Location: California wooden boats in the winter I was wanting to move to the Maryland area and I wanted to know what wooden boat owners do to their boats in the winter if they are live-a-boards and also I am concerned about salinity levels.
I haul my boat for a couple months each winter (cold molded) but would probably keep her in the water if I lived close enough to touch her every day and night. CatBuilder Previous Member   A wooden boat is arguably the best boat made for winter liveaboard. I've spent several winters aboard hauling firewood (the only source of heat for my wife and I) down to the boat. Or course, you must winterize everything (as mentioned above) and hunker down for the winter. The heat that you do produce, as a liveaboard, helps a lot with keeping any ice away, but ice rarely forms in any damaging quantity down south like that.
I've got about a million tips, so go ahead and fire away any specific questions you may have had. Location: California Thank you all for responding so far, I have a 34 foot Sea Spirit, It's a Hugh Angleman design and was built in Yokahoma Japan in 1967 by Tokyo Yacht Works.
Originally Posted by wsvoboda Thank you all for responding so far, I have a 34 foot Sea Spirit, It's a Hugh Angleman design and was built in Yokahoma Japan in 1967 by Tokyo Yacht Works. A wooden boat is at its best in cold, salty waters because those boring worms that eat away wooden boats down in the tropics don't exist up in MD.
I've found a lot of expertise on Wooden Boat forum and there are a number of members there that have older vessels in the bay that can talk to any long term concerns about the level of salinity. Location: California BKay I am working hard at getting a job at NAS Pax River, I was an Aviation Ordnanceman in the Navy but the job I'm trying to get is a security position. Location: California Well if I get called for he job I will have to have her shipped, it's just a matter of finding a fair priced shipper I have heard anything from 6 to 10 thousand.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals.
The modern version of traditional wooden boats in Vietnam and Cambodia are all powered by diesel or gasoline engines.
The dislocation caused by the partitioning of Vietnam in 1954, with some Northerners emigrating hastily to the South, caused a corresponding radical change in the distribution of traditional fishing vessels.


Moreover, the American presence included a vigorous effort to encourage motorizing the South Vietnamese fishing fleet and Japanese engine makers were eager to enter the market.
The forced migration and mixing of boat designs during the turbulent years of the middle twentieth century and the near-complete end of sailing working boats means that, though many local variations persist, there is a fundamental type of traditional Vietnamese fishing boat, derived from the sailing hulls, and still very viable all along the coast. If sailing vessels could not compete with motorized fishing boats, there are still many fundamentally traditional designs that adapted to motor-power quite well. The hull is relatively slender and gracefully tapered toward both ends, no matter how large the hull is.
The bow in particular rises in a long curve with a very long overhanging cutwater reaching out over the sea. The sheer line sweeps unbroken (or nearly so) from end to end, with the stern rising well above the water, though almost never as high as the bow. There is a pilot house or at least an engine enclosure aft and a fish hold or several fish holds forward of the house. The boat may show a vestigial bow daggerboard operating in a slot in the stem, or at least the vestige of the structure that made the slot in sailing days.
With the sole exception of the placement of the pilot house or engine cover aft, essentially all these characteristics are direct opposites of the Modern Motor Fishing Vessel. In the far south of the country, in the Mekong Delta, the heavy freight boats are built with absolutely no framing or temporary forms until they are planked clear up to their deck edge. Not surprisingly, there are a good many boats built along the coast that are somewhere between the Traditional Indochinese construction style and the Modern Motor Fishing Vessel style. Today even auxiliary sails are rare, but the modern, traditionally designed vessels come from a long line of sailing vessels with characteristics unique to the area of South East Asia that used to make up French Indochina and today, are the countries of Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. So, in the South particularly, motors began to be fitted to existing boats and new boats were built specifically to use the new motors more efficiently. It may, however, have the aft deck extended to the sides to provide a better working platform, by decking over a few transverse beams or spreading just the last topside plank. How to Build Wooden Boats: With 16 Small-Boat Designs (Dover Woodworking) [Edwin Monk] on Amazon.
Pietri, the French Commissioner of Fisheries for Indochina, published Voiliers d’Indochine (The Sailboats of Indochina), a careful description of the traditional boats of the coast all the way from what is now Cambodia to Southern China, that is to say, the region controlled by the French colony of Indochina, which included the present-day countries of Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos.


They make a perfectly good small to medium sized motor boat and are popular among the fishermen and small freight carriers in the Halong Bay area, right up to the Chinese border (which I have not yet crossed, they may be popular in China too).
Pietri (author of The Sailboats of Indochina) often used differences in sail rig to distinguish among otherwise very similar boats. As you will see I have not really found a definite direction for this new web site, but I know where it will not go.
Thus it is that Peitri’s 1943 book, by great good fortune, left us a record of local types of boats being built and working locally from the moment in time just before an enormous upheaval.
The forces of war and the advent of cheap diesel engines (and cheap diesel to run them) caused sweeping changes to the types and distribution of boats all up and down the coast.
In some cases they still carry short sailing rigs as steadying sails or as emergency propulsion to get home if the engine fails offshore.
The method worked well enough that it was adapted to many all-wooden boats as well, though others rigged more or less ordinary dagger boards through water tight trunks inboard.
It started out being a great project for my son and I a Building a Small Wooden Boat - EzineArticles Submission - Submit . With the end of the American war in 1975 things changed yet again and have continued to do so steadily, so that today you will find what I call the Modern Motor Fishing Vessel as the dominant type in almost any harbor on the Indochinese coast. Pietri’s excellent drawings are a great help in understanding the types of boats and their distribution in that era, which amounts to a direct link back many years, perhaps centuries of gradual development of sailing fishing vessels. From the deck down, most such traditional hulls are built today just as they were in sailing days. Particularly in Hoi An and Da Nang you’ll find pretty little double ended motorboats with nicely sized pilothouses built over their enginerooms, and still carrying a sliding daggerboard in their stems, left over from sailing days.



Classic wood boat sales jobs
25 boat plans uk
Boats for sale eau claire wi ymca
Boat sales in sudbury ontario geology