New york boston ferry,bachmann ho scale santa special train set,nyc subway 3 train route nyc - Tips For You

admin 14.09.2014

The historic ferry boat sank years ago after decades as a popular restaurant and night spot. The current owner, Daniuel Kim, had hoped to save the Binghamton when he bought it in 2007, but before he could begin renovations, it sank. Leading Russian musicians staged a classical concert on Thursday in the ancient theater of Syria's ravaged Palmyra in a show to herald Russia's successes against terrorists in the war-torn country. Famed conductor Valery Gergiev led Saint Petersburg's celebrated Mariinsky orchestra through pieces by Johann Sebastian Bach, Sergei Prokofiev and Rodion Shchedrin in front of a crowd of Russian soldiers, government ministers and journalists. Cellist Sergei Roldugin played a solo against the backdrop of the Roman amphitheater where jihadists from the Islamic State group staged mass executions less than a year ago. Syrian troops recaptured the UNESCO world heritage site from Islamic State group fighters in March. Russian army sappers said last month they had demined the ancient site - known as the "Pearl of the Desert" - where jihadist fighters blew up ancient temples and looted relics. The Kremlin shipped foreign journalists to the concert as it basked in the retaking of Palmyra, one of the most significant achievements since it launched a bombing campaign in September.
Putin said that he saw the concert as a sign "of hope not just for the rebirth of Palmyra as a cultural asset for the whole of humanity, but for seeing modern civilization rid itself of this terrible scourge of international terrorism". Mikhail Pyotrovsky, the director of Russia's Hermitage Museum, told journalists at the scene that "Palmyra is injured but she has not been killed" and pledged help in restoring it. Sitting in the audience, Syrian tour guide Anwar Al-Omar told AFP that while he thought only Russia could help rebuild the ancient town he was downbeat about its prospects in the long-term.
Gergiev is one of the world's best known conductors but has faced backlash in the West for his strongly pro-Kremlin views, with his tours sometimes interrupted by protesters. Gergiev also conducted a charity concert in Tokyo for victims of the Fukushima tragedy in 2012 and led a charity concert tour to raise funds for victims of Russia's Beslan school massacre in 2004.
A live web broadcast showed the first-stage booster touching down vertically in the pre-dawn darkness atop a barge in the Atlantic, just off the Florida coast. Because of the high altitude needed for this mission, SpaceX did not expect a successful landing. Musk said this was a three-engine burn for the booster's return, "so triple deceleration from the last flight". Musk contends rocket reusability is key to shaving launch costs and making space more accessible. Already in the delivery business for NASA, SpaceX hopes to start transporting US astronauts to the International Space Station by the end of next year in the company's next-generation Dragon capsules. In a groundbreaking announcement last week, Musk said his company will attempt to send a Red Dragon to Mars in 2018i??i??and actually land on the red planet. Brazil's Supreme Court on Thursday suspended a powerful lawmaker at the center of efforts to impeach President Dilma Rousseff, on grounds he tried to obstruct a probe into his alleged corruption.
Eduardo Cunha, the speaker of Brazil's lower house of Congress, is the architect of the impeachment drive that is expected to force Rousseff to step aside from office on Wednesday. He said his suspension, the latest in a whirlpool of corruption scandals, was retaliation for his campaign against Rousseff.
Her supporters argued it was grounds for the impeachment drive now to be dropped, though it was not expected to spare her now that her case is in the hands of the Senate.
Despite facing criminal charges including bribery and hiding money in Swiss bank accounts, Cunha has survived months of attempts by prosecutors and a congressional ethics committee to see him brought to justice.
A master backroom political operator, he is widely seen as the key figure in getting the impeachment proceedings greenlighted by the lower house in April. But the man Brazilians refer to as a real-life Frank Underwood - the corrupt US politician in the hit Netflix series House of Cards - appeared finally to have been brought down by the high court. Justice Teori Zavaski slapped the suspension on Cunha on Thursday morning, and the full court ratified it later in the day.
Zavaski said that Cunha had obstructed justice "to prevent the success of investigations against him".
With Rousseff likely to be suspended and replaced by her vice-president, Michel Temer, next week, Cunha would have moved up to first on the presidential succession list.
The government's top lawyer Jose Eduardo Cardozo said the suspension "shows that Mr Cunha abused his office".
Rousseff is accused of manipulating government budget accounts with illegal loans, a charge which she describes as technical and not worthy of impeachment.
Cunha is accused of taking bribes as part of the corruption scheme centered on Petrobras, the huge state oil company. He is also being investigated by the congressional ethics committee over allegedly lying to Congress about possessing secret Swiss bank accounts. Justin Anderson, a local resident, packs his three children and dog into his truck as he prepares to leave the Christina Lake Lodge campground in Conklin, Alberta, on Thursday. A convoy of evacuees began the long drive out of work camps north of the fire-ravaged Fort McMurray area on Friday morning. Meanwhile, a mass airlift of evacuees was expected to resume, a day after 8,000 people were flown out. In all, more than 80,000 people have left Fort McMurray, in the heart of Canada's oil sands, and officials say no deaths or injuries related to the fire have been reported. Crews battling the fire got a little help with temperatures forecast to fall overnight to 16 C from 30 C. The Alberta provincial government, which declared a state of emergency, said more than 1,100 firefighters, 145 helicopters, 138 pieces of heavy equipment and 22 air tankers were fighting the fire, but Chad Morrison, Alberta's manager of wildfire prevention, said rain is needed. About 25,000 evacuees moved north in the hours after Tuesday's mandatory evacuation, where oil sands work camps were converted to house people.
Officials said a helicopter would lead the evacuation convoy on Friday morning to make sure the highway is safe. Fort McMurray is surrounded by wilderness, and there are essentially only two ways out via road.
Aided by high winds, scorching heat and low humidity, the fire grew from 75 square kilometers on Tuesday to 100 square km on Wednesday, but by Thursday it was almost nine times that - at 850 square km. Unseasonably hot temperatures combined with dry conditions have transformed the boreal forest in much of Alberta into a tinder box.
The region has the third-largest reserves of oil in the world behind Saudi Arabia and Venezuela.
The wildfire was expected to incur the largest insured property losses from a single disaster in Canadian history. Capital Markets analyst Tom MacKinnon said in a report on Wednesday that the insurance losses was estimated between $2 billion and $3.6 billion. Australian police have charged a 21-year-old woman with fraud after she allegedly spent $3.4 million that her bank mistakenly gave her, with much of the money reportedly lavished on handbags. The woman, named in Sydney media as Malaysian chemical engineering student Christine Jiaxin Lee, reportedly splashed out on luxury apartment rentals, designer bags and other high-end items after her Australian bank gave her an unlimited overdraft on her savings account. Police arrested the woman as she attempted to board a flight to Malaysia on Wednesday night. They said she had been charged with dishonestly obtaining a financial advantage by deception and knowingly dealing with the proceeds of crime.
Reports said that Lee, who has been released on bail, allegedly spent the money between July 2014 and April 2015, and that some $2.4 million had not been recovered.
Stapleton questioned whether the cash could be considered a "proceed of crime", saying "it's money we all dream about". NSW state police detective inspector Sean Heaney told the ABC on Thursday that if members of the public find money in their accounts that should not be there, or they have an ability to overdraw on an account that they should not have, they should not spend the money. The Food and Drug Administration's action brought regulation of e-cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco and hookah tobacco in line with existing rules for cigarettes, smokeless tobacco and roll-your-own tobacco. The rules promise to have a major impact on the $3.4 billion e-cigarette industry that has flourished in the absence of federal regulation, making the nicotine-delivery devices the most commonly used tobacco products among US youngsters.
The FDA said it will require companies to submit e-cigarettes and other newer tobacco products for government approval, provide it with a list of their ingredients and place health warnings on packages and in advertisements. The FDA will require age verification by photo identification, ban sales from vending machines except in adults-only locations and stop the distribution of free product samples. The new regulations had been highly anticipated after the agency issued a proposed rule two years ago on how to oversee the e-cigarette industry and the other products.
Burwell said health officials still do not have the scientific evidence showing e-cigarettes can help smokers quit, as the industry asserts, and avoid the known ills of tobacco. E-cigarettes are handheld electronic devices that vaporize a fluid typically including nicotine and a flavor component. The e-cigarette vapor industry, which includes e-cigarettes, vapors, personal vaporizers and tanks, is expected to have about $4.1 billion in sales in 2016, Wells Fargo estimated.
Three million US middle and high school students reported using e-cigarettes in 2015, compared with 2.46 million in 2014, according to the most recent federal data.
A University of Southern California study of high school students last year found that those who used e-cigarettes were more than twice as likely to also smoke traditional cigarettes. The Workers' Party of Korea, the ruling party of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, opened its 7th Congress on Friday. It is the first WPK congress in 36 years and the first under the leadership of Kim Jong-un.
Analysts say the congress may focus on further consolidating the policy of simultaneously developing nuclear weapons and the national economy, and might emphasize the DPRK's status as a nuclear state. An estimated 3,000 party representatives will attend the meeting, which presumably will last three days. Yoon Hae-ryoong, a senior majoring in mechanics at Kim Il Sung University, told Xinhua that he sees the congress as a historical watershed in the revolutionary cause of the DPRK.
He said the concurrent development of nuclear weapons and the national economy is a long-term strategic approach to dealing with "US imperialists".
In Beijing, Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said that China hopes the DPRK can "achieve national development" and "heed the calls of the international community and work with us to maintain peace and stability in Northeast Asia". Pyongyang had announced in late October that the 7th WPK congress would be convened in early May. Cannabis may join the herb and spice rack in California kitchens as the most populous US state prepares for the possible legalization of recreational marijuana in November. Chef Chris Sayegh is leading the way by taking haute cuisine to a higher place with his cannabis-infused menus in private homes for as much as $500 a head, or in "pop-up" banquets around Los Angeles for $20 to $200 a person. Sayegh, 23, who cut his teeth in the kitchens of top restaurants in New York and California, said incorporating cannabis into his recipes creates an entirely new consciousness for diners that goes beyond the effects of a fine wine.
Edible marijuana products are nothing new, and the market for them has evolved into a multimillion-dollar industry.
Marijuana has been legally permitted in California for medical purposes since 1996, and voters are widely expected to pass a measure on the upcoming November election ballot to legalize pot as a recreational drug for adults statewide. Sayegh said he began experimenting with cannabis cuisine after growing tired of pot-baked brownies and other snacks. In the kitchen, Sayegh uses oil containing an extract of tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of cannabis, and a "vaporizer" to infuse ingredients with THC. The livestreamed Cats Meok Bang show is a twist on an online trend of young South Korean men and women tucking into feasts in real time, while viewers send messages and sometimes virtual cash. While the stars of those programs seek a rapport with their fans, cat TV has gained viewers despite its uneventfulness.
Cats Meok Bang, a mash-up of the Korean words for broadcasting and eating, began by accident.
Four months on, 110,000 South Koreans a month on average watch the show and more than 10,000 of them have bookmarked the show.
During the slow hours after patients leave his office, Yoo Young-hoon, 49, a physician in Seoul, said he always plays the cat TV on the screen next to the medical chart.
Unlike dogs that are considered loyal to their owners, cats do not have a positive image in South Korea. But viewers of the online cat show said they began paying attention to those animals roaming around the street with affection. Stray cats approach foods prepared by Koo Eunje, the 35yearold host of an online cat show in JeollaNamdo, South Korea. Alberta declared a state of emergency on Wednesday as crews frantically held back wind-whipped wildfires that have already torched 1,600 homes and other buildings in Canada's main oil sands city of Fort McMurray, forcing more than 80,000 residents to flee. Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said fire had destroyed or damaged an estimated 1,600 structures.
Danielle Larivee, Alberta's minister of municipal affairs, said the fire is actively burning in residential areas. Fatalities have been reported from a collision on a nearby highway but she was unaware if it was related to the evacuation or fire. There were haunting images of scorched trucks, charred homes and telephone poles, burned out from the bottom up, hanging in the wires like little wooden crosses. Some residents were evacuated for a second time late on Wednesday when they were told to leave their emergency accommodations in the nearby hamlet of Anzac.
The blaze effectively cut Fort McMurray in two late on Tuesday, forcing about 10,000 north to the safety of oil sands work camps. The other 70,000 or so were sent streaming south in a bumper-to-bumper snake line of cars and trucks that stretched beyond the horizon down Highway 63. Firefighters were working to protect critical infrastructure, including the only bridge across the Athabasca River and Highway 63, the only major route to the city in or out. Labour's Sadiq Khan, the son of a bus driver from Pakistan, voted early in his multiethnic constituency of Tooting in south London. His main rival, environmentalist Zac Goldsmith, cast his ballot in the posh Richmond neighborhood west of the city center. The vote is seen as the first major electoral test for opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, whose party has been rived by infighting over allegations of anti-Semitism.
The results of the regional elections that are also being held in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will likely set the tone for the final seven weeks of campaigning ahead of Britain's June 23 EU membership referendum. In the Scottish Parliament, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon's pro-independence party is looking to tighten its hold on power as it seeks to build support for a second vote on seceding from the UK following a failed referendum on the issue in 2014.
If Britain as a whole votes to leave the European Union but Scotland votes to stay in, Sturgeon says that would be a pretext for her Scottish National Party to demand another independence referendum.
In London, polls show the city facing a straight choice between Labour candidate Khan and his Conservative rival Goldsmith.
The campaign has been dominated by negative campaigning, with Goldsmith seeking to establish links between Khan and Muslim extremists, which Khan has consistently dismissed as "desperate stuff". Khan, 45, is the son of a Pakistani immigrant bus driver who became a human rights lawyer and government minister, while ecologist Goldsmith, 41, is a son of the late tycoon financier James Goldsmith, a scion of one of Britain's wealthiest families.
Despite the surface-level rancor, both candidates accept that the sky-high cost of homes and the city's creaking transport system are the dominant issues for voters. Of the 12 candidates, second preference votes for the top two are added on to determine the winner. London's Evening Standard newspaper endorsed Goldsmith on Wednesday, as he spent the last day of campaigning on a 24-hour tour of the city.
During a visit to a street market in south London on Wednesday, Khan told AFP his rival had run a "negative, divisive and increasingly desperate campaign".
The new mayor replaces the eccentric Conservative Boris Johnson, whose eight-year term in office included the London 2012 Olympics and the launch of a cycle hire scheme dubbed "Boris Bikes". Out of London's City Hall, the fiercely-ambitious Johnson - a leading figure in the EU referendum's "Leave" campaign - is the bookmakers' favorite to become Britain's next prime minister.
Sadiq Khan, Britain's Labour Party candidate for mayor of London, and his wife Saadiya pose for photographers after casting their votes for mayor in South London on Wednesday. The leader of Bangladesh's top Islamist party Jamaat-e-Islami is set to hang within days after the Supreme Court on Thursday upheld his death sentence for war crimes. Motiur Rahman Nizami was convicted of murder, rape and orchestrating the killing of intellectuals during the country's 1971 independence struggle.
A defense lawyer for the 73-year-old said he would not seek clemency and Alam said jail authorities would begin preparing for the execution once they received a copy of the verdict. Security has been stepped up in Dhaka, already tense after a string of killings of secular and liberal activists and religious minorities by suspected Islamist militants.
Hundreds of people who had campaigned for the Islamist leaders to be tried for their roles in the 1971 war burst into impromptu celebrations at a square in central Dhaka and in the port city of Chittagong. Three senior Jamaat officials and a key leader of Bangladesh Nationalist Party, the main opposition party, have been executed since December 2013 for war crimes despite global criticism of their trials by a controversial tribunal. Jamaat said the charges against Nizami were false and aimed at eliminating the leadership of the party, a key ally of the opposition BNP. Nizami took over as party leader in 2000 and was a minister in the Islamist-allied government of 2001-2006.
Prosecutors said he was responsible for setting up the Al-Badr pro-Pakistani militia, which killed top writers, doctors and journalists in the most gruesome chapter of the 1971 conflict. Their bodies were found blindfolded with their hands tied and dumped in a marsh on the outskirts of the capital. Prosecutors said Nizami ordered the killings, designed to "intellectually cripple" the fledgling nation.
The 1971 conflict, one of the bloodiest in world history, led to the creation of an independent Bangladesh from what was then East Pakistan. Nizami was convicted in October 2014 by the International Crimes Tribunal, which was established in 2010 by Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina's government and has sentenced more than a dozen opposition leaders for war crimes.
Rodrigo Duterte has a commanding lead in opinion polls ahead of the May 9 election, much to the dismay of business chiefs, investors and diplomats who see him as a clown with no clear economic policies and a possible liability for the country. Brash and openly scathing of the political establishment on the campaign trail, he has been likened to US presidential candidate Donald Trump. And yet, Duterte's supporters point to his past to argue that as president, he would not be the disaster that critics fear. As mayor of Davao city in the south of the country, they say, the 71-year-old former prosecutor waged war on drugs, crushed crime rates, lifted investment levels, improved health and education, and delegated policy issues to technocrats.
Eurasia Group, a global risk research firm, said in a report this week that the Philippines is likely to continue on the pro-growth and reform-oriented path set by outgoing President Benigno Aquino, regardless of who wins the election. It said that while Grace Poe, a senator who was at one stage the front-runner in opinion polls, appears more engaged and knowledgeable on economic policy, Duterte defers to capable advisers and is likely to pursue infrastructure development, administrative streamlining and openness to foreign investment. Last week, members of the country's leading business club were stunned when Duterte addressed them in his usual style, threatening to kill criminals and making risque comments about Viagra use and his sex life, but shedding little light on the economic policies he would pursue if he became president.
Presidential candidate Rodrigo Duterte (center) listens as Senate candidates Dionisio Santiago, right, and Sandra Camtalk to him while campaigning inManila. A senator selected as a fact-finder by a special Senate commission considering the impeachment of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff recommended on Wednesday that she be put on trial for possible removal from office.
The Israeli military launched airstrikes early on Thursday on four Hamas targets in the Gaza Strip in response to mortar rounds fired at Israel, the military said. A bleeding pregnant woman dropped dead at the gates of Haiti's largest public hospital after failing to get help on Wednesday amid a weeks-old strike by resident doctors, nurses and other staff.
A woman has been found alive after six days in a collapsed building and rescuers were working to free her, a Kenyan government official said on Thursday. Rescuers were creating room to release the woman who was speaking to medics waiting to treat her, said Pius Masai, the head of the National Disaster Management Unit. The New Day newspaper is shutting down after only nine weeks after its circulation failed to meet expectations. Relative calm prevailed on Thursday in the Syrian city of Aleppo following a US-Russian agreement to extend a cessation of hostilities that had crumbled after nearly two weeks of violence between rebels and government forces that killed dozens. Syrian state media said the army would abide by a "regime of calm" in the city that came into effect at 1:00 am for 48 hours. But the army again blamed Islamist insurgents for violating the agreement overnight by what it called indiscriminate shelling of some government-held residential areas of the divided city. President Bashar Assad said on Thursday his country would not accept less than an outright victory against rebels in the northern city of Aleppo and across Syria, state media reported. In a telegram sent to Russian President Vladimir Putin, Assad said the army would not accept less than "attaining final victory" in its fight against the rebels. Witnesses said at least one person was killed in rebel shelling overnight of the Midan neighborhood on the government side of the city. A resident contacted in the rebel-held eastern part of the city said although warplanes were flying overnight, there were none of the intense raids seen during more than 10 days of aerial bombing. People in several districts ventured out onto the streets where more shops than normal had opened, the resident of al Shaar neighborhood said. The only intense fighting reported was in the southern Aleppo countryside where Syria's al-Qaida offshoot Nusra Front is dug in close to where militias maintain a stronghold. The surge in bloodshed in Aleppo wrecked the first major "cessation of hostilities" agreement of the war, sponsored by Washington and Moscow, which had held since February. Meanwhile, around 64,000 Syrians are stranded at the border with Jordan after intensified violence around Aleppo, Jordanian border guards said on Thursday. Jordan, which is already home to more than 630,000 Syrian refugees, said it must screen newcomers to ensure they are genuine refugees and not jihadists seeking to infiltrate the country.
A Syrian refugee woman, who is stuck between the Jordanian and Syrian borders, holds her child as she crosses into Jordan after a group of refugees had crossed into Jordanian territory on Wednesday.
Davutoglu, who had fallen out with President Recept Tayyip Erdogan, announced he was stepping aside following a meeting with executives of the ruling Justice and Development Party, or AKP, which has dominated Turkish politics since 2002. Davutoglu indicated he did not plan to resign from the party, saying he would "continue the struggle" as a ruling party legislator.
The shake-up is seen as the outcome of irreconcilable differences between Erdogan, who would like to see the country transition to a presidential system, and his once-trusted adviser.


But the adviser to Erdogan tried to act independently on a range issues and often proved to be a more moderating force to Erdogan. Crisis talks between the former political allies dragged out for nearly two hours on Wednesday but clearly failed to resolve their differences. Divisions between the Erdogan and Davutoglu camps first spilled into the open over the conflict with Kurdish militants.
Erdogan took issue with Davutoglu after he spoke of the possibility of resuming peace talks with the PKK if it withdraws its armed fighters from Turkish territory. Volunteers in opposition-held areas of Syria are forced to improvise as they carry out one of the world's most dangerous tasks: dismantling cluster munitions, land mines and explosive booby-traps as they work to make battle-torn areas safe for civilians to return.
Booby-traps laid by the Islamic State group in the Kurdish-held town of Kobani, in northern Syria, have killed more than 20 volunteer sappers in 15 months, according to a senior regional official. The sappers were all regular fighters in the main Syrian Kurdish militia, the YPG, who volunteered to take a munitions-clearance course based on Internet videos and shared experience. Still, the amateur demining effort continues in other parts of Syria, often with minimal training and no specialized equipment. An estimated 5.1 million Syrians live in what the UN's demining coordination body, UNMAS, calls "contaminated" areas, where unexploded ordnance poses a threat to life and limb. Defusing or otherwise neutralizing unexploded ordnance is a perilous task for even the best-trained technicians, to say nothing of volunteers. The weapons have been used extensively by the Syrian government, the Russian Air Force, and the Islamic State group in civilian areas throughout much of the war, according to evidence gathered by Human Rights Watch and other watchdog agencies. The Syrian government has been able to rely on Russian military technicians to secure areas under their control, such as the ancient city of Palmyra, which pro-government forces retook from IS in March. Clips broadcast from Palmyra on Russian media showed the technicians, clad in specialized protective gear, moving methodically across minefields and booby-trapped neighborhoods, sweeping the ground with metal detectors and explosives-sniffing dogs. In contrast, hourslong amateur footage circulating on social media shows YPG volunteers in opposition-held areas prodding the ground with sticks, digging up bomblets with spades, and defusing them by hand.
They endure toxic fumes and backbreaking loads to earn pennies hauling out a substance used to bleach sugar and vulcanize rubber.
Just after midnight, wearing headlamps to find their way through the darkness and volcanic smoke, the miners descend into the crater with shovels and crowbars, often without protective masks. They break up the mustard-yellow slabs of sulfur that are formed by planting pipes into the crater, forcing sulfuric gases to condense and then solidify. Bearing loads of up 70 kilograms, the men make an agonizing climb out of the crater and then a 3-kilometer journey down the mountain. They face deformities and shortened life spans working in a job that in other countries is mechanized because of the high dangers.
The miners earn 1,000 rupiah (7 cents) for each kilogram, or about $10 a day if they make two trips up and down the smoldering 2,799-meter volcano.
Marzuki, a sulfur miner, carries baskets of sulfur as he climbs up from the crater of Mount Ijen in Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia. The Canadian province of Alberta raced to evacuate the entire population of Fort McMurray where an uncontrolled wildfire was taking hold in the heart of the country's oil sands region, with dry winds forecast for Wednesday that could fuel the blaze. Alberta appealed for military help to battle the fire and airlift people from the smoke-filled city after authorities issued a mandatory evacuation order for 80,000, but officials said army and air force assistance would take two days to arrive.
About 44,000 people were estimated to be on the roads, fleeing the city, while approximately 8,000 had reached an evacuation center outside Fort McMurray, officials said.
The 2,650-hectare fire, which was discovered on Sunday, shifted aggressively with the wind on Tuesday to breach city limits.
The southern route eventually reopened but traffic was quickly gridlocked in both directions.
Alberta is much drier than normal for this time of year, strengthening prospects for a long and expensive wildfire season, in the wake of a mild winter with lower-than-average snowfall and a warm spring.
Authorities expect increased winds on Wednesday that will make it harder to fight the fire.
Suncor Energy, whose oil sands operations are closest to the city, said its main plant, 25 km north of Fort McMurray, was safe, but it was reducing crude production in the region to allow employees and families to get to safety. Suncor said evacuees were welcome at its Firebag oil sands facility, while Canadian Natural Resources Ltd said it was working to ensure any affected CNRL workers and their families could use its camps.
Shell Canada also said it would open its oil sands camp to evacuees and was looking to use its airstrip to fly out nonessential staff and accommodate displaced residents. A number of flights from Fort McMurray airport were canceled and the airport advised passengers to check with their airlines for updates. The blaze started southwest of Fort McMurray and spread rapidly to the outskirts of the city, located about 430 km northeast of Alberta's capital, Edmonton. Television footage and photographs on Twitter showed flames and smoke billowing over the city and a destroyed trailer park. At least one residential neighborhood in the city's southeast had been destroyed by the fire and others were severely damaged or still under threat, local fire chief Allen said. Fort McMurray resident Crystal Maltais buckles in her daughter, Mckennah Stapley, as they prepare to leave Conklin, Alberta, after evacuating their home threatened by a raging wildfire on Tuesday. Embattled President Dilma Rousseff greeted the Olympic flame in Brazil on Tuesday, promising not to allow a raging political crisis, which could see her suspended within days, to spoil the Rio Games. The flame, which arrived in a small lantern from the ancient Greek site of Olympia, via Switzerland, was transferred to Brazil's Olympic torch featuring waves of tropical colors.
The torch will now be carried in a relay by 12,000 people through 329 cities, ending in Rio's Maracana stadium on Aug 5 for the opening ceremony. Air Force jets roared overhead in a clear blue sky to write "Rio 2016" and the five Olympic rings in their vapor trails.
Twelve-year-old Syrian refugee Hanan Daqqah, who arrived in Brazil's biggest city Sao Paulo with her family in 2015, was also among the 10 first torch bearers. But political and economic turmoil overshadowed the ceremony ahead of South America's first ever Olympics.
Rousseff will be suspended from office for six months next week if the Senate votes on May 11 or 12 to open an impeachment trial, meaning that Tuesday could have been one of her final major public events as president. According to reports in the Globo, Folha de Sao Paulo and Estadao dailies, chief prosecutor Rodrigo Janot has requested authority to open an investigation into the embattled president and also her predecessor and key political ally Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva.
India's Supreme Court on Wednesday said the tobacco industry must adhere to federal rules requiring stringent health warnings on cigarette packs, in a major setback for the $11 billion industry that opposes the new policy.
The court also turned down an industry plea to stay the implementation of the new tobacco-control rules introduced from April 1, which require health warnings to cover 85 percent of a cigarette pack's surface, up from 20 percent earlier. The tobacco industry "should not violate any rule prevailing as of today," the two-judge bench said during the 45-minute hearing inside a packed courtroom in New Delhi.
It also directed the high court of Karnataka state to hear dozens of pleas filed against the new rules in several Indian courts and decide on the matter within six weeks.
Last month, Indian tobacco companies, some backed by foreign "Big Tobacco", briefly shut down production as the new rules came into effect. The Supreme Court declined an industry lawyer's request that a stay obtained by a lower court be allowed to continue.
Shares in India's biggest cigarette maker ITC Ltd, part-owned by British American Tobacco, fell nearly 1 percent after the court directive. US-based Philip Morris International's India partner Godfrey Phillips pared gains but was trading 1.3 percent higher. Officials from the Tobacco Institute of India, an industry lobby group whose members include ITC and Godfrey, were not immediately available for comment. It was not immediately clear when the companies will start printing bigger warnings on their packs. The head of Korean Air, who just resigned as the chief organizer of the 2018 Winter Olympics, was sued on Wednesday by his carrier's pilots for allegedly demeaning their work. The airline's pilot union filed a defamation lawsuit with the Seoul district court against Cho Yang-ho over a Facebook posting the chairman made in March, a Korean Air spokesman said.
Responding to a Korean Air pilot who backed a pay rise demand by detailing the complex preflight checks required of the cockpit crew, Cho posted that flying a modern passenger plane on autopilot was "easier than driving a car". The posting infuriated Korean Air pilots already embroiled in a protracted wage dispute, and the union decided to take the matter to court.
Cho was already in the headlines on Tuesday when he resigned as head of the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games Committee, citing "critical financial issues" with Hanjin shipping which, like Korean Air, is part of the tycoon's Hanjin Group. Muslim militants have threatened to kill three more hostages in their jungle base in the southern Philippines more than a week after beheading a Canadian man when their multi-million dollar ransom demands were not met.
In a video circulated on Tuesday by the SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors jihadi websites, the captives from Canada, Norway and the Philippines pleaded for the Canadian and Philippine governments to heed the Abu Sayyaf militants' demand.
Six heavily armed Abu Sayyaf fighters stood behind the hostages, who were made to sit in a clearing and spoke briefly before a camera. The militants beheaded John Ridsdel on April 25 in the southern Philippine province of Sulu, an impoverished Muslim province in the south of the largely Roman Catholic country, after they failed to get a ransom of $6.3 million. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau condemned the killing but vowed not to give in to the kidnappers' ransom demands.
Canadian captive Robert Hall asked the Philippine government to "please stop shooting at us and trying to kill us. The four were seized from a marina on southern Samal Island and taken by boat to Sulu, where Abu Sayyaf gunmen continue to hold several captives, including a Dutch bird watcher who was kidnapped more than three years ago, and eight Indonesian and Malaysian crewmen who were snatched recently from three tugboats. The militants freed 10 Indonesian tugboat crewmen a few days ago reportedly in exchange for ransom.
The United States and the Philippines have separately blacklisted the Abu Sayyaf for kidnappings for ransom, beheadings and bombings. Republican front-runner Donald Trump went from long-shot contender to become the party's presumptive nominee on Tuesday with a commanding win in Indiana, and the party began to coalesce around him as top rival Ted Cruz bowed out of the race. The New York billionaire, who has never held public office, had repeatedly defied pundits' predictions that his campaign would implode.
The former reality TV star now can prepare for a match-up in the Nov 8 election with Hillary Clinton expected to be his Democratic opponent. Trump's immediate challenge is to unite deep fissures within the Republican Party as many party loyalists are appalled at his bullying style, his treatment of women and his signature proposals to build a wall on the border with Mexico and deport 11 million illegal immigrants.
Trump himself called for unity in a speech at a victory rally that was free of his usual bombast and flamboyance.
Trump's victory put to rest a belief that Republicans would choose their nominee at a contested convention when party leaders gather in Cleveland July 18-21.
At his victory rally at Trump Tower in New York, Trump walked on stage with wife Melania and other family members as the Rolling Stones' Start Me Up blared over loudspeakers. He is likely to formally wrap up the nomination on June 7 when California votes, although Ohio Governor John Kasich vowed to stay in the race as Trump's last challenger. Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus called Trump the party's presumptive nominee in a tweet and said, "We all need to unite and focus" on defeating Clinton. As the vote returns flowed in, Cruz announced that he has ended his campaign in Indianapolis, with his wife, Heidi, at his side. Trump won at least 51 of 57 possible delegates awarded in Indiana, according to the Associated Press delegate tracker. US presidential candidate Donald Trump smiles during his speech at the start of a victory party at Trump Tower in New York on Tuesday. Bernie Sanders said on Tuesday that his primary bid against Hillary Clinton was far from over, pointing to his victory in Indiana and strength in upcoming races as a sign of his durability in the presidential campaign. Sanders spoke to the AP after he defeated Clinton in Indiana's primary, predicting that he would achieve "more victories in the weeks to come" in West Virginia, Kentucky, Oregon and California.
Sanders' win in Indiana likely won't make much of a dent in Clinton's lead of more than 300 pledged delegates. With Donald Trump all but clinching the Republican nomination for president, Clinton is beginning to explore ways to woo Republicans turned off by the brash billionaire. Sanders said in the interview that he would be the best-positioned Democrat to take on Trump.
Sanders said he had no intention to drop out of the race and rejected the notion that his criticism of Clinton's record on issues like trade, campaign finance and the Iraq war would help Trump.
Kenyan police have disrupted a cell of extremist medics linked to the Islamic State group suspected of plotting a biological attack on Kenya and recruiting university students to join the group in Libya and Syria, Kenya's police chief said on Tuesday. A court allowed anti-terrorism police officers to keep Mohammed Abdi Ali, a medical intern at the Wote District Hospital in Makueni County who was arrested on Friday, for 30 days to complete investigations, Joseph Boinnet said in a statement. Kenya is struggling to battle the Islamic State group's recruitment of some of the country's youths. China Sea The Citizen Citizens Bank Classic Chevrolet Classic Chevrolet - pre-owned The Clock Works Co-Go's Coins R Us Colaizzi Pedorthic Center Community Care Plus Costcutters Family Hair Care Cricket - Bellevue Wireless Curves of Bellevue CVS Pharmacy Dairy Queen of Bellevue Dance America Dari-Villa Restaurant John B DeBonis Family Dentistry Joseph G DeFrancesco, DMD Domenic S. Enjoy Bellevue Ephesus Mediterranean Erin's Hallmark Esthetica Salon Family Dollar First Niagara Bank Samuel S Floro, Esquire Fodi Jewelers, Inc Forest Avenue Presbyterian Church Frankfurter's Hot Dog Shoppe Fred Dietz Floral, Gifts and Antiques David Gillingham Girl Scouts Western Pennsylvania Gold Star Construction USA, Inc. Jackson-Hewitt Tax Service James Trunzo Collision Shop James V Jordan, Attorney at Law Jatco Machine & Tool Co., Inc. Pittsburgh Regional Chiropractic Center Pittsburgh Valve and Fitting PJ's Smoke Shop Plank Eye Board Shop PNC Bank Donald H Presutti, Esquire Produce Plus Market & Deli, Inc. EAT'N PARK RUSTY NAIL HOME DEPOT STATE STORE BASEBALL PITTBIRD THREE RIVERS CASINO FOOTBALL PNC PARK HEINZ FIELD CONSOL ENERGY CENTER CADDY DOLLAR GENERAL BELLEVUE POLICE DEPARTMENT PD FAMILY DOLLAR AVALON BEN AVON EMSWORTH WOODS RUN GIANT EAGLE KUHN'S LINCOLN AVENUE BUSINESS DISTRICT GROCERY SHOPPING KMART WALMART BELLEVUE POLICE DEPARTMENT PD P.D.
Supreme Court, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, the United States District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania and several of the U.S. The NAACP bestows the annual Image Awards for achievement in the arts and entertainment, and the annual Spingarn Medals for outstanding positive achievement of any kind, on deserving black Americans. The NAACP's headquarters is in Baltimore, with additional regional offices in California, New York, Michigan, Colorado, Georgia, Texas and Maryland.[6] Each regional office is responsible for coordinating the efforts of state conferences in the states included in that region.
In 1905, a group of thirty-two prominent African-American leaders met to discuss the challenges facing people of color and possible strategies and solutions. This section may need to be rewritten entirely to comply with Wikipedia's quality standards.
The Race Riot of 1908 in Abraham Lincoln's hometown of Springfield, Illinois, had highlighted the urgent need for an effective civil rights organization in the U.S.
On May 30, 1909, the Niagara Movement conference took place at New York City's Henry Street Settlement House, from which an organization of more than 40 individuals emerged, calling itself the National Negro Committee. The conference resulted in a more influential and diverse organization, where the leadership was predominantly white and heavily Jewish American. According to Pbs.org "Over the years Jews have also expressed empathy (capability to share and understand another's emotion and feelings) with the plight of Blacks. As a member of the Princeton chapter of the NAACP, Albert Einstein corresponded with Du Bois, and in 1946 Einstein called racism "America's worst disease".[21][22] Du Bois continued to play a pivotal role in the organization and served as editor of the association's magazine, The Crisis, which had a circulation of more than 30,000.
An African American drinks out of a segregated water cooler designated for "colored" patrons in 1939 at a streetcar terminal in Oklahoma City. In its early years, the NAACP concentrated on using the courts to overturn the Jim Crow statutes that legalized racial segregation.
The NAACP began to lead lawsuits targeting disfranchisement and racial segregation early in its history. In 1916, when the NAACP was just seven years old, chairman Joel Spingarn invited James Weldon Johnson to serve as field secretary. The NAACP devoted much of its energy during the interwar years to fighting the lynching of blacks throughout the United States by working for legislation, lobbying and educating the public. The NAACP also spent more than a decade seeking federal legislation against lynching, but Southern white Democrats voted as a block against it or used the filibuster in the Senate to block passage.
In alliance with the American Federation of Labor, the NAACP led the successful fight to prevent the nomination of John Johnston Parker to the Supreme Court, based on his support for denying the vote to blacks and his anti-labor rulings. The organization also brought litigation to challenge the "white primary" system in the South.
The board of directors of the NAACP created the Legal Defense Fund in 1939 specifically for tax purposes.
With the rise of private corporate litigators like the NAACP to bear the expense, civil suits became the pattern in modern civil rights litigation.
The NAACP's Baltimore chapter, under president Lillie Mae Carroll Jackson, challenged segregation in Maryland state professional schools by supporting the 1935 Murray v.
Locals viewing the bomb-damaged home of Arthur Shores, NAACP attorney, Birmingham, Alabama, on September 5, 1963.
The campaign for desegregation culminated in a unanimous 1954 Supreme Court decision in Brown v. The State of Alabama responded by effectively barring the NAACP from operating within its borders because of its refusal to divulge a list of its members. New organizations such as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) rose up with different approaches to activism.
The NAACP continued to use the Supreme Court's decision in Brown to press for desegregation of schools and public facilities throughout the country.
By the mid-1960s, the NAACP had regained some of its preeminence in the Civil Rights Movement by pressing for civil rights legislation. In 1993 the NAACP's Board of Directors narrowly selected Reverend Benjamin Chavis over Reverend Jesse Jackson to fill the position of Executive Director. In 1996 Congressman Kweisi Mfume, a Democratic Congressman from Maryland and former head of the Congressional Black Caucus, was named the organization's president.
In the second half of the 1990s, the organization restored its finances, permitting the NAACP National Voter Fund to launch a major get-out-the-vote offensive in the 2000 U.S. During the 2000 Presidential election, Lee Alcorn, president of the Dallas NAACP branch, criticized Al Gore's selection of Senator Joe Lieberman for his Vice-Presidential candidate because Lieberman was Jewish.
Alcorn, who had been suspended three times in the previous five years for misconduct, subsequently resigned from the NAACP and started his own organization called the Coalition for the Advancement of Civil Rights.
Alcorn's remarks were also condemned by the Reverend Jesse Jackson, Jewish groups and George W. The Internal Revenue Service informed the NAACP in October 2004 that it was investigating its tax-exempt status based on Julian Bond's speech at its 2004 Convention in which he criticized President George W.
As the American LGBT rights movement gained steam after the Stonewall riots of 1969, the NAACP became increasingly affected by the movement to suppress or deny rights to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.
This aspect of the NAACP came into existence in 1936 and now is made of over 600 groups and totaling over 30,000 individuals. In 2003, NAACP President and CEO, Kweisi Mfume, appointed Brandon Neal, the National Youth and College Division Director.[46] Currently, Stefanie L. Since 1978 the NAACP has sponsored the Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO) program for high school youth around the United States.
When right-wing media maven Andrew Breitbart publicized a maliciously edited video of a speech at a NAACP-sponsored Georgia event by USDA worker Shirley Sherrod, the mainstream press recycled his libel without properly vetting it, and the organization itself piled on without properly checking what had happened.[48] NAACP president and CEO has since apologized. 21.Jump up ^ Fred Jerome, Rodger Taylor (2006), Einstein on Race and Racism, Rutgers University Press, 2006.
22.Jump up ^ Warren Washington (2007), Odyssey in Climate Modeling, Global Warming, and Advising Five Presidents. 30.Jump up ^ AJCongress on Statement by NAACP Chapter Director on Lieberman, American Jewish Congress (AJC), August 9, 2000.
33.Jump up ^ "President Bush addresses the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) national convention" (video). 37.Jump up ^ "Election Year Activities and the Prohibition on Political Campaign Intervention for Section 501(c)(3) Organizations". National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Region 1 Photograph Collection, ca. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. In 1987, Bishop Zubik was appointed Administrative Secretary to then-Pittsburgh Bishop Anthony J. In 1995, he was named Associate General Secretary and Chancellor of the Diocese of Pittsburgh, and on January 1, 1996, became Vicar General and General Secretary—a position in which he served until his appointment to the Diocese of Green Bay. Bishop Zubik was consecrated a bishop on April 6, 1997, at Saint Paul Cathedral and was appointed auxiliary bishop of the Diocese of Pittsburgh. The side has collapsed, the interior is open to the elements and the river washes in on the lower deck. It was visible for 40 years from both sides of the Hudson, but ultimately surrendered to age and, even now, a fascination.
Now, he’s working a deal to get the wreck out of here, pay his $231,000 in fines and bring in another floating restaurant. George Ferry Terminal on the northern shore of Staten Island and Whitehall Street on the southern tip of Manhattan. Before liftoff from Cape Canaveral, Florida, he put the chances of a successful touchdown at "maybe even" because the rocket was coming in faster and hotter than last time.
The Senate was scheduled to vote Wednesday on whether to open a trial and suspend Rousseff.
It appeared the highway is safe enough on Friday to move thousands more south on the highway.
The convoy will pass through Fort McMurray where the fire has torched 1,600 homes and other buildings. Morrison said the cause of the fire hasn't been determined, but he said it started in a remote forested area and could have been ignited by lightning. This amount of money would likely to be "by far the largest potential catastrophe loss in Canadian history," he said.
Industry officials said the regulations could hurt smaller companies and cripple a their job-creating business due to the expense of the regulatory process. While some researchers believe e-cigarettes pose a lower cancer risk because they do not burn tobacco, other researchers view e-cigarette vapor as potentially harmful because of chemicals released during the burning process.


They were asked instead to stay outside the meeting venue and interview Pyongyang residents. He said that as a young college student, he was lucky to take part in the parade and torch march before the meeting.
Cannabis dining, on the other hand, is a relatively new concept, and Sayegh wants to bring it to the masses. Carrot confit gnocchi with cannabis-infused pea emulsion was followed by New York strip steak with parsnip puree and a "medicated" red wine reduction.
In a country where young adults increasingly live and dine alone, the shows have become so popular, some hosts have made small or big fortunes from the virtual cash sent from viewers. Some avid fans say they quit watching soap operas, reading online news or playing mobile phone game to watch. While visiting his mother-in-law in a mountainous village, Koo Eun-je, 35, saw a cat outside, wondered how it survived and put out leftover fish for it. Some viewers have sent Koo virtual cash items, which help cover his living expenses and cat food. The show has replaced his time on Facebook and his day is full of newfound cat-related activities although he still does not plan to adopt one.
Stray cats are called "thief cats" because they are believed to survive by stealing food from humans. But now once in a while I look down, like beneath a car, to see what kind of cats live near my house," said Park Tae-kyung, a 33-year-old computer graphic designer. Flames are being kept from the downtown area thanks to the "herculean'" efforts of firefighters, said Scott Long of the Alberta Emergency Management Agency. Fort McMurray is surrounded by wilderness in the heart of Canada's oil sands - the third largest reserves of oil in the world behind Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. There had been 2,500 evacuees registered at the local recreation center, although it was not known how many were still there when they were told to get on buses for Edmonton further to the south. Federal Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale called it one of the largest fire evacuations in Canadian history, if not the largest. Now there is no bar to execute him unless he seeks clemency from the president and the president pardons him," said Attorney General Mahbubey Alam after the Supreme Court dismissed Nizami's final appeal.
We hope the government will now execute him without wasting any time," said Imran Sarker, a secular blogger. The Senate's website said Senator Antonio Anastasia made the recommendation for a Senate trial in a 126-page report he presented to the 21-member commission. The military said it hit "terrorist infrastructure sites" belonging to Hamas, the Islamic militant group which rules Gaza. Hundreds of people gathered around the woman just outside the General Hospital compound in Port-au-Prince's crowded downtown. The party will hold an emergency convention on May 22 to select a new party leader who would also replace the premier. It comes a day after Davutoglu's government scored a victory of sorts, with the European Union's executive commission recommending approval of a deal to give Turkish citizens the right to travel to Europe without visas.
Davutoglu was expected to play a backseat role as Erdogan pushed ahead with plans to make the largely ceremonial presidency into an all-powerful position. But the death toll in the Kobani area was so high that the campaign there has been suspended, Hisso said. Members of the Civil Defense demining teams in Aleppo province have developed their own methods, including burning explosives in primitive pits and detonating unexploded cluster munitions by shooting at them. Volunteer sappers in oppositionheld areas of Syria are improvising their approaches to one of the world's most dangerous tasks. Stunning Mount Ijen in east Java draws tourists by day and hundreds of sulfur miners by night.
The blaze closed off the main southern exit from the city, Highway 93, prompting many residents to head north toward the oil sands camps. Gas stations throughout the area were out of fuel and police were patrolling the highway with gas cans.
Officials said a gas station had exploded and flames engulfed the roof of a Super 8 Hotel during a live report on Canadian television. Then there were cheers as the first relay runner, double Olympic gold winning women's volleyball captain Fabiana Claudino, set off.
But if confirmed, the probe into Rousseff would be on top of a separate investigation that Janot earlier on Tuesday asked the Supreme Court to open against Lula and three of Rousseff's ministers in relation to corruption at the state oil giant Petrobras. The industry says the new policy is impractical and says it will boost cigarette smuggling. Ranjit Kumar, solicitor general of India, told the court New Delhi was committed to the new rules and opposes any stay on their implementation. The World Health Organization says tobacco-related diseases cost India $16 billion annually.
Following the beheading, the Philippine military launched an offensive, which security officials believe have killed more than a dozen gunmen so far. They're gonna do a good job at that." He asked his government to heed the militants' demand.
The brutal group emerged in the early 1990s as an extremist offshoot of a decades-long Muslim separatist rebellion in the south. He prevailed despite making outrageous statements along the way that drew biting criticism but still fed his anti-establishment appeal.
Clinton's march to the Democratic nomination was slowed by rival Bernie Sanders' victory over her in Indiana. Cruz, 45, sounding beaten but defiant, said he no longer sees a viable path to the nomination. But the voters chose another path, and so with a heavy heart, but with boundless optimism for the long-term future of our nation, we are suspending our campaign," said Cruz, a US senator from Texas. Some at his event expressed shock at the decision by Cruz, who had been the last serious challenger to Trump out of an original field of 17 candidates.
His victory in the state pushed him to 1,047 delegates of the 1,237 needed to clinch the nomination, compared with 153 for Kasich. Trump was jubilant after his win in the state of Indiana and his chief rival Senator Ted Cruz dropped out of the race for the Republican presidential nomination. The Vermont senator acknowledged that he faced an "uphill climb" to the Democratic nomination but said he was "in this campaign to win and we are going to fight until the last vote is cast".
Clinton is still more than 90 percent of the way to clinching the Democratic nomination when the count includes superdelegates, the elected officials and party leaders who are free to support the candidate of their choice.
Two of Ali's alleged accomplices Ahmed Hish and Farah Dagane, medical interns in the western town of Kitale, have gone into hiding, he said. At least 20 Kenyan young people have travelled to Libya to join the extremist group, according to police. Jesse The Tailor Jim's Hidden Treasures Joe's Rusty Nail Restaurant Johnston Self Storage Joyce's Antique Emporium of Bellevue (Antiques & Uniques) Just Playin Norman J. Hickton was nominated for United States Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania by President Barack Obama on May 20, 2010, and was confirmed by the U.S.
The board elects one person as the president and one as chief executive officer for the organization; Benjamin Jealous is its most recent (and youngest) President, selected to replace Bruce S. Local chapters are supported by the 'Branch and Field Services' department and the 'Youth and College' department. They were particularly concerned by the Southern states' disfranchisement of blacks starting with Mississippi's passage of a new constitution in 1890.
In fact, at its founding, the NAACP had only one African American on its executive board, Du Bois himself. In the early 20th century, Jewish newspapers drew parallels between the Black movement out of the South and the Jews' escape from Egypt, pointing out that both Blacks and Jews lived in ghettos, and calling anti-Black riots in the South "pogroms".
Storey was a long-time classical liberal and Grover Cleveland Democrat who advocated laissez-faire free markets, the gold standard, and anti-imperialism. In 1913, the NAACP organized opposition to President Woodrow Wilson's introduction of racial segregation into federal government policy, offices, and hiring. It was influential in winning the right of African Americans to serve as officers in World War I. Because of disfranchisement, there were no black representatives from the South in Congress. Southern states had created white-only primaries as another way of barring blacks from the political process.
The NAACP's Legal department, headed by Charles Hamilton Houston and Thurgood Marshall, undertook a campaign spanning several decades to bring about the reversal of the "separate but equal" doctrine announced by the Supreme Court's decision in Plessy v. Board of Education that held state-sponsored segregation of elementary schools was unconstitutional. These newer groups relied on direct action and mass mobilization to advance the rights of African Americans, rather than litigation and legislation.
Daisy Bates, president of its Arkansas state chapter, spearheaded the campaign by the Little Rock Nine to integrate the public schools in Little Rock, Arkansas. Johnson worked hard to persuade Congress to pass a civil rights bill aimed at ending racial discrimination in employment, education and public accommodations, and succeeded in gaining passage in July 1964. The dismissal of two leading officials further added to the picture of an organization in deep crisis. A controversial figure, Chavis was ousted eighteen months later by the same board that had hired him.
Three years later strained finances forced the organization to drastically cut its staff, from 250 in 1992 to just fifty. On a gospel talk radio show on station KHVN, Alcorn stated, "If we get a Jew person, then what I'm wondering is, I mean, what is this movement for, you know? Bush (president from 2001–2009) declined an invitation to speak to its national convention.[31] The White House originally said the president had a schedule conflict with the NAACP convention,[32] slated for July 10–15, 2004.
Bond, while chairman of the NAACP, became an outspoken supporter of the rights of gays and lesbians, publicly stating his support for same-sex marriage. Barber, II of North Carolina participating actively against (the ultimately-successful) North Carolina Amendment 1 in 2012. The NAACP Youth & College Division is a branch of the NAACP in which youth are actively involved. The program is designed to recognize and award African American youth who demonstrate accomplishment in academics, technology, and the arts. Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience, in articles "Civil Rights Movement" by Patricia Sullivan (pp 441-455) and "National Association for the Advancement of Colored People" by Kate Tuttle (pp 1,388-1,391). Hooks, "Birth and Separation of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund," Crisis 1979 86(6): 218-220. Zubik was born September 4, 1949, in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, to Stanley and the late Susan (Raskosky) Zubik.
That was the first successful landing at sea for SpaceX, which expects to start reusing its unmanned Falcon rockets as early as this summer to save money and lower costs.
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police is escorting 50 vehicles at a time, south through the city itself on Highway 63 at a distance of about 20 kilometers south and then releasing the convoy.
Wall Street analysts expect the regulations to herald a new wave of consolidation led by big tobacco companies. It throws off the whole flavor of the dish," he said, adding that he "micro-doses" his dishes to the desired potency of individual clients. When the stray cats finally come to eat the food left out for them, people watching online sit enraptured by their feline charms. But it has helped change negative images of stray cats in South Korea, which has traditionally seen them as thieves. An update from the Municipality of Wood Buffalo later in the evening indicated the fire was continuing to claim homes and had destroyed a new school. Rousseff is facing impeachment over allegations her administration violated fiscal laws by shifting around government funds to plug holes in the budget.
The Gaza Health Ministry said three children and a 65-year-old Palestinian suffered light-to-moderate injuries in an airstrike that hit a metal workshop in Gaza City.
They covered her body in a blanket and carried it to a nearby radio station in an impromptu protest, chanting: "Medicine needs to work!" "This woman came here to get help but couldn't find any doctors. The newspaperi??i??the first title to launch in Britain in 30 yearsi??i??had been seen as a counter to the trend of declining newspaper sales in an online world. Authorities fear that IS is trying to establish a presence in Kenya, East Africa's biggest economy and transport hub. Maria Simbra of KDKA Pittsburgh Publicly tell the World, on the Internet and TV, whether AHN murders healthy patients for organs, via fabricated diagnosis, fraudulent life-support, torture thereby, and Morphine overdose.
The 'Legal' department focuses on court cases of broad application to minorities, such as systematic discrimination in employment, government, or education.
Through the early 1900s, legislatures dominated by white Democrats ratified new constitutions and laws creating barriers to voter registration and more complex election rules. Mary White Ovington, journalist William English Walling and Henry Moskowitz met in New York City in January 1909 and the NAACP was born.[14] Solicitations for support went out to more than 60 prominent Americans, and a meeting date was set for February 12, 1909. It did not elect a black president until 1975, although executive directors had been African-American. Storey consistently and aggressively championed civil rights, not only for blacks but also for Native Americans and immigrants (he opposed immigration restrictions).
Six hundred African-American officers were commissioned and 700,000 men registered for the draft. United States (1915) to Oklahoma's discriminatory grandfather clause that disfranchised most black citizens while exempting many whites from certain voter registration requirements. The NAACP regularly displayed a black flag stating "A Man Was Lynched Yesterday" from the window of its offices in New York to mark each lynching. The NAACP lost most of the internecine battles with the Communist Party and International Labor Defense over the control of those cases and the strategy to be pursued in that case.
Since southern states were dominated by the Democrats, the primaries were the only competitive contests. Intimidated by the Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service, the Legal and Educational Defense Fund, Inc., became a separate legal entity in 1957, although it was clear that it was to operate in accordance with NAACP policy. He followed that with passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which provided for protection of the franchise, with a role for federal oversight and administrators in places where voter turnout was historically low. Benjamin Hooks, a lawyer and clergyman, was elected as the NAACP's executive director in 1977, after the retirement of Roy Wilkins.
They accused him of using NAACP funds for an out-of-court settlement in a sexual harassment lawsuit.[26] Following the dismissal of Chavis, Myrlie Evers-Williams narrowly defeated NAACP chairperson William Gibson for president in 1995, after Gibson was accused of overspending and mismanagement of the organization's funds. Large amounts of money are being given to them by large corporations that I have a problem with."[27] Alcorn also said, "I cannot be bought. Jackson said he strongly supported Lieberman's addition to the Democratic ticket, saying, "When we live our faith, we live under the law. On July 10, 2004, however, Bush's spokesperson said that Bush had declined the invitation to speak to the NAACP because of harsh statements about him by its leaders.[32] In an interview, Bush said, "I would describe my relationship with the current leadership as basically nonexistent. Most notably he boycotted the 2004 funeral services for Coretta Scott King on the grounds that the King children had chosen an anti-gay megachurch. The Youth Council is composed of hundreds of state, county, high school and college operations where youth (and college students) volunteer to share their voices or opinions with their peers and address issues that are local and national. A graduate and former Student Government President at Howard University, Stefanie previously served as the National Youth Council Coordinator of the NAACP.
Local chapters sponsor competitions in various categories of achievement for young people in grades 9–12. Crafting Law in the Second Reconstruction: Julius Chambers, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, and Title VII. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: A Case Study in Pressure Groups. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
He attended Saint Stanislaus Elementary School and Saint Veronica High School, both in Ambridge, before entering Saint Paul Seminary in Pittsburgh. In 1988, he was appointed Administrative Secretary and Master of Ceremonies to then-Pittsburgh Bishop Donald W. That's not right," computer technician Jean Michel Tius said as he watched the crowd march away with the body. Keystone Rehabilitation Systems KFC Klauscher Architects Knights of Columbus Council #1400 Jonathon Kohler, DDS P.C. Monda, DMD Mount Assisi Academy PreschoolMount Zion Baptist Church Mt Assisi Convent Mt Nazareth Center Muddy Cup Coffee House Lisa M. Hickton was involved in a wide range of community activities, and has long been an active supporter of and participant in organizations which benefit children and the arts. This was intended to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the birth of President Abraham Lincoln, who emancipated enslaved African Americans. Jews made substantial financial contributions to many civil rights organizations, including the NAACP, the Urban League, the Congress of Racial Equality, and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. The following year, the NAACP organized a nationwide protest, with marches in numerous cities, against D. Within four years, Johnson was instrumental in increasing the NAACP's membership from 9,000 to almost 90,000. More than 200 black tenant farmers were killed by roving white vigilantes and federal troops after a deputy sheriff's attack on a union meeting of sharecroppers left one white man dead.
Starting on December 5, 1955, NAACP activists, including Edgar Nixon, its local president, and Rosa Parks, who had served as the chapter's Secretary, helped organize a bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama.
He [Lieberman] is a firewall of exemplary behavior."[27] Al Sharpton, another prominent African-American leader, said, "The appointment of Mr.
Winners of the local competitions are eligible to proceed to the national event at a convention held each summer at locations around the United States. He received an undergraduate degree at Duquesne University in 1971 and went on to study at Saint Mary Seminary and University in Baltimore, Maryland, where he earned a degree in theology in 1975.
He was then assigned as Vice Principal of Quigley Catholic High School in Baden as well as Chaplain to the Sisters of Saint Joseph Motherhouse and Chaplain to the students at Mount Gallitzin Academy. Wuerl (now Cardinal Archbishop of Washington, DC), where he served until 1991, when he began his service as Director of Clergy Personnel. For 50 years, 1010 WINS has been a news and information utility for the New York metropolitan area.
The woman has been given oxygen and she is trapped in small corner of her room, said Abbas Gullet, head of the Kenya Red Cross. He is a past Executive Board Member of the Pittsburgh Public Theater, and served as its President. Men who had been voting for thirty years in the South were told they did not "qualify" to register.
Walling, social worker Mary White Ovington, and social worker Henry Moskowitz, then Associate Leader of the New York Society for Ethical Culture. While the meeting did not take place until three months later, this date is often cited as the founding date of the organization. Jewish historian Howard Sachar writes in his book A History of Jews in America of how, "In 1914, Professor Emeritus Joel Spingarn of Columbia University became chairman of the NAACP and recruited for its board such Jewish leaders as Jacob Schiff, Jacob Billikopf, and Rabbi Stephen Wise."[19] Early Jewish-American co-founders included Julius Rosenwald, Lillian Wald, Rabbi Emil G. Warley in 1917 that state and local governments cannot officially segregate African Americans into separate residential districts. White published his report on the riot in the Chicago Daily News.[23] The NAACP organized the appeals for twelve black men sentenced to death a month later based on the fact that testimony used in their convictions was obtained by beatings and electric shocks.
This was designed to protest segregation on the city's buses, two-thirds of whose riders were black. 449 (1958), the NAACP lost its leadership role in the Civil Rights Movement while it was barred from Alabama. Committing to the Youth Council may reward young people with travel opportunities or scholarships. At the same time, he began graduate studies at Duquesne University where he earned a master’s degree in education administration in 1982.
The goal of the Health Division is to advance health care for minorities through public policy initiatives and education.
The Court's opinion reflected the jurisprudence of property rights and freedom of contract as embodied in the earlier precedent it established in Lochner v.
Over the next ten years, the NAACP escalated its lobbying and litigation efforts, becoming internationally known for its advocacy of equal rights and equal protection for the "American Negro". Although states had to retract legislation related to the white primaries, the legislatures soon came up with new methods to limit the franchise for blacks. He served in the role of adjunct spiritual director at Saint Paul Seminary from 1984 through 1991 and associate spiritual director at Saint Vincent Seminary, Latrobe, from 1989 through 1996. 86 (1923) that significantly expanded the Federal courts' oversight of the states' criminal justice systems in the years to come.



New york public transit system routes
Railroad hq fallout 4
  • ANGEL_IZ_ADA, 14.09.2014 at 22:19:58
    The use of N scale trains cleaning automobiles, and electronic cleaners nonetheless, newcomers can with Micro Trains.
  • Daywalker, 14.09.2014 at 21:23:54
    Brandt Hickman's internet site only shows.
  • qaqani, 14.09.2014 at 19:53:25
    The infamous Lionel train set with the helicopter they go hand in hand all the.