Download Good Morning Breakfast Milk is available under Good Morning desktop background Wallpapers category.
Every object tells a story, and Collections Up Close presents short, illustrated features that highlight the stories and history behind selected items in the Minnesota Historical Society's museum collections.
Every object tells a story, and Collections Up Close presents short, illustrated features that highlight the stories and history behind selected items in the Minnesota Historical Society's museum collections. A look at the early days of the Great American Pastime in Minnesota, from its beginnings post-Civil War up to the arrival of the Minnesota Twins. This episode features Victorian valentines from the Minnesota Historical Society’s collections, dating from 1840 to 1900. This episode features Victorian valentines from the Minnesota Historical Society's collections, dating from 1840 to 1900.
View a selection of holiday greeting cards from the Minnesota Historical Society’s extensive collection.
View a selection of holiday greeting cards from the Minnesota Historical Society's extensive collection. View footwear highlights from the Minnesota Historical Society’s Collection featuring styles from the 18th century, through the 1920s, into the 1960s, and beyond. View footwear highlights from the Minnesota Historical Society's Collection featuring styles from the 18th century, through the 1920s, into the 1960s, and beyond. At the turn of the 20th Century, about 70% of Minnesota’s population was either first or second generation American, so ethnic attitudes toward alcohol were very influential.  Much of the state’s population favored moderation rather than total abstinence, but each group had some kind of temperance tradition.
The national temperance movement had been gaining steam in the United States since the 1870s, spurred by the growth of temperance organizations such as the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, or WCTU, the Anti-Saloon League, and the Prohibition Party.
By 1933, widespread disrespect for the law led to the passage of the 21st Amendment, which remains the only constitutional amendment approved for the explicit purpose of repealing another amendment.  Prohibition officially ended December 15, 1933, to the delight of many Minnesotans, who waited in long lines at local breweries to enjoy their first legal beer in thirteen years. The national temperance movement had been gaining steam in the United States since the 1870s, spurred by the growth of temperance organizations such as the Womenrsquo;s Christian Temperance Union, or WCTU, the Anti-Saloon League, and the Prohibition Party. For many Americans, the word "breakfast" conjures up images of hearty bowls of cereal and toasters popping out slices of golden-brown bread. A recent acquisition of the State Archives came from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR).
With summer just around the corner and prime picnicking season already upon us, we present a century's worth of images of that perennial warm-weather sightseeing destination: Minnehaha Falls.
This short video addresses the release of the 1940 Federal Census, including what kind of information it contains and how to access it.
The Minnesota Secretary of State, Mark Ritchie, recently requested the transfer of the state’s Session Laws to the State Archives of the Minnesota Historical Society.
The Minnesota Secretary of State, Mark Ritchie, recently requested the transfer of the state's Session Laws to the State Archives of the Minnesota Historical Society. When genealogists set out to piece together the lives of their research subjects, they often concentrate on text-based sources like letters, city directories and vital records. In a nation of immigrants, becoming a citizen -- being "naturalized" -- has been an important part of our personal and national history. Explore the curious, cute, weird, and wonderful world of mascots who represent the Great State of Minnesota. Often students come in to the Library with assignments to do research in primary source materials, but find that they’re not quite sure what a primary source is. Often students come in to the Library with assignments to do research in primary source materials, but find that they're not quite sure what a primary source is. This informative piece on the history of bow ties focuses on those in the Minnesota Historical Society’s Collection. This informative piece on the history of bow ties focuses on those in the Minnesota Historical Society's Collection. The events, politics, movements, music and television of the late Sixties return in The 1968 Exhibit. The Kensington Runestone has been a point of controversy, contention, pride, and interest since it was discovered in 1898 by Swedish immigrant farmer Olof Ohman. The Walsh Family of Bantry Bay - Reese River  - Pioneer Families -    This section is devoted to a 1970 article that ran in the Sunday Supplement of a Las Vegas Newspaper.


Watch to learn more about the system of prisoner exchanges and how circumstances deteriorated as the war dragged on.
Mondale Papers and has one of the nation’s premier collections of government, politics, and public affairs materials. Mondale Papers and has one of the nationrsquo;s premier collections of government, politics, and public affairs materials.
While prohibition was in effect, Minnesota’s capitol city became a haven for gangsters such as John Dillinger, Babyface Nelson, Alvin Karpis, and the Barker gang.  See the podcast “St. It also mentions the resources the Minnesota Historical Society has to help find people in it, as indexing will not be complete for another six months or so. This podcast describes these important historical records, shows the moving process, and explains how they will be preserved for future generations.
Take a look at this video for helpful hints to get started finding photographs, objects, artwork, oral histories, moving images, maps, and more!
In this podcast we examine the beginnings of the sport in the state as well as some early innovators who had national and worldwide impact. From a lumberjack and Twins to a gopher and a duck, the mascots are a recognizable part of life in Minnesota and often our ambassadors to the world beyond.
This video provides a brief discussion of primary and secondary sources with examples from the Society’s collections. This video provides a brief discussion of primary and secondary sources with examples from the Society's collections.
Objects Curator Matt Anderson takes a look at some of the exhibit’s artifacts drawn from the Minnesota Historical Society’s collection. Reference Specialist Debbie Miller discusses the story behind this important piece of Minnesota history and some of the resources the Minnesota Historical Society has relating to it. Collections Assistant Christopher Welter shares a few of the thousands of State Fair photos in the Society’s collection, with a special emphasis on the fair’s more spectacular offerings over the years. You control the search; you have the power to make it as wide or narrow as need be, so have fun searching!
Hill and his family were the primary occupants of 240 Summit Avenue but another, less familiar group of people lived there as well: the 10 to 12 live-in domestic servants who did the cleaning, cooking, laundry, and maintenance work at the house. Uppsala University Professor Henrik Williams also gives a brief introduction to what runes are and what they are not.
In the first years of the 1880s, my father had owned a Reese River ranch on which the family had lived for a time, later known as the Dieringer place and now a part of the Shoshone Indian reservation Yomba. Since the Saint Paul Winter Carnival and Crashed Ice start soon, we thought this a good time to look at a variety of winter weather from images and film in our Collection, including an Easter snowball fight, winter swimming, -20 degrees, and blizzards.
State Archives collections are available through the Minnesota Historical Society’s Library. State Archives collections are available through the Minnesota Historical Society's Library. In piecing together the stories of these servants, information is culled from a variety of sources that can be found in the collections of the Minnesota Historical Society.
The two Barret girls were about Mothers age, and with Lydia King of Belmont, also a former Grantsville resident, made frequent visits to our Smokey Valley home. Barret, mother of two young ladies was a mid-wife, and because no doctor was available, it was she who delivered my younger sister, Elva Tate.  Gradually through the years, the ties with these old friends loosened or were dropped altogether when some of our Reese River intimates moved away, although I still remember visits when the Barrets returned for that purpose from as far away as Idaho. As late as the 1920s and early 1930s, I have seen at the Walsh home during sage hen and deer season large groups of visiting hunters seated at the long table in the spacious dining room all made welcome.
His 16-room house built in the early 1900s, together with the bunk-house and the old Hess home still standing at Walshes could easily accommodate them all.    Photo taken in 1977 There was during these years, always a cook in the kitchen, but the women folk of the household assisted her in preparing the three large daily meals. A number of Indian ranch hands employed on the place occupied a table of their own in the long kitchen.
Several other pioneer Nevadans were born in the same part of southern Ireland, first migrating to Boston, and like Walsh moving on West, especially to such mining camps as Austin where there was work to be had. Pat wrote them about the booming camp in the Toiyabes and suggested that they too join him.
The Walshes settled on Reese River. After Walsh became a wealthy rancher, he delighted to tell a story of his financial state when he arrived in Austin.


He said that he was down to his last four-bits when he left Eureka on the overland stage for the last lap of his journey.
Here, Pat decided not to spend his only coin for the hearty meal served to travelers ( which cost just fifty cents ), but to save it for a nights lodging at his destination.
He met friends, found work and early saw the possibilities of the neighboring valley for farming and cattle raising. There was, however, a lighter side to the life of the settlers, and many humorous tales are told concerning these activities. Locale, of one such story is the old race track just below Austin in Reese River Valley, on what was long known as the Malloy ranch. An owner of a fast horse, watching the warm-up of a race during the early nineties, saw that his entry was not being handled as expertly as he thought it should be. Mike also liked to tell stories of his early efforts when money was closer an harder to come by than in later years.
One of these was an incident of the panic of the early 1900s. The Malloy ranch was only a few miles out of Austin on the Reese River, but through the winter the family lived in town where the children attended the Austin school. Mike said that his savings were always put in the Austin bank in which everyone had great faith. However, in the fall of 1907, when one solid bank after another closed doors, Malloy became more than a little nervous over the situation.
The bag of coins he left in the wagon bed, covering it up again with the canvas pretending to have an errand somewhere in the large field surrounding the ranch center.
Here, by a corner post for a marker, he dug a hole and dropped in the heavy bag, shoveling the hiding place full of sod and dirt. They were well known to Malloy and went into the field, as they frequently did to dig for gophers, a sought after food of the Shoshones.
Their extermination of these small pest was usually welcome to the ranchers and the Indians were accustomed to dig for them when ever and where ever they pleased. Mike rode down into the field on his horse and engaged his Indian friends in conversation and finally diverted their attention from that portion of the field by pointing out another larger group of gopher mounds. With numerous families growing up there, this ranch was, during the nineties, a rendezvous for gatherings of the young people of the vicinity and, like the Walsh place, was popular with visitors. Bell whose Cloverdale ranch, at the extreme southern tip of the Toiyabes, had been a stage stop on the old road from Belmont to the railroad at Sodaville. This funeral took place at the Bell ranch on Reese River. Several other sons were engineering graduates of the University of Nevada. Two of the latter had civil engineering offices in the boom mining camp of Manhattan during 1905 1906. He was an itinerant trapper and ranch worker, who made a somewhat precarious living at such labors. Like Frosts Hired man, Wilsons home was the place that when you go there, they have to take you in."  Crazy Wilson was not only eccentric but was known for his prodigious appetite. Housewives said that when Crazy Wilson got his feet under the table, where there was a good meal, he filled up for lean weeks ahead. Ranch meals were served family style with everything placed down on the table before anyone sat down and this included dessert. It was Wilsons habit to reach for any food that attracted him, and almost empty the receptacle onto his plate without  Walters quick eye took in the picture. He hastily reached for the plate, took a cream puff and bit into it, purposely squeezing out the whipped cream filling. Annie, he called to his sister who was pouring the coffee and tea, take these biscuits back and bake them some more, the're all dough in the middle. It was returned later and passed around with Wilson last in order to get the dish. Automobiles came into common use after the early years of the 1900s, making transportation easier.



Workout and eating plan to lose weight fast
Low carb high protein diet healthy eating
Fastest weight loss diet program


Comments

  1. EMOS

    But it can be treated successfullysometimes dieting operates it.

    02.01.2014

  2. IMPOSSIBLE_LIFE

    That screens out a substantial percentage.

    02.01.2014

top