One thing that has been very consistent about Albert Raymond Mortona€™s documents is that he invariably listed his mothera€™s name as Ida Louise Easley.
We searched for twenty-five years to find any record of this woman, other than those listed by Raymond, and were infuriatingly unsuccessfula€¦ until June 2012.
Ida Louise Easley was born in Oct 1856 (according to the 1900 census for Winslow, Navajo, AZ) in Macoupin County, Illinois. She was thirteen years old in the 1870 Federal census for Chetopa, Neosho Co., KS and still living with her parents and siblings at that time. We find her (at age 18) still residing with her siblings in the 1875 Kansas state census, in Neosho Co.
In the 1880 Federal census for Lincoln, Neosho, Kansas, we find Aaron and Ida Bonham with a new set of twin boys, just a few months old, Clarence and Lawrence, born in early 1880.
At about the same time, Aaron Bonhama€™s parents had settled in Franklin Co., Kansas, about 80 miles to the north. After this time, we can find no document to indicate that Aaron Bonham was still alive, but neither can we prove that he had died. Aaron and Ida could have divorced, she then quickly married Ira Morton in the fall of 1885 (after the census) and they could have had a son, Raymond, the following year--Sept 1886. Aaron could have been away for an extended period and Ida could have met Ira Morton and had a child out of wedlock before Aarona€™s return. Now, keeping that dilemma in mind, leta€™s proceed with the other documents that we have been able to find for Ida L.
Note that at the time of this marriage, she was still going by the name of a€?Bonhama€? -- not Morton. The 1890 Federal census would have been very helpful to us here, but unfortunately, it was destroyed. We would never have thought to search for this record under the names of a€?Holmesa€? without first finding the record of her marriage--above.
In the very same year, and census, for the same county, we find that by the time the census taker had moved on to the home of Martha Bonham (the widowed mother of Aaron Bonham--and mother-in-law of Ida L. Now, this census was just a very short time after the previous exhibit (above) but here, Ray is listed as being 10 years old, and with the surname of a€?Bonham.a€? It is the same young boy. Even though Raya€™s mother had moved west, to Arizona, Ray continued to live with Martha Bonham.
The question must arise, that if Ray was born a€?out of wed-locka€? while Marthaa€™s daughter-in-law was still married to her son, Aaron, one might think that of all of the children, Ray may have been the least likely of the children for Martha Bonham to take into her home to raise. Whether Ray was actually going by the Bonham name, as indicated above, or whether the census taker once again made an assumption of that, is not known. In the 1905 KS State census we again find this family still living in Stafford Co., KS with Frank Bonham now showing as the head of the household, and Martha was still alive at age 78, but Ray is no longer living with them. It is interesting that Ida stated that her parent were born in KY, because in prior census records she had always correctly stated they were born in Tennessee. In the 1920 Federal census for Bakersfield, Kern Co., CA we find the family still in this community. Note that Margaret Bonham Kelly had named her oldest son, William Raymond Kelly, with his middle name being a remembrance of her younger brother, Albert Raymond Morton.
We have heard that Ida Louise Easley Bonham (Morton) Holmes Hamilton passed away in Bakersfield, CA in the 1930s but we do not have a specific date for her death at this time.
Note that at the time of this marriage, she was still going by the name of a€?Bonhama€? -- not Morton.A  This adds credence to the supposition that she may not have actually married Ira H. Easley Bonham--the twins who died when just a few months old, and the four living children, three of which (# 1, 2 & 4) all claim that Aaron Bonham was their father, but #3 (Raymond) always claimed that his father was Ira Morton.
Aaron and Ida could have divorced, she then quickly married Ira Morton in the fall of 1885 (after the census) and they could have had a son, Raymond, the following year--Sept 1886.A  We know Ira died in 1888, and Ida could have been reconciled to Aaron and remarried him with Bernice born to them in 1888. Aaron may have died in about 1884.A  Ida could have married Ira Morton in the fall of 1885 (after the census) and then had both Raymond (1886) and Bernice (1888) prior to Iraa€™s death on 12 Dec.
This old man, in turn was fond of all the children in the household, consisting of my four half-sisters, two half- brothers, my full brother and myself. This old man at times was arbitrator between the children in the many quarrels and differences that we had from time to time. From time to time, the old man with tact and kindness growing from the wisdom of the aged alleviated our childish differences and smoothed over our petty quarrels and jealousies. One inch of ice in 3 days !!!It wasreal windy most of the day and I spent more time in the EskimoQuick Fish 3.The two holes in the shelter provided some steady action for perch and bluegills.
This kindly old man as a matter of duty, also as long as he was able did light chores, such as to feed the chickens in the farmyard, carry in the wood for fuel to heat the house, and also wood for the kitchen stove.
As time went on, the old man became ill and on one cold winter morning was found dead in the little room that he occupied in my fathers home. The death lull kicked in around1230 and fishing picked back up again at 3pm.I landed the usual residents of the lake-- a few trout, afew nice crappies, perch and gills. BirchamDuring the period preceding the so-called hard winter of 1889 -1890, the owners of large herds of cattle, also the owners of great flocks of sheep and large bands of horses, did not to any extent depend on hay or grain as winter feed for the great numbers of livestock that they owned. Since the beginning of the white mans era in this section of the country, the livestock owners had driven or herded their bands to the high mountain ranges for summer grazing or forage. These ranges were well watered and produced vast quantities of natural grasses and other palatable livestock feed.During the late fall, the stock was started toward the southern end of the state of Nevada, this area being called the desert on account of its lower altitude, milder climate, and usually less precipitation in the form of snowfall. Plenty ofpanfish with a few perch hitting the 9-inch mark and a crappie thatwas almost 10 inches.I caught trout sporadically throughout the day, ending with 9. This snow was necessary on these long drives since its water content was the only form of moisture the animals could find to subsist on. This was the situation on most all of the desert and on a good many of the routes to and from the desert.
The names no doubt were quite appropriate since water was taken by the means of a scaffold, then with the help of a horse or a windlass, a barrel at the end of a rope was lowered and raised, the water so obtained was used principally for saddle horses, work teams, pack animals, and also for human consumption. Sometimes the water drawn from the wells, especially after several months of non-use was green with vermin, snails, and rodents.
The mountain ridges were also obscured by a sort of haze as heavy wind storms swept the country at large, all in all, the general atmosphere seemed quite ominous or suggestive of some great change. The stockmen in general did not give much thought to the possibility of a clean sweep or as to what was to happen the total loss of their livestock in some cases, and nearly all in others.  No provision was made for the sipping in or storing of feed.
Alas, when the snow did come, it came so fast and with such a fury and depth that the livestock were never moved.  Band after band of sheep were huddled together and smothered in the deep snow.


This man, at a later date rebuilt his fortune to some extent, which was consistent with the spirit of the west at that time.Another personality of that time and a close neighbor of my fathers was a victim of the extreme cold weather that followed the heavy fall of snow. Bircham, froze to death at a point not over three hundred yards from his home.  On this occasion this man was returning from the direction of the desert where he had been making strenuous efforts to move his livestock toward a better feeding ground.
Failing in this, he turned back, owing to the extreme cold which was in the locality about forty-five degrees below zero, at the time. In addition to the cold and snow, there was a heavy fog and in this, the man became bewildered and although only a few steps from home, lost consciousness, fell asleep, and froze to death. The mans body was found fortunately the following morning by his brother-in-law and returned to the home that this poor man had tried to reach.
Teddy told me the lake is completed covered and the ice might be about 1 inch orso.Teddy has patrolled and lived next toAntietam Lakealmostall his life and he knows the lake. This man was an early settler in the country and at the time the incident occurred was busy in his chosen occupation as a truck farmer or gardener, he also owned about three milk cows and the one yearling heifer. Reese River Reveille1907With the little he owned, he was endeavoring to make a living for his family, consisting of a wife and eight or nine small children. The circumstances surrounding this, the theft of this mans only young animal would make the act all the more despicable.
A group of roving cowboys, or vaqueros ( some of them being Mexicans ) were camped for the night only a few miles away from the gardeners little home and although they were tending a herd of cattle that in numbers counted in the thousands, they took it upon themselves to drive this one lone animal to their camp and butcher it for meat, leaving only the waste matter behind as they moved on. Maestretti, on missing his animal searched high and low and at last finding tracks in the deep snow which by that time had crusted, started out on foot to trace the animal.
The snow had crusted to a certain extent but not enough to bear a mans weight, so in order to follow the tracks he crept on his hands and knees to the spot where he found the evidence that the animal had been butchered. Greatly disappointed and vexed at the discrepancies of human nature, this man returned to his humble home to carry on, and at a later date lived to be a large stock owner and rancher, as well as the patriarch of a family that now by extention numbers in the hundreds.
This man died at the age of ninety-nine years, only a short time ago, such was the stamina and ruggedness of most of the early day pioneers. This situation in itself was not very encouraging as the loss of feed for their horse's weakend them for the long jouney home of about fifty miles. However, his stepdaughters, my mothers two girls by a former marriage, were not susceptible to my fathers swaying influence. The power that my father exercised over his children was formed more from a mental attitude than from any form of forceful chastisement. It is known that he only whipped my brother John the one time, and this was for carving on a window-sill with a jackknife.
In fact, he always wanted his children to respect other peoples property. The one time that he whipped me with a piece of flat board was at a time when he had a leg injury caused from a four hundred pound barrel of cement falling from the level of a wagon bed directly on his instep. This injury for a time was very serious, since in addition to a bruised condition, a couple of his foot bones were crushed.
The accident necessitated his use of crutches and at a time when he was using these crutches he was obliged to drive a team of horses hitched to a wagon up to the Barley field for the purpose of irrigating a small patch of potatoes that was planted there.On the way to and from the field, a distance altogether of fourteen miles, was a gate to be opened and closed.
Although much to small to be of help, and more likely to be in the way of older and stronger hands, I was very determined not to leave the ranch with my father.
However, while some other family member held me, my father paddled me lightly with the flat board and as a consequence I finally, although reluctantly, mounted the wagon seat beside him. When we were only about one-half of a mile from the ranch I could see tears in my fathers eyes and he asked me if I still wanted to help the boys handle the horses. You can go back and help the boys."  As I look back over the circumstances surrounding this whipping, the only one he ever gave me, I think on the whole, the light paddling I got was entirely too mild a punishment.
I do remember, however, of feeling very small that evening whem my father returned from his trip to the Barley Field.
There isplenty of rainfall predicted for that area.Most of the fish sitting in the estuary should be entering the river as I type this.
The story began with a cattle sale that involved moving stock from the Walsh Ranch in Nevada to Northern California. The purpose of what we detail here is to remember that it is not only family that shapes us, but also the friends we meet along the way.
Anglers tend to give you space, the scenery is beautiful and the Osprey's always put on a show. However, I am pleased to state that I did not find any such people, nor were any of the cattle missing. Finally, I was convinced that the cattle were reasonably safe in the enclosure, and as a consequence of this assurance, I did not ride fence everyday in the week.For a period of about two months, I remained very lonely indeed, brooding constantly over a sudden ending of my first love affair. The Post Office was located in the one general merchandise store in the village, and was taken care of by the same people who owned the store. Wednesday was spent in the upper fly zone and wasslow in the morning but pretty consistent in the afternoon.
Of this family, three members lived in a small building adjoining the store, and these three people, the father, the mother, and the one son, operated the store and also attended to the Post Office. He was a student at Stanford University, and I met this young son only once when he was home for the Christmas holidays.After a time, the Collins boy, who lived at home with his parents, and myself became good friends and quite chummy.
Therfore, we had much in common and confidentially we compared notes and sympathized with one another. Ialso landed a smallmouth bass, a few small brown trout, afew small rainbows (steelhead smolts ?), a fallfishand a baby AtlanticSalmon.
This fine young man was lost in the service of his country, and while I will not attempt to be a sentimentalist regarding him, it was a pleasure to have known him, and as a friend departed, I have the greatest of respect and admiration for this fine young man. The Mohawk egg pattern accounted for many smaller fish and the salmon sized Light Spruce fly produced a few hookups. Last years--One Day Trip-- hot fly,Olive bugger with White marabou tail and redcrystal flash also received plenty of attention and did account for 2 fish.
The guyI was fishing withused plenty of flies with smaller bucktail flies doing most of the damage.
He didhook-up with a few fish while usingmy Death Stonefly, landing one nice Coho.I can tell you this---the next few weeks will provide some serious action.
There are fish in the system at this moment and with the water release at 1800 CFS and the rain.
The pool we were fishing was loaded with suckers and chubs and I did see a few trout and a couple of nice sized smallmouth bass. Any questions as to what to tie, just shoot me an email or use the Contact 2Bonthewater page. All that cold water coming from a quarry and the creek itself in that area is near lifeless.


The bridge is now being painted a Hunter Green color.Most of the creeks in the OleyValley are really low. Even with the rain, the creeks remain very low.A I have a trip scheduled to the Salmon River planned inlate September thanks to Jack.
Without Jack's kindness and awesomeness, I would not be going salmon fishing.A I have startedtyingflies for the upcoming salmon trip. Zoe competed in a National Beauty pageant and won honorable mention in the beauty competition (FYI -- Zoe wears no make-up, fake hairor fake teethand she competes in the natural division--she is my little girl and I would never DRESS HER UP like all those crazy folks you see on TV). We dressed as fishermen, answered a question about each other and then Zoe did some fly casting on stage. Zoe was crowned Little Queen when she won the Pennsylvania state pageant back in 2006 while competing in a Sunburst pageant. There are plenty of out of the way smaller streams that are teeming with Smallmouths, Carp and a variety of Panfish. Perkiomen Creek -- air temp 89 degrees, checked the temperature at two spots, temps were 70 and 69 degrees -- Taken between 415-425 pmA Manatawny Creek -- air temp was 88 degrees, checked the temperature at three spots, temps were 76 degrees at Red Covered Bridge, 74 degrees above TIKI bar and 76 degrees below the Rt.
This heatwave has made most ofthe local trout streams too warm to fishfor the catch and release angler.
Maiden Creek below Ontelaunee Lake should provide anglers with some fishthat are willing to bite.
You can find Carp, Smallmouth Bass, Largemouth Bassand a wide assortment of panfish to keep you busy. Take some cold water with you !!!Your best way to keep the water cool is to freeze a bottle or two of water the night before you head out.
As the day heats up, the water bottles will slowly melt, leaving you with nice cold waterto drink throughout the day. I fished for 30-minutes on Manatawny and landed 2 wild browns on a tan caddis dry fly in the area where the water temp was 68 degrees.
Temperature wise, if it is 90 degrees outside, pretty sure most, if not all of the local trout waters will be at 70 degrees or higher.
We don't wantto kill the trout.The trout that survive through the summer will offerus great fishing in the fall. I have not made a trip to the Schuylkill River as of yet, but I'd bet the house that the smallie action should be pretty darn good. You can also takeyour watercraft outbefore Epler atCross Keys Road or at Muhlenburg Township park which is below the PFBC Epler Access.
There is little room to fish, unless you don't mind walking the shoreline that is covered with all types of vegetation, including Poison Ivy. Pleny of fish to be caught in this body of water, that is if you can get to them.A Manatawny Creek fished OK.
This stretch used to provide some very nice smallmouth action, but the last few trips here have been poor. Switched to a spent spinner pattern and hooked up twice--snapped one off and landed a nice stocker brown.
The water is up from recent rains inthe valley, but the stream was clear and in perfect condition.
The Schuylkill River and a few tribs shouldprovide any cat or carp angler with a few bites each nite. Channel catfish prefer dead baits andsmaller live bait, while the Flatheads prefer larger live bait.
Carp will eatsmaller live bait including minnows andcrayfish along with the standard fare of homemade MUSH bait or whole kernel corn.The bottom line is--It doesn't really matter what bait you areusing. But, by now it was pitch black and it was raining pretty good and thelightning made it look like the 4th of July came early.I managed to land 2 fish on my emerger pattern androll 2 other trout. Started out at the mouth of Sacony Creek but there was some serious bridge work going on, so I left after a few casts. Caught some nice bluegills, onebrown trout, pumpkinseeds, green sunfish, agolden shiner and I almost hooked into a very nice largemouth bass.
Kids and water mean plenty of noise,lots of splashing and lots offun.Normally, 750pm is about the timethe sulphurs start popping off.
I saw some Iso's and huge stoneflies coming off and flying around.I caught a trophy Bluegill, no kidding check out the picture, almost 9 inches. I left my headlamp in the truck so I had to walkout before it got too dark and miss the potential spinner fall.
I then drove to another stretch of the crick and hooked up a few times fishing a brown spent spinner. I lost them at the bank.A Fish the mornings with a brown or white spent spinner and you might get a few takes on the surface. My favorite is a "John's Spring Creek Pupa" tied in size 18 and 20 (Trout Flies of The East--page 93).
I caught two brookies on a CDC sulphur dry fly and the rest of the fish were caught with nymphs. What an amazing fish, especially on a 2 wt bamboo fly rod with a fly reel that is dated to the 1930's or 1940's. What a specimen.He looked like a submarine swimming in the water !!My first impression of the leviathan is that it was a wild fish. Tonights fishing provided a mixed bag of fish, a few smallwild brown trout, along with a few stocker browns, stockerrainbows and the brook trout.
I topped it all off with a visit to Ted's house to show off the bamboo fly rod and talk shop. It was about 40 degrees and raining.I didroll a larger fish on a midge, but aside from that, it was a very slow night.
Cast down and across and hop the flies upoff the bottom with quick upward lifts of the fly rod.The fish would really strike hard. I still have not figured out whyone day I will catch all browns, one day I will catch all rainbows and some days, you will catch a little of everything.



Stories of love free download
Naruto dating quiz




Comments to «How to find out date of death for free»

  1. TSHAO writes:
    Point that you need to have to know to make positive that you lady in the planet him the.
  2. EMRE writes:
    For females, hair idealized top quality so that.
  3. Skynet writes:
    More than prepared to keep i think I was trying??that with this you ready to start wearing colors.
  4. LEZGI_RUSH writes:
    Three contradicting varieties of LOVE??that you have to comprehend in order to overcome select.


2015 Make video presentation adobe premiere pro | Powered by WordPress