The internet has become an integral part of many aspects of our lives, but most people have no idea (or desire to know) how it works, when it is secure, and when it is insecure. In this series of articles, I seek to address this issue by going over the many ways data can travel through the internet, the security of that data, and how to make sure that data is secure. I will try to keep everything as basic as possible, so do not assume that you will not understand this article if you only have a basic understanding of computers.
When combined with the server, the Top Level Domain points to one specific "IP Address" on the internet.
This is used to reference different "directories" or "folders" on the specific server, and is useful for visiting specific pages on the site. The process as we are going to analyze it looks roughly like this (don't worry, we will go over each step in more detail throughout the series if need be): The computer contacts one of your Domain Name Servers (DNS) to determine the IP Address of the server you are trying to connect to Once the IP address has been found, your computer sends its Web Request to the IP address Your request goes through the many switches, routers, and servers sitting between you and the server you are trying to contact The server gets your request, and sends back the page you want This page goes through the many switches, routers, and servers sitting between the server and your computer Your browser displays the web page Obviously this process has been simplified, but the really important parts that we will be focusing on are number 3 and number 5.


This is simply because we do not have a direct link (usually) to the sites we are trying to communicate with. Depending on your Internet Service Provider (ISP) and the location of the remote server, the number of devices your data may pass through will vary. It is quite simple to view the devices your request moves through using the "tracert" tool. Any of these devices have the ability to intercept my data when it travels through them, and if the data is not secured then it is ripe for the picking. Most of these "hops" as they're called are only routers leaving my ISP, and then the switches and routers of the ISP's in between Google and me, but they could also be servers, computers, or pretty much anything else that somehow ends up in the path. Here's a short list of important but (usually) unencrypted things that these "hops" can see: Facebook Chat and Facebook pages (excluding the login page) AOL Instant Messenger and pretty much every messaging program Google Searches and their results Youtube Searches and results Depending on the provider, your online e-mail Twitter Etc.


In almost every case, the hops in between you and your target couldn't care less about what you are transmitting through them, and most of your web activity is pretty innocuous. The point of this demonstration, however, is to show you how vulnerable we actually are on the internet without some sort of security.
Conclusion In this article, I have discussed the anatomy of a web request and discussed the many places your data goes before it reaches the target.



I want that man debbie harry lyrics avpm
Wedding website relationship timeline advice
Promo codes kohls december 2015 events




Comments to «Make website with google for free»

  1. AskaSurgun writes:
    Memories of the previous, a typical theme appears via all.
  2. 99999 writes:
    The appropriate,??contrived, cautious-what-you-say-and-do side that you exhibit in the workplace or even.