Facebook quotes sayings, Facebook quotes and sayings, Facebook quotes & sayings, quotes and sayings Facebook, sayings and quotes for Facebook, quotes and sayings on Facebook, quotes & sayings for Facebook, quotes and sayings for Facebook status, Facebook status quotes and sayings, sayings and quotes for Facebook status, Facebook quotes and saying and Facebook saying and quotes. Some people stick with the traditional, feeling struck by the epic beauty or blown away by the insane scale of the universe. As many stars as there are in our galaxy (100 - 400 billion), there are roughly an equal number of galaxies in the observable universe -- so for every star in the colossal Milky Way, there's a whole galaxy out there. The science world isn't in total agreement about what percentage of those stars are "sun-like" (similar in size, temperature, and luminosity) -- opinions typically range from 5 percent to 20 percent. There's also a debate over what percentage of those sun-like stars might be orbited by an Earth-like planet (one with similar temperature conditions that could have liquid water and potentially support life similar to that on Earth).
SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is an organization dedicated to listening for signals from other intelligent life. The technology and knowledge of a civilization only 1,000 years ahead of us could be as shocking to us as our world would be to a medieval person. A Type III Civilization blows the other two away, accessing power comparable to that of the entire Milky Way galaxy. If this level of advancement sounds hard to believe, remember Planet X above and their 3.4 billion years of further development. One hypothesis as to how galactic colonization could happen is by creating machinery that can travel to other planets, spend 500 years or so self-replicating using the raw materials on their new planet, and then send two replicas off to do the same thing. Continuing to speculate, if 1% of intelligent life survives long enough to become a potentially galaxy-colonizing Type III Civilization, our calculations above suggest that there should be at least 1,000 Type III Civilizations in our galaxy alone -- and given the power of such a civilization, their presence would likely be pretty noticeable.
We have no answer to the Fermi Paradox -- the best we can do is "possible explanations." And if you ask ten different scientists what their hunch is about the correct one, you'll get ten different answers. Explanation Group 1: There are no signs of higher (Type II and III) civilizations because there are no higher civilizations in existence. Those who subscribe to Group 1 explanations point to something called the non-exclusivity problem, which rebuffs any theory that says, "There are higher civilizations, but none of them have made any kind of contact with us because they all _____." Group 1 people look at the math, which says there should be so many thousands (or millions) of higher civilizations, that at least one of them would be an exception to the rule. Therefore, say Group 1 explanations, it must be that there are no super-advanced civilizations.
The Great Filter theory says that at some point from pre-life to Type III intelligence, there's a wall that all or nearly all attempts at life hit.
If this theory is true, the big question is, Where in the timeline does the Great Filter occur?
One hope we have is that The Great Filter is behind us -- we managed to surpass it, which would mean it's extremely rare for life to make it to our level of intelligence. One possibility: The Great Filter could be at the very beginning -- it might be incredibly unusual for life to begin at all.
Another possibility: The Great Filter could be the jump from the simple prokaryote cell to the complex eukaryote cell. There are a number of other possibilities -- some even think the most recent leap we've made to our current intelligence is a Great Filter candidate. If we are indeed rare, it could be because of a fluky biological event, but it also could be attributed to what is called the Rare Earth Hypothesis, which suggests that though there may be many Earth-like planets, the particular conditions on Earth -- whether related to the specifics of this solar system, its relationship with the moon (a moon that large is unusual for such a small planet and contributes to our particular weather and ocean conditions), or something about the planet itself -- are exceptionally friendly to life. For Group 1 Thinkers, if the Great Filter is not behind us, the one hope we have is that conditions in the universe are just recently, for the first time since the Big Bang, reaching a place that would allow intelligent life to develop.
One example of a phenomenon that could make this realistic is the prevalence of gamma-ray bursts, insanely huge explosions that we've observed in distant galaxies. If we're neither rare nor early, Group 1 thinkers conclude that The Great Filter must be in our future. One possible future Great Filter is a regularly-occurring cataclysmic natural event, like the above-mentioned gamma-ray bursts, except they're unfortunately not done yet and it's just a matter of time before all life on Earth is suddenly wiped out by one. This is why Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom says that "no news is good news." The discovery of even simple life on Mars would be devastating, because it would cut out a number of potential Great Filters behind us. Explanation Group 2: Type II and III intelligent civilizations are out there -- and there are logical reasons why we might not have heard from them. Group 2 explanations get rid of any notion that we're rare or special or the first at anything -- on the contrary, they believe in the Mediocrity Principle, whose starting point is that there is nothing unusual or rare about our galaxy, solar system, planet, or level of intelligence, until evidence proves otherwise. Possibility 1) Super-intelligent life could very well have already visited Earth, but before we were here.


Possibility 2) The galaxy has been colonized, but we just live in some desolate rural area of the galaxy.
Possibility 3) The entire concept of physical colonization is a hilariously backward concept to a more advanced species. An even more advanced civilization might view the entire physical world as a horribly primitive place, having long ago conquered their own biology and uploaded their brains to a virtual reality, eternal-life paradise. Possibility 4) There are scary predator civilizations out there, and most intelligent life knows better than to broadcast any outgoing signals and advertise their location. Possibility 5) There's only one instance of higher-intelligent life -- a "superpredator" civilization (like humans are here on Earth) -- who is far more advanced than everyone else and keeps it that way by exterminating any intelligent civilization once they get past a certain level.
When you have a contact person at the company, include the information in your cover letter and personally address the cover letter to the hiring manager. You act like my bestfriend all over again and all the grudges I was holding just disappear. Personally, I go for the old "existential meltdown followed by acting weird for the next half hour." But everyone feels something. On the very best nights, we can see up to about 2,500 stars (roughly one hundred-millionth of the stars in our galaxy), and almost all of them are less than 1,000 light years away from us (or 1 percent of the diameter of the Milky Way).
All together, that comes out to the typically quoted range of between 1022 and 1024 total stars, which means that for every grain of sand on Earth, there are 10,000 stars out there. Going with the most conservative side of that (5 percent), and the lower end for the number of total stars (1022), gives us 500 quintillion, or 500 billion billion sun-like stars. Some say it's as high as 50 percent, but let's go with the more conservative 22 percent that came out of a recent PNAS study.
Let's imagine that after billions of years in existence, 1 percent of Earth-like planets develop life (if that's true, every grain of sand would represent one planet with life on it). If we're right that there are 100,000 or more intelligent civilizations in our galaxy, and even a fraction of them are sending out radio waves or laser beams or other modes of attempting to contact others, shouldn't SETI's satellite array pick up all kinds of signals?
A civilization 1 million years ahead of us might be as incomprehensible to us as human culture is to chimpanzees. We're not quite a Type I Civilization, but we're close (Carl Sagan created a formula for this scale which puts us at a Type 0.7 Civilization). Our feeble Type I brains can hardly imagine how someone would do this, but we've tried our best, imagining things like a Dyson Sphere.
If a civilization on Planet X were similar to ours and were able to survive all the way to Type III level, the natural thought is that they'd probably have mastered inter-stellar travel by now, possibly even colonizing the entire galaxy.
You know when you hear about humans of the past debating whether the Earth was round or if the sun revolved around the Earth or thinking that lightning happened because of Zeus, and they seem so primitive and in the dark? And since the math suggests that there are thousands of them just in our own galaxy, something else must be going on.
There's some stage in that long evolutionary process that is extremely unlikely or impossible for life to get beyond. Depending on where The Great Filter occurs, we're left with three possible realities: We're rare, we're first, or we're fucked. This is a candidate because it took about a billion years of Earth's existence to finally happen, and because we have tried extensively to replicate that event in labs and have never been able to do it. After prokaryotes came into being, they remained that way for almost two billion years before making the evolutionary jump to being complex and having a nucleus. Any possible Great Filter must be one-in-a-billion type thing where one or more total freak occurrences need to happen to provide a crazy exception -- for that reason, something like the jump from single-cell to multi-cellular life is ruled out, because it has occurred as many as 46 times, in isolated incidents, just on this planet alone. In that case, we and many other species may be on our way to super-intelligence, and it simply hasn't happened yet.
In the same way that it took the early Earth a few hundred million years before the asteroids and volcanoes died down and life became possible, it could be that the first chunk of the universe's existence was full of cataclysmic events like gamma-ray bursts that would incinerate everything nearby from time to time and prevent any life from developing past a certain stage. This would suggest that life regularly evolves to where we are, but that something prevents life from going much further and reaching high intelligence in almost all cases -- and we're unlikely to be an exception.
Another candidate is the possible inevitability that nearly all intelligent civilizations end up destroying themselves once a certain level of technology is reached. And if we were to find fossilized complex life on Mars, Bostrom says "it would be by far the worst news ever printed on a newspaper cover," because it would mean The Great Filter is almost definitely ahead of us -- ultimately dooming the species.


They're also much less quick to assume that the lack of evidence of higher intelligence beings is evidence of their nonexistence -- emphasizing the fact that our search for signals stretches only about 100 light years away from us (0.1 percent across the galaxy) and suggesting a number of possible explanations. In the scheme of things, sentient humans have only been around for about 50,000, a little blip of time -- if contact happened before then, it might have made some ducks flip out and run into the water and that's it.
The Americas may have been colonized by Europeans long before anyone in a small Inuit tribe in far northern Canada realized it had happened.
Living in the physical world of biology, mortality, wants, and needs might seem to them the way we view primitive ocean species living in the frigid, dark sea. This is an unpleasant concept and would help explain the lack of any signals being received by the SETI satellites. That suggests that there's a potentially-habitable Earth-like planet orbiting at least 1 percent of the total stars in the universe -- a total of 100 billion billion Earth-like planets.
And imagine that on 1 percent of those planets, the life advances to an intelligent level like it did here on Earth.
There are far older stars with far older Earth-like planets, which should in theory mean civilizations far more advanced than our own. If this is indeed The Great Filter, it would mean that not only is there no intelligent life out there, there may be no other life at all. If this is The Great Filter, it would mean the universe is teeming with simple prokaryote cells and almost nothing beyond that.
For the same reason, if we were to find a fossilized eukaryote cell on Mars, it would rule the above "simple-to-complex cell" leap out as a possible Great Filter (as well as anything before that point on the evolutionary chain) -- because if it happened on both Earth and Mars, it's almost definitely not a one-in-a-billion freak occurrence. We happen to be here at the right time to become one of the first super-intelligent civilizations.
Now, perhaps, we're in the midst of an astrobiological phase transition and this is the first time any life has been able to evolve for this long, uninterrupted. Further, recorded history only goes back 5,500 years -- a group of ancient hunter-gatherer tribes may have experienced some crazy alien shit, but they had no good way to tell anyone in the future about it.
There could be an urbanization component to the interstellar dwellings of higher species, in which all the neighboring solar systems in a certain area are colonized and in communication, and it would be impractical and purposeless for anyone to deal with coming all the way out to the random part of the spiral where we live.
With all that energy, they might have created a perfect environment for themselves that satisfies their every need. FYI, thinking about another life form having bested mortality makes me incredibly jealous and upset. It also means that we might be the super naive newbies who are being unbelievably stupid and risky by ever broadcasting outward signals. The way it might work is that it's an inefficient use of resources to exterminate all emerging intelligences, maybe because most die out on their own. That would mean there were 10 quadrillion, or 10 million billion intelligent civilizations in the observable universe. As an example, let's compare our 4.54 billion-year-old Earth to a hypothetical 8 billion-year-old Planet X.
On the surface, this sounds a bit like people 500 years ago suggesting that the Earth is the center of the universe -- it implies that we're special.
They might have crazy-advanced ways of reducing their need for resources and zero interest in leaving their happy utopia to explore the cold, empty, undeveloped universe.
There's a debate going on currently about whether we should engage in METI (Messaging to Extraterrestrial Intelligence -- the reverse of SETI) or not, and most people say we should not.
But past a certain point, the super beings make their move -- because to them, an emerging intelligent species becomes like a virus as it starts to grow and spread. However, something scientists call "observation selection effect" suggests that anyone who is pondering their own rarity is inherently part of an intelligent life "success story" -- and whether they're actually rare or quite common, the thoughts they ponder and conclusions they draw will be identical.



Make a website for free with your own domain
Website for free nfl games xbmc
Chris anderson how to make a killer presentation
Code promo europcar canada




Comments to «I want to put many pictures in one picture»

  1. PALMEIRAS writes:
    Odd and repetitive, and only.
  2. SS writes:
    Been more than a year now are some of the invest far more time picking your.
  3. VERSACE writes:
    Actual me is indeed fairly that, or they've learned from higher school and over time current net.


2015 Make video presentation adobe premiere pro | Powered by WordPress