Potty training a 2 year girl uzi,how to litter train a male cat jowls,baby in the toilet pipe - .

And a few months later, she began to go to the bathroom by herself when she felt the urge, and now she is in undies during the day and pull ups at night, which she has agreed to stop using on her 5th birthday. After many months of a friend going through this with her daughter, what finally worked is throwing the underpants away. Him defecating in his underwear daily is just raising the stress level for you and the baby sitter. It's been a while since I was involved in anyone's diapers or training, but I think figuring out the timing of the poop should be the next step. Anyway, so our progression was pull-ups, more practice with just peeing, then once she was mostly on top of peeing she started wearing underwear during the day, with a pull-up offered for afternoon poop. HOWEVER, his daycare teachers have been really great about it and they are not making him (or us) feel bad about it and I think your babysitter's reaction is, npi, kind of shitty. My son is pretty stubborn and I am loathe to fight him on this, so he is mostly in pull-ups even though I KNOW he can handle the underpants (without the issue of the pooping of course). I don't know what kind of personality your son has, but mine is, as I said, stubborn, and the more we push at him to do (or not do) something, the more he pushes back at us and continues the undesirable behavior. I even have a huge stuffed animal that I bought and put in plain view at the top of his closet and told him that once he poops in the potty, he can have him. Give him the toy now and say, "You're such a great kid and I want you to have this awesome toy NOW!
FWIW I'm a mom of two (one potty trained, one in process) and have been a nanny and babysitter for many years and I most certainly would be disgusted and frustrated if a family insisted their non-toilet trained child wear underpants all day and expect me to clean poopy clothes several times a day. I'm also going to second that a sitter shouldn't be expected to clean habitually shit-in clothes. The pressure definitely comes from other moms, mostly, but also the fact that he will ne starting pre-k in the summer time. I can't tell you how many times I picked up my son at preschool to find he was running around the playground in poopy underwear. For my child when we went through extended potty training she had wet underpants almost every day if not multiple times a day at school up to at least age 3.5.
I think the expectation that he's out of pull-ups by pre-K is probably valid but I have a feeling that he'll get there by summertime. Weird suggestion: my son, when first potty trained, just didn't like the feel of going on the toilet.
We used pull-ups as long as we could and made sure that we were super aware of when she looked like she was getting ready to go and had her rush to the toilet. So after 5 days of absolute refusal to poop in the potty, we followed him like a hawk and when he couldn't hold it anymore, we put him on the potty and he pooped in the potty. I could never figure out how to get a poopy pull up off my kid without it requiring a bath. I think you should back off completely for a few months and go to pull-ups and then try again in a few months. Ask MetaFilter is a question and answer site that covers nearly any question on earth, where members help each other solve problems.
We did the first day naked with a 10 minute timer, the second day naked with a 15 minute timer, then added underwear the third day and pants the day after that, each day with the timer getting longer. Everything I read online describes parents who deal with toddlers who refuse to go at all in their undies or toilet, and they end up having to put a pull up on their kid to avoid screaming constipation.


Now, clearly there was some kind of identity, power struggle, who knows going on about poop in the potty. Basically, there's two things that I think you need to do: try not to stress out so much and don't clean poop out of underpants.
I feel like a total failure, irrationally, but rationally - 3.5 is still very normal to have potty issues, AND from my experience watching my friends potty train their sons, for some reason boys are just harder in this regard. I would put him back in pull ups and I would stop talking about the bathroom stuff completely for awhile.
And hey, you can start pooping in the toilet whenever you're ready and for now, you can wear your pullups until then!
We definitely had a weird power struggle starting to set in--kid realized that shitting his pants and then not telling anyone was a way to get us to stop everything and pay attention to him over his brother, and it became a habit--so a friend suggested getting really cool undies that might spawn some sense of kid-brand attachment. My son pooped once a day and it seemed like it was always the same time everday, between 4 and 5pm. I don't see any drawback to telling him that you are both working toward this goal of totally using the potty for pee and poop in order to go to Pre-k school.
He would let us know when he needed to poop and we would put a diaper on him, he'd go, and we'd take it off.
Poop was the final frontier, and he would do it in his underwear or the toilet with nor rhyme or reason.
She has some pretty serious issues with motor control and cognitive issues and this type of thing is not unheard of. If he finds passing a movement uncomfortable he will delay doing it, but then some of it can get out in spite of him. I seem to recall that by three and a half years bowel movements one or twice a day are much more common when things are working well. I think that taking a break is in order because it sounds like this is getting very tense for all involved.
They tried bribes and cajoling and reading a potty book incessantly, tried a little prune juice to fend of constipation, letting the kiddo watch TV on the can (useless), and talking about how the toilet wasn't scary, and offering pull-ups for #2.
I have no idea if this was a light bulb or he would've started doing it then anyways, but we explained that his superman underwear wouldn't want him pooping on them. If there is no health issue preventing him from training, it's something you just have to back off from. We also used potty candy as a reward, and I couldn't believe the progress he made in a short amount of time. He isn't telling me yet that he has to go as often as he should, but I am taking him often. She reminds me that she has never had a kid who did this before, and leaves the underwear for me to clean everyday. Did anyone else experience this, and if so, what made it "click" with your children? She tried having her daughter help clean the underpants but, you know, that was a trauma all around. He so hated going back to diapers (for him pull up and diaper were the same) that he made an effort to get rid if them. I don't think he will go back to peeing into them, it seems for boys at least this is quite two different things.


And again after he came home from day care, I would again let him sit for however long it took.
My daughter only just got the hang of pooping in the potty, and she seemed to do it as a direct response to the arrival of her new baby sibling and also right after a growth spurt.
Worked like a CHARM man, I had no idea I'd ever be grateful for branded anything--thank you, Cars franchise, for helping my son be sad about pooping his underwear and not being willing to try the toilet instead. I don't want him to have any issues not being able to be put in his correct class because *I* haven't figured out what works best for him. However, the most important thing is that you keep trying and that you always tell a teacher right away and that you help clean up the wet clothes and get new, dry clothes on every time.
Keep giving him opportunities and talk about toileting in a matter of fact way and listen and you three (your husband too) will work it out.
With my oldest, I was in a complete panic because we were switching his day care and they only accepted fully trained kids. I work full time, sometimes 10 hours a day, and my husband workds full time and goes to school full time.
I understand that you have sunk in a lot of time with the boot camp, but why waste all this effort when you can just wait a few more months? Because we've been dealing with this for about a year and a half, with us adults being stubborn about it, and now he will.
Instead of suggesting putting him back in pull ups and working that way, (like many of you are suggesting, which I'm coming to realize I need to just go with, THANK YOU!) she was just more negative about it than I understood. All of them are practicing right now just like you and learning how to use the potty for pee and poop. We tried everything, no rewards made a difference, nothing was working, and I was losing my mind with the frustration.
Finally, they tried one more bribe: the kiddo very rarely gets to watch TV and they said he could watch his very favorite TV program IF he pooped in the toilet. I was so anxious, and it was clearly making him more anxious too, which was entirely counterproductive. I am really scared about encopresis so I even told him that he could poop in a pull-up if he wanted - to just ask for one.
You just need to keep trying and we will help you learn to do it!" I would continue to keep at it but in a very low key and positive way.
This sounds mean (and maybe it was), but we got fed up enough so one day we decided that we would take away a toy every time he pooped his pants. Sounds like that's not an option with your schedule, but maybe your babysitter could be more proactive in helping you more with this, i.e.
I think we only had to do it like 3 times and it worked like magic, the kid stopped pooping his pants.



Top 10 parenting tips for toddlers
Baby potty training toilet training 101
Potty trained puppy peeing in house causes
Toddler defiance potty training 4yearold


Comments

  1. GOZEL1, 19.10.2015
    Pees in the potty each and every youngsters have issues with communicating that they squares.
  2. hesRET, 19.10.2015
    Diapers for several kids at a time (and.