Landing page redirect html,player for avi files on windows,internet without advertising - Plans On 2016

In this 11-part course landing page expert Oli Gardner and 10 renowned conversion rate optimization experts (including Rand Fishkin, Peep Laja, Michael Aagaard, Copyblogger, Hubspot and more), will walk you through how to create high-converting landing pages. A landing page can be any page that someone lands on after clicking on an online marketing call-to-action.
This creates the need for two types of landing page – a lead generation page and a click-through page. Once you have a lead’s permission, you then try to convert them into a customer by combining the two most powerful 1-to-1 communication tools a marketer has – email and landing pages. Click-through pages (sometimes called jump pages) are designed as a conduit between a marketing ad and it’s final destination. Commonly used for ecommerce, click-through pages provide enough information to inform the buyer, making them ready to purchase, before pushing them further down the funnel – probably to a shopping cart or checkout.
Landing pages live separately from your website and are designed to only receive campaign traffic. If we look at an example of a WebTrends landing page, which is focused entirely on a single campaign objective, you’ll notice that it has only one call-to-action. It’s immediately clear what you are supposed to do on this page, complete the form to download the data sheet. Landing pages should have all navigation and extra links removed so there is only a single action for your visitors to take. With 50 links on your homepage, your attention ratio is 2% – compared to 100% with a single CTA.
Webinar registration for live online sessions, often with Q&A with experts and special guest presenters.
Or any of the lead capture uses listed above, if you want to use an introductory page before sending them on to the landing page with your lead gen form. Most visitors are impatient and will leave your page within a few seconds of arrival if you don’t reinforce their intent with a matching headline and purpose (quickly and clearly).
By ensuring a strong message match, you are letting the visitor know that they made a “good click”.
A weak message match will result in a higher bounce rate and thus a drop in conversion rate. Not only is the copy perfectly matched here, but there is also a very strong “design match”, where the visual treatment of the landing page has been incorporated into the banner, helping to further reinforce the connection between banner and landing page.
Conversion scent, or information scent, is another way of describing the connection between your source ad and your landing page. Maintaining the information scent from ad to landing page is a critical factor for conversions. The more contextually related your page headlines are to the calls-to-action people clicked on, the more likely those prospects are to make the connection that your landing page is for them.
To round out the first day of the course, we’ve got a video for you so you can observe just how bad message match can be. This is a classic technique used to hijack your visitors eyes and create a tunnel vision effect.
Call attention to the most important page elements by using strangely placed and angled arrows.
Give your page elements breathing room to produce a calming effect and allow your CTA to stand out from the rest of your design. Common psychological motivators are the use of urgency (limited time) and scarcity (limited supply).
To demonstrate how you can apply the CCD concepts to a landing page, I’ll show a before and after template design example. Note: This template is available for use within the Unbounce landing page platform suite of landing page templates. Nicely encapsulated form area: CCD principle #1 talks about the use of encapsulation to bring attention to your form areas. Crowded page could use some whitespace: CCD principle #4 talks about the use of white space to improve the clarity and reading experience of your page.
By enhancing the messaging of the form area to explain, and focus on, the purpose of the page, the clarity of communication will improve and encourage more people to complete a form they know will benefit them.
Add a FAQ: You can remove the need for so many questions by opening a FAQ page in a lightbox that addresses all of the questions you are currently answering via external links.
The form area is nicely separated from the content, and there is a lot of breathing room all around the main image. This would be *really* good if the bottom blue area was a different color – perhaps just a dark grey.
There’s a ton of social proof logos on display here, although I think the lower set of logos is overkill. By being more explicit in the headline about what TAVR is, more people will be able to relate, staying on the page and completing the form as a result. Another thing to mention here is that the copy doesn’t really say anything about what you are downloading! By focusing on the local business aspect in the CTA, there will be a better understanding of the local brick and mortar business relevance and more targeted downloads (creating better qualified leads).
By including a strong value proposition that illustrates why they are unique, people will be more willing to click through to the next step. Tagline: There could be a tagline right next to the logo (to use some of the wasted space up there) that helps define the company right away.
The page talks about small business, and then features giant companies as the supporting proof of success. By changing the page title to directly describe the purpose of the page, the bounce rate will be lowered, and conversions lifted. Replacing the infographic with key facts in written form will improve the clarity and time spent reading, resulting in more people completing the form, as they will have a better idea of what the benefits of using FWCanada are. Replace the infographic: Take the key points out of the infographic to inform readers who can apply, who can be a sponsor, and how to apply.
This page is actually a microsite, so I would first suggest ripping out the header and footer navigation to increase the on-page engagement and turn it into a promotion specific landing page.
What Falcon Social does really well is something that I’ve been preaching for a long time, namely the use of lightboxes to show extended content without leaving the page. However, the page lacks explanation of what the solution provides prior to asking someone to start a free trial. By changing the CTA copy to a benefit driven statement and telling the customer what they would be when they sign up, more people will start a trial. CTA copy: To test different CTA’s, I’d run the original against a core benefit CTA such as “Grow Your Brand Socially” and a 3rd CTA that says “Grow Your Brand Socially” with a smaller supporting “x-day free trial” directly beneath the button. Having the space surrounding the main content area (on both sides), it gives the page a less cramped feeling. Validation: They jump right into showing off the famous publications that have featured their company.
Removal of doubt: The subtext below the CTA lowers the perceived risk, which can improve the click-through-rate (CTR).
The example below shows an alternate page they created, presumably to speak to a different segment or create a different emotional trigger.
This is the best and funniest example of a testimonial I’ve ever seen, and fits the fun brand perfectly. There are quite a lot of orange elements on the page, by choosing a button color that’s not within the orange range you will make it stand out more. The video poster frame should be more enticing: A poster frame is the image that is visible on your video before the play button is clicked. As I mentioned above, if you shifted the form down to sit half in and half out of the main header area, you could encapsulate it nicely in a design element that really separates it from the surrounding elements, by virtue of how it would break existing lines. The color choice for the 2 CTAs (just one please, tsk tsk) does have contrast with it’s surroundings, but something about the design is just awfully flat. There is some generous white space in the main content area which lets your eyes flow down the page through the content. Video product demos are always a good window into what you are offering, and can simplify the subsequent content consumption as you can easily scan to seek out any remaining holes in your buying process.
The subheader of the page is actually a testimonial which clarify the purpose of the product at the same time as adding social proof. Clear value proposition: The headline is very simple and leaves no doubt about the purpose of the page and the product.
Highlighted testimonial: The brushed highlight of the testimonial gives it a bit of extra design zing and prevents the page from feeling too text heavy. Context of use: Their choice of imagery lets you know that the product can produce mobile-ready polls.
Validation: Like the example above, they provide a strong sense of trust by including a set of logos. Remove the footer navigation: Any extraneous navigation on a landing page can lead your visitors down the wrong path. Just a little touch of design behind the testimonial helps to make it stand out as different from the content section above it, helping to set a visual barrier that keeps your eyes in place when you are reading the three chunks above.
Price: Travel is very much about price, and they get that out of the way right off the bat, so you can move on to the finder details after unerstanding if you can afford it or not.
The use of opacity for the form container is a good example of drawing just enough attention to the form, while still following the soft design esthetic of the page. The use of darker areas on both sides of the content, helps to drive you through the content in the middle of the page, like a funnel.
Honesty: It tells you the cost, so you can weigh up the potential value associated with extending your brand reach.
Clear contact method: The big phone number increases the trust factors by letting you know there are real people to deal with. Re-architecting the page to focus on one element alone with two columns of visually related content would greatly simplify the reading process. The Facebook following number lends some credibility to their appeal, as it’s what they are selling as a service. The success of your website promotion and marketing initiatives is dependent upon your goals and your carefully planned strategy. An element of campaign success often overlooked is the landing page your targeted respondents will arrive at by following the link in your ad. The home page of your website is typically designed as a general introduction to all that you offer. An internal page of your website may contain the specific product or service information promised in your ad but does it speak directly to respondents in the same way that compelled them to click your ad?s link in the first place? It most likely provides a generic description of the product or service or addresses a typical need different from the one in your ad.
A targeted landing page offers you the ability to control, track and report on each element of your campaign. You know that athletes are interested in physical endurance and performance while college students are interested in mental endurance and performance.
The content developed also takes into consideration the frame of mind of the person clicking on the link. Use what you know now about your anticipated respondents, and what you learn throughout your campaign, to craft a targeted landing page that speaks directly to a specific group about why they clicked your link in the first place. Another great benefit of targeted landing pages is the ability to track both user interaction and conversion using tools like Google Analytics.
With the release of WordStream’s new landing page grader tool, we can’t get landing pages out of our heads!
Before we get started, it’s important to remember that landing pages aren’t just about the page itself. In the spirit of competitive analysis, I spent some time Googling around and comparing the best and worst landing pages that I saw for those Google searches. This Kaezi landing page looks great – it’s showing me a bunch of studio light kits I might be interested in, and I can click an individual set for more details. The first huge problem is intent – I clicked an ad for photography lighting kits, and this is what I get. What’s really frustrating is that this site does have what I’m looking for – they just make it hard to find.
Even if I stick around long enough (and the vast majority won’t) to explore, none of the navigation links near the top seem to help me with finding lighting kits.


Next we’ll try another Google search, this time for “dog beds,” because we all love our dogs and want them to be comfy 'n' cozy.
Orvis does a pretty solid dog bed landing page – their landing page features a wide selection of dog beds, and an eye-catching photo of a happy, napping pup.
This page is a struggle because it does a lot of things right, but the things it does wrong are pretty damaging.
There are a ton of great Amazon reviews featured on the landing page, and while I love how they used the red underline to highlight key points, there are waaay too many reviews (40+).
They have 3 reviews that talk about how easy the bed is to clean, 7 about how the beds are good for arthritic dogs, 5 about how attractive the bed is, etc. While the trust signals up top are great, the first chunk of text below the headline could be a lot more scan-friendly.
This bulleted text found when you scroll down should really be up above the fold where it can be more useful and provide visitors with a better snapshot about the dog beds. There’s some great info on this page about why this type of bed is recommended for older, arthritic dogs (the info was especially interesting for me as owner of an senior canine) but a lot of this great content gets buried because of the sheer enormity of the page.
Some simple rearrangement of content and text resizing could help this landing page out a lot. What’s really silly is that after searching for dog beds with the site search tool, I find that Pottery Barn does offer dog beds.
Pottery Barn doubtlessly has a hefty advertising budget, so why such careless work when it comes to landing pages?
This landing page starts off with a big flyer talking about all the cool crafts I can make with silk flowers.
What’s interesting is that when I do click on that flyer about the DIY crafts I can make with silk flowers, I’m taken to this page. Many other landing pages struggle to rope in and condense their copy, but this Hubspot landing page gets straight to the point. Most of my criticisms are small, and may even seem petty, but truly good landing pages do require an almost scientific exactness and perfectionism. While I like the small icons explaining the core components of Zoho campaigns, the colors are a bit too light. While the customer recommendation is good to have in there, it may be better to choose a recommendation from a more recognizable brand or client (and add their logo to the testimonial).
It’s a shame because I don’t doubt that some of this is valuable content; it’s great that SAP is trying to create original, helpful content to share with visitors, but this isn’t the time or the place. The headings and text are well chosen and placed, with text color variation to indicate levels of copy importance.
A few things I would change: I might consider moving the testimonials that exist below the fold up higher and swapping out the bottom left text chunk, but it’s not the end of the world.
I am irked a tiny bit that the first name form field doesn’t align with the one below, and that the button isn’t perfectly centered between the form fields, but those are easy fixes.
Let’s move on to look at some of the innovative landing page designs some companies are exploring. One growing landing page trend involves scrapping nearly all text and instead relying exclusively on large, high-quality images to get the page’s idea or product across.
Falcon Social, a social media management software, has a landing page that looks remarkably similar to Square Space’s, right down to the color pallet.
We hope this adventure into landing page examples and designs has helped you gain a better understanding of what makes a good landing page and has given you ideas about how you can go about building a landing page and improve it incrementally. Hey Megan,Just wanted to say thank you for taking the time and putting these examples out here.
Awesome landing page examples Megan, already bookmarked this and will continue reading it later. I know that you pointed out some specific design issues with Infusionsoft, but I wonder if there has ever been a study to show is a page with better alignment of elements performs better or worse than a page with "perfect" alignment.
Great post, I came across a decent enough landing page the other day - aesthetically it was fine, however it was geared for an American audience but being served int he UK.
Thanks for a great article that really pinpoints the do's and don'ts of good landing page design.
Let me make a comment about style - and it's about _this_ page, rather than the ones shown. Here's the bad news: it's the folks who're still in work, but getting towards retirement, who're most likely to blink owlishly at the text, and find something, somewhere else, that's more comfortable to look at. The course includes step-by-step instructional videos so you can follow along, creating your own landing pages as you go.
In essence it floats alone, only accessible from the link you’re providing in your marketing content (the call-to-action in an email for example).
Videos or product images paired with a description and product benefits help to persuade the visitor to click the call-to-action. As we’ll see, this separation allows them to be focused on a single objective and makes analytics, reporting & testing a simpler task. It speaks to your overall brand and corporate values and is typically loaded with links and navigation to other areas of your site.
Each link on your page that doesn’t represent your conversion goal is a distraction that will dilute your message and reduce your conversion rate. Message match is the ability of your landing page to reinforce the messaging presented on the link that was clicked to reach the page. The scent begins when the ad is seen, and is maintained or ended when the visitor sees your landing page (depending on how strong your message match is). A great way to ensure your message match is strong is to write your ad CTA on a piece of paper and your landing page headline on another piece of paper underneath.
You can think of it like creating a window on your landing page where your CTA is the view.
Tie a sequence of arrows together to define a path for the visitor to follow, ending at your CTA. The purpose of this particular template is to facilitate the download of an ebook in exchange for the standard name and email.
It would essentially mean that someone converting at 10% would have a conversion rate of 100% which isn’t attainable. Your CTA button should always explain explicitly what will happen when it’s clicked, for two reasons. Mobile commons again do a nice job here, making sure the conversion area stands out from the rest of the page and making it clear where you need to go to complete your interaction with the page. By making the page a little longer, they could make each part of the message more clearly chunked into digestible blocks. Removing all links on the page so there is only one action, will increase the engagement with the page’s conversion goal, increasing form completions and reducing the bounce rate. If you really need to link to something, do it in a lightbox to keep prospective students on the page. This will reduce your total points of interaction to three: The CTA, privacy policy and the FAQ. The form is nicely contained in it’s own box, which helps it stand out from the image behind it. Knowing this right off the bat relaxes the mind so that it can explore the content on the page, knowing that you know where to go if you decide to continue on.
The two testimonials could use a different treatment to make them stand out as quotes rather than the current design that makes them look like a block of text like the rest of the page. Although I don’t get a clear sense of what TAVR is right away (the tiny description of the acronym is hard to see).
This would increase the Quality Score and the test would compare the change in Quality Score by making the header bot-readable. Which really opens the way for the use of color and contrast to make your form area stand out. Something we learned this very CCD week, was that having a short Slideshare presentation on your page to showcase part of your content, you really can bump your conversion rate.
These could use more consistency, and represent what the next step will reveal (I’m assuming the homepage). I don’t know how the company differentiates from the 100 other email service providers out there. There seems to be a mismatch of company size that could make people perceive their offering is targeted toward the enterprise market. I think the best thing that could be done for this page would be to add some white space to let it breathe.
By shuffling the page elements around, to offer up the required information before the call to action, and creating a better hierarchy of information, the page wouldn’t make you jump around wondering which order you should be consuming it in. This could include having an introductory paragraph beside the video that mentions how long the trial is along and include a benefit statement. It starts with a customer list, then moves on to hear what some of them are saying.In general the information hierarchy is nicely done on this page. From a design perspective, the grey monotone prevents a mishmash of colour creating any visual distraction from the call to action (CTA).
They’ve gone with B here, presumably in an attempt to catch your attention and increase curiosity (or to push a particular button).
Adding the blue container separates the main content area nicely, making the reading experience much simpler. I’m not sure what membership services are, so this could use a more descriptive image and supporting statement. A phone number to contact the company to discuss business, or to download a marketing guide. However, it could be communicated more effectively if it was written out, rather than trying to play with an image. It’s good to be above the fold for the most part, but when you are asking someone to engage in communication with you, you might want to expose them to more information about your product offering first. It would be enhanced further by using a larger type size, with an appropriate line height to give the copy room to breathe also.
In this example, you could easily skip the 1, 2, 3 content below the video as it’s covered in the video.
And it’s nicely backed up by a well written explanation of some of the core benefits directly below. Let you eye wander around the page and you’ll see how easy it is to identify each block of information. The Trip Advisor certificate of excellence let’s you know that a recognized authority has validated the company. The white stands out nicely from the solid background (to steal a comment away from Miss Contrast). Everything is in the same three colors, making it super hard to distinguish what the intended conversion goal (interaction point) of the page is. It functions as your beautiful lobby where visitors learn more about reaching the department that interests them.
You are able to present a marketing message that takes advantage of information you already know as well as the information you will learn from the campaign over time. In order to specifically address the differing needs and interests of the two groups, a targeted landing page is developed to receive each one separately. The college student, for example, who wants to overcome his tiredness and do well on his exams, and not give up any time he spends playing games :), clicks on the ad for the energy drink that promises the solution. Solution to enhance physical endurance, solution to enhance wakefulness or mental endurance, etc?. Although not impossible, it is more difficult to conduct this type of comparative testing on the home page or internal pages of your website, particularly where there are CTA’s not specifically related to your ad.
By tracking results on targeted landing pages (especially by setting up Goals in Google Analytics) the data you gather is specific to your campaign and not diluted in any way by visitor behavior outside of your campaign.
Process comes into play as well – what did visitors click to be brought to your landing page?
In this post, we’re going to evaluate and grade a few landing page examples from each Google search, as well as take a look at some innovative landing page designs that break the mold. There are also some appropriate related categories in the left-hand navigation bar I also might be interested in. A little meandering around the site helped me find some actual photography lighting kits, similar to what Kaezi showed.


Hide your kids, hide your wives, things are about to get really ugly with this “photography lighting kit” landing page example from Fovitec. The large product photos are also appealing, and you can filter the selection by color, feature, shape, fabric, price and more.
In all fairness, this landing page about XL dog beds does everything in a BIG way – the text, the reviews, everything. It’s absolutely fantastic that so many customers love the product, and it’s really smart to showcase those good reviews, but instead of drowning the visitor is XL print, I’d recommend that there be one shining review about how easy the beds are to clean, one about how they are good for arthritic dogs, etc.
Pottery Barn’s “dog beds” landing page gets a solid fail – clicking their dog bed ad brings me to a landing page for decor accessories. This landing page isn’t doing much with its headings, and the boring, lengthy (and small-print) content is riddled with very obvious cases of keyword stuffing. Their landing page lacks any strong imagery to retain the visitor’s attention, choosing instead to focus on its impressive awards and accolades. Shades of grey text can be preferred to black, usually used to delineate focus (darker text = more important).
The colored icons on the right draw the visitor’s attention to the key benefits offered by the product. I see a free trial offer as a better incentive than a demo, but maybe Infusionsoft has great success with their demo – each company has their own folder of testing research that can influence certain elements of their landing page. In an earlier blog post about great landing page designs, we discussed recommended best practices for obtaining an optimal landing page. It’s a bit of a risky move as it’s not entirely clear how Square Space plans on making my website better.
Falcon Social leaves out the vaguely philosophical catchphrase and gets straight to the point – social media management for enterprise. The landing page is centered around a large image while still maintaining some standard landing page practices with testimonials and trust signals. If you’re wondering how your landing page stacks up, be sure to try our free landing page optimization tool. The Infusionsoft landing page was actually part of a test we ran that created a +46% increase in demo conversions over the control page.
We have never ventured into PPC campaigns and therefore not really up on "landing pages" per se.
Really got me thinking about how a one size fits all approach can't work for everything - sure best practice is usually across the board, but when it comes to targetting certain audeinces you need to get to know the cultural implications that may impact on conversion rates.Cheers. I am taking a class in e-marketing and working on an assignment relating to "landing pages". For me, a good landing page is clean and simple in its design without being over-stylized (or fashionable). Dedicated landing pages are standalone pages that are designed for a specific marketing campaign.
A green CTA may well outperform red in some circumstances, but if the page is dominantly green, that green button is going to get hidden among other page elements. Most are from Unbounce customers, but I’ve thrown in some scary ones too, just to mix it up, and scare you into making your own pages better.
It would be more effective to have a customer testimonial talking about the conversion improvement they achieved. Firstly, so people will know what they are going to get, and secondly, so there is another element on the page backing up its purpose.
It could also draw more attention to the testimonial, by shifting the left column away from the form.
Yet, having skimmed (that’s all people will do) the page copy, I see no mention of an event.
If you have highly targeted ads, then you need to make sure the headline is a clear match with them.
In this instance I’d try going for a red button to make it stand out from the main color palette. As the form action is to get the guide, I wouldn’t muddy the waters by having the phone number in there.
The form container could also use a little something to make it stand out from an otherwise flat page. It can be more effective to have a descriptive and enticing benefit statement as the starting point – to make people want to watch. It could be as simple as putting a few bullet points in place of the form and nudging it down a bit.
Which allows you to visually break the information into three pieces, speeding the reading process.
The testimonials shown are anonymous which reduces their impact (as they could have been made up).
I would try to knock everything back to be within the same basic color hue, so the pricing grid can stand out. Hopefully you have presented your content to welcome and guide your different audience groups effectively; however, it is still a general introduction that may not be addressing the specific concern raised in your latest targeted email, AdWords or banner ad campaign. You strategically place your ads on various content sites specifically geared to the different target groups: maybe healthy living and exercise sites for the athletes and popular video and gaming sites for the college students. Highly focused content is developed for each of the landing pages that clearly confirms to the user the reason why he responded to the ad and clicked on the link in the first place. He arrives at a landing page that acknowledges how he feels, accepts his need to engage in these targeted activities, and demonstrates how the energy drink is the solution to his pain. This concentrated data can be used to make adjustments to improve your overall results and increase your ?return on advertising spend? (ROAS).
Pour couronner le tout, ce theme WordPress est livre avec un systeme de gestion de la page d’accueil. We’re taking today to show some real-world landing page examples, so get ready for some breathtaking brilliance and miserable monstrosities. As a consumer chances are pretty good that I’d back myself right out of this landing page disaster and find a page that is better at meeting my needs.
I clicked an ad for photography lighting equipment, so why don’t I see anything even remotely photography-oriented? Since "dog beds" is a pretty broad query, this meets the intent well, allowing the visitor to browse and find exactly what they need. Visitors already see that these beds have a five-star Amazon rating (which is a clever trust signal to promote above the fold). The Pottery Barn brand is well known and has a solid following – I’m sure many consumers would choose PB dog beds over others, but driving PPC clicks to the wrong landing page is throwing away potential purchases.
This page comes off as spammy and damages any potential trust the brand might have earned (and really, any website that starts with a lowercase “e“ or “i” already raises suspicions).
At the moment the buttons are the same color as the background with a subtle orange outline – not irresistibly clickable. The main image is confusing – is this a glimpse of the product itself, or are we supposed to be drawn to the colorful designed templates Zoho offers against the bleak and dreary templates offered by other companies? It looks more like a resources page than a product landing page (and an ugly resources section at that). Remember, you know your company best, and it’s very possible that not all general landing page best practices will apply to you.
However, plenty of sites are interested in sacrificing landing page standards for the sake of experimentation.
There's just no way you can expect a visitor to take their time meandering around a website until they find what they want.
It still amazes me that businesses are not even using landing pages at all, let along making them relevent to the search term! It's good to see examples of landing pages in different industries and how they compare to each other. Your post has helped to understand better about the best landing pages and the worst landing pages. If a user takes in the message before they see the design, then I think that is a successful page. If you focus on contrasting colors you will be much more successful at making it stand out.
If you stood back and looked at this page you’d be hard pressed to really differentiate the most important element.
Here, the page is so simple that there’s no real visual complexity to compensate for, but you should still get in the habit of practicing separation.
This could mean that you need to move the 3rd feature block somewhere else, and switch it to 2 or 4. Always ask permission to use a testimonial and include the name of the person providing it for extra trust points. That’s the equivalent of walking into a clothes store and being told to buy these clothes before you even try them on. I’d also make the two pricing tiers on the outside, the same muted color, to make the recommended (center) tier the most dominant. The landing page speaks directly to the specific pain identified in your ad that prompted the user to respond. The only hint that I haven’t accidentally clicked a random pop-up ad is the Fovitec logo featuring an aperture icon in the “O” (although whatever camera allusions the word “Fovitec” is supposed to conjure are lost on me). If potential buyers want to read more reviews from customers, they’ll go to the Amazon page. This is a good landing page – it would have been perfect for my initial search for “silk flowers.” However, in order to get here, I had to click a link talking about DIY silk flowers crafts.
I clicked an ad that appeared for “email marketing software” and the word “email” is nowhere to be found. The button color and text are appropriate, and I like how the central-positioned form draws the visitor in. Apart from being a missed opportunity to optimise a campaign properly, customers have no chance of finding what they want so conversion must be terrible!I love landing pages and totally understand their importance, however, I have learned a few things from this article and I'm now off to perfect them! Our internal Creative department has taken the landing page conversion strategy and created an incredibly elegant version for main website demo page testing. However, there's a fad in commercial web design at the moment to use pale grey on white as a colour combo, and this page suffers from that. Some of this could be resolved by moving the customer logos to the bottom of the page, potentially in greyscale to prevent them from conflicting with the rest of the page.
Or you could extend the header area to be longer, and balance the design by putting a relevant statement beneath the video, talking about a benefit of the service. The “landing” process and movement through the funnel is just as important as the physical page design.
If I’d have to choose between a landing page that’s too crowded or too spaced out, I’d absolutely choose the spaced out page. Square Space is getting enough notice these days that they might be trusting that visitors already know what they’re all about. The question is, will visitors stick around and watch the video for a better understanding, or simply look elsewhere for a landing page that spells out the benefits for them in a quick, scan-friendly design?
For someone with weakened eyesight, or glasses with an older prescription, the low contrast makes it a strain to read. Even if you manage to work your way down to it, it’s so bland and nondescript, with no real purpose attributed to it.
Sounds like this site really needs to focus on intent and think about where they really want to direct visitors. However, a second testimonial or an extra icon line of features could be added while still maintaining a sleek, attractive design. So my test advice is to say exactly what you will receive in the header, and reinforce that in the CTA.



Market plan of kfc
Promo video clips
Free recording and editing software windows 8



Comments to «Landing page redirect html»

  1. Bad_Boy writes:
    The adapter and a free version of the app for.
  2. RONIN writes:
    Obstacles can in fact be addressed by advertising significant benefit of this sort of computer such.
  3. VIP_Malish writes:
    Time, you can use a weblog to start advertising.
  4. Leon writes:
    Concern, adblocking has risen in popularity among customers.