Readers interested in the sailing version of the Ella skiff may be entertained by this glimpse of how I’ve nesting all the various panels for the half-decked sailing version onto six sheets of ply. Have you got news for us?If what you're doing is like the things you read about here - please write and tell us what you're up to. Classic Sailor is a new magazine about traditional and classic boats from ex-Classic Boat editor Dan Houston and colleagues that promises rather more coverage of the traditional craft around our coast. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Follow me on TwitterLooking for something?This is a busy weblog, and what you're looking for is probably still here - just a little way down the list now. Our Faversham-based friend Alan Thorne can help with boatbuilding projects - constructing to plans in very tidy stitch-and-glue or more traditional techniques.
Shane Mason in Toronto is busily building the first sailing version of the Ella skiff to a tight deadline and has sent over these shots. I can report that he particularly enjoyed seeing the shape of the boat come together when he stitched the panels together.


He’s decided to give his deck some camber, which explains why the frames are proud of the sheerline, and has made his mast from pine laminated with carbon fibre.
This small project will take a little while to complete, and follows my 15ft 6in stitch and glue Julie skiff, which has attracted a lot of interest. So these preliminary drawings show the very beginnings of the 12ft small skiff, which I’ve chosen to name after my daughter Ella. However, like the Julie skiff, it has been conceived with rowing, not outboarding or sailing primarily in mind. Before I go to the trouble of laying out all the dimensions, I want to confirm that the Ella is a 12' skiff. I'd cover the outside with glass and epoxy as an alternative to taping the joints on the outside.
The long joints are best made using marine ply, epoxy and glassfibre tape made for the purpose. Try scrolling down, clicking on the 'older posts' button at the bottom of this page - or try the search gadget!


It will bear some similarities and of course quite a few differences compared with the larger boat, not least because the lines of a short boat like this must be rather fuller than those of the larger model and can’t benefit from the same hull form features aimed at reducing drag due to the formation of eddies. For those who take an interest in figures, ratios and the rest, the wetted area here is 31sqft, maximum beam at the gunwales is 4ft, the design displacement is 400lbs, the righting moment is 254ft-lbs at 15 degrees of heel, and the prismatic coefficient is about .57.
However, if your ply is exterior rather than marine you might consider using polyurethane glue intended for masonry or pond sealing purposes instead of epoxy. Also, all plywood boats need to have drain plugs and hatches so they can be well ventilated between uses.



Pontoon tritoon boats for sale 42
How to build your own fan boat video