Adobe illustrator create logo text,best tattoo equipment website design,tattoo quote ideas yahoo,skull tattoo koh phi phi - Reviews

Chances are, if you use Adobe Illustrator, and you get good with it, you’ll eventually come across requests for cartoon characters. Graphic design & illustration tutorials envato tuts+, Tutorials and inspiration to help you learn and expand your graphic design and illustration skills, all online and free. Create cute panda bear face icon - vectips, Lately, i have been working on some children illustrations, creating some uber cute creatures. Create badass hip hop character illustrator, Hi everyone, after a hiatus of almost three months without writing any tutorial i'm finally back and, as usuai, i have a good exercise to share with you guys..
Create simple school teddy bear adobe illustrator, In tutorial learn create cute teddy bear school themed items. How create glamorous portrait adobe illustrator, Today ’ show detailed step--step guide create glamorous portrait stock reference. How create detailed audio rotary knob control , How create detailed audio rotary knob control photoshop & illustrator. Extras, Featured Content, TutorialsEver wondered how those nifty 3D tools in Illustrator can be put to work? Wedha, originally from Indonesia, created his art work in traditional mediums early in the 1990s, which later in early 2000, crossed over into the digital world. Since then, it has gained major popularity in Indonesia, with several communities dedicated to the creation and showcasing of portraits in a WPAP style, with members in their thousands! The following is a tutorial on how to create a WPAP (Wedha's Pop Art Portrait) portrait in Adobe Illustrator, by the WPAP master himself! WPAP's main goal is to represent the faces that are already familiar to us, with a new and different style, but it still must be easily recognizable. With that in mind, the WPAP creative process is based on two main processes; the faceting process and the coloring process. Before we start the process, we should begin to see and assume the face of a human being as a shape that consists of many flat surfaces on a sphere, just like the ball in the below image. In coloring, to show something stronger, I only use flat colors, instead of a gradual colors. Aim for a photo that has even lighting and does not hit extremes, either in light or shadow.
I usually start the tracing process by selecting an area with a definite boundary between the dark and bright areas. Using the Rectangle Tool (M), I trace the highlight in the iris, that still seems vague in the photo. In the original photograph, the iris, purple and eyelid edges have a dark color and it's clear to where you can define the edges of this shape. Of course, the highlight you've drawn in the first step will now be hidden by the new layer.
Facing such a case, intuitively, you have to be confident enough to determine the boundary for the shape.
Create your straight edged shape along the corner of the eyelid, making sure you overlap the shapes for the eye so it doesn't leave any gaps between the shapes. We are still going to find the unclear and even invisible boundaries for each potential shape. All portraits will use a different series of shapes, so I can only show you the shapes I've drawn for Ola's portrait. If you're starting out, it will be easier if you paint it from the beginning with the grayscale tones, as you can clearly see which areas use dark and bright shapes. We'd like to thank Wedha for his wonderful tutorial and insight into his unique style of rendering portraits. For starters you will learn how to setup a simple grid and how to create two, simple art brushes. Moving on, you will create the nose and a subtle shadow using two simple blend and a bunch of Drop Shadow effects. Move to your Artboard and simply create a 30 x 150px ellipse, the Snap to Grid should ease your work. Make sure that your shape is still selected, open the Brushes panel (Window > Brushes) and click the New Brush button.
Once you can see the new art brush inside your Brushes panel you can remove that brown shape from your artboard.
Switch to the Anchor Point Tool (Shift-C), focus on the top side of your new shape and simply click on the existing anchor point. Reselect your brown shape, go to the Brushes panel (Window > Brushes) and click again the New Brush button. Open the Gradient panel (Window > Gradient) and simply click on the gradient thumbnail to add the default black to white linear gradient. Move to the Layers panel, make sure that the newly created group is selected and simply hit Shift-Control-G to Ungroup it. Fill the resulting shape with the linear gradient shown in the following image, lower its Opacity to 15% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light. Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 105 x 55px shape, set the fill color at R=253 G=207 B=155 and place it as shown in the first image. Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 25x 30px shape, set the fill color at R=243 G=177 B=125 and place it as shown in the following image. Reselect both copies made in this step and click the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel.
Focus on the Layers panel and simply drag this new blend below the set of thin shapes used to highlight it.
Make sure that this new group is selected, send it to back (Shift-Control- [ ) then move to the Layers panel and simply rename it "Ear". Finally, select the "Thin Brush" art brush from your Brushes panel, make sure that the Paintbrush Tool (B) is still active and draw four tiny paths roughly as shown in the third image. Pick the Paintbrush Tool (B), select the "Thin Brush" art brush from your Brushes panel and draw some simple paths roughly as shown in the first image. Make sure that your "nose" shape is still selected and make a copy in front (Control-C > Control-F). Open the Blend Options window, go to the Specified Steps section and make sure that your blend is set at 30 steps. Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 15 x 10px shape, set the fill color at R=255 G=197 B=145 and place it as shown in the first image. Reselect your "nose" shape along with the tinier shape situated in front if it and simply hit Alt-Control-B to create a new blend. Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 25 x 30px shape, set the fill color at R=239 G=65 B=54 and place it as shown in the first image. Reselect both shapes made in this step and click the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 15 x 20px shape, set the fill color at R=209 G=35 B=24 and place it as shown in the first image.
Create a reflection of the left cheek (right-click mouse - Transform > Reflect, Vertical). Take our created brush (be sure you apply the stroke color, not fill) and try to draw the hair of little girl like in the image below. Simply draw an orange rectangle (color R=230 G=104 B=50), incline to the left and place it behind the collar, but before the hair. Hit the Eyedropper Tool (I) and set for this new shape the same dark orange color as on the hat. Slide the bigger oval to right with pressing the Alt key (I marked the new copy with green stroke).


Draw an orange rectangle with a shadow - you already know how to do it from previous steps. Group the whole arm with the mitten (right-click mouse and Group) and make a reflection (right-click mouse Transform > Reflect, Vertical, and press Copy).
In the Pathfinder cut off the piece inside the green stroke ellipse by pressing Minus Front.
Select just the two tiny rounded rectangles and right-click your mouse, choose Transform > Reflect. Using the Rectangle Tool (M) and holding the Shift key draw a square (R=129 G=207 B=211) 600px weight and 600px high.
Group the whole girl and put her over the background, (right-click mouse - Arrange > Bring to Front). If you understand how one shape relates to the next, you can change a corner or a segment and create the shape that you want in seconds. I can position and merge two basic shapes and create a complex shape in just a couple of keystrokes. The angle of rotation should be set to a number that, when repeated, adds up to 360 degrees. To finish off your snowflake, simply hit Ctrl+D to repeat the pattern until you complete a full circle.
With the resurgence of the geometric trend, it's fair to say that WPAP may venture out of Indonesia and into more aspects of design.
Different in a sense of being more unique, more dynamic, more striking and of course, more visually pleasing to see, I hope. Every facet (plane) is formed based on the different degrees of dark and bright areas seen on the original photo. Although the colors look as if they collide with each other, effort should be made to make it look three-dimensional. So the photo selection is important because a good photo in quality, image sharpness, lighting and resolution, will help you to create a good final rendering of a WPAP piece. It may be a boring and tedious process, however it is the only way to create a proper WPAP composition. The best way to overcome this problem is through the experience of repeatedly creating artwork in this style.
From there, you can build up the number of colors you introduce to the process, however it's not until you use a full color spectrum that you'll create a more striking portrait. Try using Illustrator's Recolor Artwork feature to experiment with different combinations of colors.
He's a great example of how a great traditional style of art can cross over perfectly to vector and have such an impact in our respective vector communities. Check out Envato StudioChoose from over 5 million royalty-free photos and images priced from $1. Next, using basic tools and effects along with the Blend Tool you will learn how to create the head and the ears of your character. Taking full advantage of the Appearance panel you will learn how to create the eyes and the eyebrows. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 600 in the width and height box then click on the Advanced button.
Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 6 x 20px shape and make sure that the fill color is set at R=96 G=57 B=19. Grab the Direct Selection Tool (A), select the two anchor points highlighted in the second image and drag them 4px down.
Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 225 x 180px shape, make sure that it stays selected and focus on the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance). Keep focusing on your Gradient panel, set the Angle at 90 degrees then move to the gradient colors.
Enter the properties shown in the following image, click OK and go to Object > Expand Appearance. Enter a 5px Radius, click OK then move to the Appearance panel and simply click on the "Opacity" piece of text to open the Transparency fly-out panel. Select the top copy and simply move it 5px up using the up arrow button from your keyboard. Select the top copy and simply move it 5px down using the down arrow button from your keyboard. Keep in mind that the white numbers from the Gradient image stand for Location percentage while the yellow zeros stand for Opacity percentage. Select it along with your black compound path and click the Intersect button from the Pathfinder panel. Select Specified Steps from the Spacing drop-down menu, enter 30 in that white box then click the OK button. Fill the resulting shape with white, lower its Opacity to 70% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light. Fill the resulting shape with black, lower its Opacity to 50% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light.
Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 5 x 10px shape, set the fill color at R=223 G=137 B=86 and place it as shown in the first image. Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 5 x 10px shape, set the fill color at R=223 G=127 B=76 and place it as shown in the following image.
Enter the properties shown below (don't forget to check the Reflect X box) then click the OK button. Pick the Paintbrush Tool (B) and select the "Thick Brush" art brush from your Brushes panel.
Make sure that the resulting shapes are selected and simply click the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel.
Select that "headShape" shape, make a copy in front (Control-C > Control-F) and drag it outside the group, in the top of the Layers panel. Turn the resulting group of shapes into a compound path (Control-8), set the fill color at black, lower its Opacity to 10% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light.
Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 45 x 35px shape, fill it with the linear gradient shown below and place it as shown in the following image. Enter the properties shown in the top, left window (in the following image), click OK then add the other five Drop Shadow effects shown in the following image. Switch to the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 35 x 20px shape and place it as shown in the second image. Switch to the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 25 x 15px shape and place it as shown in the second image.
Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 1 x 3px shape, set the fill color at R=239 G=65 B=54 and place it as shown in the first image. Press Control-C, Control-F to make one copy over it and make this copy smaller, holding in the same moment the Shift and Alt keys. First one (orange) is with the color R=230 G=104 B=50 and the second - any color, it's a cutter in this case. Create the yellow circle (color R=240 G=236 B=112) which you need to send behind the hat (Control-X, Control-B) and a lighter one over it (color R=245 G=242 B=156).
Set the stroke color at R=245 G=242 B=156 and make it a bit thinner by decreasing the Stroke Weight in a Stroke panel. Make the fill color lighter (I used R=112 G=54 B=54) and drag it again to the Brushes panel. To create them - draw one circle using the Ellipse Tool (L), and set its color to R=235 G=235 B=230.


For this, send to back the orange rectangle (Control-X, Control-B) and then send to back hair. I marked the new copy with green stroke just for better visibility, it is just a cutter in our case. Using the Direct Selection Tool (A) move marked on the image below anchor points a bit down. All cartoon characters are just a collection of basic shapes, you just have to know how to break down the complex shapes into simpler shapes. Hold down the Option key on your keyboard and click on the bottom center of your snowflake’s first leg.
At this stage, the "white" of the eye has a clear edge, so you can go ahead and create this shape to complete the eye. Notice how I've created a not-so-square shape and distorted the shape so it shows the darker shadow cast from the eyelashes.
You may think of using Posterizing or Live Trace, but no, I don't use those facilities as they do not create the same style.
My priority is always facial resemblance, this is the most important element of the portrait. Using those saved art brushes along with some basic effects and blending techniques you will learn how to create the hair. Using the Pucker & Bloat and the Zig Zag effects along with some neat stroke attributes you will create the tiny, orange bow tie. Select RGB, Screen (72ppi) and make sure that the Align New Objects to Pixel Grid box is unchecked before you click OK. You should also open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your shapes. Simply click on the existing anchor point and your shape will look like in the second image.
Enter "Thick Brush" in the Name box, set the attributes shown in the following image then click the OK button. Enter all the properties shown in the following image, make sure that your name it "Thin Brush" then click the OK button. Select the right slider and set the color at R=243 G=197 B=145 then select the left slider and set the color at R=233 G=167 B=115. Move to the Layers panel (Window > Layers), open your layer, simply double-click on the existing shape and rename it "headShape".
Make sure that the resulting shape is selected and make a copy in front (Control-C > Control-F).
Turn the resulting group of shapes into a new compound path (Control-8), make sure that the fill color is set at black, lower its Opacity to 30% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light.
Select the top copy and move it 1px down and 1px to the left using the arrow buttons from your keyboard.
Select this fresh copy along with the brown shape and click the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel.
Select the resulting shapes along with the orange path and click the Unite button fro the Pathfinder panel.
Replace the linear gradient used for the fill with a flat black, lower its Opacity to 30% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light. Pick the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 3 x 5px shape, use the same fill color and place it as shown in the second image. Before closing the path, press the Alt key - this option will help you to a start anchor point. But for a better result pick the Convert Anchor Point Tool (Shift-C) and convert two lower anchor points. Duplicate first example of the coat, keep it selected and also select a new copy which we moved to the left. Keep pressing Control-D, this will repeat your previous movement, and until the snowflake is done.
In the same way make smaller one (R=219 G=241 B=242) and rotate it on 45 degrees (right-click mouse - Transform > Rotate). If you can understand this simple concept, you’ll easily be able to create a cartoon character in Illustrator.
In the video above, I break down that illustration into basic shapes to make it easy to understand how it is made.
Grab the Direct Selection Tool (A), select the two anchor points highlighted in the second image and drag them 30px down. Don't forget to remove the brown shape from your artboard once you can see the new art brush inside the Brushes panel. Select this copy and hit the up arrow button from your keyboard five times to move it 5px up. Fill the resulting shape with black, lower its Opacity to 10% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light. Fill the resulting shape with white, lower its Opacity to 50% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light. Reselect the shape made in this step along with your "ear" shape and create a new blend (Alt-Control-B).
Make sure that the resulting shape is selected and replace the existing fill color with R=242 G=101 B=34. Make sure that the resulting shape is filled with R=96 G=57 B=19 then move to the Layers panel and simply rename it "hair". Replace the linear gradient used for the fill with a flat black, lower its Opacity to 0% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light. Keep selected two ovals and using the Blend Tool (W) select one anchor point in a small pink oval and one anchor point in a light brown oval. Keep it selected and select the copy, created with the Alt key, in the Pathfinder panel hit Minus Front. You can use the Direct Selection Tool (A) to achieve the results you want by moving the guides.
In the pop-up menu you will see the Convert Anchor Point Tool (Shift-C) - take it and convert the right anchor point of the oval to make sharp corner.
In the Video below, I’ll show you how to create a cartoon character in Adobe Illustrator. It helps if you group your final snowflake (select all the pieces, right-click or Ctrl-click, and hit Group) so you don’t lose bits and pieces as you create more and move them around the page. Reselect both shapes made in this step, open the Pathfinder panel (Window > Pathfinder) and click the Minus Front button.
Be sure that the Specified Steps in Blend Options are 40 or more (double-click on the Blend Tool (W) to activate the Blend Options window).
Then click on the top and bottom anchor points using the Direct Selection Tool (A) and move them a little to the left. For moving, you should be using the Direct Selection Tool (A) and for deleting - the Delete Anchor Point Tool (-).
No matter what color you choose, as long as you pick it from the right group, the result should work well in this format.
After that will appear another Art Brush Options window, and here just be sure that your direction is from left to right, OK.



Tribal tattoo designs catfish 80400g
Mens tattoos chest exercises


Comments: