Pease Boat Works & Marine Railway is an internationally renowned wooden boat building yard (chart) on Cape Cod in the beautiful sea side village of Chatham, Massachusetts.
IF YOU DON'T LIKE COMPLIMENTS, PEOPLE STARING AT YOU, ASKING ABOUT THE BOAT, DROOLING, THIS IS NOT YOUR BOAT!!
SO I GOT THIS REALLY NICE BOAT ON A TRADE, I HAVE DONE QUITE A BIT OF WORK ON IT AND AM PUTTING IT OUT THERE TO SEE WHAT GETS OFFERED TO ME. Weetamoo was first married to Alexander (Massasoita€™s son) from 1653 until his death in 1662. Another book, Massasoit of the Wampanoags by Alvin Weeks (available in the Los Angeles City Library, but which I have not been able to obtain) says that Weetamoo had two additional husbands, or a total of five.
If Weecum were Weetamoo's daughter by Alexander she would have been between 13 and 22 years old, certainly of marriageable age and about the same age as her husband Benjamin. The Pocasset Tribe was one of the largest and most powerful tribes in the Wampanoag Federation. It was Corbitant who, in July 1621, shortly after the Pilgrims arrived, contrived a plot to become the Great Sachem of the Wampanoags. This plot was thwarted when Hobomock and Squanto heard Corbitant's speech to the Nemaskets.
In March of 1623, when Massasoit was suffering from his serious illness, Winslow was sent to pay his respects to the dying Sachem. After dinner Corbitant asked Winslow, if it had been Corbitant who was ill, would Governor Bradford have sent medicine and would Winslow have come such a long distance to heal him. Winslow had to think for a moment on this and then replied that it was a mark of respect and they treated all people that way when they felt a great respect for them. Their conversation turned toward religion and they were both surprised that their religions actually had much in common.
Following Alexander's death, Weetamoo returned to her home to assume her role as Squaw Sachem of the Pocassets. Weetamoo eventually married Peter Nannuit, (Petanonowett, Petanunuit.) Little is known of him, except that at the outbreak of the King Philip War, he sided with the English. As the main body of Indians moved north, Weetanoo, went to Ninigret, Sachem of the Eastern Niantics, in Rhode Island.
In the fall of 1675, while she was still with the Eastern Niantics, Quinnapin escaped from jail in Rhode Island and came to seek refuge with his friend (and father's cousin) Ninigret. Quinnapin was the son of Canjanaquand, (Cagianaquan) who was a brother to Miantonomo, Great Sachem of the Narragansetts before his son Canonchet. Quinnapin and Weetamoo joined with Canonchet in his swamp island shortly before the surprise attack of the English known as the Great Swamp Massacre, of December 19, 1675.
Under the military leadership of Canonchet, Quinnapin became one of the leading war sachems, striking hard with his force of 400 warriors. Following the death of Canonchet in April, Quinnapin was the leader of the Narragansetts in battles. In early August, as the end seemed to be nearing, Quinnapin led what was left of his Narragansett warriors, back to Rhode Island. There remained some question as to her cause of death but this is the state in which her body was found and desecrated.
After returning to Rhode Island, Quinnapin was also hunted down by the English and eventually captured. Little is know of Weecum (Weecome) except that she was a Squaw Sachem, probably of the Pocasset Tribe. Pamantaquash (Pomantaquash) was the Sachem of the Assawampsetts Tribe in the Wampanoag Federation.
Pamantaquash has been confused, by some writers, with Poquanum, the Sachem of Nahant, a tribe located north of Boston on a peninsula south of Lynn. In 1668, six years after the death of Massasoit, Pamantaquash had the following will recorded by Nathaniel Morton, secretary of the Plymouth Colony, naming Tuspaquin as his heir.
Tuspaquin (Tuspequin Tispaquin, Watuspuquin) was a highly regarded sachem at Assawampsetts Pond. In contrast to the very tall, fair complexioned Indians of New England, Tuspaquin, is said to have been short, very heavy, with unusually long arms for a short person. Tuspaquin was regarded highly enough to win the hand of Amie, the daughter of Massasoit, for his wife.
There are indications that Tuspaquin extended his domain to include the Nemasket Tribe to the north as he is sometimes referred to as being the Sachem of the Assawampsetts and Nemaskets. Although he seemed compatible with the English settlers, Tuspaquin never aligned himself closely with them.
At the outbreak of the War, Tuspaquin led a large force of 300 warriors in support of Philip. After Philip returned to Wampanoag country near the end of the war, it was easier for the English to enlist volunteers and also to surround the holdouts.
Of Tuspaquin's and Amie's children, it is quite certain that William was killed in the war.
Benjamin Tuspaquin (Tuspaquin II, Squim, Squin, Benjamin Squinnamay, Benjamin Squamnaway) is the only child of Old Tuspaquin and Amie known to have survived the King Philip War and remain in this country. After the King Philip War, the surviving Indians recognized their place as a conquered people and settled down to be subservient to the English in, what was formerly their land. Lydia's parents both died when she was young and she was raised by her grandparents, Benjamin and Weecum. At the time of his second marriage, Andrew already had two children of his own from his prior marriage. A point against the argument that this was a case of mistaken identity and that the dead man was not Andrew Newcomb, is the fact that he was known by the men who identified him. The obvious omission of his oldest son, Andrew II, as an heir could be due to the fact that this son was already well established in life and had no need of an inheritance; or it is possible that there was a falling out between father and son. The first record of Andrew buying land was on 20 April 1669 (deeds at Alfred, York Co., Maine, Vol. At this time Andrew Newcomb became Constable of the town and was living at the Shoals, or in Kittery.
The name of Andrew's first wife, Sarah, appears only once, on a deed of land sold and recorded 21 July 1673 (from the deeds at Exeter, N.H. At Edgartown, Andrew became a prominent citizen and his name appears in many documents, as witness for land transfers, etc.
Sometime after his arrival in Edgartown, Andrew met and married his second wife, Anna Bayes, daughter of Anna Baker, of Boston and Captain Thomas Bayes.
By 1690, Andrew was an established member of the community and had acquired several parcels of land. Although some records list 11 children for Zerviah and Josiah Bearce, other records make it clear that they, in fact, had no children. Bearce says (9) he knows from family tradition that Margaret was the daughter of one of Massasoit's two brothers but he could not remember which one.
The birth date of Margaret is not known but, it is likely to have been about 1612-15, or about the same time as her Uncle Akkompoin. At the arrival of the pilgrims, Quadaquinna was in his thirties and could easily have been the father of the 6-9 year old Margaret. Even before the arrival of the Pilgrims, while exploring New England, Captain Dermer was captured by the local Indians at Nemasket. When the Pilgrims landed, in December of 1620, Quadaquinna was in his prime, probably somewhere in his 30's.
As Quadaquinna entered the English lodge where they were to meet, he was concerned about their guns and refused to sit down until they had all been removed from the building.
It is not known whether Quadaquinna died young, or whether he was so much a part of Massasoit's company that no one bothered to specifically mention him again.
Nothing is known of Quadaquinna's family except that Bearce (9) says, one of Massasoit's brothers was the father of Margaret. Gabriel Wheldon was born in England and seems to have had a wife and children before coming to America. From the pilgrim's records, it is not apparent that Gabriel Wheldon was sent, or sentenced, to Matachees.
To summarize much of the above, Gabriel Wheldon arrived in Plymouth, probably from Nottinghamshire, England, in 1628 and went immediately to Mt. After living with the Pokanoket Indians for some time, Gabriel must have felt safe in returning to the town of Plymouth.
On October 27, 1646 Ruth Wheldon, the daughter of Gabriel and Margaret, was married to Richard of Yarmouth.
A record can be found of an Indian Sagamore by the name of a€?Richarda€? at Yarmouth at this time. A dissenting view is expressed by Bearce, who says that a€?Richard Tayler was born in England.a€? No source, or support is given for this statement.
Richard of Yarmouth, the tailor, at about age 42, married Ruth Wheldon, age 14, October 27, 1646. The Indians on Cape Cod were considered part of the Wampanoag Nation but, that may have been because they really didn't have much choice.
The Indians on the Cape, those of Marthas Vineyard, Nantucket and Elizabeth Islands were part of the Wampanoag Federation but more removed physically, socially and perhaps politically.
During the life of Massasoit, most of the Nipmuck tribes, of central Massachusetts, and many of the Massachusetts Federation, of eastern Massachusetts, also gave allegiance to the Wampanoag's Great Sachem and were considered to be part of Massasoit's followers in about the same way as the Cape Indians. Because of this, there is less known of the Cape Indians than of some of the other Wampanoag Tribes. It is not absolutely clear if all of the other Cape Indians belonged to a single tribe, or if there were further divisions.


Coneconam, Sachem at Manomet, was one of those captured by Captain Edward Harlow in 1611, along with Epanow, Sachem at Gay Head on Marthas Vineyard Island. It will be remembered that, the first encounter the Pilgrims had with any of the natives was in December 1620, when they first landed on the Cape. In June 1621, less than three months after Massasoit and Quadaquinna signed the first treaty with Plymouth, a young boy from the colony got lost in the woods. It was no secret to the Indians where the boy was, but when the colonists were unable to find him they sent word to Massasoit, who responded that they need not worry, the boy was safe and in good hands. Before they could return to their boat, it was mid-day and Iyanough invited them to stay for lunch. Aspinet then told them that Massasoit had been captured by Canonicus, of the Narragansetts, and recommended that they return to help him as soon as possible. As soon as they got underway they met with such strong winds that the colonists could make no real headway. Iyanough was evidently supportive of the Treaty of Submission to King James, signed at Plymouth on September 13, 1621.
In January, Miles Standish, the ill tempered military captain, went with the ship and a shallop to Nauset to pick up the corn that had been left there. Shortly thereafter, in February 1623, Miles Standish went to Mattachee to pick up the food that Governor Bradford bought and left there.
About the same time, Governor Bradford made a trip to Manomet to ask for food from Coneconam. We retrieved our luggage, with no problem, and caught an SAS bus to the city terminal, 26 miles away, (100 kronors.) We only had to walk two blocks over to check into the Stockholm Sheraton. We walked by the palace again and through Gamla Stan (Old Town), checking out restaurants and shopping. We walked over and through the nearby Stadhus (old city hall) and admired this venerable structure.
We caught the Djurgarden ferry (60 K for 2 round trip tickets) and docked at the GronaLund amusement park. Next, we walked down the central boulevard to a magnificent, turreted edifice called the Nordic Museet (30 K each).
We walked back to GronaLund for a coke (10K) and watched a bungee jumper plummet off of a crane.
From the jetty, we walked through the waterfront to the Nyboplan Area, hoping to catch the last ferry to Millesgarden.
We stopped off at the Cattelin restaurant, in Gamla Stan, for fish, fries and a Tuborg beer.
We strolled across the stroget for a last walk and enjoyed the evening, before turning in early to pack for the trip to Gothenburg. Continuing on through the university section, we walked through the grounds of Rosenborg Castle.
We walked on and past the grounds of Amalienborg Palace, where the royal family resides, to the beautiful waterfront. Strolling through Nyhavn, or new harbor, we admired the large wooden fishing vessels berthed along the quay. From Nyhavn, we retraced our steps along the Stroget, which was very crowded, to the hotel for a brief respite. On the way back to the hotel, we stopped in at the Old English Pub, but it was too crowded for us.
We breakfasted early and walked over to Christianborg Palace, before proceededing across the bridge to Christianhavn. After breakfast, we walked over to the Radhus Plaza and caught the #30 bus to Dragor, a fishing village 10 miles south. Tired & footsore, we returned to the hotel to pack and ready for the flight to Oslo, Norway. Later, we walked along the waterfront, past a large statue of FDR and took a one hour Oslo Fjord tour for 100K.
Further along the harborfront, is Akker Brygge, a restored shopping area, adjacent to a large quay.
It was getting late and cooling off, so we walked through town and on up, through Queen's Park, to the hotel. Later, we boarded a ferry (30K each) , for a trip to the BygDoy peninsula, with its attractions. We boarded the return ferry (30K) to the Radhus Plad (City Hall Plaza) and walked through neighboring Akker Brygge. The day was waning and we were tired with the day, so we retired to the hotel via cab (45K). Munch's earlier works (1880-90's) remind one of Degas or Manet, his works after 1900 appear to be fed from a cocaine induced mania.
We walked back into the city center and stopped at the Scotsmen's Pub, on Karl Johan's Gate, for coffee (36K). That night, there was a massive thunderstorm echoing through the hills with very heavy rain. We had a good dinner of catfish and steak, at the hotel, for 350K .After a short stroll through the town, we crashed, tired with the day. Somewhat tired with the day, we returned to the hotel to pack and ready for tomorrow's flight. After a brief r & r at the hotel, we had pizza at Jeppe's Pizza, in the late afternoon. We stopped at the Tourist Information Center, in Radhus Plaza, and walked on up to the rail station. At Gudvagen, we scrambled for the buses like a last lifeboat, that would take us to Voss, with a 15 minute stop at scenic Stahlheim Hotel, in the mountains. We stopped at the bus station, next door to the train station and bought some sandwiches and chips for dinner.
Upon our return to the market area, we walked through the old Hanseatic buildings complex and stopped at the Tracteursted, a 300 year old tavern on Bryggen wharf, for a beer. We arrived at the airport early, checked our bags into the Braethen Airlines counter, for the 50 minute flight to Oslo and had coffee in the terminal. She would also have been a part of the royal family which would make her a suitable mate for Benjamin.
Rowlandson says that a victory dance a€?was carried on by eight of them, four men and four squaws.a€? Weetamoo was one of the squaws. James Church and certain members of his company of friendly Indians, in consideration of services rendered by them to the Province tract of land in what was then Freetown, but now East Fall River.
1666-7, in the Ketch _______, Andrew Newcomb, Master, for Virginia for account of John Ely and Eliakim Hutchinson--various horses described--avouched by Mr. Andrew Nurcom complayneth agaynst Amos an Enden (Indian) for Inbaseling or purloyning away Sidor & Rum. 2 p.24) Late that afternoon, the shallop finally got out of the harbor and made Plymouth before nightfall. Are the most fecund builders and restorers of the sterling variety of river and lake workmanship in timber Indiana the UK. We had cafe au lait, in the outdoor cafe behind the opera, (38K) while we waited for the bus. Gold, diamonds, emeralds and an array of Royal treasures are artfully displayed in secure, glass enclosed exhibits. This city was included on our trip because it is near where Mary had spent the summer of 1968.
Again, a good selection of pickled herring, smoked whitefish and plenty of everything else.
It is a delightful 3 story, turreted castle , that is the repository of the Danish crown jewels and a hoard of other antiquities. We had a Tuborg beer, in an outdoor cafe for 50K, and watched the considerable tourist traffic flow by. We returned to the Sheraton and had a beer in the Red Lion Pub, for 50K, before retiring footsore and tired from the day. We walked over to Ackerhus Castle and, for 20K each, toured this massive coastal fortification. The light rain was intermittent, so we walked through and sat in several squares, at a leisurely pace. It is a thrilling rollercoaster ride through gorges with cascading streams gushing from the mountains in every direction. We checked into the Scandic Hotel, which is very nice, and got a room with a great view of the harbor. Then, we nosed around the circa 1702 buildings, from the Hanseatic league era, on the wharf.
The short flight to Oslo and the brief layover, gave us a few minutes to spend our remaining coins, before leaving.
This Indian plantation was afterwards surveyed and divided into 25 lots, of which the 19th, 20th, 21st and 22nd lots were assigned to the lineal descendants of Benjamin Tuspaquin. John Kendrick was the first ship-master who went on a voyage to the northwest coast from the United States and discovered the Columbia River. 25, 1651-2, at Barnstable, Mass.) The King Philip War had just ended in which her husband, Joseph, served for the English. At Harris Wooden Boats we draw upon a wide pool of highly skilled craftspeople with type A jointure passion for wooden boats traditionally built. A marching band, in police uniforms, led the parade and performed for an hour.(yawn) It was hot , the courtyard was very crowded and we were tired.


Then, we took a brief overview of the harbor area and central city (Nobel prize site), before heading out to Djurgarden. It looked like the building must have housed a much more impressive collection that had then moved on to better quarters.
After readying for the next day's trip to Copenhagen, we settled in with Needful Things by Stephen King and As the Crow Flies by Jeffrey Archer. She had tried to make contact with the Davidson's, the Swedish family she stayed with, but to no avail.
For 20K each, we viewed the remains of 3 Viking longboats that had served as funerary biers.
A few blocks over, we hopped on the trolley (30K) and rode to the Edward Munch Museum, near the university.
After lunch, we walked about a mile out to Maihaugen, a Norwegian cultural park, featuring 18th century wooden structures, in a rugged natural setting. There were wooden stockade type buildings, a stave church and other structures dating from the 1700's. We stopped at the bank to exchange dollars for kronors, the post office for Olympic stamps, the town information center and finally the Olympic information center. The best advice here is, if you must call long distance, use your calling card and dial unassisted. It has statues of fishermen, fish mongers and women waiting apprehensively for their men to come home from sea.
We drove through one of four, mile long subterranean tunnels, that connect the 4 major islands that make up Aalesund. The tour was only moderately interesting, because the guide was having a private conversation with a passenger and seemed to forget his narrating duties.
There were chess games with outsized pieces, bocce, game tables, fountains and benches in the small square. The locals take their kids everywhere and cart food and beverages underneath the strollers, for a family picnic. As we approached the pale yellow Royal palace, with green spires, it reminded us of Versailles.
We were pretty tired and footsore, so we took a slow walk, back along the river, to the hotel.
There are several nice restaurants , cafes and many amusement rides and carnival attractions. After dinner, we walked through Kong's Nytorv (King's Square) and again strolled through picturesque Nyhavn. We again stopped in the Old English Pub for a quiet afternoon beer.(49K) We bought pita sandwiches, chips, and sodas for 100K and then had a picnic, for dinner. We stopped in to look over the nearby Alte Kirke (old church) and perused Johan's Gate, Oslo's version of the Stroget.
We picked up several small baguette sandwiches (80K) and mineral water (40K) for a picnic supper.
Every train station we stopped in, was loaded with dozens of backpackers, of all nationalities. It was not something we were aware of before we left , but is definitely worth asking about. Lastly, we stopped by the Oppland Kommune (county hall) and exchanged Erie County pins for theirs. Each turn risked a head on collision and swung outward, with a view guaranteed to terrify an acrophobic.
After checking out prices in the market area, as well as tourist shops, Mary purchased a Norwegian sweater from a woman in the market. Wooden sauceboat and transport blusher caulking Le Tonkinois Varnish Marxist leash paint anti.
The Wasa is an enormous, elaborately carved warship that had sunk in Stockholm harbor in the 1700's.
Gamla Stan, with its cobblestone streets and narrow alleys, was very crowded with tourists. The hotel charged about $10 per shirt, so we looked up a nearby laundromat, on Istedegade, and walked over.
In addition, they have nightly performances by musical groups, dance and theater companies.
The Danish Crown Jewels, in the cellar vault, are truly impressive, rivaling England's or France's. The park is a beautiful green expanse, but it is more a living monument to Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland. They believe that the mountains are the broken bodies of trolls, who were caught in the daylight.
At the bus station, we bought 2 round trip tickets to tour the Geiranger Fjord area for 492K. At the top, is a restaurant with a terrific view of the harbor area and surrounding coastline. 1716, she married Josiah Bearce I, the son of Joseph and Martha (Taylor) Bearce, and grandson of Austin (Augustine) and Mary Bearce. The square was vibrant and interesting, but of course attracted the requisite number of hustlers. We then had a pleasant one hour flight, on SAS #154, to Landvetter Airport in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Several small lagoons and tasteful floral settings enhance the omnipresent neon outlines on all of the buildings.
Jugglers, musicians, singers and actors regularly perform, for coins, on an impromptu basis. Outside of town, we walked onto what appeared to be a large fishing, swimming pier, with secluded sections for sunbathing. On the approach to Oslo, we could see the many lakes and relatively flat terrain of eastern Sweden. A horse and dray, with driver and peasants, in native felt costumes and capes, rode through town. We then walked through the Radhus Plad and looked in the Alte Kirke (13th century) .It has a Dutch mini cannonball embedded in the front wall. Retracing our steps, we had coffee at the 2nd floor Lido restaurant, overlooking the fish market. Among the things he told us, were that he was a sky diver, jumped at 150 feet and he thought the French were assholes.
Traditional working vessels and definitive yachts are transformed to their quondam beauty as artworks and. Huge renditions of his statues, which adorn fountains throughout Europe, were placed atop columns and in various nooks throughout.
Vikings of long ago had held sacrificial rites here and wove a legend of sorcery and mysticism around the place.However, the skies were a beautiful bright blue and it was warm and sunny.
Then, a forecourt with a large central fountain is surrounded by sculptures of various nymphs.
Another brisk walk downhill to the KonTiki Museum , featuring the Ra I and II , was only moderately interesting. We followed the paths upward, stopping at a small mountain lake, to watch the ducks and appreciate the scenery.
Reputedly, the king had authorized the extra level of cannons whose added weight sank the boat, so no official blame was ever attached.
We arrived at Helsinborg, Sweden, where two of the rail cars were detached and loaded onto a large ferry.
A large obelisk shaped monument, composed of hundreds of human figures, climbing on top of one another, dominates the area. Photos taken inside the museum did not turn out well, in that it is very dark, to prevent further deterioration of the vessel. After a brief ferry ride across the Baltic, passing Elsinore castle (the setting for Hamlet), we arrived in Helsingor, Denmark. Live sex shows, gay bath houses, porno shops, pimps, pushers, hookers and all manner of interesting characters abounded on the this street.
Surrounding the obelisk, are a score or so of paired sculptures, depicting the various ages of man from childhood to death.
The countryside was changing gradually to mountains, clear streams and cooler temperatures. The view is a magnificent panorama, over a 270A° vista of mountains , ocean, fjords and greater Bergen. We had a 90 minute layover in the town of Geiranger, so we browsed and stopped for coffee and french fries (70K).
The town is really a ferry stop with a small hotel, a few shops and houses on the edge of this arm of the fjord.
We strolled along the Storgata, a pedestrian shopping mall, that runs through most of the downtown center. It was a charming town, but all roads were undergoing massive renovation in preparation for the Olympics.



Wooden boat restoration tools automotive
Boat rentals in brigantine new jersey zip
How to make a fishing boat in minecraft xbox 360
Wooden boat restoration and repair pdf viewer