The picnic tables are made from a single sheet of plywood, take about 30 minutes to mark out, and about 1 hour to cut out. These flat-pack plywood picnic tables have been a God send this summer for both me personally and for for my business; Cargo Cycles. They have been hauled around to various shows and events that I have attended, been used as canteen seating in the unit workshop for sammy and I. I have used a cordless jigsaw for the rounded cuts, and cordless circular saw for the long straight cuts, but a jigsaw will be more than adequate for all the cutting requirements. The best results will be obtained by using a jigsaw blade that will cut on both the up, and down strokes, and is suitable for cutting curves. When the plans say that you can make this flat pack picnic table from a single sheet of plywood, they weren't kidding. Now is the time to round off the edges of the plywood, complete a general sanding down and either coat with paint or timber preservative. My six flat pack plywood picnic tables, along with another 6-10, that I can borrow from my Church will be used during our house warming party in 3 weeks time; 40 odd guests, two bands, and 5 other performers.
I have however encountered an issue with them, not exactly a problem, but more of a niggle.
I am lucky as I have a whole metalworking and woodworking workshop available for my every whim, and so the other day I fished out my 6 inch diameter hole saw and made some simple, but very effective plywood feet to spread the load, reduce the ground pressure, and prevent another situation of having to recover the sunken narrow legs of a table from the turf again.
What I forgot to mention in the step-by-step instructions was that because I was allowing the public to sit at my tables, I had used a router with a rounding over bit on all exposed edges.
As for surviving the rigors of being used by super sized members of the public; the yellow table pictured above was the one that supported well over 60 stones, or about 385 kg for almost 2 hours without damage, and it is still in daily use up at the workshop for Sammy and I to use for our breaks. About 30 seconds to assemble, about 45 seconds to dismantle and secure with a couple of bungees for storage, and a whole table made from 18mm thick plywood weighs approx 15kg. I have just given that idea a lot of thought over a cuppa during the last 15 minutes, and my business Cargo Cycles would be very happy to host and sponsor that competition.
Archive for Over the Gate Join in for a friendly chat over the gate about home and country matters. How to make a flat pack plywood Picnic table S-B-SI actually got around to making some flat pack plywood picnic tables. To mark out the plywood, you'll need: a rule or tape measure, a pencil, a square, and a straight edge of about 4 feet long, or slightly longer.
When the plans say that you can make this flat pack picnic table from a single sheet of plywood, they weren't kidding.
OK, I owe you all an apology now, as I forgot to take any photos of the assembly joints being cut out; this I'll rectify tomorrow when I make another picnic table.


I saw someone cycling round Norwich on a sort of tricycle with a great big sort of supermarket trolley on the front. They have been hauled around to various shows and events that I have attended, been used as canteen area in the unit for sammy and I.
My six tables along with another 6-10, that I can borrow from my Church will be used during our house warming party in 3 weeks time; 40 odd guests, two bands, and 5 other performers. I had 3 very large ladies (and I mean very large; think 20 plus stones a piece) sit at one of my tables and eat their picnic during one show (and they weren't even interested in my products ), their combined weight sank the table legs almost 4 inches into a reasonably dry grass playing field, and I had one helluva job pulling the table out of the soil while Sammy, in fits of laughter stood by watching me. OK I have used a hole-saw and a bench mounted pillar drill, but a jigsaw and pistol drill are more than adequate to make a set feet similar to the ones that I have made. The picnic tables have been taken out of winter storage: under a plastic sheet in the garden. All has faired well: no damp timbers, no warped boards, no splits or other problems, even the paint work looks good but will require a wipe down with a soapy cloth to clean away a few water marks and settled dust.
Our plywood picnic tables are two years old now, and have coped exceptionally well with the rigors of several local shows, 4 church fetes, 3 parties in the park, 2 music festivals, 1 firework display, several parties (at ours and at friends), have been loaned out on a few occasions, and we have enjoyed many alfresco meals, BBQs, and evenings sat at them.
Lois has recently encouraged me to repaint ours with a more subtle gloss green than the original bright gloss Melon Yellow that I used. My Bikes 2006 Falcon Explorer Hybrid, 2007 Falcon Nomad MTB, 2008 Landrover Visalia Crossover, 2010 Cargo Cycles Senton, 2010 Cargo Cycles Capability, and a 2001 AVD quad pedi-van.
OK, not exactly a Utility Cycling related subject, but these flat pack for storage plywood picnic tables are ideal for cycle events, and can be easily hauled on a bicycle trailer (6 tables flat packed will fit inside my AVD pedal-van with space to spare). They have been hauled around to various shows and events that I have attended, been used as canteen seating in the unit workshop for Sammy and I.
2006 Falcon Explorer Hybrid, Old Universal MTB BSO converted into a Bike Polo hack, 2008 Landrover Visalia Crossover, 2010 Cargo Cycles Senton, 2010 Cargo Cycles Capability, and a 2001 AVD quad pedi-van.
I was thinking that you could make up a stencil and spray your logo and number onto the sides of the tables? French bicycle racer, Latourneau pulled an Airstream caravan in 1947 to demonstrate how light it was. Mate, you can become Cargo Cycles apprentice if you want; Sammy only works for me on a partime casual basis during his days off from being a nightclub bouncer.
I already have the picnic tables liveried with Cargo Cycles decals, and have given 6 of them away to friends with businesses that attend various shows up and down the country.
These flat-pack plywood picnic tables have been a God send this summer for both me personally, and for for my business; Cargo Cycles.
The best results will be obtained by using a jigsaw blade that will cut on both the up, and the down strokes, and is suitable for cutting curves.


I have however encountered a slight issue with them, not exactly a problem, but more of a niggle. I am lucky as I have a whole metalworking and woodworking workshop available at my disposal for my every whim, and so the other day I fished out my 6 inch diameter hole saw and made some simple, but very effective plywood feet to spread the load, reduce the ground pressure, and prevent another situation of having to recover the sunken narrow legs of a table from the turf again. OK, I have used a hole-saw and a bench mounted pillar drill, but a jigsaw and pistol drill will be more than adequate to make a set feet similar to the ones that I have made. It may not display this or other websites correctly.You should upgrade or use an alternative browser. The only really tricky part of the plans and the dimensioning is the long recesse in the seat support.
You will also need to set the reciprocating motion function of your jigsaw to either 0 or 1. There must be lots of stuff you can do, especially once you go down the slot-together construction route. As most regular OTG viewers already know, I'll be making about 10 of these as unique advertising media to publicly display my company's logo and contact details.
I've yet to get around to the sanding and painting, so I'll not quote any times for these two processes. With the bank holiday weekend almost upon us (and the rest of the summer) there is still the chance of nipping out to the timber merchants or DIY store to buy a sheet of Plywood, and within a couple hours, you could be enjoying a BBQ or drinks in your garden sat at one of these tables. The only really tricky part of the plans and the dimensioning is the long recession the seat support.
That means that Cargo Cycles gets on average 10 hours per day advertising (free) at shows and music festivals that I am not at. Each table weighs about 15 kg, are extremely robust, take about 30 seconds to assemble, and about 45 seconds to take apart and strap up for storage. The only really tricky part of the plans and the dimensioning are the long recesses in the seat support. They've been loaned to my neighbours on the business estate for similar duties, have been borrowed by friends, etc. They've been loaned to my neighbours on the business estate for similar duties, have been borrowed by friends, etc.




Boating stores in somers point nj hours
Build wooden speed boat
Used fishing boats for sale nsw private