Free gay phone numbers australia,iphone 3 free,phone number person search free - Try Out

admin | Category: Telephone Number Search | 18.03.2014
Thirteen-year-old Siti Maryam says she suffers headaches and nausea after harvesting tobacco leaves with her bare hands during four years of working on her family's farm in Indonesia. Maryam, who is among the thousands of children a rights group says work in hazardous conditions on farms in the world's fifth-biggest producer of tobacco, spoke to Reuters in a field near the east Java city of Probolinggo.
Indonesia is one of the world's fastest-growing markets for tobacco products, with about $16 billion worth of cigarettes sold last year in the country of 250 million, an increase of 13 percent from 2014, says market research firm Euromonitor International. But a lack of information leaves families oblivious to the risks their children face while working on tobacco farms, said Margaret Wurth, a researcher for New York-based rights group. Several big companies lack procedures to screen out tobacco that involves the effort of children working in hazardous conditions, the group said in a report on Wednesday. The group interviewed 227 people, among them 132 children aged between 8 and 17, who said they worked on tobacco farms in four Indonesian provinces. But the report risks generalizing the whole of Indonesia and some children do work in nonhazardous conditions on tobacco farms, said Soeseno, chairman of the Indonesian tobacco farmers' association.
Parents getting children to help is in line with cultural norms in some areas, said Soeseno, who like many Indonesians goes by one name. Customers do not normally ask whether child labor is involved, said Suradi, a trader who buys tobacco from farmers in Probolinggo for resale. A rights organization said it contacted some of the biggest companies operating in Indonesia, such as Philip Morris International Inc, Djarum Group and PT Gudang Garam Tbk.
Philip Morris welcomed the report, said sustainability officer Miguel Coleta, adding that the company sourced almost 70 percent of its tobacco through direct contracts with Indonesian farmers, versus about 10 percent four years ago. But change requires many stakeholders to cooperate, including the Indonesian government, he added. Indonesian tobacco firms Djarum and Gudang Garam did not respond to Reuters' requests for comment.
The research, led by scientists at Britain's Imperial College London, looked at attitudes to and use of e-cigarettes across Europe between 2012 and 2014.
Using data from more than 53,000 people across Europe - with at least 1,000 from each country - the study also found the proportion of people across Europe who consider e-cigarettes dangerous nearly doubled to 51 percent from 27 percent. E-cigarettes are metal tubes that heat liquids typically laced with nicotine and deliver vapor when inhaled. Experts fiercely debate whether the devices can help people give up smoking and whether they are safe - with some studies raising concerns about the toxicity of some of the ingredients. Most people who reported trying e-cigarettes were former or current smokers, although the number who had never smoked tobacco but had tried them also rose. Bill Cosby's lawyers gave a blistering preview of the questions the actor's accuser will face at trial, as a judge refused to dismiss the sex-assault case at a preliminary hearing. Constand did not testify, a decision meant to spare her from being cross-examined before trial. The defense objected to Constand's absence during the half-day hearing, which marked the first time that police statements from either Constand or Cosby, 78, have been aired in public. No trial date has been set, and lawyers are expected to spend months arguing over what evidence can be used - most notably, whether other accusers can testify and whether Cosby's deposition from Constand's lawsuit can be used. Several women have accused Cosby of drugging them and sexual assault while they were drugged. McMonagle on Tuesday suggested that Constand was having a relationship with a married man and that the pair had engaged in "petting" during a few earlier visits to his home.
On the night in question, she said that Cosby urged her to take three blue pills "to take the edge off" her stress and to wash them down with wine he had poured. McMonagle argued that Constand "voluntarily" took the pills and perhaps had a bad reaction. The defense also seized on discrepancies in the three police statements that Constand gave, including her shifting memory of precisely when the encounter occurred.
As for the alleged crime, she said the comedian penetrated her with his fingers and fondled her after giving her what he said was herbal medication. Actor and comedian Bill Cosby (center) leaves a preliminary hearing on sexual assault charges on Tuesday at Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pennsylvania. Michael Rizzi was arrested at his Brooklyn home on charges of conspiring to launder the proceeds of the multimillion-dollar operation. Federal prosecutors say the company advertised on more than 50 websites with names such as Lush Playmates. The EgyptAir jet that disappeared last week did not show technical problems before taking off from Paris, sources within the Egyptian investigation committee said late on Tuesday.
They said the plane did not make contact with Egyptian air traffic control, but the controllers were able to see it on radar on a border area between Egyptian and Greek airspace about 480 kilometers from Cairo. Speaking on condition of anonymity, the sources said the plane disappeared without swerving off radar screens after less than a minute of it entering Egyptian airspace.
Egypt's state-owned newspaper Al-Ahram reported on Tuesday that the plane had shown no technical problems before taking off, citing an Aircraft Technical Log signed by its pilot before takeoff. Earlier on Tuesday, the head of Egypt's forensics authority dismissed as premature a suggestion that the small size of the body parts retrieved since the Airbus 320 jet crashed indicated there had been an explosion on board.
Investigators are looking for clues in the human remains and debris recovered from the Mediterranean Sea.
The plane and its black box recorders, which could explain what brought down the Paris-to-Cairo flight as it entered Egyptian airspace, have not been located.
An Egyptian forensics official said 23 bags of body parts had been collected, the largest no bigger than the palm of a hand. But Hisham Abdelhamid, head of Egypt's forensics authority, said this assessment was "mere assumptions" and that it was too early to draw conclusions. At least two other sources with direct knowledge of the investigation also said it would be premature to say what caused the plane to plunge into the sea. The twin offensives marked some of the most serious ground efforts against IS since the group declared its self-styled "caliphate" straddling the Syrian-Iraqi border in 2014. Territory under IS control has been steadily shrinking for months but it has carried out a wave of attacks including bombings in the Syrian government's coastal heartland on Monday that killed 177 people.
The US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces on Tuesday announced its largest offensive to date against IS territory north of the jihadists' stronghold of Raqa city. The offensive was aimed at pushing IS from the province's north and securing other areas, the alliance said in statement on Twitter. Baghdad-based US military spokesman Colonel Steve Warren confirmed the assault, saying it was "putting pressure on Raqa". He said the US military would conduct airstrikes to support thousands of SDF fighters, some of whom have been trained and equipped by US forces. Just before the SDF announcement, Russia said it would be ready to coordinate with both Washington and the SDF in an offensive for Raqa.
Meanwhile, three explosions rocked the town of Banyas on Tuesday in Syria's Tartus province, about 400 kilometers west of Raqa city. Security forces were spread out throughout Banyas but there was no immediate word on casualties or the cause of the blasts. The US rejected a Russian proposal last week for joint air operations against jihadist groups in Syria. The anti-IS coalition headed by Washington has set its sights on Raqa in Syria, as well as Fallujah and eventually IS's main bastion of Mosul in Iraq.
On Tuesday, Iraqi forces closed in on Fallujah after capturing the nearby town of Garma and cutting IS off from one of its last support areas. With forces converging, concerns grew that the estimated 50,000 civilians believed to still be inside had nowhere to go. The Afghan Taliban on Wednesday announced Haibatullah Akhundzada as their new chief, elevating a low-profile religious figure in a swift power transition after officially confirming the death of Mullah Mansour in a US drone strike.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu reached a deal to expand his coalition government on Wednesday by bringing in the ultranationalist Yisrael Beitenu party and appointing its leader Avigdor Lieberman as his new defense minister. A stretch of street collapsed in central Florence early on Wednesday, dropping a row of parked cars into an underground pipeline and cutting water supplies to part of the ancient city. A Swedish court upheld the arrest warrant for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Wednesday. A police source said they hoped to transfer "roughly the same number" of migrants as on Tuesday, when they bussed more than 2,000 to newly opened camps near Greece's second city Thessaloniki, about 80 kilometers to the south. Some 8,400 people are living in the muddy and dirty camp on the Macedonian border, which has become a potent symbol of human suffering and chaos as Europe struggles with its worst migrant crisis since World War II. The dawn operation, involving some 700 police backed by helicopter, "is continuing normally and calmly, like yesterday", said the police officer, who declined to be named.
Most of those at the camp are fleeing war and misery in the Middle East and Asia and the group transferred on Tuesday included 662 Syrians, 1,273 Kurds and 96 Yazidis. Around 100 migrants refused to enter the new center on Tuesday and headed off by foot to Thessaloniki. On Tuesday, ERT state television and state news agency ANA showed migrants patiently queuing up to board buses and being driven away, some waving at the camera. Many carried their belongings in huge bin bags, while others piled possessions into pushchairs. It will take a week to complete the operation to clear all 8,400 people living there, the government said. Oxfam urged Athens to guarantee migrants have "full access" to information and medical treatment.
And the transfer comes after a brutal winter of freezing rain and mud which saw many people trying to force their way across the border, sometimes resulting in violent encounters with Macedonian police.
A refugee family sit in front of their tent waiting to be transferred to hospitality center, during a police operation at a camp in Idomeni, Greece, on Tuesday. The government has relaxed restrictions on self-employment in recent years in an attempt to slash the state payroll and battle economic stagnation, leading to the creation of many independent businesses from hairdressers to restaurants.
President Raul Castro said at the Communist Party Congress last month that such businesses were working "without the necessary legal recognition", under rules designed for small, family firms only. The 32-page document published on Tuesday detailed the party's plan for Cuba's economic development, stating Cubans could create "private businesses of medium, small and micro size" that would be recognized as "legal entities". Economists said this recognition might confer on businesses additional rights such as the ability to import wholesale supplies or export products. The ruling party holds a Congress every five years to evaluate progress and set the economic and political guidelines for the next half-decade. The new guidelines will not become law until approved by Cuba's National Assembly, which is due to hold in July.
Inside Armando Yera's gym, toned Cubans in tight spandex are pumping iron in front of mirrored walls and pedaling furiously on stationary bikes, a scene that looks more Miami than Havana.
Yera is one of Cuba's first competitive bodybuilders and part of its budding class of entrepreneurs.
In the entryway, there are before-and-after photos of clients whose sagging bodies Yera has helped turn into chiseled statues. Those changes are just about as gradual, painstaking and yet transformative as the ones taking place in Cuba itself, as the island opens up to the world. The bodybuilding craze started to grow after President Raul Castro launched tentative free-market reforms when he took over in 2008. Last year he reestablished Cuba's diplomatic relations with the United States - a bodybuilding haven. Sian Chiong, a 21-year-old pop singer, is a regular at Mandy's Gym, and gives it credit for his success with the teenage girls who swoon for him and his boy band, Angeles. Musicians in today's Cuba have to please a public that "has become a consumer of image as well as music", said the muscular, immaculately coifed young star.
The late revolutionary dreamed of a Cuba of "new men" who would toss aside individualism and materialistic cares to be selfless citizens.
He started bodybuilding when he was 18 and retired from competitions in 2008, but still has bulging muscles at age 56. A former customs official, he got into bodybuilding back when the only way to do it was with rudimentary equipment and a protein-rich diet. He owes much of his success to state TV, which invited him to speak about health on one of its programs.
He brought along a woman he helped to "transform" her body, plus her before-and-after pictures. Despite its much-vaunted state healthcare system, Cuba is not immune to the global obesity epidemic: nearly 45 percent of its 11 million people are overweight or obese. But gyms tend to draw mostly healthy young people looking to meet a set "standard" of beauty, said Dayron Delgado, a 30-year-old bodybuilder who works with Yera also as a personal trainer. A woman is coached by a personal trainer as she exercises at a gym in Havana, Cuba, on May 17. The Venezuelan bottler of Coca-Cola has halted production of the sugar-sweetened beverage due to a lack of sugar, a Coca-Cola Co spokeswoman said on Monday. Venezuela is in the midst of a deep recession, and spontaneous demonstrations and looting have become more common amid worsening food shortages, frequent power cuts and the world's highest inflation.
Production of sugar-sweetened drinks has stopped, but output of diet drinks such as Coca-Cola Light and other zero-sugar beverages continued, spokeswoman Kerry Tressler wrote by e-mail. Coca-Cola Femsa SAB, Latin America's biggest coke bottler and operator of four plants in Venezuela, added that it was hoping the nation's sugar inventories would recover "in the short term". The bottler, which gets some 7 percent of its income in Venezuela, is a joint venture between Coca-Cola and Mexico's Femsa. Over the past several years, the combination of price controls, rising production costs, lack of foreign exchange, restrictive labor laws, and a lack of basic inputs such as fertilizer, have resulted in a drop in Venezuela's sugar cane production with fewer planted hectares and lower yields. Many smaller farmers have turned to other crops that are not price controlled and thus provide greater income. As the worst drought in half a century delays rice planting in Cambodia, a pair of oxen on Tuesday delved into rice, corn and bean bowls at an annual plowing ceremony in an omen for good harvests for those crops in the year ahead. Annual rains have come late to Cambodia, exacerbating the drought and forcing farmers to wait before planting this year's crop of rice.
Exports of Asia's staple are expected to fall well short of the 530,000 metrict tons shipped in 2015, further exacerbating a tightening rice market as drought has also hit top rice exporters India and Thailand.
Watched by Cambodia's King Norodom Sihamoni, and a crowd of thousands in the ceremonial furrow in Siem Reap province, the two cows ate 90 percent of three out of seven snacks on offer in ornate bowls.
Each year, based on the oxen's choice of crops and the amount the animals eat, the Royal Palace astrologers forecast coming harvests and pray for regular rainfall. But rains so far this month have been insufficient for farmers to start planting rice, said Keo Vy, a spokesman for the National Center for Disaster Management. Authorities have had to truck water supplies to 18 of Cambodia's 25 provinces, with some 2.5 million people affected by the drought, he said.
Last year's exports of 530,000 tons were well below the target of 1 million tons, partly because of drought but also due to a lack of finance for millers and a global supply glut. This year shipments could be 10 percent lower again, said Kann Kunthy, chief executive of rice miller Brico, adding that farmers desperately need rain by July. Kunthy said that the industry was also concerned about the danger of floods after the drought.
The strongest El Nino in nearly 20 years, which damaged crop production in Asia and caused food shortages, has ended, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology said on Tuesday.


Climate indicators associated with El Nino, which emerged in 2015, have now returned to neutral levels, the bureau said. A warming of sea-surface temperatures can lead to scorching weather across Asia and east Africa, but cause heavy rains in South America.
The latest El Nino caused drier than average weather which resulted in a fall in production of wheat, palm oil and rice in Asia.
Farmers will now be looking for the development of a La Nina weather pattern, which brings wetter weather in Asia. A fisherman sits to smoke on his boat at a dried up pond in the drought-hit Kandal province in Cambodia on May 13.
Japan will ask US President Barack Obama to take strict measures to prevent crime by people from US military bases after the arrest last week of a US worker in connection with the murder of a Japanese woman. Obama will visit Japan this week for a Group of Seven nations summit and he will also make a historic visit to the city of Hiroshima, which the US military attacked with an atomic bomb in 1945.
US troops have been stationed in Japan since its World War II defeat and about 50,00 remain in various bases. Abe was expected to ask Obama to ensure that strict discipline is enforced at bases and other measures are taken to prevent crime, Suga said. A 32-year-old US civilian working at the Kadena air base on Japan's southern island of Okinawa was arrested last Thursday on suspicion of dumping the body of a 20-year-old woman.
Okinawa, the site of bloody World War II battles, hosts the bulk of US military forces in Japan and many residents resent what they see as an unfair burden. The island's governor, Takeshi Onaga, who was elected on a pledge to shift a big US Marines base off the island, was sceptical anything would be done on crime. Obama's visit to Hiroshima on Friday will be the first by a serving US president to the city devastated by a US atomic bomb on Aug 6, 1945. Obama said in an interview with the NHK broadcaster on Sunday his visit would emphasize friendly ties between former enemies, and he reiterated he would not apologize for the atomic bomb attack. The city of Nagasaki was bombed three days after Hiroshima was bombed and Japan surrendered six days after that. The SWIFT secure messaging service that underpins international banking said it plans to launch a new security program as it fights to rebuild its reputation in the wake of the Bangladesh Central Bank heist. Chief executive of the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication, Gottfried Leibbrandt, was scheduled to tell a financial services conference in Brussels that SWIFT will launch a five-point plan later this week. The attack followed a similar but little noticed theft from Banco del Austro in Ecuador last year that netted thieves over $12 million and a previously undisclosed attack on Vietnam's Tien Phong Bank that was not successful. The crimes have dented the banking industry's faith in SWIFT, a Belgium-based cooperative owned by its users.
The Bangladesh Bank hack was a "watershed event for the banking industry", Leibbrandt was scheduled to say. SWIFT wants banks to "drastically" improve information sharing, to toughen up security procedures around SWIFT and to increase their use of software that could spot fraudulent payments.
SWIFT will also provide tighter guidelines that auditors and regulators can use to assess whether banks' SWIFT security procedures are good enough.
Leibbrandt would again defend SWIFT's role, saying the hacks happened primarily because of failures at users. Users frequently do not inform SWIFT of breaches of their SWIFT systems and even now, the cooperative has not proposed any sanctions for clients who fail to pass on information, which SWIFT itself says is key to stopping future attacks. Some critics said SWIFT should also be more active in auditing clients and be ready to cut off members whose security is not up to scratch. Former SWIFT chief executive Leonard Schrank said it appeared that SWIFT's security efforts had not kept pace with the criminals increased sophistication and that the cooperative needed to work hard to restore its reputation. Iraqi officials said clashes between government forces and the Islamic State group outside the city of Fallujah have briefly subsided.
The Iraqi troops are engaged in the third day of a large-scale military operation to drive the militants out from their stronghold west of Baghdad. In nearby city of Garma, Mayor Ahmed al-Halbosi said engineering teams are clearing booby traps from houses and government buildings on Tuesday - a day after capturing most of the town. Colonel Mahmoud al-Mardhi, in charge of paramilitary forces, said they are still encountering pockets of resistance in Garma outskirts.
Iraq launched the Fallujah offensive on Sunday, backed by US-led coalition airstrikes and paramilitary troops. Before the offensive, the United Nations called on Monday for "safe corridors" to be set up to allow Iraqi civilians to flee Fallujah.
Some 50,000 civilians in the city are at "great risk" during a campaign against IS fighters by the Iraqi army backed by militias, UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric said on a news conference at the UN headquarters. The UN spokesman said some civilians were able to flee and were receiving emergency assistance, shelter and water, but he did not provide figures. Women and children were taken to a location south of Fallujah and men to central Anbar for security screening, said the spokesman.
The United Nations is "very concerned" about the fate of civilians and mobilizing its aid partners to assess the situation and send help, he added.
Fighters from the Iraqi Shiite group Kataib Sayyid al-Shuhada gather near Fallujah, Iraq, on Monday.
Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system, a rival to America's GPS, took a step closer to becoming operational with the launch Tuesday of a fresh pair of satellites to join a dozen already in space. Orbiters 13 and 14 blasted off on a Russian Soyuz rocket from Europe's spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, at 0848 GMT as planned, according to a live broadcast by space firm Arianespace.
After a journey of nearly four hours, the pair should enter Earth orbit at an altitude of 23,522 kilometers. Ultimately, the multi-billion-euro constellation is meant to comprise 24 operational satellites, providing navigation as well as search-and-rescue services. Another launch, this time of four orbiters on a single rocket, is expected to boost the constellation to 18 by year-end, allowing for Galileo to start providing usable signals. More modern than GPS, Galileo's high-tech instruments should allow it to provide a more precise signal. The launch of the seventh and eighth orbiters in March last year was about three months late to allow engineers time to probe an August 2014 mishap which sent satellites five and six into a lopsided orbit.
The incident was blamed on frozen fuel pipes on the Soyuz rocket's fourth stage, called Fregat - a problem the European Space Agency says has since been fixed.
The launch of satellites five and six - meant to have been the first fully operational Galileo orbiters - had itself been delayed by more than a year due to "technical difficulties".
Tuesday's launch, the seventh for Galileo, was a late addition to the schedule, in a bid to speed up deployment of the project funded by the European Commission, the European Union's executive body. The remaining satellites will be launched using a combination of Russian Soyuz rockets, which can take two into space at a time, and Europe's own Ariane 5 ES launcher, specially adapted to handle four. Greek authorities began an operation at dawn on Tuesday to gradually evacuate the country's largest informal refugee camp of Idomeni on the Macedonian border, blocking access to the area and sending in more than 400 riot police. The government's spokesman for the refugee crisis, Giorgos Kyritsis, said on Monday that police would not use force, and that the operation was expected to last about a week to 10 days. The first six buses, which police said were carrying a total of 340 people, left Idomeni just over two hours after the operation began, heading to a new refugee camp near Greece's main northern city of Thessaloniki. The camp, which sprung up at an informal pedestrian border crossing for refugees and migrants heading north to Europe, is home to an estimated 8,400 people - including hundreds of children - mostly from Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq.
At its peak, when Macedonia shut its border in March, it housed more than 14,000, but the numbers have declined as people began accepting authorities' offers of alternative places to stay. In Idomeni, most have been living in small camping tents pitched in fields and along railroad tracks, while aid agencies have set up large marquee-style tents to help house people.
Police and government authorities said the residents will be moved to newly completed official camps. More than 54,000 refugees have been trapped in financially struggling Greece since Balkan and European countries shut their land borders. In March, the European Union reached an agreement with Turkey meant to stem the flow and reduce the number of people undertaking the short but perilous sea crossing to Greece, where many have died after their overcrowded, unseaworthy boats sank. Under the deal, anyone arriving clandestinely on Greek islands from the Turkish coast after March 18 faces deportation back to Turkey unless they successfully apply for asylum in Greece. At least 11 people died in a landslide in a remote jade mining region of northern Myanmar with many more feared missing, authorities said on Tuesday, the latest deadly incident to hit the shadowy industry.
US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's proposal to meet DPRK's leader Kim Jong-un is a "kind of propaganda or advertisement" in the election race, a senior official from the Democratic People's Republic of Korea said on Monday.
French police have dislodged protesters blocking a key fuel depot on the Mediterranean, as gasoline shortages spread around the country amid increasingly tense labor actions.
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan approved a new government on Tuesday formed by one of his most trusted allies, who has pledged to push through constitutional reforms that would expand the powers of the presidency.
A pro-European Union candidate eked out a victory on Monday over a right-wing, anti-migrant rival to become Austria's next president, in a tight contest viewed Europe-wide as a proxy fight pitting the continent's political center against its growingly strong populist and anti-establishment movements.
European mainstream parties joined Austrian supporters of Alexander Van der Bellen in congratulating him on his victory over Norbert Hofer. Hofer had been narrowly ahead of Van der Bellen, a Greens politician running as an independent, after the counting of votes directly cast on Sunday.
The results diminish the scenario that Austria's political landscape could immediately move away from its centrist political image through a new president who could oppose the government's EU-friendly policies and increase pressure for tighter migrant controls.
Still, the narrow margin for Van der Bellen is the latest indication that Europe's anti-establishment parties are gaining influence.
The French navy said that one of its ships has joined the search for the wreckage of EgyptAir Flight MS804 on Monday, focusing especially on the hunt for its flight recorders, as questions remain over what caused the Airbus 320 to crash over the Mediterranean, killing all 66 on board. Five days after the plane crashed, human remains of the victims arrived at a morgue in the Egyptian capital, Cairo, where forensic experts were to carry out DNA tests, according to the head of EgyptAir, Safwat Masalam.
Security officials at the Cairo morgue said family members had arrived at the building to give DNA samples to match with the remains, which included those of a child. Questions remain over what caused the crash and what happened to the doomed jet in the final minutes before it disappeared off radar on Thursday.
Egyptian authorities said they believe terrorism is a more likely explanation than equipment failure, and some experts have said the erratic flight suggests a bomb blast or a struggle in the cockpit.
A 2013 report said the same plane made an emergency landing in Cairo that year, shortly after taking off on its way to Istanbul after one of the engines "overheated".
Ehab Azmy, head of Egypt's state-run provider of air navigation services, said that "the plane did not swerve or lose altitude before it disappeared off radar", challenging an earlier account by Greece. Azmy, head of the National Air Navigation Services Company, said that in the minutes before the plane disappeared it was flying at its normal altitude of 11,300 meters, according to the radar reading. Greek Defense Minister Panos Kammenos has said the plane swerved and dropped to 3,000 meters before it fell off radar. Two very different visions of the hell that is war are seared into the minds of World War II survivors on opposite sides of the Pacific. Michiko Kodama saw a flash in the sky from her elementary school classroom on Aug 6, 1945, before the ceiling fell and shards of glass from blown-out windows slashed her. Lester Tenney saw Japanese soldiers killing fellow US captives on the infamous Bataan Death March in the Philippines in 1942. Different experiences, different memories are handed down, spread by the media and taught in school.
The US dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki three days after Hiroshima, and Japan surrendered six days later, bringing to an end a bloody conflict that the US was drawn into after Japan's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941.
Japan identifies mostly as a victim rather than a victimizer, said Stephen Nagy, an international relations professor at the International Christian University in Tokyo. A poll last year by the Pew Research Center found that 56 percent of US citizens believe the use of nuclear weapons was justified, while 34 percent do not. Terumi Tanaka, an 84-year-old survivor of the Nagasaki bombing, said of Obama I hope he will give an apology to the atomic bomb survivors, not necessarily to the general public.
The White House has clearly ruled out an apology, which would inflame many US veterans and others, and said that Obama would not revisit the decision to drop the bombs. A lot of these people are telling us we shouldn't have dropped the bomb - hey, what they talking about said Arthur Ishimoto, a veteran of the Military Intelligence Service, a US Army unit made up of mostly Japanese-Americans who interrogated prisoners, translated intercepted messages and went behind enemy lines to gather intelligence. Now 93, he said it's good for Obama to visit Hiroshima to bury the hatchet, but there's nothing to apologize for. A nighttime fire at a dormitory of a primary school in northern Thailand killed 18 girls, many of whom had been roused by a dorm-mate but went back to sleep, thinking it was a prank, officials and the girl who sounded the alarm said on Monday.
The two-story wooden structure that caught fire housed 38 girls, most of them belonging to the area's ethnic minorities.
Some of the students were still not asleep when the fire broke out and were able to raise the alarm, said Rewat Wassana, manager of the Pithakkaiat Witthaya School, to which the dorm is attached. The kindergarten and primary school in Wiang Pa Pao district, just outside the city of Chiang Rai, has about 400 day students and boarders. An 11-year-old girl identified only as Suchada said at the same news conference that she had gotten up to go to the bathroom when she noticed the fire downstairs, and ran to tell her friends in various rooms. A police official told The Associated Press by phone that besides the 18 dead, another five girls were injured, including two in serious condition. The official did not wish to be identified because he was not authorized to speak to the media. Firefighters took three hours to extinguish the fire, and pulled survivors and bodies from the second-story window of the wooden building. South African state prosecutors said they would respond on Monday to a court ruling that President Jacob Zuma should face almost 800 corruption charges, in a move that could threaten his hold on power. The charges, relating to a multibillion dollar arms deal, were dropped in 2009, clearing the way for Zuma to be elected president just weeks later. The prosecutor justified dropping the charges by saying that tapped phone calls between officials in then-president Thabo Mbeki's administration showed political interference in the case. But a court last month dismissed the decision to discontinue the charges as "irrational" and said it should be reviewed. Zuma has endured months of criticism and growing calls for him to step down after a series of corruption scandals amid falling economic growth and record unemployment. Pressure on the president would increase if some or all of the 783 charges - which relate to alleged corruption, racketeering, fraud and money laundering - were reinstated. The ruling African National Congress party faces tricky local elections in August, but Zuma retains widespread support within the party and has appointed many loyalists to key positions countrywide. Last month, a commission that Zuma set up cleared all government officials - including himself - of corruption over the 1999 arms deal. The tapped phone recordings, which became known as the "spy tapes", were kept secret until they were released in 2014 after a long legal battle fought by the main opposition party, the Democratic Alliance. The Democratic Alliance hopes to make major gains in the August elections, tapping into discontent over the ANC's struggle to deliver jobs, houses and education 22 years since the end of apartheid rule. In March, the president lost another major legal case when the country's highest court found he violated the constitution over the use of public funds to upgrade his private residence. India successfully launched its first mini space shuttle on Monday as New Delhi's famously frugal space agency joined the global race to make rockets as reusable as airplanes. The shuttle was reportedly developed on a budget of just $14 million, a fraction of the billions of dollars spent by other nations' space programs.
The Reusable Launch Vehicle, or RLV-TD, which is around the size of a minibus, hurtled into a blue sky over southeast India after its 7:00 am lift off.


After reaching an altitude of about 70 kilometers, it glided back down to Earth, splashing into the Bay of Bengal 10 minutes later.
The test mission was a small but crucial step toward eventually developing a full-size, reusable version of the shuttle to make space travel easier and cheaper in the future.
The worldwide race for reusable rockets intensified after NASA retired its space shuttle program in 2011. They are seen as key to cutting costs and waste in the space industry, which currently loses millions of dollars in jettisoned machinery after each launch.
Internet tycoon Elon Musk's SpaceX and Blue Origin of Amazon owner Jeff Bezos have already successfully carried out their own test launches. Musk told reporters in April that it currently costs about $300,000 to fuel a rocket and about $60 million to build one.
SpaceX first landed its powerful Falcon 9 rocket in December while Blue Origin's New Shepard successfully completed a third launch and vertical landing in April this year. But ISRO hopes to develop its own version, primarily to cash in on the huge and lucrative demand from other countries to send up their satellites. Veteran actress Jaclyn Jose has become the first Filipino to win the best actress award at the Cannes Film Festival for her performance in Ma' Rosa as a mother who falls prey to corrupt police after she was forced to sell drugs to survive. The movie was directed by Brillante Mendoza, who in 2009 became the first Filipino to win best director at the festival for Kinatay. The actress, who had appeared in previous films by Mendoza, said she was sharing the award with her director, her daughter and the cast of the film, as well as all Filipinos. ABS-CBN network reported that Jose beat big-name actresses including Charlize Theron, Kristen Stewart and Marion Cotillard.
Ma' Rosa is about a mother of four who owns a small convenience store in a poor neighborhood of Manila.
British director Ken Loach won the Palme d'Or top prize at Cannes on Sunday for the second time in a decade with his moving drama I, Daniel Blake about the shame of poverty in austerity-hit Europe.
The award marked a major upset at the world's top film festival in favor of the left-wing director, who turns 80 next month and is known for shining a light on the downtrodden. He beat runaway favorites including the rapturously received German comedy Toni Erdmann by Maren Ade, one of three female directors in competition, and US indie legend Jim Jarmusch's Paterson starring Adam Driver as a poetry-writing bus driver. Loach now joins an elite club of two-time victors at the French Riviera festival including Francis Ford Coppola and Emir Kusturica.
The runner-up Grand Prix award went to Canada's Xavier Dolan, 27, for his hot-tempered family drama It's Only the End of the World featuring a cast of A-list French stars which had been widely panned by critics.
Britain also claimed the third-place Jury prize, for Andrea Arnold's high-energy American Honey starring Shia LaBeouf in a tale of disadvantaged US youths selling magazines door-to-door. French film magazine Cahiers du Cinema tweeted that it had been a "lovely competition ruined by a blind jury". Actress Jaclyn Jose, center, holds her award after being named Best Actress for her role in the film Ma' Rosa, at the 69th Cannes International Film Festival in Cannes, France, on Sunday. Egypt has sent a submarine to join the hunt for the flight recorders from the EgyptAir jetliner that crashed in the Mediterranean and killed all 66 people aboard. Mounting evidence pointed to a sudden and dramatic catastrophe that led to Thursday's crash of EgyptAir Flight MS804 from Paris to Cairo, although Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi said on Sunday that it "will take time" to establish what happened aboard the Airbus A320. In his first public comments since the crash, Sissi cautioned against premature speculation. A submarine belonging to the Oil Ministry was headed to the site about 290 kilometers north of the Egyptian port of Alexandria to join the search, Sissi said.
A Ministry source said Sissi was referring to a robot submarine used mostly to maintain offshore oil rigs. Beside Egypt, ships and planes from Britain, Cyprus, France, Greece and the United States are taking part in the search for the debris from the aircraft, including its flight data and cockpit voice recorders.
Egypt's aviation industry has been under international scrutiny since Oct 31, when a Russian Airbus A321 traveling to St. The president spoke a day after the leak of flight data indicated a sensor detected smoke in a lavatory and a fault in two of the plane's cockpit windows in the final moments of the flight.
Authorities said the plane lurched left, then right, spun all the way around and plummeted 11,582 meters into the sea, never issuing a distress call.
Investigators have been studying the passenger list and questioning ground crew at Paris' Charles de Gaulle airport, where the airplane took off.
Egypt will have to work 10 times harder to revive its tourism industry, Tourism Minister Yehia Rashed said on Sunday, after a series of setbacks including the crash of an EgyptAir flight into the Mediterranean three days ago.
Egypt's tourism industry has struggled to rebound after 2011 in a period of political and economic upheaval.
Recovered debris of the EgyptAir jet that crashed in the Mediterranean Sea is seen on Saturday.
Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi on Monday announced the start of a military operation to retake the city of Fallujah from the Islamic State group.
The fight to recapture the jihadist bastion, which has been out of government control for nearly two and a half years, will be one of the toughest in Iraq's war against IS group.
The premier said that special forces, soldiers, police, militia forces and pro-government tribesmen will take part in the operation to retake the city, located in Anbar province just 50 kilometers west of Baghdad. The announcement settles the issue of which IS-held city Iraq should seek to retake next - a subject of debate among Iraqi officials and international forces helping the country fight the jihadists. Iraq's second city Mosul was the US military's recommended target, but powerful Iraqi militias may have helped force the issue by deploying reinforcements to the Fallujah area in preparation for an assault.
Iraqi forces have begun laying the groundwork for the recapture of Mosul, but progress has been slow and an assault to retake the city remains far off. The US-led anti-IS coalition carried out seven strikes in the Fallujah area last week, and Iraq said it has also bombed the city with US-supplied F-16 warplanes. On Sunday, Iraq's Joint Operations Command warned civilians still in Fallujah - estimated to number in the tens of thousands - to leave the city. It also said that families who cannot leave should raise a white flag over their location and stay away from IS headquarters and gatherings. Officials said several dozen families had fled the city, but IS has sought to prevent civilians from leaving, and forces surrounding Fallujah have also been accused of preventing foodstuffs from entering. Iraqi forces have in recent days been massing around the city, which has been out of government control since January 2014.
Anti-government fighters seized it after the army was withdrawn, and Fallujah later became one of IS's main strongholds. Fallujah and Mosul, the capital of Nineveh province, are the last two major cities IS still holds in Iraq. Fallujah is almost completely surrounded by Iraqi forces, who have regained significant ground in the Anbar province in recent months, including its capital Ramadi further up the Euphrates River valley. US forces launched two major assaults on Fallujah in 2004 in which they saw some of their heaviest fighting since the Vietnam War.
On Monday in Syria, more than 120 people were killed in a wave of bombings claimed by the IS group, the deadliest attacks yet in the government's coastal heartland.
Seven near-simultaneous explosions targeted bus stations, hospitals and other civilian sites in the seaside cities of Jableh and Tartus, which until now had been relatively insulated from Syria's five-year civil war. IS claimed the blasts via its Amaq news agency, saying its fighters had attacked Tartus and Jableh. IS is not known to have a presence in the coastal provinces, where its jihadist rival and al-Qaida's local branch al-Nusra Front is much more prominent.
The ashes of Nobel literature laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez were laid to rest on Sunday in Cartagena, the jewel of colonial architecture on Colombia's Caribbean coast, following a tribute to the author. Huge yellow butterflies, a symbol of magical realism - the genre Garcia Marquez helped make famous - graced the cloister's trees for the ceremony, which was attended by his widow and some 400 guests, most dressed in white. Garcia Marquez, the author of One Hundred Years of Solitude, died at the age of 87 on April 17, 2014 in Mexico, where he lived with his wife. Edgar Parra Chacon, president of the University of Cartagena, to which the cloister is attached, expressed what he said was a "great honor to receive 'Gabo'," the affectionate nickname given to the writer. The Claustro de la Merced, or Cloister of Mercy, is about 100 meters from the family's seafront home. Garcia Marquez's two sons, Garcia Barcha, a designer who lives in Paris, and Rodrigo Garcia Barcha, a US-based filmmaker, unveiled a bronze bust of the author by British sculptor Katie Murray, which stands in the courtyard.
Children work in hazardous conditions in the tobacco industry, according to international rights groups.
Under a recent state law, prosecutors can instead have witness statements read into the record.
He said she was "incapacitated by her own hand, by her own drinking." And he questioned her continued contact with Cosby in the year between their encounter and her first call to police. He ran a legitimate business that provided only companionship, defense lawyer Javier Solano told The New York Times. Air traffic controllers from Greece and Egypt have given differing accounts of the plane's final moments. The third message came at 00:26 GMT on May 19 and showed a rise in the temperature of the co-pilot's window. Speaking on condition of anonymity, the official said their size pointed to an explosion, although no trace of explosives had been detected.
The surprise announcement coincided with a Taliban suicide bombing near Kabul which killed at least 10 court employees in what was termed a revenge, illustrating the potency of the insurgency despite the change of leadership. The development caps a tumultuous political week that began with Netanyahu negotiating with the moderate Labor Party against a backdrop of international pressure to relaunch peace efforts with Palestine. About 200 meters of road running up to the famous Ponte Vecchio caved in when a major waterpipe it was sitting on broke, Mayor Dario Nardella said. Assange, 44, is wanted by Swedish authorities for questioning over allegations, which he denies, that he committed rape in 2010. The migrants are tired and no longer expect the borders to be reopened," a police source said on Tuesday.
Both activities were long frowned on in the country but are slowly gaining space on a changing island. Most of his clients pay $30 a month to be members - more than the average monthly salary on the island.
Cuban body builder Armando Yera opened a gym in central Havana, which is becoming increasingly popular among Cubans looking to transform their bodies. International forecasters see the arrival of La Nina weather pattern increasingly likely this year. Occasional crime by US personnel or civilian base workers infuriates Japanese people and often fuels call for the bases to go. In February thieves hacked into the SWIFT system of the Bangladesh bank, sending messages to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York allowing them to steal $81 million.
However, some finance industry executives say SWIFT has not been as active as it should be in improving security.
Nearly a million people have passed through Greece, the vast majority arriving on islands from the nearby Turkish coast. Locals and officials are searching for bodies after a wall of unstable earth collapsed during a downpour on Monday night in the town of Hpakant in Kachin state, the war-torn area that feeds a huge demand for the precious stones. Trump, in a wide-ranging interview with Reuters in New York last week, said he is willing to talk to the leader to try to stop Pyongyang's nuclear program, proposing a major shift in US policy toward the nation.
The CGT union reacted angrily to the overnight police advance on the depot at Fos-sur-Mer, where trucks resumed traffic on Tuesday morning.
Erdogan took a break from hosting a summit meeting in Istanbul to approve a cabinet list presented by Binali Yildirim, who replaces the outgoing prime minister, Ahmet Davutoglu.
But with less than a percentage point separating the two, Hofer's Freedom Party and its allies across Europe also had reason to celebrate what they cast as a major political surge by one of their own.
But around 700,000 absentee ballots still remained to be tallied on Monday, and those numbers swung the victory to Van der Bellen.
Only a little more than 31,000 votes separated the two, out of more than 4.6 million ballots cast.
Aviation experts have said that overheating is uncommon yet is highly unlikely to eventually cause a crash. Now 78, she has never forgotten the living hell she saw from the back of her father, who dug her out after a US military plane dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan. Collectively, they shape the differing reactions in the United States and Japan to Barack Obama's decision to become the first sitting US president to visit the memorial to atomic bomb victims in Hiroshima later this week. I think that represents Japan's regional role and its regional identity, whereas the United States has a global identity, a global agenda and global presence.
Many survived by rappelling down from a second-floor window using sheets tied together to form a rope. She tried to help the students escape," Rewat told reporters at a news conference broadcast on local television.
But some of them didn't believe her and closed the door on her to go back to sleep, she said. It was not clear whether the vessel would be able to help locate the black boxes, or would be used in later stages of the operation. Petersburg from the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh crashed in the Sinai Peninsula, killing all 224 people aboard. I get the most business, my girls make the most money, my clients are the wealthiest people in the world. The plane kept transmitting messages for the next three minutes before vanishing, Al-Ahram said. Around 20 cars fell into the newly created ditch, awash with water, but no one was injured. Assange avoided possible extradition to Sweden by taking refuge in Ecuador's embassy in London.
The area has suffered a string of deadly landslides over the past year, with a major incident in Hpakant last November killing more than 100. If you didn't say the right words you were killed, and if you were killed, you were either shot to death, bayoneted, or decapitated, the 95-year-old veteran said. So when it views the bombing of Hiroshima, Nagasaki, it's in the terms of a global narrative, a global conflict the US was fighting for freedom or to liberate countries from fascism or imperialism. I would like him to meet them and tell them that he is sorry about the past action, and that he will do the best for them.
When they get arrested, she and her children become desperate and are ready to do anything to buy her freedom from corrupt police.
Russia said the crash was caused by a bomb planted on the plane, and the local branch of the Islamic State claimed responsibility, citing Moscow's involvement in Syria. Castor has since become a defense witness of sorts, testifying that he had a binding agreement with Cosby's lawyers that the case would never be prosecuted. The striking workers want the government to abandon a labor reform that extends the workweek, and are blocking refineries and fuel depots around the country.



How to find mobile number network provider
Look up cell phone numbers and names for free download
Home security companies no credit check


Comments »

  1. | Victoriya — 18.03.2014 at 17:34:47 The final name of a defendant to try to find a decision.
  2. | fsfs — 18.03.2014 at 17:29:49 Ten digit phone quantity advertisements are what let you move forward AT ALL! Feedback.