10 foot by 10 foot metal shed,how to build a shed with landscape timbers home depot,outdoor storage sheds in pittsburgh pa zip - Plans On 2016

16.03.2016
Cincinnati’s #1 Slate Roofing Contractor Roofing Slate, a 100% natural material that is able to protect you and your home from nature’s elements for your lifetime and beyond.
Cincinnati’s #1 Slate Roofing ContractorRoofing Slate, a 100% natural material that is able to protect you and your home from nature’s elements for your lifetime and beyond. A.The term "square" in reference to roofing materials refers to 100 square feet of roof area. As long as the slab is level and will fully support the perimeter frame, the concrete slab will be a good floor.
With Instructables you can share what you make with the world, and tap into an ever-growing community of creative experts. I spent a full week grading, compacting the soil and leveling each block before laying the floor joist. I'd love to know which resources you used on learning the proper techniques for everything you did.
120 square feet (12x10) Of course I would have liked to make it larger, but I had to work with a small budget.
To understand ourselves it is important to understand our ancestors, and a part of them, and their heritage, lives on in us today. To the world the American Indians seemed like a forgotten people when the English colonists first arrived and began to occupy their lands. I want to give special thanks to my cousin, Mary Hilliard, for her assistance and encouragement in researching and preparing this book. Wherever possible I have tried to find at least two sources for the genealogical data, but this has not always been possible.
I have also found Franklin Elewatum Bearce's history, Who Our Forefathers Really Were, A True Narrative of Our White and Indian Ancestors, to be very helpful.
It is certainly possible that such a record may contain errors, but it is also very fortunate that we have access to this record as it presents firsthand knowledge of some of the individuals discussed in this book. 8 Newcomba€? Cpt.
Sometime before the colonial period, the Iroquoian tribes began moving from the southern plains eastward across the Mississippi River and then northeasterly between the Appalachians and the Ohio River Valley, into the Great Lakes region, then through New York and down the St. Though they were neighbors and had similar skin color, these two groups of Indians were as dissimilar as the French and the Germans in Europe. Federations, as well as the individual tribes, were fluid organizations to the extent that the sachem was supported as long as he had the strength to maintain his position.
Belonging to a federation meant that an annual tribute had to be sent to support the great sachem and his household, warriors had to be sent if he called for a given number to go to war, and strictest obedience and fidelity was demanded.
Some of these federations had as many as thirty member tribes supporting their Great Sachem, although many of these tribes would be counted by more than one sachem, as any tribe that was forced to pay tribute was considered as part of that Great Sachem's federation. Any member of the society who dishonored himself, in anyway, was no longer worthy of the respect of his people. When viewing the typical Indians of America, one would describe them as having a dark brown skin. They wore relatively little clothing, especially in summer, although the women were usually somewhat more modest than the men. The English resented the fact that the Indians wouldn't convert to Christianity as soon as the missionaries came among them. The various tribes of New England spoke basically the same language and could understand each other well.
There are many words used commonly in our language today that were learned from these New England Indians: Squaw, wigwam, wampum, pow-wow, moccasin, papoose, etc.
Today there is little doubt that prior to Columbus's voyage, the Norsemen sailed to the coast of North America early in the eleventh century. We do not have a record of all of the European contact and influence on the Indians in the early years of exploration because the greatest exposure came from the early European fishermen and trappers who kept no records of their adventures, as opposed to the explorers. In 1524, Giovanni da Verrazano wrote the first known description of a continuous voyage up the eastern coast of North America. As the fur trade became increasingly more important to Europeans, they relied heavily on the Indians to do the trapping for them. Another problem with which the Indians had to contend was the White man's diseases for which they had no tolerance nor immunity.
In the spring of 1606, Gorges sent Assacumet and Manida, as guides on a ship with Captain Henry Chalons, to New England to search for a site for a settlement. In 1614, Captain John Smith, who had already been involved in the colony at James Town, Virginia, was again commissioned to take two ships to New England in search of gold, whales or anything else of value. Dermer wanted to trade with the local Indians of the Wampanoag Federation and asked Squanto if he would guide them and be their interpreter. Derner was given safe passage through Wampanoag land by Massasoit and soon returned to his ship.
When the Pilgrims left England in the Mayflower, their stated intent was to establish a settlement on the mouth of the Hudson River, at the site of present day New York City. The Pilgrims returned to the Mayflower and, after many days of exploration, found a more suitable location. On March 16, 1621 the Pilgrims were surprised by a tall Indian who walked boldly into the plantation crying out, "Welcome! The Pilgrims gestured for Massasoit to join them in their fort but, he in turn, gestured for them to come to him.
When the amenities were ended, the English brought out a treaty they had prepared in advance, which specified that the Wampanoags would be allies to the English in the event of war with any other peoples and that they would not harm one-another; and that when any Indians came to visit the plantation they would leave their weapons behind. After the ceremonies were ended, Governor Carver escorted Massasoit to the edge of the settlement and waited there for the safe return of Winslow.
Part of Massasoit's willingness to make an alliance with the English must be credited to his weakened condition after suffering from the recent epidemics which left his followers at about half of the strength of his enemies, the Narragansetts. In June of 1621, about three months after the signing of the treaty, a young boy from the Colony was lost in the woods. When the English could not find the boy, Governor William Bradford, (who replaced John Carver, who died in April) sent to Massasoit for help in locating the boy. That summer Governor Bradford sent Edward Winslow and Stephen Hopkins, with Squanto, to Pokanoket (Massasoit's own tribe, on the peninsula where Bristol, R.I. From this trip of Winslow's, we learn more about the daily life of the Indians in this area. Massasoit urged his guests to stay longer but they insisted they must return to Plymouth before the Sabbath.
Less than a month following this visit, Massasoit sent Hobomock, a high ranking member of the Wampanoag Council, to Plymouth to act as his ambassador and to aid the Pilgrims in whatever way they needed. Hobomock and Squanto were surprised at what they heard, and quietly withdrew from the camp to Squanto's wigwam but were captured there before they could get to Plymouth.
Although the Narragansetts and Wampanoags were historical enemies and continually feuding over land, they did not usually put hostages of high rank to death. Normally, treason was punishable by death and Massasoit would certainly have been justified in executing Corbitant for his part in the plot against him but, for some reason, Massasoit complete forgave him. Their first harvest was not a large one but the Pilgrims were.happy to have anything at all. During the winter, a rivalry developed between Squanto and Hobomock, the two Indians who now lived continually at Plymouth.
According to the treaty he had signed with Plymouth, they were to turn over to him any Indians guilty of offense. In June and July, three ships arrived at Plymouth with occupants who expected to be taken in and cared for. In the winter of 1622-23, Governor William Bradford made trips to the various Indian tribes around Cape Cod to buy food to keep the Pilgrims from starvation.
Next, Standish went to Cummaquid (Barnstable, MA.) where Iyanough was Sachem of the Mattachee Tribe. Thinking that Massasoit was dead, they went instead to Pocasset, where they sought Corbitant who, they were sure, would succeed Massasoit as the next Great Sachem. Winslow describes their arrival, where the Indians had gathered so closely that it took some effort to get through the crowd to the Great Sachem. Since the Pow-wow's medicine had not produced any results, Winslow asked permission to try to help the ailing Sachem. Their second Thanksgiving was combined with the wedding celebration of Governor Bradford and Alice Southworth.
Because of Massasoit's honored position, more was recorded of him than of other Indians of his time. Massasoit most likely became Sachem of the Pokanokets, and Great Sachem of the Wampanoags, between 1605-1615. The second son of Massasoit was Pometacomet, (alias Pometacom, Metacom, Metacomet, Metacomo or Philip.) Philip was born in 1640, at least 16 years younger than Alexander. The third son, Sunconewhew, was sent by his Father to learn the white man's ways and to attend school at Harvard. When his two oldest sons were old enough to marry, Massasoit made the arrangements for them to marry the two daughters of the highly regarded Corbitant, Sachem of the Pocasset tribe. The tribes of Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, as well as some of the Nipmuck tribes of central Massachusetts, looked to him for Military defense and leadership.
Following the plagues of 1617, which reduced his nation so drastically and left his greatest enemy, the Narragansetts of Rhode Island, so unaffected, Massasoit was in a weakened position.
In 1632, following a battle with the Narragansetts in which he regained the Island of Aquidneck, Massasoit changed his name to Ousamequin (Yellow feather) sometimes spelled Wassamegon, Oosamequen, Ussamequen. In 1637, the English waged an unprovoked war of extermination against the Pequot Federation of Connecticut, which shocked both the Wampanoags and the Narragansetts so much that both Nations wanted to avoid hostilities with the feared English.
After hearing of the death of his good friend, Edward Winslow in 1655, Massasoit realized that his generation was passing away. As Massasoit's health began to decline, he turned more and more of the responsibilities over to Alexander who was a very capable leader and who was already leading the warriors on expedition against some of their enemies. Massasoit was succeeded, as Great Sachem, by his son Alexander, assisted by his brother, Philip.


The younger generation saw, in Alexander, a strong, new leader who could see the danger of catering to the English.
Both Philip and Weetamoo were very vocal in their condemnation of the English and word of their accusations soon reached Plymouth. Together, Philip and Canonchet reasoned that it would take a great deal of preparation for such a war.
Created by Mother Nature over hundreds of millions of years, roofing slate offers a unique combination of all natural material, extremely long service life and unparalleled beauty. Generally speaking, North American slate is some shade or combination of the following colors:Grey (Gray), Green, Purple, Black and Red.
Unfading slate is slate which changes very little from its freshly quarried look and whatever changes do occur are relatively uniform throughout the roof. The portion of the slate that you can see, (not buried under succeeding courses) is referred to as "exposure".
Headlap is simply the portion of the slate that is overlapped by two layers of slate (from the next two courses). One square of slate is the amount of slate that it takes to cover 100 square feet of roof area.
At first I was very skeptical of this record as it was a family tradition passed down for many generations.
She was very fond of her Grandmother, Freelove, knew all about her and stated on several occasions that Freelove's Mother was Sarah Mauwee, daughter of Joseph Mauwee, Sachem of Choosetown, and not Tabitha Rubbards (Roberts). Massasoit was the Sachem of this tribe, as well as being the Great Sachem over the entire Wampanoag Federation, which consisted of over 30 tribes in central and southeastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket.
Welcome, Englishmen!" It was a cold and windy day, yet this Indian, who introduced himself as Samoset, Sachem of a tribe in Monhegan Island, Maine, wore only moccasins and a fringed loin skin.
Extracted from the ground and fabricated by people with centuries of slate heritage, and installed by our craftsmen using methods passed down through generations, a slate roof imbues any project with a sense of quality, permanence and tradition.
If slate isn't unfading it is known as "fading" (also "weathering" or "semi-weathering.") The amount and type of fading or weathering varies from color to color and quarry to quarry. Brown slate occurs in "weathering" or "semi-weathering" veins and after exposure to the elements. Vinyl-Coated Garage Type Steel Storage Shed 1 answer Can it be used on old shed concrete slab?
Vinyl-Coated Garage Type Steel Storage Shed 1 answer What is the roof snow load rating? She obtained her copy of Zerviah Newcomb's Chronical from Zerviah's original diary, in the hands of Josiah 3rd himself.
A reputable supplier can usually offer a fair prediction of the weathering characteristics of their slate. Which slates are destined to turn brown and which are not is not readily apparent (it takes a few months of sun and rain), so if brown is not a desired color in the finished roof, then "unfading" slate should be specified.
As you might guess, slate which is two or three times thicker than standard will usually be significantly more expensive.
Made from vinyl-coated steel, this durable shed also features a heavy duty metal truss system for strength. Fading and color shifts do not affect the longevity of top-quality slate, but will affect the appearance and thus should be anticipated. Fading and weathering involves all or part of a slate turning some degree and shade of brown. The percentage of brown that will occur in "weathering" and "semi-weathering" slate will vary from quarry to quarry with some deposits turning almost 100% brown and others as little as 10%.
Copper nails are in keeping with a good slate roof's longevity and the smooth shank is forgiving in those inevitable moments when you'll be forced to pull a nail or use the ripper on one. The wide, roll-up garage door allows storage of large items like tractors and mowers, and the sliding side door provides additional access to the shed. Bearce's Great-aunt, Mary Caroline, lived with Josiah III and Freelove Canfield Bearce for several years, listened to their ancestral stories, and made her own personal copy of Zerviah's diary supplement.
Lawrence to what is now known as Lake Champlain where his party killed several Mohawks in a show of European strength and musketry. Knowing the weathering characteristics of the stone you're using makes good sense and avoids unpleasant surprises and misunderstandings.In addition to natural forms of weathering, slate can be discolored by any number of environmental factors including tree sap, rusty roof metal and airborne pollutants.
You get the picture.The number of pieces required to cover one square is dependent on the size (or sizes) of the slate. There are other options, and sometimes engineering considerations such as a concrete deck dictate a different specification. I am very pleased with the super fast shipping all the way from Utah to Panama City Florida in a couple days. Generally speaking, North American slate is some shade or combination of the following colors: Grey (Gray), Green, Purple, Black and Red. 13" dimensions are traditionally avoided, presumably out of superstition.Aside from the standard slate sizes, you usually are able to have other sizes specially made, but most producers will demand a premium for deviating from standard production.
My grandparents the Walter Sealeys lived just two blocks from downtown in a home on Main St. There are limits, of course, but we have seen roofing slates as large as 30" x 24" and as small as 9" x 6". It should be mentioned that under no circumstances should the installer try to "stretch" the slate by "cheating" on the headlap. Sealey Bldg.- still standing!) I was raised in Alachua, coming to school in 1942 (3rd grade) and remaining there until 1952 when I graduated. He further told them that Massasoit, the Great Sachem of the Wampanoags, was at Nemasket (a distance of about 15 miles) with many of his Counselors. What wonderful memories I will always cherish from my hometown! ?My husband bought our first car when we married in 1957, from Bill Enneis.?Thigpen's Drug Store was on the corner of Main Street.
He also sold tickets to ride the train to Wiliford, Bell, Curtis and Wannee to the west of Alachua, and to LaCross, Brooker, Sampson City, and Starke to the east of Alachua. Knowing the weathering characteristics of the stone you're using makes good sense and avoids unpleasant surprises and misunderstandings. Waters family, was the agent at the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad (ACL) across the street, both depots were on the south end of town.
Highway 441 ran through Alachua on main street; the by-pass and overpass was not built until the forties.
Formerly there had been a big cotton farming operation in the area supporting two cotton gins.
One gin was in the middle of town on a spur railroad track of the SAL and one on the south end of town on SAL's mainline. In general ,however, because the "Main stay'* of the economy of the community was farming, the area did not suffer as much as other areas. Little happened during the week; school, church, gardening, cleaning yards and a few social club meetings. There was visiting with friends, getting haircuts and other amenities of life that you hadn't done in weeks or months. Most businesses closed at 5 - 6 O'clock, but grocery stores stayed open until 8-10 O'clock. The Four H Club, sponsored by the school and County Agent, was a big influence in the community. Occasionally a theatrical company would come to town and help the community put on a production of some kind.
Among the other things you did for entertainment or diversion was to go to Gainesville to see the movies. There were two theaters in Gainesville; the Florida Theater on University Avenue and the Ritz (Or Lyric) Theater near the post office. One of the cool things about going to tlie movies in Gainesville; they were air conditioned. Ehjring hot weather you would go to Poe Springs, a few miles west of High Springs for swimming and a picnic or to Blue Springs, which was a little further west.
It was located just west of present day I - 75 on the south side of Millhopper Road to Gainesville. The east-west passage was the largest From the west entrance you went east down a gradual slope for 30 to 50 feet. When you got to the bottom and center of the cross, you could see an extension to the north that extended 30 to 40 feet. Several university students were injured exploring the cave and rumor has it that possibly one or more may have died as a result of dare-devil climbing. As the participation in WWII grew in scope and activities the depression ended and the good times returned. C.
Frankly, it's been only out of respect for my parents that I never legally changed my name. Okay, with that behind us, let's see what my dad, at the age of 97, now recalls about the old days in Alachua.
His station was at the southernmost rail line running by Copeland Sausage Company and Ennis Motor Company.
Leland manned the Seaboard station just a few yards from Papa Waters' Coastline station on the south end of town. David manned another Coastlme station, known as "East Alachua," which was located up by the current location of US 441. The old road tfiat comes in under the railroad overpass and then turns north at Main Street was the original US 441 . Passengers traveling to High Springs would disembark in Alachua and look for other transportation to High Springs. As results were telegraphed in, he would give them to my dad (Beb), who would "run" them to City Hall, where a large board displayed the latest election information.
The center of town in those early days was just north of the Seaboard tracks, on the southern end of Main Street, as I think of it today.
Mott's blacksmith shop was just up the street from the barber shop of Willie Cauthen (Hal's dad). One of tfie hotels, The Hawkins House, later named the Skirvin Hotel, was just south of the southernmost railroad tracks.


Large bowls and platters of meats, potatoes, vegetables and breads were placed on the tables and the guests would pass them around just like at a large family gathering. I recall one summer when Dad and I were "batching" and he and I ate there quite often. Living in town, we enjoyed the convenience of regular home delivery of the block of ice needed to keep food in the box cool. The old man who delivered the ice was named Lige, but I don't recall the name of the horse that pulled the wagon.
The best-known train that ran through town was named "Peggy." Peggy was a Seaboard train that ran from Staike through Bell to Wannee, where the train would turn around and retrace its route. I recall a story that now escapes Dad's memoiy about what his mom and the other Waters mothers would do from time to time when the kids got under foot. Since all three moms in the Waters clan had access to the railroad, they could use "Peggy" to occupy the kids for a few hours.
Simply put the kids on the train when it arrived from Starke, and they would be out of the way for a few hours while riding down to Wannee and back.
I remember at least one occasion when my cousins Larry, Johnny Dampier, Lano (Delano), maybe Clara Nell, and I made that trip. Since all the "big boys" (older cousins) got off during the temporary stop, of course I did too. As the runt of the lot, I was the last to grab for the hand rail when the train started moving, and I almost had a very long walk back to Alachua. Other entertainment for Waters boys: Ventures into Warren*s Cave were treacherous in Dad's day. He says they had no flashlights, so they took "fat pine" sticks to light up, once they were deep enough to need a light source.
Dad recalls one occasion when the circus was in town and some of the horses got loose just as a train was passing though.
It was an outdoor theater composed of a billboard-type screen and rows of logs for the audience to use for seating. The show was located in a vacant lot on the east side of Main Street, approximately one block south of the main downtown intersection, where the First National Bank was located for many years. Marbles were a lot less expensive than the electronic devices kids have for entertainment today. So was everything else! Bland Horse Races 1944  By Kent Doke:The Bland horse races actually started in Haynesworth in the summer of 1944 when Paul Emery and I raced our horses on the straight graded road North of Hollingsworth. I had borrowed an English saddle to race with and when we jumped off, the right stirrup leather came off the safety catch and was dragging.
I couldn't get it off my foot and was afraid the horse would step on it and drag me off I always claimed that was why I lost the race and it was why I rode bareback in all the races to follow. Somehow Jessie Shaw got involved and we started having horse races in Bland every Wednesday afternoon after school.
At that time people not in the service were making more money than they had ever made in their life. No cars were being made during the war so people rode with each other to the nearest entertainment.
What is now County Highway 241 that runs out from Alachua to the Santa Fe River was at that time a seldom graded road. In the late thirties and early forties this new road was being cut using only mules and convict labor. I still remember the guards with shotguns loaded with buckshot guarding the prisoners as they drove the two mule teams pulling small drag buckets of dirt. Jessie really got into the racing; he would grade one quarter mile of the road using a tractor and a grader he bought.
He cut the fence so cars could be parked on the West side of the road and, at it's peak, we would have about 250 people out to see the races. I raced my own horse, The Santa Fe River Ranch entered a horse, Jessie raced a horse, Roy Ceilon, J.
Once George Duke brought a race horse and jockey with a jockey saddle in to race against Roy's horse. We were very lucky to win that race and did so only because the jockey couldn't control the horse at the start. About fifty years after the races had stopped I asked Roy how much he thought was bet on those races and he said probably about twenty five hundred dollars. Also about fifty years later I was introduced to an old lawyer in Gainesville who asked me if I had ever ridden horses in the Bland Races. Makes me feel good, even now. Aiachua High School Memories  Charles Beverly (Beb) Waters Class of 1930 The Alachua Indians played football on a field that was right next to the school rather than down the hill from the grammar school. The offense was the Notre Dame Box, The quarterback lined up about four feet behind the center and had a fullback lined up a few feet behind him. The other two halfbacks were lined up on their left (or right), stacked one behind the other to form a square box. The QB would take a direct snap and then hand off to one of the backs or drop back to pass. And yes, we wore leather helmets and had drab brown canvas pants; and the jerseys were whatever you could find and had no numbers. Alachua didn't have a good punter, so Marion Pearson would try to throw a long Interception rather than try a weak punt. The Big Rival was the High Springs Sandspurs, at least until around 1929 when we had "the Big Fight" playing in High Springs, The referee that night was a prominent High Springs doctor (Whitlock?), maybe even the mayor.
Emotions were running high, and an intense argument between players, coaches and the referee ended in a Big Fight when Jessie Shaw knocked the referee out cold and the townspeople charged the field. I prudently ran for the car. As a result of the fight, the teams didn't play each other again for a number of years (20?). School buses couldn't be used for game trips, so townspeople would drive the players, Barney Cato was a rural mail carrier and had a son on the squad.
The school buses back then were Model A trucks with a row of seats down each side and a bench down the middle. A long one story building was in its' place containing eight classrooms and a big auditorium. One big event of that year was a class play about the Pilgrims Thanksgiving and with the Indians. One day a student walked behind her, on the way to the restroom, and kicked the chair out from under Miss. I had to wear glasses beginning in the seventh gi'ade, so did not participate in sports much.
Perhaps the biggest event in our High School lives was the Junior and Senior theatrical productions. The Junior class play was usually produced in the fall and the Senior class play in the spring. Wq were excused from classes to climb into a ton and a half truck to go load scrape iron from some garage or farm. Som.eone asked her a question and she answered, "just a minute, I have the answer right here in my drawers". So, if you could manage to leave the Supply room unlocked, you then had to find a classroom window unlocked.
In closing I have always told anyone who asked, my years at A H S was comparable to the Tom Sawyer story.
One gin was in the middle of town on a spur railroad track of the SAL and one on the south end of town on SAL's mainline.
There was visiting with friends, getting haircuts and other amenities of life that you hadn't done in weeks or months. Frankly, it's been only out of respect for my parents that I never legally changed my name. Okay, with that behind us, let's see what my dad, at the age of 97, now recalls about the old days in Alachua. Leland manned the Seaboard station just a few yards from Papa Waters' Coastline station on the south end of town. The old man who delivered the ice was named Lige, but I don't recall the name of the horse that pulled the wagon. I recall a story that now escapes Dad's memoiy about what his mom and the other Waters mothers would do from time to time when the kids got under foot.
I couldn't get it off my foot and was afraid the horse would step on it and drag me off I always claimed that was why I lost the race and it was why I rode bareback in all the races to follow.
He cut the fence so cars could be parked on the West side of the road and, at it's peak, we would have about 250 people out to see the races.
Once George Duke brought a race horse and jockey with a jockey saddle in to race against Roy's horse. We were very lucky to win that race and did so only because the jockey couldn't control the horse at the start. Alachua didn't have a good punter, so Marion Pearson would try to throw a long Interception rather than try a weak punt. As a result of the fight, the teams didn't play each other again for a number of years (20?). School buses couldn't be used for game trips, so townspeople would drive the players, Barney Cato was a rural mail carrier and had a son on the squad. A long one story building was in its' place containing eight classrooms and a big auditorium. I had to wear glasses beginning in the seventh gi'ade, so did not participate in sports much.



How to create a website for free step by step in asp.net
How to build a business website for free
Small garage plans with living space

Category: 10X10 Shed



Comments to «10 foot by 10 foot metal shed»

  1. I_Like_KekS writes:
    Although about masking all the proof seal and male hose threaded end for simply being.
  2. ISABELLA writes:
    Basement house you can also make can put the.