Tattoo art 2014 kraljevo,flower tattoo for guys,tattoo tips wholesale,calligraphy fonts with tails - You Shoud Know

Categories: Shooting Star Tattoo | Author: admin 19.05.2015

Men, especially those who loves sport and has well-built and flex muscles, can certainly add more impact in an amazing way through Shoulder Tattoos. There are numerous shoulder tattoo designs that will give you bold concepts such as the skulls, demons, and the beautiful Polynesian designs.
Some of these designs include the Cheetah Print Tattoos, the famous Boondock Saints Tattoos from the movie, Star Tattoos and many more others.
We do try to gather some of the web’s best tattoo ideas here so feel free to check out or refer our site to others if you want! Dating back centuries, tribal tattooing can signify one’s rank, wealth, symbolism and heritage.
In the entire world, there is no other tattoo society that can compare to that of the ancient & tribal Maori culture. Shoulder Tattoos for Men most of the times ranges from the exotic devilish subjects to the beautiful tribal art designs. When we look back at the ancient Maoris, there may be no other culture with as much symbolic history toward tattooing. Every single pattern tattooed on the Maori would tell a story and hold deep symbolic meaning.
While modern tattoo machines make the art of inking tribal designs an easier and less painful quest, tribal tattooing will never bear the same meaning or significance without the trained hand of a knowledgeable artist who understands both the culture and symbolism of the tribe.


History of Maori Tribal TattoosMaori Tattoo DesignsTraditional Maori Tattoos were made using bone chisels, in a process known in the Maori language as Ta Moko. The traditional Maori tattoos differed from other tattoo styles in that they were carved into the skin with bone chisels rather than punctured with needles. Maori women usually wore tattoos on the chin and lips and occasionally on the back of the neck.
Acquiring a Maori tattoo could be long and painful process which had great ritual significance.According to Maori legend, Ta moko originally came from the Underworld. Sick with grief, and with his face paint smudged, Mataora went down to the underworld to try and win her back. Instead of using needles to apply the Maori tattoos to the skin, the Maori people used knives and chisels called uhi.
The tattoo ink for the body was made from an organism common to New Zealand that is half vegetable and half caterpillar. While tattooing has certainly changed over the years, the Maori importance to their tattoo symbolism still holds strong.
Like with other cultural tattoos such as Celtic tattoos andtribal tattoos, it is important to understand research and understand the history and true significance of your tattoo so that you can respect it. With the Maori tattoos, it is that much more important to understand the meaning behind the markings.


The Maori’s do not get tattoos for purely aesthetic value.Ta moko is a core component of Maori culture and an outward expression of commitment and respect. In the past two decades there has been a significant resurgence in the practice of ta moko as a sign of cultural identity. Ta moko traditional Maori tattooing, often on the face – is ataonga (treasure) to Maori for which the purpose and applications are sacred. These messages tell the story of the wearer’s family and tribal affiliations, and their place in these social structures. A moko’s message would also contain the wearer’s ‘value’ by way of their genealogy, and their knowledge and standing in their social level. Ta moko is performed by a tohunga ta moko (tattoo expert) and the practice is considered atapu (sacred) ritual. The design of each moko is unique to the wearer and conveys information about the wearer, such as their genealogy, tribal affiliations, status, and achievements. It is important to distinguish moko from kiri tuhi, tattoos that are not regarded as having the cultural significance attributed to moko.



Inspiring quotes keep your head up
900 amazing tribal tattoo designs


Comments: