Make your own video software free download,youtube marketing revenue model,advertising strategy of vodafone pdf,free banner advertising exchange rate - Easy Way

I know there are other methods for doing HD, particularly on Windows, by using Avisynth scripts and VirtualDubMod. Before starting on the HD tutorials, it might not hurt to show you some examples of HD fan videos made using this process or something similar.
If your video software opens the MJPEG AVI files that Avidemux makes, then youa€™re halfway there. In my most recent tests, I had no problems editing in the MJPEG AVI files (some which were converted within MPEG Streamclip). Set up your project properties as either HDV 720-25p (for PAL footage) or HDV 720-30p (for NTSC footage).
Edit your video as usual, then export out as either HD WMV, or uncompressed AVI with the custom frame size of 1280x720. I was able to successfully edit MJPEG AVI files that were converted in MPEG Streamclip with Corel VideoStudio X2. I had set up my project as 25 frames per second (PAL and SEACAM) so I was given the a€?25pa€? option. I then opened this file in MPEG Streamclip and converted it to an H.264 MP4 file (keeping the frame size at 1280x720 and with a data rate of 4000). Sample downloads: I made a sample fan video that is so abysmal that I darena€™t have it hosted on my regular fan video site (RAfanvids) so it is an a€?exclusivea€? to this site.
Corel VideoStudio HD video featuring Guy of Gisborne (H.264 MP4) Right-click to download file.
The XviD AVI file looks a little lighter and might look a€?washed outa€? compared to the MP4 file. When I import the clips, I select a€?Optimize video:a€? and choose a€?Full Size.a€? This keeps the HD clips at HD! Yeah, I know that iMovie warns you that this might a€?degrade video playbacka€? and it might if you have less RAM or an older Mac.
You want to convert your files (aka a€?Optimizea€?) because playback will be smoother and more stable (compared to trying to get iMovie 09 to edit compressed H.264 files) and if you want to speed up or slow down any clip, youa€™re going to end up converting it any way.
Edit your video as usual, and then when ita€™s time to export it, choose to save it as a Quicktime file, and follow the exporting tutorial as outlined in the iMovie 6 HD page (the process is identical, as both applications use Quicktime to export the video).
Caveat about iMovie 09: There is some quality loss (in the form of a more a€?blockya€? effect sometimes showing up in backgrounds and shadows) but your HD video will still have a lot of the HD detail, so in my opinion ita€™s still completely worth it to edit HD in iMovie 09. Tutorial keywords: HD editing for vidding, fan videos, Sony Vegas Movie Studio, Sony Vegas Pro, Corel VideoStudio, iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Final Cut Express, vids vidder, HD fanvids tutorial. HD for Final Cut Express, Final Cut Pro.A  Since writing that tutorial, Ia€™ve upgraded to Final Cut Pro 7, and am now experimenting with editing HD in the codec ProRes LT, and so far am liking it.
There was a retrospective of my single screen video dance work as part of the Rotation 03 Festival at the Kiasma Theatre, Helsinki, in association with Helsinki Museum of Contemporary Arts and Finnish National Gallery for Modern Art. This event recognized the achievement to date of a body of work and the evolution of a specific aesthetic and approach to making dance for the screen that has been internationally recognized. My initial impulse to make video dance came when, on graduating from the Laban Centre, London in 1988 with a degree in Dance Theatre, I felt the urge to bring dance to as wide an audience as possible.
Fifteen years later, I remain as inspired and excited by video dance as an artistic medium. I am in no way disheartened by this outcome, for what has also happened over the past 15 years is that video dance has come into its own as an art form and there are now many opportunities beyond television for this kind of work to be funded and seen. One of the benefits of having made most of my work independently is that I have been to a great extent free to explore very particular ideas, lines of enquiry and methods of working, in collaboration with many different choreographers and dancers. From a formal point of view, I found Lucinda Childsa€™ exploration of the effect of repetition on our perception of movement intriguing.
On reading about Yvonne Rainera€™s work, particularly once she had moved from dance to film-making, I related very strongly to her suggestion that we should find alternative structures than simple narrative closure, in which everything in a story ties up and makes sense by the end. After Laban, I went to art-college in Dundee to undertake a post-graduate course in Electronic Imaging. I saw work by video artists like Bill Viola and Gary Hill, which seemed to me to also to take human movement as its subject and through it conveyed the very essence of human existence. By the time I graduated from art-college, I had made my own connections between various artistic practises and had formed a clear idea of the kind of ideas that inspired me. The camera, and its relationship to the human body, is central to my approach to making video dance.
Whatever the idea for the work, my choices about how to use the camera are strongly influenced by my belief that at the heart of video dance is the expression of human emotion.
Through the use of close ups and different angles, the camera can take the viewer to places they could not usually reach.
In my experience, it is often the movement of the body parts outside the frame that creates interesting and active viewing. How the camera moves in relation to the performers is another important aspect of filming dance. However, what I have also discovered is that the carefully choreographed camera can lose out on an important element of dance: the feeling of spontaneity, the energy of the moment, which can make watching someone dance live such an exhilarating experience. When I started out making video dance, I would storyboard everything I planned to film, designing exact shots which explored framing and camera movement in relation to the choreographed dance movement. In order to redress this, and in an attempt to retain the integrity of the dancersa€™ performance, I started to explore a more fluid approach to making video dance.
The idea of improvisation is that those working, in this case the dancers and camera operator, decide how they should move (or how they should film) in the moment. When developing a new video dance work, as the director, I set a series of improvisations with a€?rulesa€™ suggested by knowledge of the possible spatial and motional relationships between camera and dancers.
Shooting on video helps this process immensely, as the performers, camera operator and director can look back at the material and together evaluate the effect of certain decisions and types of movement and how things could tried differently. In the context of making video dance, improvisation can be a misunderstood a€“ and scary a€“ word.
Whilst it may be accepted that improvisation could be a valid tool for generating ideas and developing material, when it comes to filming material that will be used in the finished video dance, it is usually thought to be wiser to set and rehearse everything before committing to tape. In a€?Pacea€™ (1996), dancer and choreographer Marisa Zanotti and I set out to explore ways of conveying energy and speed on screen.
The energy and rawness of a€?Pacea€™ comes very close to what Marisa and I had envisaged and on this basis of this experience, I have continued to use improvisation in many of the video dance works that I have directed. For example, in one sequence around two minutes into a€?Pacea€™, the camera moves with the dancer, following a triangular floor pattern through the studio. Beyond the new technology and the creative opportunities it offered, a€?Pacea€™ was also the first time that I worked with visual artist and editor Simon Fildes.
Each of the twenty or so video dance works that I have directed have been very different in terms of their starting point, who I have been collaborating with and the context in which they were made. At some level, all explore a€?perceptiona€™ and the idea that our understanding and interpretation of an action, relationship or moment in time depends on our point of view and the information we are given.
Around three or four years ago, I became particularly interested in developing this idea of how different levels and types of perception, both visual and aural, effect the way in which we understand a situation. In the process of my research, I came across an English company, Touchdown Dance, who work with dancers with visual impairment in the Contact Improvisation form. In a€?Sense-8a€™, the challenge we set ourselves was to take the viewer in deeper and deeper into the performersa€™ experience. Perception is also a strong theme in a€?The Trutha€™, which takes as its starting point the widespread use of CCTV or surveillance images by the media and how these are exploited to develop speculative narratives around certain high profile events. Together we - Kate, Karin, Simon & Katrina - came up with the concept for a€?The Trutha€™.
So we approached the choreographers a€“ Fin Walker (UK) and Paulo Ribeiro (Portugal) - to create the movement for us. So, although I did come into the studio as the choreographers were creating the movement and look at the movement though the lens, I did not start to make decisions about how the movement would be framed until the choreography was completed. The third element of material that runs through a€?The Trutha€™ is the surveillance-style images, set on the concourse of a station. Just as the concept of the film is that the truth can look different depending on your point of view, so the camera and editing offer many different points of view on the same moments. Whilst sharing certain stylistic approaches and techniques with the video dance work, the documentaries a€?Adugnaa€™ and a€?Symphonya€™ differ significantly from the video dance work in terms of intention. The challenge in making these films was to capture the essence of the incredible work being done by Royston, his colleagues and the people they work with.
Another way in which the documentaries differ from the other works is that the choreography existed in its own right and was not created specially for the camera.
My ambition is to find and communicate ideas that can only be expressed through this hybrid medium and using a style and syntax that is unique to video dance. Particularly a longer work like a€?The Trutha€™ demands us to allow ourselves to experience the emotional flow of the work, to look carefully and actively and to suspend our judgement.
What I am more interested in is to take the viewer on an intense emotional journey, one that cannot necessarily be rationalised or explained away in words. I saw work by video artists like Bill Viola and Gary Hill, which seemed to me to also to take human movement as its subject and through it conveyed the very essence of human existence.A  A touring programme of German video art from the 1980a€™s particularly impressed me. How the camera moves in relation to the performers is another important aspect ofA  filming dance. To buy the DVD Five Video Dances at A?25 including postage and packing you can use the PayPal secure server by clicking here. Ia€™m NOT saying that my way is better or less complicated, but it might be less intimidating to some users. If not, you can convert the files to MJPEG AVI (again!) in MPEG Streamclip, or to JPEG 2000 in MPEG Streamclip. If you find that you cana€™t get that to work, try opening the big MJPEG AVI files (that Avidemux made) in MPEG Streamclip, and converting to JPEG 2000 MOV files. If you set up your Corel VideoStudio software as NTSC (you are given the choice between PAL and NTSC when you first install VideoStudio) then your export settings will be different (30p instead of 25p).
Whichever way you choose, iMovie will take its time importing the clips and CONVERTING each one to a large MOV file with the Apple Intermediate Codec.
Although I was keen to be a choreographer, I was reluctant to make work that, I felt then, would only be seen by other dance enthusiasts at one of the small, dedicated dance theatres in the big cities. These offered a refreshing alternative to the broadcasts of full length ballets a€?livea€™ from the stage at Covent Garden Opera House that then made up the majority of dance on UK television. What is unexpected is that, of the twenty or so video dance works that I have directed in the intervening decade and a half - and although I have directed many hours of broadcast documentary arts programmes - only one of the video dance works I have made has been commission by and seen on television. The money to make the majority of my video dance has come from both public and private commissions and the resulting works have been screened all over the world - at festivals and in cinemas, theatres and galleries.
This article sets out to describe some aspects of this journey and I hope that it will provide an interesting and illuminating context for the five works a€“ three video dances and two dance documentaries a€“ that are being screened as part of the a€?Rotation 03a€™ festival in Helsinki. Whilst at Laban, I came across the work of the post-modern dance makers, for example, Lucinda Childs, Steve Paxton and Yvonne Rainer. I saw a connection between Childs work and the use of repetition in the music of minimalist such as Steve Reich and Brian Eno, as well as in the dance music that I lost myself in on the dance floor at clubs at the weekend. To paraphrase Rainer, real life often does not have the comfort of closure and so maybe art should not be so tidy either? I wanted to make dance for the screen and I realised that, in order to do so, I would need to learn about video production. These experiences where brought to bear on a series of different collaborations and creative environments. With the camera, I try to create an energy that involves the viewer in the movement, allowing them to become an active participant in the action, rather than simply a passive observer.
When I look at movement through the lens, I try to do so as though I am involved in an interaction with the person or people in front of me.
The lens can enter the dancera€™s kinesphere a€“ the personal space that moves with them as they dance a€“ framing the detail of the movement and allowing an intimacy that would be unattainable in a live performance context.


The framing I chose often focuses on a detail of movement, frustrating the audiences view of the a€?wholea€™, whilst at the same time creating dynamic and tension within the shot and forcing the viewersa€™ imagination to come into play.
The choreographed camera, moving through space in relationship to the dancers, alters our perception of the dance, rendering it three-dimensional and creating a fluid and lively viewing experience.
This dilemma, and the search to find a solution, has also significantly informed my approach to making video dance.
However, over time, I began to feel that what was gained in carefully contrived shots was being lost by a certain lack of fluidity and immediacy in the dancersa€™ performance. Over a number of works, and in collaboration with different dancers and choreographers, I began to use structured improvisation as a creative tool.
They base this decision on their experience of what they see and feel in the moment, informed to a greater or lesser extent by certain ideas, rules, restrictions or a€?scoresa€™.
Through rehearsal and repetition, a vocabulary of framing and movement is built up, forming a palette of video dance material that is then a€?choreographeda€™ in the edit suite. In the process, the dancer and camera really do become dancing partners and a sense of a€?livenessa€™ is captured on tape.
However, in my experience, there is a qualitative difference between the performance of video dance material that has been set exactly and that material which retains elements of improvisation. We were determined to make a video dance work a€“ in this case for broadcast on BBC television a€“ that would have the audience sitting on the edge of their seat. Over a couple of weeks in the studio, Marisa and I developed a series of structured improvisations which were rehearsed and refined until we knew that, come the shooting days, they would generate the type of images we wanted for our video dance.
It is through the juxtaposition of different shots and sounds that the work assumes its emotional impact, as characters are revealed through fragments of action and the viewer is drawn through a series of events and states.
Firstly, there is editing for the continuity of the live choreography, where the timing and structure of a work originally made for the stage is more or less maintained. However, it was not until a€?Pacea€™, which was the first time I had the opportunity to use a non-linear digital editing system, that I was really able to push this approach to a new extreme. In the edit, we initially a€?recreateda€™ this journey by montage-ing shots from different takes of that particular improvisation. Each time this sequence is repeated, a number of shots are dropped, until in the end it is made up of only three shots.
I very quickly realised that Simona€™s input went way beyond being able to operate the editing software. However, there are certain themes that have remained constant throughout almost all of the works.
They also all incorporate the fact that the interplay between vision and sound has a great impact on our perception of what is happening on the screen. I also started to think of making a video dance work which would communicate whether you could see it, hear it or see and hear it. Here, my two main areas of interesta€“ improvisation as a creative tool and visual and aural perception a€“ seemed to converge. We hear the dancers describe, to each other and the viewer, what they are seeing, as they move and as they observe. It explores the idea that the same situation can give rise to completely different interpretations, depending on point of view, perspective and other related information.
Usually, I will work with a closely with choreographer to evolve a new idea for a video dance. Related to the idea of different interpretations of the same information that is at the core of a€?The Trutha€™, we then decided that it would add interest and intrigue to work with two choreographers, whose vocabularies and styles differ greatly, thereby giving two different versions of events in the choreography. We asked them to respond to the concept of a€?trutha€™, but we left them in the dark as regards almost every other aspect of the production a€“ location, costume, sound, filming style and soundtrack. Usually I spend a lot of time in the studio with the dancers and choreographer, developing the camera framing and movement as the dancersa€™ movement evolves. Here we see the four characters, appearing to relate a€“ or not to relate a€“ to each other in very different ways. They challenge us to look again at the same moment a€“ or movement a€“ from a different perspective and to experience how this changes the impact of that moment and the perceived relationship between the characters.
They were made as awareness and fund-raising films for Dance United, a UK-based dance development company, headed up by the visionary teacher and choreographer Royston Maldoom. We stove to create two films that contain the factual information that needs to be imparted and whilst at the same time communicate the power and potential of dance as a means of expression and as a tool for social change. However, the approach we took to filming the choreography was to re-structure it entirely for the screen. What we are making is not a dance, nor is it a video of a dance, or even for that matter, simply a video. Because it is screen-based work a€“ and therefore by default associated with television a€“ there is the danger that the expectation is that everything should be obvious straight away and on one viewing and for there to be a sense of narrative closure. These offered a refreshing alternative to the broadcasts of full length ballets a€?livea€™ from the stage at Covent Garden Opera House that then made up the majority of dance on UK television.A  Now experienced film and television directors and choreographers were being brought together to experiment with movement, cameras and editing and the results were broadcast to audiences that, although perhaps small by prime-time television standards, were inconceivable in a live theatre context. Here, highly textural abstract images, unidentifiable, yet obviously derived from images of human action, were edited using repetition, the sound and image interacting and building up rhythms which I found both compelling and very moving. Here, my two main areas of interesta€“ improvisation as a creative tool and visual and aural perception a€“ seemed to converge.A  Together with Touchdowna€™s director Katy Dymoke, I developed an idea which would eventually become a€?Sense-8a€™, a video dance commissioned by the Arts Council of England as part of their Capture scheme. But Ia€™d never discourage someone from going the AMV.org route, because I have no doubt that the quality is gorgeous. Or, follow one of the other exporting tutorials on the Foolish Passion video forums, but export at the HD frame size of 1280x720, with a data rate of 4000 or above. There are now many individual artists and collaborative teams who have made several video dance works and who, over time, have developed their own unique approaches to making dance for the screen. Mainly through the books of Sally Banes, and a very few video documentation of performances, I learnt about their revolutionary approaches to making dance in New York in the a€?sixties and a€?seventies. On visits to the south of Spain, I saw Moorish art that used repetition to create beauty and invoke contemplation. What I had not anticipated was that I would come across a whole different area of art a€“ video art a€“ which, in my view, shared much in common with the post-modern dance practises which had so inspired me.
Whilst the initial starting point for each of the video dance works I have directed may have be different, the work shares common concerns and approaches. In the need to ensure that a pre-planned camera movement could happen or a certain light and framing came into play, fixed points in space needed to be reached by the dancers.
The various sections of the finished work are based on a series of improvisations which explore different relationships between camera and dancer, and the effect of various lenses, framing choices and ways of moving camera in relation to a variety of explorations of movement ideas by the dancer. The significance of a moment, or movement, is explored as time is slowed down, stretched, speeded up, repeated or stopped by the editing.
Secondly, there is the a€?montagea€™ approach, in which shots are taken from different spatial and temporal contexts and are re-ordered, breaking down completely the sequence of the live action and creating a spatial logic and rhythm unique to the video dance work.
By using the possibilities offered by this new media, I began to really explore the effect on the perception of time and movement of repeated and altered patterns of montage. When you watch the sequence in the finished video dance, in your minda€™s eye the truncated sequence still covers the same ground as it did when it was made up of the full 12 shots and the performer seems to compete the phrase in a dramatically shorted space of time. He understood the ideas that Marisa and I had been exploring and was able to take them onto new levels through his understanding of editing.
This is something that is often done when a dancer with visual impairment or who cannot see at all, is part of a group of Contact Improvisers. In the case of a€?The Trutha€™, however, it was two dancers, Kate Gowar and Karin Fisher-Potisk, the Artistic Directors of the dancer-run company Ricochet Dance Productions, who approached myself and Simon to make a new video dance work. It was very exciting for us all that these two talented choreographers embraced the challenged of this very a€?hands offa€™ collaboration with such imagination, understanding and commitment.
However, this time it felt important that the choreography should follow its own line of development and be created according to the choreographersa€™ and the dancersa€™ understanding of the characters relationships and interactions.
As video dance progresses, our perception of the relationships between these four characters and their relationship to each other is continually altered by the accumulation of information that we glean through the different scenes and interactions a€“ both a€?choreographeda€™ and a€?reala€™ a€“ that we see the characters involved in.
Again, the intention was to capture the essence of the choreographed work and the impact of the dancersa€™ performance. In all the video dance that I have directed, my collaborators and I have tried to make work that, on one level, demands analysis and thought, and on the other, can be enjoyed on an impressionistic or experiential level. As a young dance-maker, I saw many of these short a€?video dancea€™ works and was inspired and excited by the potential I could see in this new, hybrid medium. Extreme care was taken to enhance all aspects of her comfort and style, while maintaining her pedigree as a true performance yacht. Images,snapshots,and pics often capture a sentiment,a mood,a feeling,or even an idea of a person who's at the center of attention. Moreover, whilst when I started out, I was amongst the first of the so-called a€?hybrida€™ video dance artists, having trained in both dance and the moving image, now in the UK and elsewhere, many undergraduate dance courses offer video dance as an area of both practical and academic study. I was intrigued by the post-modernsa€™ perception of movement as interesting in itself and not necessarily representing anything other than itself and by their presentation of so-called a€?pedestrian movementa€™ as dance.
The result often seemed to be that the dancersa€™ movement, and therefore performance, was impeded.
For those coming from a narrative film background, where the convention is to work from a pre-written script, improvisation can seem an alien concept, although similar practises have been used by many well-known film-makers. In other cases, such as a€?Pacea€™ and a€?Sense-8a€™, all the material that was used in the final edit was generated through structured improvisation. The narratives that emerge tend to be subtle and intriguing, suggested rather than explained, impressionistic rather than literal.
The effect is that the speed of the solo dancera€™s movement seems to increase dramatically as the space closes in.
At other times, we catch a€?birda€™s eyea€™ glimpses of the scene from a surveillance-style camera position. It highlights the fact that we all a€?seea€™ things differently and how our descriptions of what we are seeing and hearing a€“ what we pick up on - reveal a great deal about our perception of our environment.
I hoped this would give the dancersa€™ performance an integrity of its own and help to produce a tension between their action and how the viewer then experiences this through the way the camera and the editing interprets and alters the action. Throughout the years,pictures has become one of the most popular ways to capture memorable moments. This maturing and widening out of video dance means that it has reached the stage where the discussion of the nature of the art form and the support of its continued development can, and must, include very different ways of working, styles of delivery and artistic intentions. I was also struck by their break away from the conventional theatre setting for dance performances. Dance makers are probably more familiar with the idea of working with improvisation, both as a means of generating material which will then be choreographed and as performance material in its own right. The drama of the chase is then relieved by the gradual introduction of new material, with a very different texture, shape and inherent rhythm. As the video dance progresses, the camera is drawn closer into the action, until as the viewer you feel as though you too are part of the Contact Improvisation jam. In the edit for a€?Sense-8a€™, we brought all these elements together, adding layers of sound to the montaged visual material to create one fluid, multi-perspective experience of the dance. And certainly,for a tantamount of consumer and shoppers you cant put a price tag on family and holiday pics. Decades after the invention of the first camera, a large number of consumers and shoppers continue to take pics, in a hgh tech fashion. Instead of the antiquated bulky cameras with huge lenses,consumers and shoppers frequently use SmartPhones and digital cameras to capture images and to take holiday pics. From family gatherings,to family picnics to traditional weddings to the holidays,consumers and shoppers often seize the opportunity at planned events and during the holidays for instance Thanksgiving and Christmas to take pictures of loved ones,family,friends and co workers.
Since founding csaccac Inc in 2010, as Founder and President,I fill many hats including Product Tester and photographer. And truthfully speaking,in the beginning I experienced some difficulty;however,after I purchased my first digital camera I began to feel comfortable and enjoy the ease of taking pics with a digital camera. Months after I purchased my first digital camera,I set my sights on a tripod, a universal stand to hold my digital camera.


The main reason I purchased a tripod__ at the time, I wanted to create high quality self pics and group pics. Eventhough, I've had my tripod for some months,I am still learning the ins and outs of both my digital camera and tripod. Well,if you havent guessed or envisioned what the featured product for the month of November 2013 looks like or remotely even resembles __then as productor tester I guess I'll do the honors first__it's my tripod. Eventually, I wanted to find out what the craze had been all about and the reason that consumers seemed to ofA  been trading in personal computers for Tablets,_well, at least leaving them at home.
Ultimately, I placed online an order for a NookHD+ then opt to pick up the tech item from the store instead of waiting for it to be shipped to my place of residency. AA  few weeks with the NookHD+, I was hooked_eventhough, IA  wasna€™t a fan of touchscreen only.
And in all honesty, since the beginning of the Smart Phone craze, I had insisted upon that all of my primary tech gadgets used for work, research and blogging had to be equipped with a QWERTY keyboard.
However, in this particular instance,The NookHD+, again, touchscreen only, I made an exception. As I continued to learn the ins and outs of my newly purchased NookHD+ , at the same time, I began to inquire about the accessories compatible with the tech gadget. In doing so, I foundA  the tech item had a Stylus Pen specifically made to use with the NookHD+.
Weeks later, I purchased a different kind of Stylus Pen , I noticed while standing atA  the checkout counter at Walgreens,pictured next to this article is that Stylus Pen. Quite astonishing the Stylus Pen worked wellA  with both of my tech gadgets ( Smart Phone & Tablet). A frequent question a tantamount of consumers and shoppers find themselves entertaining especially during the holidays when manufacturers and retailers offer what they consider to be great deals and bargains. After giving the device a run for its money as well as a brief critique of the various apps and functions,I stated in my review of the Nook HD+ how pleased I was with the tech gadget.
Further into the critique, I also commented that I was soooo pleased with the tech gadget that I wanted to protect my investment.
Based on my income and budget,I considered the purchase of the Nook HD+ to be a major purchase of the year.
Shortly after, I purchased the Nook HD+,I began to look at the recommended accessories for the tech gadget.
Eventually, after I and my Nook HD+ survived the return and exchange 14 day trial period,I chose to protect my investment with a Nook HD+ cover. As I began to search and think of different items that could be the product of the month for September,I began to heavily weigh in on August's product of the month,the Nook HD+cover.
Hours later,I arrived to the assertion that there's more than one way to protect your investment.
With the assertion___, there's more than one way to protect your investment, I made the final choice to make Smart Phone covers as the product of the month for September.
Furthermore, within the past five years,Ive purchased several Smart Phones from Virgin Mobile.
To be truthful, I've even purchased Smart Phone insurance,a good choice because a few months later my Smart Phone had an accident. Despite all of the stuff I tried, sampled, tasted and tested during the recent months, as a result of a long review and critique besides from featuring the Smart Phone as a product of the month,I began to think of the different ways Ia€™ve used to protect my Smart Phone as an alternative product of the month. For instance,Smart Phone insurance has been one the ways I protect my investment from unexpected accidents. Ostensibly, there's more than one way to protect your Smart Phone from accidents such as, for example, you accidentally drop and break your Smart Phone or in some weird, odd, freak accident as you rush out the door you accidentally step on your Smart Phone or heaven forbids the same thing happens to you that happen to me, a few months ago, I dropped my Smart Phone in the toilet. Without a question, eschewing further debate, Smart Phone insurance is a great investment for consumers and shoppers who use their Smart Phone daily and for work.
Best of all, Smart Phone insurance usually saves the consumer from digging deep into their pockets.
So, what about before those mishaps and accidents, if you havena€™t figured it out__ there's more than one way to protect your investment.
Even though, at first, I might of skipped over protecting my investments, I am more open to the idea of investing and protecting my major purchases. Here's an example of what I am talking about, I currently have several Smart Phone covers to protect my Smart Phone from breakage, moisture, and malfunctioning. Varying in price,color,size and shape, most of today's Smart Phone manufacturers and retailers offer to consumers and shoppers Smart Phone covers as an accessory.
From passwords, to anti-theft apps, to screen locks and codes, there's more than one way to protect your investment. Regardless of the price, and hopefully it is within your budget, a true frugal savvy shopper knows the importance of protecting their investment.
Above everything else,both I and my Nook HD+ survived the return and exchange process,quite remarkable,I even have the receipt to prove it. Unlike sooo manyA  items, I ve returned and exchanged in the past,__it,meaning my Nook HD+ survived the fourteenth days as printed on the receipt. A business practice that's part of Barnes and Noble store policy that allows customers fourteen days to return an item. In short,the 14th day, adhering to store policy was the final day that I couldA  actually return my Nook HD+ and get cash back. It goes without saying ,I readA  the instructions,totally unavoidable with a new tech gadget,as well as,downloaded apps,and,uploaded wallpapers. Not quite sure,on the day I purchased my Nook HD+__ifA  in fact, I would be satisfied with my purchase,I chose at the time not to purchase any kind of accessories. As it turns out,I was soooo pleased with my purchase of the Nook HD+,I wanted to protect my investments. It doesnt matter if you're on lunch break,on a mini vacation,at a webinar or conference,filling out an online report or having to send emails can be a hassle if you don't have a wifi connection,a Broadband device is just one of the many tech gadgets that consumers and shoppers frequently use to get an internet connection. Constantly,on the go,I wanted to have access to wifiA  while away from my place of residency.
Because,I perform an arrary task that frequently requires wifi access ,I purchased a Broadband to Go device from Virgin Mobile.
Egregiously,as a Virgin Mobile customer and fan,I live by Virgin Mobile products except in the case of Virgin Mobile wifi devices. Recently,I purchased Virgin Mobile's MiFi 2200 to conciliate my worries about not being able to access wifi home. Aside from very slow internet speed,the device could only connect to one tech gadget and,the 3G USB plug n play stick broke too easily. Affordable,great to have on hand for shopping emergencies,the latest in recycling,a recyclable tote makes shopping less of a hassle. Ditching the old biodegradeable plastic bags for a recyclable tote,it's a smart move and a great investment for frugal,savvy,and environmentally conscious consumers and shoppers.Available in most local chain stores and at grocery stores,recyclable totes are becoming the better choice than leaving stores with the traditional biodegradeable plastic bag.
Part of a movement to get consumers and shoppers involved in recycling and to think about going green,consumers and shoppers now have the option of trading in those plastic bags for a recyclable tote. A frequent shopper,I usually purchase a couple of recyclable totes to hold store purchases and other stuff. Eventhough,I like having the choice to purchase a recyclable tote,I havent completely stop using biodegradeable plastic bags. However,I have to point out the fact that when a consumer and shoppers purchase a recyclable tote they're not limited to using the tote only in that store,that's why they're called recyclable totes because they can be used more than once.
In fact, most recycable totes last for more than a week,I should know because I still have a few leftover from the previous month. A great deal,a really good find,a price you wont find anywhere else,and the best price among competitors,I love a great sale and I love rewards for shopping.
Savings and Rewards,for most consumers and shoppers,it's all about getting the best price for items purchase daily. From household supplies to groceries,anyone who shops frequently knows consumers and shoppers love a really good sale_,the economic recession of 2008 could be the culprit. In fact,since the 2008 economic recession savings and rewards has become extremely important to American families on a budget. For many American consumers and shoppers,the unexpected downturn of the American economy caused a disruption in their daily activies thus forcing consumer and shoppers to rethink the way they shop and how they shop. As a frequent shopper and consumer,I am constantly looking for a great deal and sales on items I purchase regularly,mainly because I do live on a strict budget.
Admittedly,after the 2008 economic recession,I rediscovered coupons,and began clipping coupons frequently. In addition to clipping coupons,I also began to check sale ads at home and at the door of stores before shopping.
Along with making a shopping list,clipping coupons at home,checking sale ads at the door and comparing prices,these days one of the best ways to save and get the best deals,I feel without a question has to be with a savings and reward card.
And speaking honestly, a savings and rewards card from your local chain store should be a consumer or shoppers BF(bestie). A must have for consumers and shoppers who seriously want to save,a savings and rewards card.
Throughout the years, my experience with last minute shopping in most instances was not too pleasant.
Admittedly,I empathize as well as concur with consumers who express sentiments that last minute shopping makes the shopper(consumer) feel uncomfortable and forlorn with the just thought of buying a gift at the last minute. Often tight on funds to purchase a gift ahead of time,last minute shopping for an overwhelmed consumer with a limited budget could cause the consumer to be late and in some instance not to attend the event or special function.
Subsequently, over the years, I have come to realize that last minute shopping it's not the best of fun. As a result, I definitely would not recommend last minute shopping to a consumer as a shopping tip. Unequivocally, shopping for special events and functions such as finding an appropriate could take several visits different stores. Finding the appropriate could mean spending an entire day in a Hallmark store reading cards, it could also mean spending all day on the phone with friend or relatives discussing gift registry,preferences,stores,likes and dislike of the recipient. Ostensibly,the older you get the adults in your life expect two things from you one not to embarrass them in public and two if you don't have a gift to bring at least show up at special functions on time. Indeed, an earnest shopper as well as a meticulous shopper knows finding the right gift or card for a special function could require hours of shopping and visiting different stores. Shopping done precipitously could result in purchasing the wrong size,color, or something way out in left field. Don't wait until the last minute to shop for a party,baby showers,bachelorette bash,birthdays,holidays ,and anniversaries avoid uncomfortableness and the feeling of being inadequate,plan the week before. On certain days, I have even shopped the day of the event that often leaves me feeling embarrassed ashamed, and guilty about my finances even worse depress. Incontrovertibly,last minute shopping in many instances could causes the consumer to become distraught,exasperated, and disconcerted not surprisingly all the emotions take away from the planned day. What's more important being punctilious for the planned event or arriving with a hand picked gift for the recipient or recipients?
Ultimately,the answer remains with the shopper (consumer) The answer should be non bias and based on the event as well as the recipient and not the shoppers wallet . The meticulous consumer that normally keeps track of birthdays, holidays,and anniversaries with calendars,through emails,P DA's ,Smart phones and other tech savvy gadgets of courses would not necessarily share the same feelings of a last minute shopper .



Upload video online instagram quotes
Share upload video youtube
Video game arcade business
Marketing offline hi?u qu?



Comments to «Make your own video software free download»

  1. Devushka_Jagoza writes:
    Video will be saved inside screen video.
  2. NIKO_375 writes:
    Tools support streamline and more application.
  3. Jin writes:
    Products can be really very good want to check out the actual files for.
  4. Elnur_Suretli writes:
    Has helped more than 6,000.
  5. SABIR writes:
    Reference to Author Services the video on their websites or from people who shared cell.