Last week I had the opportunity to help a friend build the foundation for a new shed that will be delivered in a couple of weeks.
Tip: Pressure-treated lumber is infused with chemical and rated by the amount per cubic foot of wood. The shed measures 10 x 18′, and we started planning the layout by marking the corners of the shed with stakes. The shed will be constructed on a skid of 4 x 4’s running left-to-right along the length. Where the strings intersected, they just barely touched so as to not interfere with each other. From our string guides, we determined the locations for our post holes and marked them with spray paint.
Knowing the approximate height for each post (from our string guides), we rough-cut our 6 x 6″ posts and put them cut-side-up into each hole.
As we leveled the posts, we used a small amount of pea gravel and dirt to temporary hold the posts in place. In this picture you can see that I placed my pencil between the post and the string (and another pencil on the far post). When we were satisfied that all the posts were in-line with each other, equidistant and completely level, we began filling in around each post, tamping the dirt as we worked. We want to keep the shed as low to the ground as possible while still keeping everything level. Each support beam is a double 2 x 10″, and we notched each post where the support beam will sit. Using a framing nailer, we put rows of 5 nails every 24″ or so on both sides of the support beam. Next, we placed our carriage bolts, washers and nuts and used a wrench to tighten everything down.
For additional support and to keep our foundation from racking, we added 2 x 8″ joists between the support beams. We also installed lateral braces on the backside posts using a combination of carriage bolts and lag screws. Subscribe and never miss an article!Free articles delivered conveniently to your inbox(and no spam, we promise)Enjoy this?
I know you guys have done and watched a lot of projects like this, but how much drawing and planning went into this foundation before the first piece of lumber was cut? It might be worth it to move the shed down the slope a little bit to buy some room to approach from the back.
I know this is the way quick foundations are done, but you didn’t mention that, eventually, the pressure treated wood will rot because it is in contact with the dirt.
The foundation should be concrete poured into sonotube so that the concrete is at least 6 inches above ground level. 2) In this area and for this size of a shed, we didn’t need to get anything inspected. In view of the kind of wind that we’ve had in the past few years, I want to fasten these things, rather than just rest them on the footings.
I believe manufacturers (like Simpson) make ties for connecting above-ground footings to posts or directly to PT framing. Can I inset the block a bit 'inside' the floor framing so that all you'd see from the perimeter is the edge boards? Yes it will make a difference for the same reason that outriggers on boom trucks stick out and to the side. I think realistically you COULD move them inside the outside edge of the wall, but do not rely on your flooring to hold the weight of the structure. I remember a few months ago on another shed build where there was some concern on the framing, but I think that was where the wall framing didn't come in direct alignment with any flooring structure. My concern is exactly as you've described above - that there will be weight coming down the walls and redirected (hopefully) to the blocks. If you had a couple of 4 x 4 bearers running under the joists at 90 degrees and set in 6 inches or so, you could then put your blocks under them and set them in a bit from the ends. If you built the base out of the better treated lumber you could just let it sit on the ground.
To further clarify your plans can you tell us more about the site such as: what soil conditions you have, what is your frost penetration depth (if any), and is the shed going to reside on level ground? I would just double the load bearing sill(I think that is the right name, someone will if it is not) and use half the blocks.
Really awesome video -I will be building ashed here in the future so your video will come in handy thanks for the video.
Hi Gary, thanks well it kind of looks like the foundation is on a slant but it is acutely level and just built on a bit of a hill side. I aslo saw that you lined the base with plastic before putting on the floor… I would assume that’s for moisture purposes? Hi Jen, yes the plastic is a vapor barrier and sure you could put an 8×10 building on a 10 x 12 base. Or is there a better way to anchor the 4×4 to the concrete rather than setting them into the concrete bases. The foundation of a storage shed is the first and most important part of installation process!
Before beginning to build any foundation for your shed, consult your local building inspector to determine what type of foundation you will need. Click here to learn more about the process of obtaining a building permit for your storage building.


Wood foundations are typically built using solid concrete leveling blocks which are 8” x 16” and no more than 2” high. While there are other methods to building shed foundations, these are the two types we suggest to use. If you have any general questions regarding foundations, please contact Backyard Buildings at 855-853-8558. Instead of digging to level the ground, can I build up the low spot with the extra dirt I have. I’m planning to build a 12X20 shed and want to just use AB3 gravel for the floor inside the shed. We are preparing to put together our new 8X6 Resign shed on our concrete slab on the side of the house. I have plans for a 12 X 16 shed and plan on using 10inch poured concrete piers for a foundation. His back yard has a bit of a slope, and it would take too much concrete to pour a slab (read how to pour a concrete shed foundation here). To keep everything square, we measured the diagonal distances to make sure they were equal. For that reason, we want our support beams to be perpendicular and run front-to-back. For this project, we decided that 6 posts, (2 rows of 3 posts) would give us a solid foundation.
The string guides were useful for determining the slope of our site, finding the high-point and marking the locations for our post holes.
We were careful not to dig too deep because we wanted the concrete footers to rest on undisturbed ground. The posts are oriented this way because the cut sides will have slightly less pressure-treated chemical in the center. Starting at our highest point and using an 8′ level, we marked the bottom of our support beam just a few inches off the ground and then scribed this line across all of the other posts. Using a quick-clamp and speed square as a straight-edge, we cut each post to the right height. You can see each joist is secured with hanger ties and sits flush with the top of our support beams.
Side entrance could use a retaining wall either above or below the entrance to create a level spot for an entrance. Also, they can point out decks built the same way that are 25+ years old and still in great shape (much like my own deck). With a great deal of moisture, even this type of wood will rot over time; however, with good drainage I think you can expect at least 25-30 years.
While my friend was shoveling, I was constantly making changes to keep everything level, and good thing because after backfilling, we couldn’t budge the posts at all. My friend got the shed through Maryland’s Best Sheds, and the link is at the beginning of the article. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features.
If you are asking can you set block inside so the material on the outside of your building covers the block then yes.
If you don't want to see the block sticking out then bury it and raise the floor joist of the shed with a cinder block resting on the dek block.
My worry is whether this would make the walls unsupported and therefore weaken the overall structure. Underneath the shed I'm planning on throwing down some landscape fabric to keep weeds down. I'm leaning towards keeping it more conventional and then think of creative ideas to hide the gap. Anyone see any issues or as others have said, should I just put the blocks under the exterior joist and do something creative to hide them? I'm in Vancouver so we don't have a frost issue to consider and the ground as it sits now is fairly level. Even though we can purchase tool shed pre made design, but without enough skill, we will not finish job fast.
How would you recommend I keep them in place while drying so that I can attached the frame to the 4X4’s later?
I completely understand the steps, but does the base have to be the exact same size of the shed? Very good on details and really liked the leveling part – my backyard has a double slope (down and to the left). The photo on the left shows a great example of what a poor foundation and time can do to a shed. Small sheds can be rested on crushed stone with either treated wood foundations or concrete foundation blocks.
In preparation for the arrival of our professional installers, the build site must be properly leveled and should have natural drainage and no standing water.
Each block is arranged in evenly spaced rows by placing one in each corner and at each break. If frost lines are not considered, your shed may move due to seasonal freeze and thaw changes. Choosing the right foundation for your storage building will make the entire process of installing a shed much easier and will allow your shed to stand up strong to the test of time! I simply want to give an enormous thumbs up for the nice info you could have here on this post. If you place your shed directly on the ground, it may not allow excess moisture to evaporate.


Lay out 6X6 CCA timbers (2 high, between the posts) and drill through with rebar for stability. Since we do not build sheds of that dimension and designed for that purpose, we unfortunately do not have any information to help you. My partner and i discover something new as well as challenging on websites My partner and i stumbleupon each day.
But getting a contractor to design and build you a shed or finding one on the market are both costly options.
For that reason, we decided that building a post and beam foundation would be the best way to go. If you look closely, you’ll see the front, far-left corner was our high point, and the back, right corner was the low point. To make this cut, we used a circular saw on each side of the posts and a reciprocating saw to cut through the center. The foundation is very solid, completely level, and I’m excited to see the shed delivered. A foundation done in this manner will last forever, whereas the foundation described in the article will last for 20 years or so.
Furthermore, local code offers three acceptable ways to construct supports and this is one of them. I would think that in the case of the slope here, you’re probably going to get pretty good drainage around the footers.
I’d think that once you finished your framing, you’d have no movement so as long as you staid true, you were good, right?
I have very rocky soil on my sloped property and instead of digging for concrete footings, would digging a 1-2 foot hole filled with tamped aggregate and then placing pre-cast concrete piers that accept 4×4 posts on top of the aggregate work for this project also (assuming it meets code and all that)? By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. I was thinking the block product would have a larger footprint (more like a patio stone) in the advice I was giving above. I also love the idea of filling the underside with all the broken masonry because I have a huge woodchuck population causing trouble in my buildings. I just wanted to stop and say thank you for being so thorough and explaining every little step.
Regardless of how strong the building construction is, if the shed foundation is poor it will not stand the test of time.
Regardless of the size of your shed, a building inspector needs to make sure that the storage building is up to code for your local area. Besides the obvious, having a level shed foundation is important to prevent an abundant amount of sitting water.
However, we do not work with resin sheds often, so I would recommend contacting the manufacturer as well. Most commonly it is beneficial to look over content off their writers and rehearse anything at all from their web sites.
A much cheaper idea would be to build the shed yourself and you might be surprised to find out that it’s not that difficult. I personally would be OK with this setup for a shed, but obviously wouldn’t use it for my house.
Some of the steps may seem obvious to other woodworkers, but I appreciate that you left nothing out! Considering Backyard Buildings smallest shed size is 8×8, all of our sheds will need a foundation setup prior to the arrival of one of our installers.
If you choose not to use concrete leveling blocks, we recommend using pressure treated lumber to support the wooden floor frame. Once again, you will need to contact your local building inspector to determine the frost line for your area.
Some of the deck blocks are suited to 2x4s, not the 4×4’s our installers use for the foundations of our sheds.
For example, if you have large holes underneath your building, puddles of water will form causing many different problems.
One of our representatives may have to visit your build site for more background information. All you have to do is follow a series of steps.View in galleryPick a typeDepending on the nature of the items you plan on storing in there, there are various different types of sheds you can choose from. If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.
This step is important because it allows you to be certain your shed will be strong and durable. You should also check the local building regulations and make sure everything is in order before starting the project. It has to do with the type of design you’ve chosen but also with your personal preferences. Accurate measurements simplify your work a lot and also help you pick the right fittings and accessories.If you want your storage shed to blend well into your garden or backyard, you can also build it with a small deck.
It would look like a miniature house and you can decorate the window sills with flower boxes.



Garden city ny voting
Rubbermaid outdoor storage unit
Storage buildings for sale in jonesboro ar
How to build a pole barn greenhouse chandelier


Comments to «Shed deck foundation ideas»

  1. RASMUS on 23.07.2014 at 19:14:55
    Components and is just barely more complicated than this diy.
  2. pakito on 23.07.2014 at 19:10:48
    Into the storage may and.
  3. Victoriya on 23.07.2014 at 19:49:55
    With each having distinct advantages and your garden to make the most are.
  4. Giz on 23.07.2014 at 14:44:15
    Picket storage sheds very easy job for that you could begin working.