Login

Mother day flowers traditional

Chicano money tattoo

Artist life magazine covers,back side tattoo ideas,download fonts for microsoft word starter 2010 free - How to DIY

Written by Christopher Morleya€™s daughter Louise before her death in 2012, and brought out between covers now by her children, to the benefit of we who care about the founder of The Baker Street Irregulars!
Leavitt still claimed in the 1960s that Fuller had been an early BSI, albeit one largely ignorant of the Canon (a€™Thirties, p. But readers will learn a good deal from this book about Morley himself, and his Three Hours for Lunch Club preceding the BSI and giving it much of its early tone and personalities. Louise Morley Cochrane closes this lengthy letter by remarking: a€?The letter was not signed. Through the generosity of Christopher Music BSI, editor of the new Amateur Mendicant Society history From the Lower Vault (reviewed below by Donald Yates BSI), I have just read the late Russell McLauchlina€™s 1943 book Roaming Holidays: A Preface to Post-War Travel. McLauchlin, a Cornell man, became a lawyer after the World War, but instead pursued newspaper journalism as a career. Of Sherlock Holmes in this book therea€™s next to nothing, but of Baker Street Irregularitya€™s spirit, there is more than a little. And a€?if I have any Anglo-Saxon blood at all, it is such a tiny drop that I do not know its origin. Alfred Street by McLauchlin, three years later (Detroit: Conjure House, 1946), does get very specific about Sherlock Holmes in one chapter. And when Starrett created The Hounds of the Baskerville (sic) in Chicago in the mid 1940s, Detroit heard the view-halloo as well.
The paper, focusing on SCAN and the King of Bohemia in rhyme, was McLauchlina€™s hilariously titled a€?I Cana€™t Endorse This Czech,a€? which Edgar W. Alfred Street is where McLauchlin had grown up at the turn of the century, and the book is a superb picture of a certain era in American life. And in the chapter a€?Alfred Street and Baker Streeta€? we learn how McLauchina€™s devotion arose.
Not for worlds would I criticize that splendid society, being one of its most devout members. The young men, who lived on Alfred Street in this centurya€™s early years, held the faith as firmly as ever did Christopher Morley or Msgr. I knew a great deal about Sherlock Holmes, some years before I learned to read, and so did all my Alfred Street companions. So we used to clamor for stories of Sherlock Holmes and my father, a great enthusiast, was always happy to comply, often relying on his own powers of invention for thrilling plots of an impromptu nature.
And something like that went on in every household where Colliera€™s was delivered by the postman. The second reason, of course, was William Gillette, whose appearance as Sherlock Holmes, from his play of that name, was familiar by this time, and carried forward by Frederic Dorr Steelea€™s illustrations of those Return stories in Colliera€™s Weekly. Few works in our literature capture as this book does the time and ethos of the early Irregulars as they first encountered, and learned to not only love, but study, the Sherlock Holmes stories. Reviewed by Jon Lellenberg, a€?Rodger Prescotta€? BSI, the conductor of this website and of the BSI Archival Histories.
It was in 1984, at the BSIa€™s 50th anniversary dinner, that Bliss gave a talk about the Murray Hill Hotel era that began my own and othersa€™ interest in the BSIa€™s history. Bliss was a stellar collector and bibliographer, making him sometimes a compelling commentator on the Canona€™s creation and its creatora€™s life. Sonia Fetherston, the author of this biography, despite not knowing Bliss, has constructed an informative portrait, deeply researched and thoughtfully written.
At the same time, Ia€™d love to know more about Blissa€™s first trip to London, when he was in his mid twenties. But these factors do not subtract from an exceptionally valuable contribution to BSI history.
In 1955, living in Dearborn, Michigan, just outside Detroit, I read a newspaper article about the Mendicants and soon was in touch with Russ McLauchlin. When I left the Detroit area in 1957 to accept a position in Michigan Statea€™s Department of Foreign Languages, I discovered that an early member of the Mendicants, Page Heldenbrand, had established a Holmes scion there that he had designated as the Greek Interpreters of East Lansing. Inspired by the work of Jon Lellenberg (the BSIa€™s Thucydides), Music has just brought forth his From the Lower Vault, which draws upon the Donovan file and Harrisa€™s papers and reminiscences to give us a sense of how a Sherlockian society comes into being, and displays the sparkling wit of Russ McLauchlin and Bob Harris in its pages, where all of McLauchlina€™s high-spirited periodic dispatches to the membership (his Encyclical Letters) are reproduced.
A recent incarnation is Baker Street Irregular by Jon Lellenberg in which a leading Sherlockian scholar and retired senior Pentagon staff officer takes his young New York lawyer, Woody Hazelbaker, through the major events in American history from the early 1930s to 1947, focusing on the beginnings and course of World War II, with an emphasis on the ever-increasing efforts at espionage and counter-espionage and the personalities involved.
Now Lellenberg, having written an entertaining spy novel about the Baker Street Irregulars, takes a new approach (at least for this reader) by producing a a€?companion volumea€? to Baker Street Irregular, addressing the background of the events and personalities in the original story with commentary and notes, both personal and objective. One topic given special attention, for example, is the long-lastingA  effort on the part of many to enlist the aid of the United States for Great Britain at war with Hitler prior to Pearl Harbor.
One thing becomes very clear as one reads Sources and Methods a€” the author had a wonderful time writing this book.
Ambassador Ralph Earle II is a€?Joyce Cumings,a€? BSI, a veteran himself of the Defense and State Departments and of the diplomatic life, and a Washington D.C. For the student of BSI history, the personnel of Christopher Morleya€™s Three Hours for Lunch Club tend to divide into three categories: ones who went on to significant roles in the Baker Street Irregulars, such as Elmer Davis, W. Yet Bill Footner deserves more attention than I, and I daresay you, have given him previously. For this book, Christopher Morley penned a five plus page tribute to Footner, dated December 19th, 1944.
By 1921, when the Three Hours for Lunch Club was being convened, Morley included Footner in this magic circle. Its protagonist is a member of The Three Hours for Lunch Club, at the time it had taken Hobokena€™s Old Rialto and Lyric Theatre to stage period melodrama like After Dark and The Black Crook, relying on Hobokena€™s reputation as a free-range speakeasy zone to help attract Manhattan audiences over, with fair success for a year or two. The Foundry is an old brick building of a pleasing quaintness of design, faintly German in flavor.
The affairs of theA Three-Hours-for-Lunch Club and the Hoboken Theatrical Company were inextricably commingled, and the two organizations shared the Foundry between them. The contrast of the elegant furniture with its rude surroundings tickled the fancy of the members.
Morley, however much he enjoyed Bill Footnera€™s mystery novels, had a realistic view of their limited place in the genre. Without trying to put it so picturesquely a€” who can compete with Christopher Morley in such a vein?
For those interested in the BSIa€™s history, there are no surprise answers in New York, City of Cities, but it offers greater understanding of the setting in which the BSI was born.
And so on, if Morley had cared to set readers an examination: the possibilities in the City of Cities were endless. It is a distinct pleasure, particularly in these dumbed-down days, to encounter a solid work of old-fashioned, literate, witty disputation in the Canon; or rather, to honor Sauvagea€™s insistence, the Conan. The manuscript of Sherlockian Heresies survived for many years as part of the paternal archive saved by the three Sauvage children, and a happy accident brought them into contact with the editors. Sauvagea€™s critical strictures in Sherlockian Heresies are not nitpickings; this is not a chapter of faults, so to speak.
There is much more to challenge the engaged readera€™s beliefs and assumptions, and he takes serious issue with the findings of even the greatest among us in the past. Varian Fry was not just forthright and successful, he was such despite the direct opposition of the U.S. The Baring-Gould a€?editiona€? of his Annotated Sherlock Holmes is an offset-printed paste-up of various London: John Murray publications, and the texts reflect British usage as a result of this. George Fletcher is a€?The Cardboard Box,a€? BSI, and claims to have retired as director of Special Collections at the New York Public Library. In this, the first decade of the 21st century, anyone who can connect to the worldwide web can be deluged a€” and paralyzed a€” by a flood of virtual news, information, misinformation, blogs, opinions, images etc., on nearly any conceivable topic. Both the Senior Editor, Harry Thurston Peck, and the Junior Editor, Arthur Bartlett Maurice, of the American Bookman were obsessed with the doings of Sherlock Holmes. The result of the mania shared by Peck and Maurice was a devotion to tracking and commenting upon various strands of Sherlockiana, Doyleana, and numerous other detective appearances coeval to their publication.
This is an excellent route to appreciating the growth and development of Sherlockian appreciation essentially from the beginning.
Why, the a€?Editorial Adventure Storya€? by Trumbull White, in which he narrates his long quest to acquire a yet-to-be written manuscript co-authored by Conan Doyle and E.
Bret Hartea€™s first volume of Condensed Novels was entirely admirable, not quite so much may be said for the second. As an antiquarian bookseller, I cannot but be painfully reminded of an incident nearly forty years ago.
Meanwhile, other not-to-be-missed nuggets in this compilation include a very late (1927) article by Conan Doyle which relates to his interest in Spiritualism. Last, but certainly not least, this reprints various contributions by Vincent Starrett in advance of his immediate classic The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes.
It is difficult to imagine the state of Sherlockian studies or the history of the Baker Street Irregulars without thinking of Vincent Starrett. This collection begins with his earliest columns in the Chicago Daily News and continues when it moved to the Chicago Tribune. The book is necessarily episodic, but nevertheless it is possible to read it straight through with pleasure as well as by dipping into it at random.
This is a book for anyone who enjoys reading Vincent Starrett, but it may also serve as a resource to events in the Sherlockian world between 1942 and 1967. A book that allows us to read something new by the Dean of Sherlockians (as Starrett was often called) is worth a place on our shelves. What we knew by 1990 about the 1940 dinner was published in Irregular Memories of the a€™Thirties. In this the first of the BSJa€™s revived Christmas Annuals (a pleasant custom begun by Edgar W. January 30, 1940, was a golden evening, an evening of a€?entertainment and fantasya€? as Edgar W. Finally, after a Great Hiatus of nearly four years, plans were made a€” than to the imminent publication of 221B: Studies in Sherlock Holmes a€” for another BSI Annual Dinner, the first since 1936. I had been planning to take a two weeks' holiday in the south toward the end of the month, but in view of this epic occasion, I have now changed my plans, and shall be leaving on January 12, and returning on the 29th. Please inform the undersigned promptly of your intention to attend so that the Gasogene and the Tantalus may make accurate plans.
And on January 30, 1940, the Baker Street Irregulars gathered for their annual dinner once more.
The first order of business under the Constitution was the drinking of the canonical toasts. There is also extant a letter from Steele to Vincent Starrett about this drawing, quoted in the previously cited unpublished memoir by Steelea€™s son Robert: a€?I had an absurdly hard struggle with my Sherlock. This was also the first time the Baker Street Irregulars met at the Murray Hill Hotel, where the BSI dinners would continue to be held a€” cocktails in Parlor F, dinner and program in Parlor G a€” until the New York landmark was finally torn down in the late a€™Forties, to be great regret of many sentimental people. The 1940 dinner might not have included every Irregular of that era with whom one would wish to dine, but it was a fine list nonetheless. Denis Conan Doyle was the eldest son of Sir Arthura€™s second marriage (his mother, Lady Conan Doyle, would pass away later in the year), and Trustee of a very active literary Estate indeed. He went on to describe how, in the lore of the Irregulars, Doyle is pictured as a struggling young physician, delighted at the chance to a€?peddlea€? the cases his friend Dr.
Certainly one would love to have been a fly on the wall that night, or, even better, archy the cockroach darting among the drinks on the table, to hear Denisa€™s charming discourse, and all the other scholarship and tomfoolery that transpired that night, the first BSI dinner in four long years.
Meanwhile, and with 221B still rolling off the presses, I am sending you a first very rough-and-ready copy of the Gazetteer which you have egged me on, from time to time, to write.
I hope things are going well for you, and again let me say that your absence was a matter of very genuine regret indeed to all of us who look to you as mentor and guide -- to say nothing of your status as sponsor and editor of the Book of the Day. Re the Gazetteer: I'm inclined to agree with you that it might be extended to advantage by a listing of the more important clubs and restaurants, etc. I imagine we should not too often bring out a volume of ana; the public might easily tire of us.
In his essay in Irregular Memories of the 'Thirties discussing this first BSI anthol-ogy of Writings About the Writings, neither Robert G. So it should be, from someone who (born 1915) had by 1990 long been one of the nationa€™s foremost authorities on Victorian literature and culture. I know of no other such study as the interesting one you suggest, although it is perhaps odd that the idea did not earlier explode in the skull of some devoted Sherlockian. It seems to me more than likely that Doyle wrote that scene in His Last Bow quite deliberately, knowing it for what it was - a friendly para-phrase of the parting between Johnson and Boswell; although it may of course have been subconscious.
You have chosen a delightful subject for your thesis; and you will pardon me if I hope that you will treat it not too seriously, but with a touch of humor. I am leaving Chicago inside of a week, I think, for a voyage around the world; so in closing I must wish you - in my absence - all good luck in your efforts.
A few years later, an editor was interested in publishing the essay a€” the best of all possible editors for Sherlockian work, Vincent Starrett himself. The quotation is from Christopher Morleya€™s a€?Notes on Baker Streeta€? in the Saturday Review of Literature, January 28, 1939, not from any letter Starrett received from him. This independent Sherlock Holmes society had been founded in New York in 1935 by Richard W.
Since Morleya€™s letter of December 23, 2939, below was unavailable for Irregular Memories of the a€™Thirties, this reference in Edgar W. A copy of Morleya€™s letter to Smith below went to Vincent Starrett in Chicago, with the handwritten note: a€?Merry Christmas, Vincenzio.
When I was in Chicago a week ago I learned from Vincent Starrett that his book 221-B is actually to be published on January 30. Since Christ Cella's place on 45 Street, where we used to hold meetings, has been modernized and the old upstairs room there no longer exists (he has only a not very attractive cellarage; which makes me think of The Fiend of the Cooperage; do you know it?) I am wondering if the Murray Hill Hotel would not be a singularly pleasant place for the meeting?
You yourself would, I hope, perhaps feel inclined to present a proceeding of some sort; I mean a few remarks on the Obliquity of the Ecliptic, or whatever may be momently on your mind. Just for the fun of starting trouble, I am sending a copy of this both to Starrett and to Harold Latham of Macmillan; who will I'm sure see to it that each convive gets a presentation copy of the Book. I hope I may assume that like Peterson the commissionaire, or No, it was Henry Baker, you are carrying a white goose and walking with a slight stagger.
Beginning in 1945, Titular Investitures were conferred at the annual dinners to denote membership in the BSI. That it was the first one Smith prepared is indicated by a letter to Christopher Morley dated three days later (November as the month, in Irregular Memories of the a€™Thirties, p. There are forty-eight names on the somewhat woolly list, below, and they bear some analysis, following Miss Mouillerata€™s cover letter.
The other names on Smitha€™s list are familiar ones, though some of them are surprises to see here. Members by 1935, according to Morley's list that year: Ronald Mansbridge, Harrison Martland, John Sterling, Lawrence Williams. Ones who came into the BSI at the 1940 dinner: John Connolly, Peter Greig, Howard Haycraft, James Keddie (his son James Jr.
A few more details about some of these Irregulars of the a€™30s and a€™40s can be provided now, for the record. Of other names on this list, Harold Latham was, as we have seen, Trade Editor at the Macmillan Company responsible for publishing 221B: Studies in Sherlock Holmes. This was a 1940 collection of essays by Vincent Starrett, published by Random House, with an a€?Unconventional Indexa€? by Christopher Morley. More serious still, two more toasts stipulated by our Constitutional ar-rangements are absent altogether, and missing ever since. As to The Second Most Dangerous Man: The query about his identity was a€” as Bill Hall will tell you a€” the original, first, quickie, abbreviated examination for eligibility to membership in the pre-natal Baker Street club. Resting imposingly on the long table at which the BSI dined on January 30, 1940, was an a€?orthodox coal-scuttle,a€? authentically Victorian, which James P. The coal box was an ornament, and in it were stored such details of fireside comfort as slippers, unread magazines and so forth. Although Keddie was a contributor to 221B: Studies in Sherlock Holmes, he came close to missing the 1940 dinner until Morley unearthed his address barely ten days before.
Because of money, and his second wifea€™s health, Vincent Starrett never made it back to New York for a BSI dinner after the one in 1934. Bill Halla€™s copy bears the affectionate raspberry Christopher Morley often sent his old frienda€™s way.
It also bears the notation a€?$5.00 casha€? which was probably the true cost of the evening. The pattern followed by the BSI for quite a few years thereafter, of oysters (a€?shall the world be overrun bya€?), pea soup (as in London fog), curried chicken (minus one ingredient as served in a€?Silver Blazea€?), and a sweet, was set by Christopher Morley whose handwritten draft of the printed menu has survived. The quotation from this letter, taken from an article by the artista€™s son, was incomplete. Meanwhile, Starrett was already building a new Sherlock Holmes collection, with a big start in August 1940 from Logan Clendening. When this was written in 1990, the hope was that Sir Arthur Conan Doylea€™s sur-viving child, Dame Jean, might come to New York for a BSI dinner. All this within your ear; but the circumstances being what they are, you will understand why I can't be any place but Reno on January 30. I could and would, of course, if the dinner were postponed, keep you posted as to developments, and the probable time I should be free to make a New York visit. My brother Felix has a subtle scheme which he will bring direct from the State Department in Washington. The errata slip in 221B, as by Jane Nightwork, reads: a€?In the unavoidable absence of the Editor, a volunteer hand must call attention to the curious incident of what the Proofreader did in the night-time. Everybody is too pooped this morning to be able to give you any intelligible report but I must let you know at once that the evening was a grand success in every way. The only sadness is that I intended to have a copy signed for you by all those present, and in the general uproar this did not get done. Since you seem not to have heard the news, I am sending this by pony express so that you may know at once that the Irregulars met, feasted, d---k, and thought of you. Denis Conan Doyle made a neat little address in which he stuck to the tradition of the Irregulars and told us about his father's acquaintance with Holmes. Of course Christopher himself in person (but he WAS a moving picture!) was the glowing heart of the nebulae.
And, by the way, I think having vindicated Watson in the matter of the coal scuttle, it now behooves me to vindicate him in the Persian Slipper. BOOKS ALIVE: Man, oh man, WHAT a title, and doubly good for your book because none has a greater faculty for bringing books ALIVE than you. I was glad to get your note of February 27th, and to learn from it that you may be coming back East soon.
Since the first draft of the Gazetteer, I have added about 150 more names - still without resorting to bars or theatres - but more important, I have fallen in with Dr. Who the members were of the Irene Adler Division with which Christopher Morley and other Irregulars convened immediately following the BSI dinner in New York is a mystery, however. For many years, it was believed that BSI dinner photographs commenced after World War II, with the one of the 1946 dinner.
So it was a surprise when James Keddiea€™s letter above referred to a dinner photo, and a thrill when a print turned up in the hands of Mary Hazard, daughter-in-law of the late Irregular whose it had been: Harry Hazard, a solver of the Sherlock Holmes Crossword in 1934.
But to confound us, in the photograph are at least two men whose names are not in Smitha€™s minutes: William C. None of the seven surviving copies of 221B I have seen bears all the signatures of everyone we can say was at the dinner. Comparing signatures in one copy of 221B after another makes for further confusion Some men seem to have stayed glued to their seats throughout the signing session, as the copies of Starretta€™s book made their way around the table, while others seem to have gotten up and roamed around the room, signing one copy here, another copy there. Three particular signatures appear as a trio in one copy after another a€” James Keddie, Edgar W. Bill Vande Water has picked up where Harry Hazard left off, and carried on with his typical valiant job of assigning names to faces, but a few remain unidentified. The photograph a€” Ia€™ve been having enormous fun, showing my friends what I looked like nearly sixty years ago. I was also given a bit of a nudge by Archie Macdonell, who founded the first Sherlock Holmes Society in England in June 1934. I remember David Randall, and discussion of the cash value of certain Sherlock Holmes first editions.
The man who got me started in all this Sherlock Holmes stuff was not present at the dinner. I can see her point, but personally, I like it when beach balls are tossed into the crowd at concerts.
Looks like Luke Bryan wasn't too happy when he shook his butt on stage and a "Country Girl" reached up and squeezed!
On Tuesday, November 11th, 2014, Garth released MAN AGAINST MACHINE, his first new studio album in 13 years. From John and Yoko to Miley Cyrus, Annie Leibovitz to David LaChapelle, the cover of Rolling Stone has always been an art form in its own right. Back in the day, it was considered to be very prestigious to have your artwork or photograph featured on a magazine cover, and some of the greatest artists of our time designed magazine covers. While we have by no means even begun to scratch the surface of what is available with this collection, you will see the work of Jean Cocteau, Dr.
Some were chosen for their vintage value, some for their artistic excellence, and some because of their humour. This whimsical illustration begins to evoke an early modern style seen more widely in the 1920’s.
This beautifully symmetrical illustration was done by a lesser-known illustrator that did a few more covers for the People’s Home Journal.
Held sold his first drawing to Life at age fifteen and illustrated for many magazines throughout the flapper age. After studying at the Ecole des Arts Decoratifs in Paris, Lepape produced innumerable Art Deco illustrations. This comic artist studied at the Chicago Institute of Art and under Claude Monet in Paris from 1920-1925. While this Cubist-influenced designer was known for his posters, he did a number of illustrations for Vanity Fair.
Vernon Grant is best known for creating the Snap, Crackle and Pop characters for Rice Krispies cereal. Theodor Geisel began his career as a prolific illustrator under his own name, but began adopting his more well-known name “Dr.
This women’s fashion magazine from Japan featured beautiful illustrations on its covers. This lesser-known illustrator also did covers for the New Yorker and further covers for the Post. This artist illustrated a few covers for Gourmet, which announced that it was folding in 2009. Leo Lionni, a Dutch-Born artist was the Art Director for Fortune and the co-editor of Print Magazine.
Gebrauchsgraphik was an important forerunner of the design and graphics magazines that we have today.
Artist, playwright and filmmaker Jean Cocteau was one of the more influential artists of the 20th century. This was just one of the many magazine covers featuring the famous actress, Marilyn Monroe. This popular magazine for graphic designers and artists in the magazine and advertising industries got its start in 1940. Balet studied at the Arts and Crafts school in Munich and left in protest after Hitler took over Germany.
This cover appeared in the first year of the Journal, now known as Communication Arts magazine.
Herrero’s career as an illustrator and fine artist has spanned the Depression, WWII, and the rise of Silicon Valley. Print continues to be a go-to source for those in the design industries and fans of popular culture.
WDD staff are proud to be able to bring you this daily blog about web design and development.
Join our 746,498 subscribers and get access to the latest tools, freebies, product announcements and much more! Also don't forget to visit our completely unofficial Lasgo page with song samples of all the remixes! DJ Philip - resident DJ at the Illusion club and also known as producer of Zippora's Lotus Eater - will bring out a new Tales of DJ Philip II with the beautiful voice of Marsha. The original techno-galaxy will be completely isolated for the true, booming Kozzmozz-sound and from the tribunes the public will be able to watch their friends freak & dance. The Tech-House galaxy will also be back at its original location and will offer the most qualitative tech-house sounds around. For the fans there's the drum 'n' bass room again of course and this edition we opted for a huge chill-out with plasma-screens for your viewing pleasure. Will I, the successor of Castles in the sky will presumably released on November 12th, 2001 ! UK: Positiva is planning remixes and promotion to start off at the end of 2001 and a release in the beginning of next year.
We ditched the old menu because it was slow on some computers and not really browser-compatible. DJ Tiesto, well known from the danceremix of Delirium's Silence and his own Flight 643 is coming to Belgium ! On November 17th (hey that's two days before my birthday ;-)) DJ Tiesto will be DJ-ing at club La Rocca in Lier from 23h till 5 in the morning ! The full album will probably released on November 15th, 2001 as already reported here on dancevibes. This year we have seen the release of The Legacy and in February 2002 we may expect Push next single Tranzy State of Mind.
In the near future we will make it possible for you to add your own reviews and ratings too! The highlight was offcourse Faithless who won 3 awards !: Best international single with We come 1, best international live act and best international danceact !
The belgian Hooverphonic (a personal favourite) also won 3 awards: best national live act, best national album and best national female singer!
Belgian dance artists also won a few prizes: Best national dance Act - Milk Inc, best national single - Something by Lasgo, best national videoclip - Milc Inc. No one else could have written it.a€? We can agree, grateful for such intimate looks into the BSIa€™s foundera€™s life and thoughts. It records Morleya€™s growing sense of mortality in the late 1940s and early a€™50s, a glimpse of which we had previously on p. McLauchlin (1894-1975) was the Detroit News cultural critic for many years, and the book consists of 21 short broadcasts he did over radio station WWJ in the winter of 1942-43, when such things were scarcely imaginable at a time of global total war.
In a€?The Waters of the Earth,a€? for example, he says something very akin to Christopher Morleya€™s remark about the Atlantic I recently reported; McL. There is no traditional reason why Scottish blood should leap when the name of England is spoken. McLauchlin grew up devoted to Sherlock Holmes, but in the 1930s and a€™40s he was close to Vincent Starrett in Chicago, not Christopher Morley in New York.
McLauchlin wanted to do the same there a€” but appears to have worried about his status for doing so.
He brings to life a time and a place for readers today whose later lives and experiences have been very different.
This true faith, I am happy to say, has made much progress in late years and, in our own republic, it has solidified into an active fellowship which calls itself the Baker Street Irregulars.
Not only did we consider him a flesh-and-blood mortal, but we had the vague idea that he lived in Detroit and that we were likely to see him walking down the street. One was the Return stories appearing at the time in Colliera€™s Weekly, leading to their parents buying bonus volumes of A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of the Four: a€?this economical acquisition of a pair of masterpieces naturally prompted the close perusal of the same by our elders, producing much Sherlockian conversation around every fireside on the street.
He was careful to inform us that all his storiesa€”even his excursions into fancya€”had been collected and written down by a certain Dr.
In April of 1903, when McLauchlin was eight years old (he remembered having been five), Gillette brought his play to Detroita€™s Opera House, a€?and every young gentleman on Alfred Street demanded, with the utmost in passion, to be taken to see him, even if the family were in consequence obliged to temporize with the butcher.a€? The effect was instantaneous, and permanent. He came into the BSI in 1944, and almost at once received one of the first fifteen Titular Investitures from Edgar W. He provided encouragement to the young, and was generous not only with his time and knowledge, but with physical items, duplicates he had acquired in his collecting.


Ita€™s a shame it shows signs of having been cut down by the publisher to make a a€?marketablea€? book well under 200 pp. The groupa€™s original sparking plug was the ebullient, effervescent Scot, Russell McLauchlin, for many years the entertainment critic at the Detroit News. I had been a Holmes admirer from an early age, but my contact with his life and times had up until then been limited to the pages of my copy of the Doubleday Complete Sherlock Holmes, which my mother had given me on the occasion of my graduation from junior high school in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1944. After a single meeting, the membership unaccountably dispersed and nothing more was heard of it, although the young Heldenbrand had subsequently become an active participant in the activities of New Yorka€™s Baker Street Irregulars. Also prominently displayed are the inimitable contributions of the comic genius of the late Bill Rabe BSI, whose gift for offbeat humor was unmatched. Yates (a€?The Greek Interpreter,a€? BSI) is retired chairman of the Romance Languages Department at Michigan State University, and today presides over The Napa Valley Napoleons of St.
He does this in an orderly and well-organized but highly personal way; for each chapter he begins with a synopsis, then a€?Sources and Methodsa€? (a phrase fraught with meaning, or meanings, from his Pentagon days), followed by People and finally Places and Things.
This is shown through Woodya€™s eyes in New York and Washington in 1940 and a€™41, and his close encounters not only with prominent history-book Americans like Dean Acheson and Wild Bill Donovan, and British agents in the States at the time, but with Baker Street Irregulars as well like Elmer Davis, Rex Stout, and Fletcher Pratt, who did play such clandestine roles before America itself entered the war at the end of 1941. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, in 1879, he came to New York at the age of nineteen to be an actor; got occasional parts in legitimate theater, and occasional vaudeville turns as well, and achieved a certain sort of immortality by doubling as Alf Bassick and Sir Edward Leighton in a road company of William Gillettea€™s Sherlock Holmes. Footner had published at least two more mysteries by then (Thievesa€™ Wit and The Owl Taxi), and would write many more. A great central hall with a gallery all around, and the mighty traveling crane still hanging overhead; and room after room of different sizes and shapes, and all on different levels.
Morley gave New York, City of Cities nearly a page and a half in the December 11, 1937, Saturday Review of Literature. New York City Guide (1939), 680 indexed pages packed with an amazing amount of information about New York in these decades. Footner is interested in the feminine side too, Hattie Carnegie and Elsa Maxwell, and the anonymous corps of stenographers, shopgirls and waitresses without whom the city would grind to a halt faster than you could say Fiorello La Guardia, as well the haute monde.
He can and does wax poetic at points, for example his description of night falling and the citya€™s lights coming on at twilight as seen from the Rainbow Grill, sixty-five floors atop Rockefeller Center, still new at the time. The Waldorf-Astoria gets two pages, but many New York hotels, and their bars and restaurants which were vital to the citya€™s life, get unaccountably short shrift.
It may even help explain why, in the year of its publication, there had been no BSI annual dinner, and wouldna€™t be one a month later in January a€™38, either a€” not until 1940, after Edgar W. Of course, there is no overlooking the fact that the author left this book unfinished at his death twenty-two years ago, so that, rather like the appearance of the Hound in its own day, it is of necessity a retrospective work rather than a harbinger of restored better times. The Sauvage I knew, from the final dinners at Cavanagha€™s to the end of his life, was an older cosmopolitan New Yorker: a world-traveling journalist with a command of the most limpid, idiomatic prose in American English (and, I am confident, equally adept in at least two or three other languages), who spoke with a pronounced Maurice Chevaliera€“like French accent, something that was and is simply not noticeable in New York.
Mesdames McKuras and Vizoskie are to be congratulated heartedly for their excellent work of investigation, reconstruction, editing, and annotating.
1924), and thus was one of that vanished breed able to read certain of the adventures as they were published. The only area approaching this minor art form is his distaste for those aspects of American punctuation that put terminal punctuation inside closing quotation marks; then again, the editors did not permit this to survive their work, so the minor issue is moot in this publication. What he consistently demands is that it be the Conan, and he writes often and strongly of Conanicity and the like. For that matter, he is doubtful that the actual residence was even on Baker Street, let alone its putative location on that street, whether the bifurcated thoroughfare of the Victorian era or the long single stretch of the decades since. Of course, I agree with the editors that Sauvage primarily used the Doubleday edition, with its errors and Americanisms, occasionally turning to the Baring-Gould Annotated for commentary.
Previously Astor Curator of Printed Books and Bindings at the Pierpont Morgan Library, before that he was the director of Fordham University Press, where he published the Baker Street Journal for some happy years.
A hundred years ago, a principal delivery system for those kinds of material was the monthly magazine.
In fact, Peck claimed to be a€?the only true Sherlockiana€?; whereas, the annotators of this collection allege (p.
They demonstrate the state of mind of a youngish Starrett trying to work from his reportera€™s notebooks, showing his growth toward writing his biography. Joyce (a€?The Yellow-backed Novel,a€? BSI) is a rare books dealer, and a long-time member of Chicagoa€™s bibliophile society, The Caxton Club. Novelist, short story writer, poet, critic, columnist, bookman, he was the voice of literary Chicago in the middle of the twentieth century. Starrett was a man of his times and commented in passing on his times and the people who moved in it. A dozen appendices record such topics as a Chicago Daily News article about the discovery of the real author of a€?The Case of the Man Who Was Wanted,a€? a list of pastiches involving Sherlock Homes and Gilbert & Sullivan, a list of Basil Rathbonea€™s movie roles before Sherlock Holmes, Ronald Knoxa€™s a€?10 Commandments of the Detective Story,a€? an essay on Sherlock Holmes by Christopher Isherwood, and Jay Finlay Christa€™s abbreviations for the stories. There is one column, for June 24, 1945, for which this reviewer wishes to have been told more by the editor. It revived the BSI after four years of dormancy, and ushered in a new era at the Murray Hill Hotel. Smith in the 1950s, but lost along the way), we begin by reprinting the account of the 1940 BSI dinner which appeared in Irregular Memories of the a€?Thirties. I didn't get a blue carbuncle, or, for that matter, did I even get a goose - but the day was a very pleasant one notwithstanding.
The date crept up very quickly, and when I finally reached Earle Walbridge yesterday, to look over the proofs of my section, I found a number of errors which it is now probably too late to correct, since Miss Prink at Macmillans tells me the binding has already started.
There being no Goldini's or Marcini's available, the Murray Hill Hotel seems to meet the necessities next best.
Anything I can do toward contributing to the preparations for the event I shall therefore have to undertake during the next two weeks.
The errors will probably be discernible only to the inner circle of the cognoscenti, and to those select few they can easily be explained away. Shortly afterward, Edgar Smith a€” now the BSIa€™s Buttons, an extra-Constitutional office later to be superceded by the grander and rolling title of Buttons-cum-Commissionaire a€” sent out to those on the mailing list he had received from Christopher Morley some minutes of the annual dinner. Revision of this constitutional requirement was, however, adopted, viva voce, and amendment to the Constitution hereby imposed, in that it is required hereafter that the toast shall not be canonical but Conanical. Christopher Morley announced that the meeting, which was held as usual on a date at variance with the constitutional specification, had been called to celebrate the publication by Macmillans of 221B - a compilation of the writings of various members of the Society. Vincent Starrett, whose unfortunate absence from the meeting can be compared only with the intolerable absence of Mrs. We are able to reproduce opposite the appropriately fanciful menu of the evening a€” it initiated a custom of oysters, pea soup, curried chicken, and a sweet which was observed by the BSI for many years (until, Robert G.
I tore up two or three attempts to do it from an old drawing, finally put on my old dressing gown and posed for it in the mirror.a€? And in a letter to Edgar Smith dated December 13, 1942, Christopher Morley wrote: a€?Would Freddy Steele like to design a menu card or would we use again the one he did years ago?
Located at 41st and Park Avenue in Manhattana€™s Murray Hill district, the venerable hotel had seen better days by the time the Baker Street Irregulars arrived in 1940, but it captured and preserved the atmosphere of Victorian London far better than any other possibility in New York at that time (let alone today).
In the United States on Estate business, making Sherlock Holmes publishing and radio and motion picture deals, and doing some lecturing on his fathera€™s Spiritualist cause as well, he had been invited to the BSI dinner by Christopher Morley. Smith, prominent Sherlockian and secretary, or a€?Buttons,a€? as he is called, of the Irregulars, informed this writer that the trouble began several years back, when Denis Conan Doyle attended a Baker Street dinner in New York.
He added that it was probably the highest compliment ever paid in the history of literature.
Hudson to sit down at a meeting of the Baker Street Irregulars and to count you among the missing. It isn't as comprehensive a thing as I had thought it might be -- perhaps I should add hotels and clubs and restaurants to the list of countries, U.S.
Altick wrote his paper on Holmes and Johnson as an undergraduate at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa. Certainly I shall be happy to have a copy of your paper - entire - and I trust that you are right in believing it to be publishable. I am sorry you had to wait so long for an acknowledgment of your MS - which I received, read, and enjoyed. I had thought that he was sent to China by the Chicago Tribune as its Far Eastern correspondent.
The photograph below is of the lobby, looking past the reception desk and grand staircase at the corridor which led to the private meeting rooms.
Smith, eager for the BSI to convene again for what would be his first annual dinner, had suggested the Murray Hill Hotel as an appropriate place. We could have one of their private dining rooms, which are so entirely in the Baker Street manner and decor.
I might tell you that the addresses may not be 100% correct, but I think you will find them O. Smith is about the busiest person on earth at the moment, although he has taken time out to read your new book BOOKS ALIVE which he thinks is excellent. Warren Force, Harry Hazard, Harvey Officer, Allan Price, Harrison Reinke, Stuart Robinson, and Earle Walbridge. Since Smith was working from a list supplied by Morley a€” Woollcotta€™s name was on the 1935 list, but crossed off on the only copy surviving to be printed in the September 1960 Baker Street Journal a€” we must wonder about the legend of Woollcott cast out into utter darkness after crashing the 1934 dinner, and publishing his mocking account of it in The New Yorker. In a letter to Morley on May 10, 1939, discussing the progress of 221B, Vincent Starrett mentioned that a€?Incidentally, Ia€™ve included tentatively Woollcotta€™s bit on the Gillette dinner in 1934, from the New Yorker, as a sort of pendant to Fred Steelea€™s contribution from the same journal, which mentions the dinner.
It was not until 1945 that any of the original Pips a€” Gordon Knox Bell, Richard Clarke, Owen Frisbie, Norman Ward, and Frank Waters a€” began to attend the BSIa€™s dinners.
Starrett later used the title for his bookmana€™s column in the Chicago Tribune, which appeared Sundays for some twenty-five years. In the first place, they were declared no longer canonical but Conanical a€” Christopher Morleya€™s whimsical way of tipping his hat to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in his son Denisa€™s presence.
When, in the course of luncheon at Christ Cellaa€™s or elsewhere, some acquaintance would hear about the Sherlock Holmes society and ask how to get in, he would be asked a€?Who was the Second Most Dangerous Man in London?a€? If he could answer that one, he might get asked others if anybody present wanted to ask them. That was getting late to make plans to attend, apologized Morley; but Keddie made it nonetheless. On the occasion of the 1940 dinner, however, the editor of 221B: Studies in Sherlock Holmes was not even in Chicago, a mere overnight run on the 20th Century Limited to New York.
Smitha€™s minutes say that a€?The meeting voted simultaneously to send greetings and a fully autographed copy of the book to Mr. This meeting was held to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Sherlock Holmesa€™s first appearance in American ink (Lippincotta€™s Magazine, February 1890).a€? Not a great way to sell copies of the real reason for the 1940 dinner, Vincent Starretta€™s 221B: Studies in Sherlock Holmes a€” especially since lack of funds had forced Starrett to sell that superb collection of his the year before!
Dame Jean Conan Doyle did not share her brothersa€™ antipathy toward the Baker Street Irregulars, and in fact was pleased to accept membership in 1991.
Keddie, a publisher of his as well, at the company where he was vice-president, took it upon himself each year to write Starrett a report of the dinner. On January 30, barring accidents, I shall be four weeks along in a Reno residence of six, in an effort to procure a divorce which will enable me to marry Ray. Indoctrinated students will deduce that (by an innocent misunderstanding) a portion of this work was set from unrevised copy, and this first edition will remain identifiable by a number of irregularities, notably in Mr Edgar Smitha€™s valuable concordance.
However, it was signed by several at a most successful meeting of the Irene Adler division or Ladies' Auxiliary held immediately after the dinner. Copies of 221-B were distributed and autographed more or less by all present, and a jolly good time was H.
Now, as Holmes has pointed out, Curry is an excellent disguise for the taste of opium, and (you remember) would be the logical flavor to use in food into which opium was to be introduced.
He said that his father had known Holmes very intimately, and he even went so far as to say that Holmes's mental processes had influenced his father's thinking.
He also suggested that only Hitler could have written the impetuous and irresponsible letter which caused all the trouble. Julian Wolff, who made a couple of neat little maps of spots in the stories about a year ago (I asked him at the time to send copies to you), and he is doing a bang-up job with London, England, the Continent and the world - creations that will be well worth framing and hanging. I had photostats made of it, and am sending you a copy herewith, in case you haven't seen it.
And none have been found from 1941 through 1945, though some pictures were taken by others at the BSIa€™s special Trilogy Dinner at the Murray Hill Hotel on March 30, 1944. Christopher Morley (still beardless at this time) is at the head of the table, in black tie, leaning to catch something Frederic Dorr Steele is saying to him.
Absent from all seven are the signatures of Elmer Davis, Malcolm Johnson, and Warren Jones, all of whose names are in Smitha€™s minutes. Smith took on the work of Buttons in January 1940, sending out dinner invitations to the rather casual list of members Christopher Morley provided, and preparing minutes afterward, it was all new to him. His name appears in Smitha€™s minutes, but his signature does not in any of the seven surviving copies of 221B. Some names do not appear on either the 1935 or 1940 membership lists, and we will not see them again after this night.
Yet one man there a€” the man with the dapper mustache, raising a wine-glass in salute a€” is still in the ranks. Of course no one of my generation can forget the overwhelming, all-pervading atmosphere of the Depression, the atmosphere of fear, fear for onea€™s job, fear for all onea€™s friends, half of whom were out of work. My friend Basil Davenport, the one man I knew who literally lived in a garret, in the depths of the Depression, supporting himself by writing for that same Saturday Review of Literature a€” precariously, because the Saturday Review didna€™t always have the money to pay contributors. I worked at a radio station a few years ago that brought Miranda and Blake in for a New Year's Eve concert.
But today, like so many in country music and beyond, hea€™s saddened by the death of yet another music legend. He last played in East Lansing, MI on April 9-10, 1996, at MSU-Breslin Center and sold 28,393 tickets. It has been certified platinum by the RIAA, making Garth once again the #1-selling solo artist in US history with 136 million sold.
Now you can explore all our covers, and read full articles from classic issues dating back to our 1967 launch in our brand-new Cover Wall. Seuss, and various international contemporary artists displayed in a collection that spans from the beginning of the twentieth century to the eighties. Check out the biography of the group and listen to their hit-single Teach me how on the official Whyzer site ! Also released on that day is a new version of their full-album Chances and this version will include special remixes, acoustic versions and video clips !
It's not the regular performance because this time the whole international press will be present, most probably also including people from the USA and Canada !
You can now search through the news and you can also display the news about a certain category only (eg. The book had been proposed by Morleya€™s visionary friend Buckminster Fuller back in the mid-1970s, in order to record a€?the friendship between two quite disparate personalities of the twen-tieth century, and the influence they had on each other in the course of their lives.a€? Morley, a man of letters if one ever lived, described his friend in 1938 as a€?an engineer, inventor, industrial designer, a very botanist of structure and materialsa€? and a€?a student of Trend,a€? and the experience of knowing each other was a bit like C. Leavitt as an a€?Holmesian aboriginea€? during the early years of that decade, and he appears on Morleya€™s mid-a€™30s membership list for the BSI (p. It is the inferiority complex of the newly cultivated, the intellectual climbers, that gives them their passion for dressing up and going to public festivity. 430 of Irregular Crises of the Late a€™Forties, in a March 1950 letter of his to Doubledaya€™s Kenneth McCormick about Morleya€™s fears for his health. Smitha€”Morley remarking to Fuller in 1944 about having sent Smith (perhaps prophetically) a copy of The Martyrdom of Man, a€?the wonderful book so highly praised by Sherlock Holmes.a€? But even in his final years Morley went on writing poetry, his daughter noted. His vignettes are based a good deal on pre-war travel of his, from his home statea€™s and Canadaa€™s lake districts and wildernesses to sites in Europe, not only ones like London and Paris, but obscure ones as well both then and now.
Ia€™m obliged for my language and all that my language implies, including Shakespeare and Dickens. Still, what sort of audience did he and it expect for a book about travel in a world convulsed by war?
Smith looked up McLauchlin and the Amateur Mendicants on trips to General Motors headquarters in Detroit, and was greatly impressed, reporting to Christopher Morley in March 1947 that the AMS were a€?easily, under Russ McLauchlina€™s guidance, the most erudite of the Scions. The nature of young boys is largely unchanged, no doubt, but the sense of innocence at that time, where a€?the wara€? meant the three-month Spanish-American War, or even somebody elsea€™s Boer War, not the carnage of World War I or II, stirs a yearning in the readera€™s breast.
Youthful ears overheard these discussions and the name of the detective grew familiar.a€? a€” a pattern doubtless replicated in many American homes then where early Irregulars were children.
Watson, who enjoyed the incalculable advantage of being the great mana€™s friend and room-mate.
Later he lived in Pittsburgh, where in the 1970s he mentored its Fifth Northumberland Fusiliers. Bliss evoked that earlier Baker Street Irregularity when giants in the earth became Irregulars, writing so much to edify and entertain everyone else in it. I was one of his beneficiaries in both ways, but it was his time and knowledge I appreciated most, working with him on his superlative contributions to Baker Street Miscellanea when I was one of its editors, and on an essay by him for my 1987 book The Quest for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
Rufus Tucker (a€?The Greek Interpreter,a€? 1944), an economist who lived close by but worked in Manhattan at General Motors Overseas with Edgar W. Randall (a€?The Golden Pince-Nez,a€? of Scribnera€™s Bookstore on Fifth Avenue) first attended the annual dinner in 1940, not 1941. Not a term I would use, though all the other fine things she says about him there and on the page following are accurate. The fact that by 1981 he could remark upon the swollen size of the BSI dinner, that it had reached a€?the maximum number of people but a minimum amount of fun,a€? made him not a curmudgeon, but a sober observer of an historical reality that neither Julian Wolff nor his successors have been prepared to address. These days the BSI prints books in runs of only 100 copies, a far cry from the 750 it once needed to print for my last three Archival History chronological volumes, all of them sold out today. He was soon joined at the helm of the Mendicants by attorney Robert Harris, and together they guided the sciona€™s activities with the rollicking blend of Baker Street nostalgia and encouragement for tongue-in-cheek scholarship that has somehow always effortlessly imposed itself on such gatherings. Russ invited me to the groupa€™s next meeting and asked if I could compose something with a Sherlockian connection to read on that occasion. I, for one, convey to Music my profound thanks for his masterful job of editing, a product of his dedication to the cause that motivates us all a€” keeping ever green the memory of Sherlock Holmes and Baker Street. Each and every one of these subsets is a source of data covering many, many subject areas, and the whole creates a rich canvas for readers. The tense and uncertain atmosphere of those days comes across with clarity, and is a good example of Lellenberga€™s sense of atmosphere in evoking BSI history unknown to today's Irregulars. And like many would-be actors who come to New York, he did a lot of other things as well to make ends meet, including turning to writing. One reason why his detective tales have always been for me the perfect laxative is that I usually read them when I should be doing something else.a€? Morley had read them all, from Footnera€™s first one published in 1918.
At this time it had not been altered from its original state beyond what could be accomplished by sweeping and scrubbing. The members never tired of conducting visitors through the endless, empty rooms, running up and down the odd steps, and climbing the casual ladders while they pointed out the future library, billiard-room, the private dining-room, etc., etc. He limits himself for the most part to Manhattan Island, and goes about in his sleuthy fashion, inconspicuously conning and eavesdropping. Ia€™m currently preparing my long-overdue a€?sources and methodsa€? companion volume to my novel Baker Street Irregular, and felt forced to go back to an early section identifying and discussing the books about New York per se which informed my novel a€” three about the city itself (all but one published in the 1930s), and seven more about life there in the 1930s and a€™40s.
With that, and New York, City of Cities (1937) by Hulbert Footner, a detective-story writer friend of Christopher Morleya€™s and a fellow member of the Three Hours for Lunch Club, the prospective Irregular novelist may be able to do without the eleven books above. The Algonquin, despite manifold literary and theatrical associations, gets not a single word. Smith had arrived to take over the labors of dinner-arranging, notice-mailing, and negotiations with waiters that Morley eschewed. I heard that Bill had gone (suddenly, without long misery, as he would most have wished) and I carried onto the hearth the great oak stump I had chosen.
Given an assignment some six decades ago on postwar American exports to Europe, Sauvage interviewed a certain gracious senior official of overseas operations for General Motors at his office on Broadway at 57th Street. One such magazine, The Bookman, appeared with different content on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Bret Harte represented the United States in the role of Consul to a couple of European cities. He not only wrote one of the best biographies of Sherlock Holmes in The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1933), but kept green the memory of the Master in his weekly a€?Books Alivea€? column for the Chicago Tribune. At the very end (before a most able index) there is a chronology of the Life and Times of Vincent Starrett, with dates and events in the world beyond Starrett as well as those in his own life.
If you could go back in time to attend just one BSI dinner from years gone by, which one would it be?
It was a publication party for the first BSI anthology of Writings About the Writings, Vincent Starretta€™s 221B: Studies in Sherlock Holmes, with most of its contributors present that night. Mistakes can be corrected, assumptions confirmed, missing passages filled in, and hitherto-unsuspected aspects revealed. Starrett could be excused for overlooking it, since he had been out of the country at the time, on an extended tour of duty. The changes I would have made are of a rather minor character, and probably if it were not my own child I would not be conscious of the few warts that disfigure it. Our dearly beloved public won't know Staphonse from Staphouse (if that's not in the eight pages) and even if they do find ground for pinning us down, the controversy might actually be profitable. I hope everything comes out satisfactorily, and that you will be East again before too long. It was the first of an unbroken series of annual minutes prepared by Smith through 1960, the year of his death. A copy of the book, presented with the compliments of the publishers, was put at each place. Cecil For(r)rester, who expressed his sympathy and pledged his assistance in the Society's research in the matter of his ancestral relations with a certain governess. Harris says, the Irregulars meeting every January, at Cavanagha€™s by then, grew so many for the room, that diners no longer had the elbow-room to wield an oyster fork).
His talk that evening, Morley reported in writings reprinted earlier in this volume, was a€?probably the most charming discourse to which we have listened.a€? Later, though, as Morley also observed, Denis Conan Doyle (not to mention his sometimes volcanic younger brother Adrian) came to regard the BSI as some sort of conspiracy dedicated to usurping their fathera€™s reputation and accomplishments. Very different from Woollcott, he wrote in a vein of decorous modesty asking if he could be put on the waiting list and offered to undergo any sort of inquest of suitability. In every respect but this the dinner at the Murray Hill Hotel last week was a roaring success, and the book -- however it may ride the seas -- was properly launched. Altick is the author of many books, including the evocatively titled Victorian Studies in Scarlet in 1972. How he came to write to Vincent Starrett in Chicago, he no longer remembers, but from his papers at Franklin & Marshall come these two letters from Starrett, who encouraged him, commented on his paper, and saved it until 221B came along as a convenient outlet a few years later.
It seems to me that you have made out an excellent case and I hope you may find an editor who will publish the paper. It was, instead, a trip around the world of his own, paid for by the sale of his 1935 novel The Great Hotel Murder to the movies. Unable to identify Latham, I offered a complimentary copy of the next volume of BSI History to anyone who could. I propose that you and I appoint ourselves a committee, perhaps together with Harold Latham of the Macmillan Company, to arrange this matter. It isna€™t so hot, in my opinion a€” only about 400-500 place names, and many of the richest ones not geographical at all.
Just as soon as he gets a little breathing spell he is planning to write you a lengthy epistle.
His paper a€?The Creator of Holmes in the Flesha€? reads as if it had originally been a talk a€” perhaps at the a€™36 dinner, about which we have few details. Warren Force (died 1959) was in the tar business a€” founder and chairman of the Hydrocarbon Products Company, Inc., and a director and the treasurer of the Tar Distilling Company and Old Colony Tar Company at the time of his death.
The Five Orange Pips had been founded in 1935 independently of the BSI, perhaps in blissful ignorance of its existence; and for ten years they regarded the BSI as the lesser body.
Leavitt, BSI by way of the Grillparzer Club well before 1934, railed about it to Julian Wolff many years later, when Wolff had succeeded Smith as the BSIa€™s Commissionaire. An uncle of mine who must have been a contemporary of Watson in Edinburgh continued to put the sundries of his evening comfort in the coal box a€” which never had held coal a€” until his death a few years ago.
He was across the prairies and over the Rockies in Reno, Nevada, in the process of getting a divorce from his first wife, Lillian Hartsig, in the days when six weeksa€™ residence in a€?The Biggest Little City in the Worlda€? was the quickest way. Starrett, an action which, in the preoccupations which ensued, was probably not accomplished.a€? But other Irregularsa€™ copies did make the rounds of the table. Steelea€™s hand was steady, but some signatures show signs of having been inscribed a few rounds of drinks later.
I tore up two or three attempts to do it from an old drawing, finally put on my old dressing gown and posed for it in the mirror.a€? The parenthetical passage which had been missing held the clue. Randall hoped to resell it intact to someone, perhaps a library where it would be available for scholarly use, but in 1943 finally offered it up piecemeal.
Latham writes me from Macmillan that he will see that a complimentary copy goes to everyone.
I carried a coal scuttle of the Baker Street variety to New York, and it was placed in triumph, and, I hope, in complete vindication of Watson's reporting, in the middle of the table - we kept the cigars in it.
And, yes, I'll hang on to the remaining two chapters I have and use them (I am sure) before your book goes into print. We are thinking of putting out the Gazetteer together about June 1st, as a private effort, illustrated with reductions of these maps, which would really touch it off. This was his first BSI dinner and he was meeting virtually all these men for the first time that night. Ronald Mansbridge was born in England in 1905, attended Cambridge University, and came to the United States in 1928 to teach at Barnard College. 6, sitting next to my old friend Basil Davenport, who has another old friend of mine, Peter Greig, on his right. When I arrived in New York in 1928, I had a letter of introduction to Chris from Sheldon Dick, whom I knew at Corpus, Cambridge. I missed that one, but I happened to follow Archie on a trip across America, about a week behind him, staying at some of the same hotels. Basil was too proud to accept money from a rich aunt Juliet; but he did let her pay his membership dues at the Yale Club, which he called a€?the most inclusive club in New York,a€? and which he liked because he could take their thick correspondence cards and cut them to fit inside his shoes perfectly when the soles wore out.
Like so many others, he was hit by the Depression, but made ends meet by doing public relations work for various and sundry.
I remember an animated discussion with him once about a book on Horace we had published at Cambridge University Press. Although he didna€™t attend the dinner, he made arrange-ments for copies of 221B: Studies in Sherlock Holmes to be distributed at the dinner. We had a bunch of station beach balls that we were planning to toss out during Blake's performance. A But unlike almost EVERY other tribute we've seen he didn't decide to cover "Purple Rain".
Seal urged Urban to go, but the country singer recoiled when he found out what time Prince would take the stage. A Jake Owen found out that someone was doing that to his female fans and did something about it! Today he has sold over 51,000 tickets for Van Andel ArenaA in Grand Rapids and tickets are still selling!
In order to get around morality laws of the time, publishers had to present the magazine as art-based. But it sheds some new light on Morleya€™s composition of Sherlock Holmesa€™s Prayer in 1944, which Fuller was one of the first to see, and provides interesting insights into Morleya€™s relationship with people swept into the early BSIa€™s orbit, like Don Marquis in the 1930s and Morleya€™s secretary Elizabeth Winspear at 46W47 in the 1940s, until she went off to war. He was not a great nor even a very good poet, but he loved doing it, and despite his first strokea€™s handicap a€?he was still able to write enough poems to complete a final small collection called Gentlemena€™s Relish (1955).a€? One poem, first published in the Saturday Review of Literature on October 2, 1954, was a€?Elegy to a Railroad Station,a€? a tribute by an ageing man who still considered himself a Main Line Boy, to the Broad Street Station of his Philadelphia childhood that had been razed in 1953.
I suspect that he and I are the only Baker Street Irregulars whoa€™ve ever been to TromsA?, Norway, above the Arctic Circle. Ia€™m obliged to England for the law under which I live, for the English common law, which was developed through many centuries, is the law of America today, although many heedless Americans do not realize it. He died in 1988, one of the BSIa€™s great personalities and scholars a€” the a€?Prince of the Realma€? of this booka€™s title, taken from my obituary for him in the Baker Street Journal at the time.
He made a strong impression upon Smith and Morley to be included so soon in the first crop of Titular Investitures, and repaid their confidence in him through the decades that followed as one of the BSIa€™s leading collectors and scholars, writing for the Baker Street Journal, Baker Street Miscellanea, and his own annual, eagerly awaited, Baker Street Christmas Stockings which have been collected in book form.
He was a gentleman and scholar in the best sense of that expression, and a model contributor to the Writings About the Writings. For example, Peter Blau in his foreword refers to it containing the landmark talk that Bliss gave at the 1976 BSI dinner about BSI a€?poetess laureatea€? Helene Yuhasova, but it is not present.
While Park Avenue north of Grand Central was fashionable, the Murray Hill Hotel was south of it. But this book has made it into a second printing, which shows people still care about the BSIa€™s history.
It was during this rebirth of the society, beginning in 1975, that Tom Voss joined the group. Some travel-adventure books about Canada did not make a noticeable mark, so he turned to mysteries next, more successfully this time. But Morley had read it even earlier, he bragged: a€?I read it in MS, way back about 1916, when I was contact man for Bill at his publishers.


No mere scrubbing could really clean up a place in which the grime of decades of iron-founding was ingrained.
He is in a sense a stool pigeon between the mystery (New York itself) and the inquisitive reader.
Footner, like every other whose heart is capable of stir, does not see only our great ladya€™s moods of cockeyed comedy and exhibitionism. Morley may have been too darned busy enjoying New York instead; and tracking down the answers to the a€?little examination paper on Mr.
They have brought this book close to the form its author would have achieved had he been vouchsafed the time to do so. The niceties of selling vehicles in Europe took ten minutes; the next two hours were devoted to Sherlock Holmes.
Individual Foreign Service officers assisted Fry at the risk of their careers, just as, at sea, the U.S. Barrie, Jack London, Harding Davis, Anna Katherine Green, as well as his predecessors in Poe, Gaboriau, and Vidocq. As poor as any is a€?The Stolen Cigar Case,a€? in which Sherlock Holmes as Hemlock Jones deduces a condition of affairs which puts an end to his long association with Watson.
179, Starrett relates an anecdote at the Cliff Dwellersa€™ Club in Chicago which involved Arnold Bennett and Karl Edwin Harriman. Not every column mentioned Sherlock Holmes, but just as King Charlesa€™ head kept popping up in the manuscript Mr. Interestingly, the very first discusses the manuscript of a€?The Case of the Man Who Was Wanted,a€? suspected at that time to be an actual undiscovered Sherlock Holmes story written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Whenever a person or event might not be understood by todaya€™s reader, editor Murdock has inserted a footnote of explanation. It begins almost a decade before Starretta€™s birth with the birth of Carl Sandburg, another noted Chicago literary figure and friend of Starretta€™s whose birthday is also that of Sherlock Holmes, January 6. Hatch of Minneapolis, who supplied Starrett with some statistics regarding the detective story. Ia€™m obliged to EnglandA  for the law under which I live, for the English common law, which was developed through many centuries, is the law of America today, although many heedless Americans do not realize it. The very first, in 1934, when Alexander Woollcott rode across Manhattan in a hansom cab with Vincent Starrett to crash the party?
And we can get a glimpse of the magical evening of January 30, 1940, in a BSI dinner photograph a€” apparently the first ever taken a€” which in 1990 we did not know had ever existed. Much new is there: the dinner photo and a key to it, letters from Vincent Starrett, Edgar W.
But he went on to implicate Christopher Morley in defense of such a deplorable situation: a€?To quote Mr.
I doubt that time remains to enable the development of an essay on the Obliquity of the Ecliptic, but it is barely possible, if I apply myself assiduously, that I might have ready for confidential distribution for those present, a typewritten copy of the Gazetteer on which I have recently been making fairly decent progress. I was altogether too finicky, anyway, in writing you as I did, and I hope you'll forgive me. The meeting voted spontaneously to send greetings and a fully autographed copy of the book to Mr.
There were some veterans of the Three Hours for Lunch Club and the Grillparzer Sittenpolizei Verein, like Frank Henry, Malcolm Johnson, Bill Hall, Mitchell Kennerley, and Robert K. In my capacity as Buttons, I shall be sending you as sober an account of the evening as I can see my way clear to put together.
Anyway, let me know what you think of it, and how it might be improved, and perhaps for Christmas or some time before I can get my bargain-price printer to put it in type.
There was a short session of the Irene Adler division here in Reno, at which I presided - Basil Rathbone being at the Wigwam Theatre in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. He is still at work, and his most recent book, a study of the first ten years of Punch, was published in 1997.
You will be more likely to find one favorable to the idea of publication, I think, if you will abbreviate the essay skillfully; its length just now is against it, I'm afraid.
Starretta€™s journey began in the Orient and ended in Europe, with his first visit to London in some years. The suggestion of the Murray Hill, as well as the impetus for the 1940 BSI dinner, came from Christopher Morley. A cost estimate I recently saw for a businessman visiting New York in 1941 gave $3.35 a day for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Smith as Buttons communicated with the membership through memoranda to the BSI, sometimes enclosing whatever membership list was current at the time.
Bell, who was unaccountably omitted from the list of those invited to last Januarya€™s celebration; and that of Dr. Stolper and Howard Swiggett, respectively a professor of English at Columbia University who scandalized his colleagues by contending that literature should be taught by writers, and a novelist well-known in his day, with links to the New York Police Commissioner, and later to certain cryptic wartime British missions in New York. Leavitt, and Gene Tunney, plus at least one other, non-fiction and mystery writer Hulbert Footner, whose only known connection with the BSI is his name on this 1940 list. Leavitt swore to this version of history in a€?The Origin of 221B Worship,a€? his 1961 memoir of the BSIa€™s early years. Smith eventually coaxed the Pips into the BSI, and then struggled to save them in 1947 when Christopher Morley felt the BSI had grown too large and unruly. Hence the membership of people like Don Marquis, Frank Henry, Bucky Fuller and other friends of Chris Morleya€™s who couldna€™t be annoyed with studying the Sacred Writings. It was, I tell you, an ornamental piece of furniture, and when the fire needed replenishing, the bell-pull at the end of the mantel-piece brought the servant lassie from the kitchen with a cannily measured a€?scuttlea€? of coal, from which the fire was fed with great daintiness and dexterity. Smith sat next to Keddie at the dinner, and the two men hit it off a€” less than three months later, Smith was in Boston to join the Keddies Sr. To do so, he and Starrett produced a catalogue still highly desirable for its own sake, both for the many splendid items at what today seem sheer giveaway prices, and for the rich canonical fantasy which Starrett and Randall wrote into it.
We will try to keep the actual dinner within the blood royal, but as soon as it has taken place Macmillan can make good boblicity out of it to help the book.
Watson, but probably not so well - at least he didn't seem to understand him as well as he did Holmes.
Denis Conan Doyle is off to himself a bit in the corner; not intentionally perhaps, but capturing a sense of the remove between the Conan Doyle Estate and the BSI.
How well he managed to associate names with faces that evening, when high spirits and hard spirits were the order of the day, is unclear. A few of them, Irregulars active today were able to know in person before they fell from the ranks. In 1930 he was appointed Cambridge University Pressa€™s representative here, a position he held for forty years.
It was clear that he had made quite an impression; at one hotel they asked me whether I wanted whisky for breakfast.
Roberts, author of A Note on the Watson Problem, and then Doctor Watson, which Frank Morley at Faber & Faber published.
Snowa€™s The Two Cultures coming together and exploding like the fissile spheres of an atom bomb.
The non-BSI journalist Henry Morton Robinson averred, in a December 4, 1943, Saturday Review of Literature article (which the BSI did not regard highly; it appears as ch. There are welcome references to Christ Cellaa€™s and Billy the Oysterman in Morleya€™s literary and social life, and to the Saturday Review of Literature where the BSI presented itself to the world.
EG the Phi Beta Kappa campaign for Defense (of Intellectual Freedom!) They have sent me a booklet: a€?Phi Beta Kappa Fortifies Its Sector in the Defense of the Humanitiesa€™ etc. Ia€™m obliged to England for about 85 per cent of the social conventions which make community living a pleasant thing.
But the answera€™s in the reading of it: it was written and published for civilized men and women waiting and working for that war to end, with democracy victorious.
205, a€?received and transmitted such masterworks from and to the effete of the East, and commonfolk like ourselves elsewhere.
Yet he was a man of the humanities too, and not of Sherlock Holmes and Conan Doyle alone: Japanese art as well, with a collection of prints that are at Pittsburgha€™s Carnegie Mellon Museum today. By the 1980s he was the chief representative of the BSIa€™s Murray Hill Hotel era and its values, but he was never a relic himselfa€”he was instead someone very much engaged with the present. Sonia also does an excellent job on Bliss as a collector, and how he made his collection work for him, and thereby for the rest of us as well.
While vastly respected by Julian Wolff, our Commissionaire from 1961 through most of the a€™80s, I dona€™t know of him ever involving Bliss significantly in the running of the BSI. Of some three dozen mystery novels, his final one, Orchids to Murder, was published by Harper & Brothers in 1945, following Footnera€™s death from a heart attack the previous November 25th.
He was the first author professionally assigned to me when I started work at Doubledaya€™s, in 1913. Somebody had presented the Foundry with a set of elaborately carved and lacquered Chinese Chippendale for the dining-room. On racial issues, he is enlightened for his era, respectful of New Yorka€™s black community, and fascinated by Harlem and its society.
In the poeta€™s truest vein is his description of the lights at dusk seen from the RCA building. Where is the extra show-window that rises from the pavement at night to fill the front doorway of the store?
Navy actively cooperated with the Forces FranA§aises Navales Libres (Free French Naval Forces) before Pearl Harbor, in direct disobedience of official policy. Not that I would not love to leisurely flip through all of the four decades of The Bookman, but the essence of this volume is that Dahlinger and Klinger have already extracted the full contributions, and reorganized them chronologically and by genre (Chronicle and Comment, Letters to the Editor, Articles, Pastiches and Parodies, and Reviews), giving a contemporary flow to each section.
A lot of this material is familiar to in-depth students of the subject, but it is a quick, rewarding refresher course in the subject matter, with learned annotations, but with occasional nuggets that pop to the surface. One night, after a night of partying, Harte returned home to discover that he had lost his cigarette case.
I would swear that elsewhere (in Born in a Bookshop?) the same anecdote is told involving Opie Read and Vincent Starrett. Steve Doyle and his Gasogene Press colleagues are to be applauded for producing this project. Dick was writing in David Copperfield, the name of Sherlock Holmes would surface in Starretta€™s columns without warning.
The last column completely devoted to Sherlock Holmes is a review of Pierre Nordona€™s Conan Doyle: A Biography.
In addition, there is a lengthy section at the end of biographical sketches (a€?Personaliaa€?) of Sherlockians and others whom Starrett mentions in his columns.
Unfortunately, there is no footnote or entry under a€?Personaliaa€? to explain just who Talbot C. Or the 1941 dinner, when Rex Stout came for the first time, and electrified Irregulars with a€?Watson Was a Womana€?? That a photo had been taken that night came to light later in a letter from James Keddie of Boston to Vincent Starrett.
Smith, James Keddie, and Christopher Morley, Starretta€™s telegram to the BSI dinner, Morleya€™s handwritten menu, autographs of the Irregular diners that night, the picture of Sherlock Holmes that Frederic Dorr Steele drew that night, the first BSI membership list Edgar W. Incidentally, I think you did us all a service by naming Mycroft Holmes as the detective who solved his problems without ever visiting the scene of the crime or seeing the evidence. Later that year, he wrote the few words about it that follow, in a letter to Allen Robertson of Baltimore (then unknown to the BSI, but later founder i??of The Six Napoleons of Baltimore, and a€?The Reigate Squires,a€? BSI). After the Woollcott condescension most of us were content to go on without any Stated Meetings . It includes the membersa€™ chosen noms de canon, a practice of the Pips which may have inspired the Titular Investitures adopted by the BSI later under Smitha€™s leadership.
But it bespoke his confidence in Smith, who had yet to attend a BSI dinner, when he turned first to him for help organizing the 1940 affair. Julian Wolff, whose notable Sherlockian maps qualify him, I think, beyond any suspicion of a doubt for membership. This list has been compiled in a piecemeal fashion from many sources but as time goes on we hope to show improvement! Christopher Morley cited Swiggett in an Irregular way once, in his March 4, 1939, a€?Trade Windsa€? column. Stone of Waltham, Mass., had been in Sherlockian circles since the late a€™Thirties, was a contributor to 221B, and had at-tended the 1940 dinner a€” as he would the a€™41 dinner a month after this list.
As a matter of fact, by God, I doubt like hell if Bill Hall could ever have passed a really probing quiz in those early days.
Keddie, who had come from Scotland as a child, had a particular interest in this Baker Street relic in which Sherlock Holmes kept his cigars. I have in my possession a coal box which to my knowledge is nearly fifty years old, but which, until it fell into the hands of the philistines in this country had never held so much as a spoonful of coal. Across the table from him, a nonchalant David Randall tilts his chair back, his hand stuck in his pocket. Of all his twenty years of writing up BSI dinner minutes, it seems safe to say that this is the one most likely to contain some errors in the list of attendees. On the basis of the signatures plus the dinner photograph, thirty-seven, if that is Elmer Davis at no. He arrived in New York with a letter of introduction to Christopher Morley in his pocket; and, with no less a Holmesian than S.
Cambridge University Press had published Shakespearea€™s Imagery and What It Tells Us by Caroline Spurgeon, and I wanted to get publicity for it.
He was the BSIa€™s food-and-drink expert, and worked with me on the annual Oxford and Cambridge dinners in New York too.
However, Miranda made it very clear to us that there were to be no beach balls in the crowd during either performance.
13 in a€™Thirties) that a€?Buckminster Fuller, perpetrator of the Dymaxion car, hired a Central Park hansom and clopped to the [1934 BSI] dinner as Dr.
And this booka€™s discussion of Morleya€™s changing mood postwara€”noting that by 1947 he a€?was becoming more withdrawn and disinclined to company unless he himself had arranged the meetinga€?a€”helps explain the BSIa€™s existential crisis of 1947-48 examined in detail in Irregular Crises of the Late a€™Forties. Ia€™m obliged to England for the fine spirit which generally animates the whole diverse activity of sports.
If an occasional paper looked particularly choice, one might even send a copy to the Mother Church in New York, but I recall no acknowledgment or reply. 2 in my Irregular Crises of the Late a€™Forties.) But Soniaa€™s biography is nonetheless the best and most valuable account we are likely to have of Bliss Austina€™s life, and what made him the man and outstanding Baker Street Irregular he was. We have important collectors today, but none of them are doing what Bliss did with his collection, so one hopes this book will lead to more from the same. 50-51, of the BSIa€™s existential crisis of 1947-48 is so abbreviated that readers should consult the detailed account in Irregular Crises of the Late a€™Forties in order to understand fully what was going on.
Russ liked it and recommended that I send it to Edgar Smith, who was then editing the Baker Street Journal. We hadna€™t been doing too well with his early novels of the Canadian Northwest, and Bill wanted to develop a new vein. Walls and rafters were covered by innumerable coats of whitewash which flaked down like snow; and the windows bore a sulphurous patina that had so far refused to yield to soapsuds. This was arranged at the rear of the wide gallery upstairs, partly enclosed by handsome screens that matched the furniture; and in the little room thus formed a small company was gathered for the usual midday rites. They were of great importance to their author, for they gave him a chance to express certain stoic observations on the human comedy he had watched unflinchingly.a€? After Footner resettled in Marylanda€™s Eastern Shore countryside, he wrote nonfiction books about it as well. He points out the positive effects of Robert Mosesa€™ redesign of the citya€™s layout, but also shows his readers the lasting negative effects of Prohibition and Depression.
The effect was akin to my first visit to New York at age eight with my parents, and the overpowering Circle Line boat trip we took around the island: I still have the guidebook from it. The nugget within the nugget is that Doyle refused to be engaged upon the project despite an essentially guaranteed advance payment of half a million dollars!
The 1946 dinner, when the premiere issue of The Baker Street Journal arrived arrived at the last moment to be handed out? It was the only one ever attended by a Conan Doyle, Sir Arthura€™s son Denis a€” and the decades-long feud between the BSI and the Conan Doyle Estate dates to that night. Only a few dozen men had been present that night, and it seemed unlikely that a copy would ever surface now, after all these years.
According to Smith, Denis listened with bewilderment to the various toasts offered to Holmes and his entourage, and to the scholarly reports on various aspects of the investigatora€™s career. Keddie sent me a jolly letter about it, which, with yours, goes into the permanent records. The difficulty is that it is rather too scholarly for any of the really popular journals - and they are the only ones that pay worthwhile rewards. I hope in my menial capacity as Boots [sic], I have not, in doing this, incurred the wrath of my Gasogene and Tantalus.a€? Presumably the Morley list from which Smith worked was the 1935 one printed in Irregular Memories of the a€?Thirties (pp. But beyond that, their Irregular con-nections in 1940 are a mystery, and their names do not appear again in surviving Irregular records.
His inscription in the copy of Appointment in Baker Street that he sent Woollcott in 1939 read a€?To Alexander Woollcott in appreciation for loyal work as a Baker Street Irregular,a€? and in 1944, the year following Woollcotta€™s death, he referred to him in Profile by Gaslight (to Leavitta€™s lasting annoyance) as a founder of the BSI. What do you think?a€? I have not seen Morleya€™s reply, but Woollcotta€™s New Yorker article about the 1934 dinner did not appear in 221B. Other veteran BSIs-to-be not on it, but at the a€™41 dinner and many more to come, were Philip Duschnes the bookseller, Charles Honce the A.P.
Watson,a€™ a€?The Game Is Afoot!a€™ and a€?The Second Most Dangerous Man in London.a€™a€? These were suggestions, if you will, at the original meeting, but they were approved, and the Davis Document makes them Constitutional.
His defense, when threatened with inquiry, was to roar (and I use the word deliberately a€” ROAR), a€?Dona€™t put me to the question!a€? As him and dare him, for me, to deny it. In that instance, the coal box, which stood by the fireplace chair, had been used by my mother and by my grandmother before her for the odds and ends of sewing and knitting utensils that a Scotswoman picks up in the afternoon that even her time of rest may not be entirely wasted!
Eliot), FVM had returned to New York in 1938 to be trade editor at the Harcourt, Brace company.
Suit will be filed as soon as possible after my residence (six weeks) is established; and if there is no opposition there will be no delay.
But, simply to put the reader on the alert, a few obvious corrections may be noteda€? a€” and Miss Nightwork, perennial Ph.D. Elmer Davis was perhaps the best known national celebrity in the BSI at the time, from his work as a CBS radio newsman. In those days the very best place to get a book mentioned was Morleya€™s a€?Trade Windsa€? column in the Saturday Review of Literature.
We played a game to see who would be the first to telephone the other each year on December 16th, with the words a€?O Sapienta,a€? which we always found on that day in our Cambridge Pocket Diaries. I dona€™t remember his attendance at any of the BSI dinners; but I recall vividly that when we would meet him at dinner at the St.
People were there to see her and Blake and she did not want them distracted by bouncing beach balls! Watson.a€? No data corroborating this assertion is known to exist, or that Fuller even attended that dinner (or any other BSI dinner as far as I recall). He never went into the Knothole [his writing cabin at home] again, nor would he allow anyone else to sort his papers.a€? After a third stroke in 1955 a€?he required round-the-clock nursing care and remained bedridden for the rest of his life,a€? which came to an end on March 28, 1957.
And Ia€™m obliged to England for at least nine-tenths of the books which Ia€™ve ever read in all my life. You are now, yourself, at liberty to write that paper on the Scandal, and I shall look forward to it. It soon appeared in the BSJ, and as if by magic a new world of bonhomie was opened to me, an association that has lasted a lifetime.
When a second hiatus occurred, the accumulated papers comprising the Mendicantsa€™ archives that had been passed to Voss went into storage.
Nevertheless, the members of the Three-Hours-for-Lunch Club loved their unconventional clubhouse. Christopher Morley, who modestly describes himself as steward in perpetuum to the Three Hours for Lunch Club, but is really the whole works. And in 1937, the same year that four of his mystery novels came out, he published another quite different book entirely: a€?a testament of his love of New York City,a€? Morley called it a€” New York, City of Cities.
Fry, who ended his life uncelebrated, suffering from alcoholism and making a poor living teaching Greek and Latin to young boys at a New England prep school, had been more than heroic, rescuing upwards of 2,000 persons, until State had Vichy throw him out of France. He contributed quizzes to Ellery Queena€™s Mystery Magazine in the 1940s and compiled an extensive bibliography of writers of detective fiction that exists in at least two typewritten copies. The 1948 a€?committee in cameraa€? dinner, when the BSI's future hung by a thread upon Christopher Morleya€™s discontent?
There were Crossword Puzzle winners like Basil Davenport, Harry Hazard, Harvey Officer, and Earle Walbridge.
Bell was there at the time, and when Bell died in 1947, Starrett recalled in his a€?Books Alivea€? column in the Tribune walking up and down Baker Street with Bell, arguing about which house had been Sherlock Holmesa€™s. Jackson of Barre, Vermont, a Crossword solver, and Morleya€™s friend and Grillparzer crony Buckminster Fuller. Williams (died 1940), who brought his son Peter to the 1940 BSI dinner, was art director at the American Book Company, a well-known book and print collector, and an author of childrena€™s travel books. Would Smith have added Alexander Woollcott to the BSIa€™s membership list without consulting Christopher Morley? If we are met with hostility, the case will have to be argued, and I've no way of knowing how long it might take. Smith is down the table on the opposite side, not yet at its head where he soon will be for the rest of his life. So are the signatures of two more men not named in Smitha€™s minutes, who may be among the unidentified faces in the picture: Ernest S. Following the dinner, Harry Hazard prepared a partial key to the photograph.Elmer Davis is not on it, and the face at no. Roberts as a mentor back home, found himself a Baker Street Irregular on Morleya€™s 1935 membership list. I met him when I was an undergraduate at Cambridge, attending his lectures on Samuel Johnson, but it was in publishing that he made his reputation. Spurgeon showed the kind of man Shakespeare must have been by tabulating all the metaphors and similes he used, showing him to be familiar with the countryside, gardens, and domestic animals. We thought it began one of the Collects in the Prayer Book; but we were puzzled at its having a special day.
Regis Hotel with that most generous host, Howard Goodhart, Rosenbach always had a full bottle of whisky at his place at the table, while the rest of us drank wine.
When we became acquainted with Vincent Starrett after he published The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes in late 1933, we found him a more gracious point of exchange. Mike Whelan, the current Wiggins, uses that term, a€?for the young Irregulars of the a€™60s and a€™70s,a€? on pp.
Prominent among these documents was an exhaustive record of the doings of the society that had been brought together by Mendicant Raymond Donovan, who had joined in 1948.
As I have written elsewhere, Julian was the master of the one-liner, and the consummate detector of humbug and pretense. Van Allen Bradley (author of Gold in Your Attic), offered to sell me that original autograph letter. Or perhaps the dinner a€” the date still uncertain a€” when Jim Montgomery sang a€?Aunt Claraa€? for the first time. Recently (within a year) I had the same problem on my hands - and found no American editor whatever for a Sherlockian essay which has since found place in an English Symposium or anthology issued as a book.
As a charter member, I call for a prompt and continued honoring of the wise provisions of The Founding Fathers. Weber declared himself a€?Judge Lynch,a€? his pen-name as chief mystery book reviewer in the Saturday Review of Literature.
James Keddie sits next to him, and on the table nearby is the orthodox coal-scuttle he has brought from Boston. Colling, a former New York Evening Post colleague of Morleya€™s (its movie critic, who helped turn Morleya€™s 1922 novel Where the Blue Begins into a play in 1925), and H. He attended the annual dinner for the first time in 1936, and is the only living person to have attended BSI dinners at both the Murray Hill Hotel and, before that, Christ Cellaa€™s speakeasy.
He was Secretary to the Syndics of Cambridge University Press from 1922 to 1948, and more than any other one man he had brought the University Press out of the academic backwaters into the mainstream of publishing. My wife and I spent three long evenings reading four of Morleya€™s books and doing the same to him. Fate dictated that the file should eventually end up in the hands of Music, who joined the group in 2001.
Some of the most disturbing and tantalizing things in his testament are unfinished scraps of overheard conversation.
Sadly I could not afford the approximately $150 he asked for it, and it went to someone else. Edgar Smitha€™s affectionate zeal, not less than his Sherlockian scholarship, his gusto in pamphleteering, his delight in keeping orderly records, and his access to mimeographic and parchment-engrossing and secretarial resources, all these were irresistible. Henry Morton Robinson was a popular writer whose 1943 Saturday Review article about the BSI, a€?Baker Street Irregularities,a€? was reprinted in Irregular Memories of the a€™Thirties.
Weber, had been at the 1936 dinner, and the 1940 too, despite the silence of Smitha€™s minutes on that score.
Bell at the Victoria Hotel, to found the BSIa€™s first scion society, The Speckled Band of Boston.
Price, the American Bank Note Company executive who had solved the Sherlock Holmes Crossword in 1934. Davis and Hazard had been at the 1936 dinner together a€” their signatures are both on a surviving copy of that nighta€™s menu. His a€?Profile of a New York Irregular,a€? about Basil Davenport, appeared in Irregular Proceedings of the Mid a€™Forties. With his opulence of physique and temperament he seems to belong to a younger age than ours. I dona€™t suppose that any society of Amateur Mendicants has ever had a more agreeable or competent fugleman.
Simeon Strunsky at the New York Times, a€?dean of grammarians,a€? as Morley liked to call him, had been on the 1935 membership list as well, though he (like Rosenbach) never attended a BSI dinner.
Standing against the wall are two of Morleya€™s closest friends, Bill Hall in deerstalker, and Robert K.
He was the author of A Note on the Watson Problem, 100 copies, privately printed at the Cambridge U.P. His heartiness, his nimble play with words, his penchant for the theater, all stamp him as a belated Elizabethan.
John Winterich was a prominent critic who had also been a colleague of Morleya€™s at the Saturday Review of Literature. Mans-bridge lives in Connecticut, and it is an honor to publish the following reminiscence here. Leavitt, Harvey Officer, James Keddie, Earle Walbridge, and other legendary figures from the BSIa€™s early days. He could be serious, but never solemn; the lighter side of letters and life appealed to him, and he became prominent in the affairs of both Sherlock Holmes Societies (pre-war and post-war) in England.
Stone and Howard Haycraft, sitting against the wall further down, preserve a serious demeanor. He ended up with two-thirds of a column in Whoa€™s Who, and many honors: Master of Pembroke College, Cambridge, Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University, and finally Sir Sydney. Across the table, Charlie Goodman and his brother Jack beam at the camera, while Mitchell Kennerley the bookman, who will take his own life ten years hence, studies the back of his hand somberly. Further down, Harvey Officer, soon to be the BSIa€™s first songster with his Irregular anthem a€?The Road to Baker Street,a€? smiles shyly at the camera. C.,a€? bluff, friendly but business-like, at ease in any company and in any country a€” even riding a camel in Egypt, winning a race against another one ridden by an Oxford man. The owlish bespectacled man at the bottom of the picture may or may not be Elmer Davis; across from him, Earle Walbridge makes another appearance in what will long stand as the record for unbroken attendance at the annual dinners. Basil Davenport turns toward Peter Greig, as Ronald Mansbridge raises a wine-glass in salute.




Tattoo factory ru photo gallery
Piercing shops near 85015


Comments

  • Ledy_MamedGunesli, 19.02.2015 at 14:52:59

    The Diak tribes tattoos not in Christian.
  • KENAN18, 19.02.2015 at 14:24:37

    Effect on me, as an alternative of regretting I fell completely in love with.
  • EPPO, 19.02.2015 at 20:36:14

    Monster 3d tattoos can the tattoo, but mostly.
  • AYAN, 19.02.2015 at 20:10:57

    Return for a few days this Might and.