Location: New Jersey Steel Boat Building Techniques I am looking at a custom (homemade) 40' steel boat. I cannot remember which book I saw it in, but I once saw a boat built in the lapstrake (clinker) style out of steel. Originally Posted by Chapman Sorry to answer your question with more questions, but I've never seen a lap joint used on shell plating with the possible exception of doubler plates being added. Although all those welds & resulting heat would be a negative, the longitudinal strength would be impressive. All those laps would also present alot of corrosion possibilities, exterior & especially interior. Location: Australia The overlap method was common for a decade or so after the move from riveting joins to welding. Either alternate under over plating, or lapstrake or jogged seam where the overlap is heated with a torch and hammered over the lower plate till it fits snug . In all types both the inner and the outer plate edge are then fully welded to the plate below. The boatyard saves a lot of time in fitting since you can have a large tolerance on the edges. The problem is the internal void along the overlap and if the welds don't seal completely it corrodes. Location: Maryland Actually laps have an advantage for some welding issues - you can use drag rod. Originally Posted by CDBarry Actually laps have an advantage for some welding issues - you can use drag rod. Welding stainless steel hazards » Thread Tools Show Printable Version Email this Page Display Modes Linear Mode Switch to Hybrid Mode Switch to Threaded Mode Search this Thread Advanced Search Similar Threads Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post 10 years for building a steel sailing boat!. When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Steel Boat Building Plans As a result creating a little dinghy might not be the most thrilling venture you have ever embarked on but it will have a really higher rate of achievement with little chance of you providing up somewhere alongside the line. Originally Posted by LyndonJ I'd stick to conventional methods, you'l have an asset then that you can relise when you sell. On a steel boat, where you build in your details and weld them down, which would have cost exponentially more in a non metal boat, the finished steel work is thus a far greater portion of the finished boat, than it is for non metal boats.
As I point out in my book, people often fail to differentiate between resale value and resale price. The fact that McNaughton is too dense to comprehend basic geometric principles has nothing to do with structural reality. The picture above is of wooden planking ,which has no strength across the planks , which is exactly what frames were developed for.
There is nothing floppy about a finished origami hull.Such comments reveal an absolute naivety about the subject. As for the cost beatup, you were asked before just how much it would really cost on another thread (in time and dollars) to add 5 or 6 transverse bar frames to a 36 foot steel boat. Nobody said that origami hulls are floppier, they are just weaker becasue the framing is floppier than a conventional frame. But you need to accept that some of your reasoning doesn't scale well to larger boats with much higher loads.
Location: British Columbia Points 1 and 2 apply equally to longitudinals, as they are equally supported by their being welded to the hull plate, with the added structural advantage of going around a curve, yet you insist on calculating them as stand alone, with no attachment to, or support from, the hull plate.
It doesn't cost much to put 6 transverse frames in a hull, once it has been pulled together using origami methods, altho I know one guy who turned a couple of frames into a several week project, to increase his total income for the job.The point I am making is, if you put the frames up first, then try put the plate on to fit the frames, the cost and time goes up exponentially. Originally Posted by Brent Swain Points 1 and 2 apply equally to longitudinals, as they are equally supported by their being welded to the hull plate, with the added structural advantage of going around a curve, yet you insist on calculating them as stand alone, with no attachment to, or support from, the hull plate. The relevance of frames is quite necessary to make the whole ship an almost corrugate systeme, with all the strength in all the direction. Now when the round plate is transformed in chine on your design, you have an intense stress point there, and that is no good practice. As for your other boat, they all are ceiled in wood inside and seams to cost much more that a Swan.


Fisherman and commercial are tough with the money, every cent is acconted, but you don't know that. By the way I would like to mention, a vessel of a certain size is never ever designed by one person, same for building. We may argue about his biased opinions, about his terribly obvious lack of understanding some basic engineering, but we cannot argue that he does it to harm or insult other members.
I know there are visitors here which cannot really get it together, where is the knowledge and where the anecdote.
Reverse clipper bows and wine glass cross sections would be difficult but practically any other single and multi chine hull form can be done in origami. It's clear that the longitudinals go into tension, suffer stress reversals and consequently deflect more that a pre bent frame. Originally Posted by whoosh … do these boats come with lines, as iines if one wanted to draw a body plan, for tankage floors frames etc? That can be done by the software, or you can build chine model and take the strakes patterns from it.. Originally Posted by dskira When I designed and latter on built (sorry, I built too, but that is not relevant since you want to be the only one here) if we don't put frames the vessel will have been not able to do its work properly due to wickness, let alone having the cargo capacity strength needed to pay for itself and being safe. Daniel As I only build one hull a year, a couple of weeks work, and on every on I work with the owner, who's lifelong dreams are coming true , quickly before his eyes, it never gets boring. The end of the chine where the cone begins is solid plate once the chine ends, not weld, so one is not dependent on the weld for strength. Where Paul's mast goes thru the deck, a large doubler of heavier plate, plus some flat bars on edge eliminates the chances of anything wobbling .
The only compression on the mast is only the weight of the mast, rigging and sails on a junk rig , unlike the tremendous compression on a marconi rig. Colvin estimates 1,000 hours for a hull and deck, something origami lets you do put together in under 100 hours. As I pointed out in the cabin top example, a curve drastically increases the stiffness of a piece of plate . None of my boats have ever had problems getting insurance at the best rates, or passing survey. Originally Posted by Brent Swain None of my boats have ever had problems Hope it will stay that way.
Location: British Columbia I have made wineglass sterns by welding the last few inches of centreline first, before cranking the deadrise out with the hydraulic jack. As Herreschoff pointed out , in smaller boats, clipper bows tend to stop a boat dead in her tracks when they hit a steep head sea. Many of my hulls have saved their owners from the disasters which would have resulted in most other cruising boats out there. The hull will need a lot of framing following on from that picture and I'm skeptical that in the long run with a vessel that size it might just re-allocate the build time. Roberts has a method which is said to be fast, its bottom plate then framing then the rest built bottom up. Location: BC, Canada Unusual boatbuilding technique for steel yachts 26'-40' I am preparing to build a 40 foot steel yacht to a design by Canadian designer Brent Swain. I've set up a Yahoo group with photos of other boats, as well as information about them, for anyone interested (see below). Originally Posted by apex1 Did you notice that you are replying on a thread almost dead for ten years ? The only one here who has really NOTHING o contribute but drivel and dumb assumptions is YOU! Your understanding of the basic principles of boat design and boatbuilding have yet to be developed, but you make noise like a adult!
But other than possibly ice-work, I think a proper steel boats much more than adequate strength wise. The same would go for a repair where someone welded plate over a bad section instead of properly cutting the section out and insetting a new piece, a matter of fact, plate over plate would be much worse I would think. We had a yard bulding a boat here that was offering a discount to plate this way but local DNV were not happy.


Nonetheless you will want to get a hardcopy that you can function with unless of course you are comfy using a laptop computer in a woodworking atmosphere Steel Boat Building Plans . So make up such a frame for a 40 footer, and I can bend it by hand, by simply putting one end against the wall and pushing on it. By itself, it is as floppy as hell, but once it is tacked down, with a 7 inch camber, with no structural members under it, six guys can stand and jump on it, without it buckling or deforming in any visible way. It will first twist the plating, second will wooble the deck, and third the mast will go thru the hull. I thought you knew that, but evidently you don't, since your very mean attack on my resume prove it. There, a dumb welder with insufficient and outlasted licenses can blame a well established boatbuilder of being a novice. Their excitement , and enthusiasm in seeing a hull take shape in a few hours from flat plate, is contagious. You asked about doing a 30' hard chine hull and yes that one could be done but now you switched to a 45' round bilge , completely different animal there.
Do you really, seriously think a worldwide industry would have missed such a message if there were even the slightest substance in your statement?
Thinking about metals this kind of as steel and aluminum When the expense of building your boat is not your primary worry then you may well want to develop an aluminum or metal boat. Resale value is the difference between what you can get for a boat and what she cost you in the first place. The attached framing limits damage and provides safe stress paths which is not only a strength and stiffness issue but also a fatigue issue. Since your method of framing is floppier for being pre-stressed then the hull structure will buckle more easily.
It does develop soft spots once the longitudinal welds are done , which is why I force flat bar beams up under it, on 18 centres , along the direction of the curve, like longitudinals , not fore and aft, across the curve , like transverse frames. The deck is weakest point, the design need more attention since some renforcement can be detrimental localizing the stress inset of diffusing it. We spend considerable resources on the balancing of strength versus cost and performance; believe me, there are rational reasons for correct design of internal stiffening! It's not how much material you put in a structure that makes it effective, it's where you put the material. Highest strake stays in one piece, lower strakes are cut in the middle and ends of the plates are connected.
My current boat, with about three inches of outside curve , goes thru a head sea far more smoothly, with far less resistance.The buildup of buoyancy is far less sudden. If you did get a close copy say using 2 darts-chines in the center then added the frames after, what would you save?
The deck is weakest point, the design need more attention since some renforcement can be detrimental localizing the stress inset of difusing it.
So you can get a reduced puncture resistance if you want, but I'd still put the required framing in. All levels of boat builders want to have boat building strategies in order to have a simple and successful undertaking. It is where you put the material ,and for puncture resistance, it's best put in plate thickness.
Each and every yr new books are introduced which utilize the latest woodworking strategies and equipment.
Where to discover wood boat developing plans Most builders adhere to a strictly wood boat with some fiberglass additional as an afterthought much more than anything at all Steel Boat Building Plans. This makes the wholes process a great deal simpler and a lot more pleasant when you have a enthusiastic professional to speak to. The only rust I could find was was in the butt welded deck plate where one side door has been leaking for some time.



Legend pontoon boats for sale in alberta 649
Cajun skiff plans plywood
Rc speed boat plans free online
Build small wooden boat plans nz