Koi tattoo designs free gallery,tattoo wallpaper for mobile baby,tattoo designs for the back of your neck - Step 3

Categories: Tattoo Picture | Author: admin 19.04.2014

Koi fish are a species of carp (Koi is the Japanese word for carp) that are specially bred to have wild, brilliant color schemes. The Japanese word Koi translates as carp, but also as love, therefore koi fish are a symbol of love (the kind of love you have for your lover, not for your parents for example).
Since they are considered to be extremely energetic, koi fish tattoo designs usually have very lively colors and lots of movement.
First, koi fish tattoos depicting the animal swimming upstream may represent strength during trying times.
Second, and perhaps more influenced by Western thought (the Japanese had and have a very close-knit society), is the koi fish tattoo for someone who is very independent. Any carp able to climb to the Dragon Gate along the Yellow Riverwill be transformed into a dragon. Sharing much of its imagery with the Japanese for the koi's strength and determination, the Chinese koi is also associated with life-long good fortune. More often than not koi tattoos are very large tattoos, with intricate shading and colors to depict their rainbow of scales and their strong swimming motion against the current. Koi fish designs are also used in zodiac tattoos, more specifically in Pisces tattoos (pisces is the Latin word for fish). Japanese dragons are not simply beautiful design choices for tattoos, they are ancient symbols full of meaning. In Japanese myth, the dragon Ryujin held sway over the power of the ocean, regulating the tides with magical jewels from his undersea palace of coral. This is why in Japan, dragons have long been associated with water, which helps to explain the reptilian, serpentine appearance of Japanese dragons.
Guardians: Japanese dragons are akin to the angels of Western culture, possessing superhuman strength, a fearless spirit, and divine wisdom.
Symbol of immortality: their ability both to create and to destroy represents the eternal cycle of life and death, as witnessed in nature. Black, white, blue and red colored dragons are described as corresponding with the four elements (wind, earth, water and fire), as well as with the four directions (north, south, east and west). Yellow dragons are considered a rare occurrence, with a reputation for staying aloof from humanity, only appearing at opportune moments. Japanese tattoos have long been associated with the Yakuza, but Japanese tattoo traditions go way beyond criminality.
Tattooing in Japan reached its zenith in the 1800s, during the Edo period, a time when the power and influence of the common people was very much on the rise. Around 1870 the Japanese government outlawed tattoos in order to make a good impression on the Western world.
Tattooing in Japan was legalized again in 1945 by the occupying forces, but never really lost its association with crime. The Western style of tattoos (which they call yobori, as opposed to wabori) is popular in Japan, especially the old school style like heart, skull and rose tattoos.


Although tattoos are getting more popular in Japan, they still face resistance by the Japanese cultural code.
Tebori is the art of traditional Japanese hand tattooing ( as opposed to Yobori, tattooing with a tattoo machine). The advantage of tebori is that it is possible to create gradations of tone that are hard to accomplish with a tattoo machine.
The dragon represents the element wood and male powers, as opposed to the phoenix, who represents the element fire and female powers. Koi tattoo designs are often combined with splashing water, cherry blossom and lotus flowers.
Originally a ravenous pet species that stirred up silt in waterways, the Japanese have inbred them and turned them into gemlike marvels. Interestingly, the Japanese assign different symbolic meanings to the fish depending upon the way it behaves, either in the pond or in the wild. The koi fish is powerful enough to fight river currents and swim against the stream in order to reach its food sources or spawning grounds. It takes a lot to be able to go against the tide of fate if life has stacked the odds up against you.
Proudly going against the grain, with little care for the opinions of others and society, a tattoo depicting a koi fish swimming through a tumultuous torrent is a powerful and personal image. Their backgrounds are often as spectacular as the fish itself: with crashing water, suns and moons, cherry blossom and lotus petals floating along. Understanding the different types of dragons, and what qualities they represent, can help you select a design that will best suit your personality. Like the Chinese dragon, the anatomy of a Japanese dragon is a combination of parts from a number of animals, with each part symbolizing a quality from the animal it represents.
The only real difference is that Japanese dragons have only three digits on each extremity, while Chinese dragons have four or (usually) five. The association with the imperial family provides insight to the nature of guardianship that Japanese dragons can symbolize.
Inking a design on the upper arm, with the dragon wrapping around the arm, then extending onto the chest or back, is another popular option.
Like many other world cultures the Japanese had a traditional and distinctive version of tattoo art.
The woman of the Ainu people used tattoos to make themselves look like their goddess, so that demons (who caused diseases) would mistake them for the goddess and get scared. One way in which people chose to use their new-found wealth was to celebrate their art and culture with tattoos. As a result, Japanese tattoos went underground and became affiliated with the Yakuza, the Japanese mafia. Even today people with tattoos are still banned from businesses like fitness centers, in an attempt to restrict the yakuza from entering their place.


They are not primarily interested in traditional irezumi though, they prefer the American style of tattooing and tribals. Tattooing in Japan is also getting more attention among females than among males, something that used to be the opposite.
Some of the wood carvers turned to tattooing as an adjunct to their artistic careers, others exchanged their carving-blades for tattoo needles full time as tattooing grew more popular in the 19th century.
Some travel to Japan to be tattooed by a Horishi in the Tebori way (by hand), a time-intensive, painful and very expensive undertaking. In Japan, the dragon is considered a benevolent creature and a bringer of good luck and wealth. His most famous work is Beneath the Wave of Kanagawa, and has become the standard Japanese style tattoo water.
Koi can swim against the current, that's why Japanese koi tattoos are associated with perseverance.
Yakuza members want to keep a low profile and a full body suit tattoo isn't exactly low profile. Koi fish tattoos often represent victory despite terrible adversity: courageous triumph over a struggle. Since koi can eat a hefty portion of their body weight every day, they were expensive to keep. The beauty of the images created was considered a reward for enduring what was, at the time, a long and painful process. They are more interested in one-point tattoos, smaller tattoos on one part of the body that are usually done in one sitting. The traditional Japanese tattoo style is very detailed, what makes getting a Japanese tattoo time-consuming and expensive. The dragon and the phoenix are enemies and are often depicted together in Japanese art and tattoos. Tattoos are their way of showing courage, masculinity and devotion towards the organization. Smaller tattoos in the Western style are getting more popular and some go as far as tattoo removal. While inking the entire dragon is the most popular choice, tattoos featuring just the head of a Japanese dragon are another option. People started covering up these marks of shame with more decorative tattoos and that's how the art started.



Dragon tree tattoo yellow springs
Photos amalgam tattoo treatment
Birth flower july tattoo


Comments: