destroyed were non-original additions.
With the opening of the Suez Canal, the clippers were removed from the trade in favor of the first steamships. Scale model kit an Cutty Sark from Artesania Latina contains necessary building material and parts. There are currently two petitions to the UK Prime Minister, one for funds to restore the ship, and the other for funds to restore the ship into commission as a sail training vessel. The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck part three-and-a-half: The Cowboy Captain of the Cutty Sark by Don Rosa features the ship herself. The Cutty Sark was then destined to trade wool in Australia and subsequently sold in 1895 to a Portuguese company. Ready-to-use fittings are plentiful in a variety of fine hardwoods, bronzed cast metal, white metal, and brass.
In the award winning science fiction novel Blue Mars, by Kim Stanley Robinson, the Cutty Sark is portrayed sailing in one of the newly created channels on Earth following a major flood bought upon by volcanic activity in Antarctica.
After more than half a century wandering through Europe and South Africa, was finally bought by the British in 1954, restored and displayed to the public in a dry dock, specially designed in Greenwich (London). Pre-printed flags, cotton sail material, and several diameters of standing and running rigging are all included. In The Deptford Mice trilogy of books by Robin Jarvis, the mouse character Thomas Triton lives on board the Cutty Sark.
The unique elegance of his line, his incredible speed and wealth of its details has made the Cutty Sark a universal legend.



Comstock yacht sales brick nj kohls
Houseboat building kits uk
Plywood boat kits australia 2014
Boat building courses gold coast 600