Originally Posted by NoEyeDeer Or if you want them lighter but still strong, a bit of carbon tape isn't that expensive. As I thought, the twist in the planking at bow and stern is pretty wicked; I'd hate to try doing it with full sheets of plywood. Location: Eustis, FL Oh that's not very bad at all, as far as twist in the section and will be easy to plank, even if you used a full width and length, scarfed panels.
Originally Posted by PAR Oh that's not very bad at all, as far as twist in the section and will be easy to plank, even if you used a full width and length, scarfed panels. Location: Australia That's going to be pretty quick if you can keep it right side up. The difference between twisting a plank (which can be difficult) and a conic projection (which simply bends) is not great, so a minor adjustment to the planview should fix any problems. So far my boats all have one plywood sheer plank and straight stems and go together easily - but I cheat by using a constant flare angle.
Originally Posted by ancient kayaker Doesn't look too badly twisted in the picture, so long as you let the planks define the stem shape and resist the temptation to force a curved stem.
Atkin shows six planks to a side, so doing lapstrake in solid cedar or glued-lapstrake plywood should handle it just fine. Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada I forgot that you are following a plan so you do not have design freedom.
When the sheer flows forward from a station to the stem, it can follow either the chine edge or the sheerline, but not always both without a buildup of tension at the edges. In a small sailboat I built I unintentionally introduced a slight hollow by gluing the inwale and chine logs to the sheer plank while flat: when they were bent, the inwale and log were compressed and the tension in the ply introduced a perceptible hollow along the sheers.


Secondly, he's been hit hard by internet businesses like Amazon, who ship to California without charging sales tax. So when I dragged the table out, dusted it off and shined it up, one thing became obvious: people should not be allowed to own X-acto knives, unless they've been properly trained and have a certificate attesting to their undiminished mental capacity. I was left with a piece of the FRP larger than the drafting table, and I'm going to use it to resurface the top. So I went googling this evening, and found that the standard cure when re-covering a tabletop is just to fasten a new layer over the old with double-faced tape.
Troy, I'm not sure whether you're familiar with this technique or not so I'll just blurt it out. Location: California I have the drafting table set up in a spare bedroom and ready to use, except that I've misplaced one of the scales (or rules, or whatever you want to call them) for the drafting machine. I went ahead and attached the FRP with Scotch Brand double-sided tape, and it seems a little iffy; I may wind up going to a drafting supply house and getting some stronger stuff.
I was going to run down a scale and start doing the molds and bulkheads in the morning, but the wife called from the other house; she has a honey-do list for me. When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. If made of Douglas fir, will weight about 15 pounds, including epoxy, but 12 pounds if Sitka or 11.5 if white spruce. Naturally, you snap these like twigs in heavy air or if you had a big load and were hit by a gust, but they'd be light, which is fast.
However, the bilge planks have a distinctly twisted appearance on some, but went in easily - I allowed them to find their own path and trimmed the stem foot to suit.


My boats have one plywood sheer plank and straight stems and go together easily; sometimes I add an external stem with a slight curve for esthetics. It's hard to tell without lines but the boat in the pic appears to have quite a severe hollow. If one is able to adjust one line so the sheer approximates a conic the stresses drop sharply; I'm not sure if this is always the case but so far it has always worked out for me.
It did not measurably change the shape the designer (Par) planned for below the waterline and it looks nice: an example of creative stress perhaps! Some folk dislike a straight stem; sometimes I add an external stem with a slight curve for esthetics.
In that case you may have to use several planks; it's never a bad thing to follow the designer's suggestions! But I'll probably do a two-piece stem instead of a rabbeted one, like I did on my flat-bottomed canoe. Now that I had that sorted I had to make up my own scale ruler which I did using a strip of poster paper.



Boats for sale by owner louisville ky
Green bay wisconsin boat tours
Boat repair shop okc menu
Used jon boat for sale in oklahoma