His music is what some would call a€?adult acoustic rock,a€? full of catchy phrases and big hooks. Recently, Grega€™s new album, Maybe the Sun, drew the attention of WFUVa€™s John Platt, who featured Greg on his a€?Sunday Breakfasta€? radio show and in his monthly a€?On Your Radara€? live show at the revered East Village songwriter mecca, The Living Room. Elements of bold performance, musical chops and clever wordplay in the family lineage hint at what was to come for Greg and his brothers.
Louis Tannen, Grega€™s grandfather, was an influential magician who opened a magic shop in New York City in 1925. At around 9 or 10 years old, Greg studied clarinet, but said, a€?I was terrible at it.a€? After maybe a year of cacophonic practice, he switched to guitar. After that, they both left Colorado and together went to North Carolina, where the third Tannen brother, Robert (today a successful screenwriter), was living.
Greg and Steve wrote together quite a bit in Colorado and, in New York, theya€™d hang out together at their respective apartments and at open mics. Greg was visiting Steve at his place and while jamming, the basic riff emerged and by the end of the evening, they had the melody and the chorus. Roam, released in 2000, was about traveling around and it kicks off with a€?I Feel Lucky,a€? a joyous and twangy guitar rocker that matches anything Tom Petty ever wrote. Maybe the Sun, released in late 2010, is a lot less New York-based and wide-ranging in its themes. One time, however, when Greg was in California, he appeared with them during one episode as part of a sub-plot on the TV series Dirty Sexy Money (2007-2009).
After eight hours of hanging around, they got all of three seconds of screen time, playing secretly in a hotel room for the Lucy Liu character, who couldna€™t be seen in public attending a concert with her illicit lover (deep-pocketed, since how else are ya gonna afford a private Weepies concert?).
Although Greg went on tour in late 2010 for two weeks behind the new album and played some one-off shows, performance plans at present are minimal. We want to encourage our readers to order Grega€™s CDs online and look for upcoming appearances in our listings pages in the months to come. In high school, he got his first band together called Talking to the Wall, with Greg on vocals and his Fender Telecaster (which he still owns). Returning to the States after one year, he settled in Boulder, Colo., (a€?A fairly good music towna€?) for about two years with older brother Steve. Given Grega€™s uncanny knack for radio-friendly tracks from the first album on, our conversation turned to songwriting. DESCRIPTION: The profound difference between the Roman and the Greek mind is illustrated with peculiar clarity in their maps. Although copies of Agrippaa€™s map were taken to all of the great cities of the Roman Empire, not a single copy has survived. Shown here are three continents in more or less symmetrical arrangements with Asia in the east at the top of the map (hence the term orientation). Note that most scholars, however, believe that due to its placement on the column in a portico or stoa open to the public, the Porticus Vipsani, it was probably rectangular, not circular. The only reported Roman world map before Agrippaa€™s was the one that Julius Caesar commissioned but never lived to see completed. We may speculate whether this map was flat and circular, even though such a shape might have been considered a€?unscientifica€™ and poorly adapted to the shape of the known world. Augustus had a practical interest in sponsoring the new map of the inhabited world entrusted to Agrippa. In point of fact Augustus may have delegated the detailed checking to one of his freedmen, such as his librarian C.
We may treat as secondary sources Orosius, Historiae adversum paganos, and the Irish geographical writer Dicuil (AD 825).
It is also claimed that Strabo (#115) obtained his figures for Italy, Corsica, Sardinia and Sicily from Agrippa. Although the term chorographia literally means a€?regional topographya€?, it seems to include fairly detailed cartography of the known world.
For a more complete assessment of what Agrippa wrote or ordered to be put on his map, we may again turn to passages where Pliny quotes him specifically as reference. It is a pity that Pliny, who seems to be chiefly interested in measurements, gives us so little other information about Agrippaa€™s map. It is the sea above all which shapes and defines the land, fashioning gulfs, oceans and straits, and likewise isthmuses, peninsulas and promontories.
A serious point of disagreement among scholars has been whether the commentarii of Agrippa mentioned by Pliny were published at the time of construction of the portico. Another element in this problem that demands some explanation is the origin of the two later works the Demensuratio provinciarum and the Divisio orbis terrarum which are both derived from Agrippa, probably through a common source.
Apart from the information supplied by Pliny, our chief evidence for the reconstruction of the map is provided by the two works already mentioned, the Demensuratio provinciarum and the Divisio orbis terrarum.
Dicuil, in his preface, promises to give the measurement of the provinces made by the envoys of the Emperor Theodosius, and at the end of chapter five he quotes twelve verses of these envoys in which they describe their procedure. According to Tierney, Detlefsen regarded these two works as derived from small-scale copies of Agrippaa€™s map. Tierney believes however, that the west to east movement supposed by Klotz is, in fact, correct, but not for his reasons.
Our idea of the detail of the map of Agrippa must be based on a study of the references in Strabo, Pliny, the Divisio and the Demensuratio. There are twenty-four sections in the Divisio and thirty in the Demensuratio, the difference being mainly due to the absence from the Divisio of the sections on the islands of the Mediterranean and the Atlantic.
These sections are largely identical with passages in Plinya€™s geographical books (Books III to VI), and show that many passages in Pliny are taken from Agrippa beyond those where he is actually named.
The consensus of the views of modern scholars on Agrippaa€™s map, is that it represents a conscientious attempt to give a credible version of the geography of the known world.
But this consensus is not quite complete and therefore I now turn to consider the view of Agrippaa€™s map put forward by Professor Paul Schnabel in his article in Philologus of 1935. Schnabel does not himself take up the general question of the use of Agrippa by Marinus and Ptolemy. Schnabel here refers to the last chapter of the geographical books of Plinya€™s Natural History, that is, Book VI, cap.
Schnabel continues with the negative argument that the Don parallel cannot belong to the school of Hipparchus. We may speculate as to whether Plinya€™s phrase regarding the a€?careful later students,a€? does not refer to Nigidius himself. Schnabel next moves on to a more ambitious argument, making the assumption that Ptolemy has used some of Agrippaa€™s reckonings to establish points in his geography. It is sad to think that this elegant piece of reasoning must be thrown overboard, but Tierney believes it must be rejected on at least three different counts. In the second place Schnabela€™s statement that Agrippa reduced the itinerary figure of 745 miles to a straight line of 411 cannot be accepted. Thirdly, it may fairly be objected that the very method by which Schnabel obtains the figure of 411 miles is faulty. Tierney passes over Schnabela€™s reasons for thinking that Agrippa established lines of meridian in Spain and in the eastern Mediterranean, all of which Tierney finds quite unconvincing. Schnabela€™s attempt to present us with a scientific Agrippa and indeed to reconstruct a scientific Roman geography may be regarded a complete failure, and the older view of Detlefsen and Klotz must be regarded as correct.
From another well-known passage in Strabo (V, 3, 8, C, 235-236) that contains a panegyric [a public speech or published text in praise of someone or something] on the fine buildings of Augustan Rome, we know that he was well acquainted with the dedications of Marcus Agrippa that he specifically mentions.
Strabo shows the contemporary Roman view of the purely practical purposes of geography and of cartography by everywhere insisting on restricting to a minimum the astronomical and mathematical element in geographical study.
This would mean then that Agrippaa€™s map was based on the general scheme of the Greek maps which had been current for upwards of 200 years, since the time of Eratosthenes and Hipparchus, and that it presumably attempted to complete and rectify this scheme by using recent Roman route-books and the reports of soldiers, merchants and travelers.
Towards the end of the fourth century two important events greatly enlarged the scope of geography.
About a century later the famous astronomer Hipparchus subjected the geography of Eratosthenes to rather stringent criticisms. The next geographer whose views are well known us is Strabo (#115), who was writing at the time of the construction of Agrippaa€™s map or some years later.
If, then, progress was no longer being made or to be expected from Greek geographers using various astronomical instruments, was anything to be expected from the other tradition, the Roman roads and their itineraries? We must then approach the map of Agrippa on a purely factual basis realizing that it provides us merely a list of boundaries followed by a length and breadth, for the areas within the Empire and beyond it. Fundamentally, therefore, Agrippaa€™s figures allow us to construct a series of boxes or rectangle with which to deck out the shores of the Mediterranean and the eastern world and whose dimensions should be reduced by an uncertain amount. Spain consists of three boxes, the square of Lusitania and the rectangle of the Hispania citerior [Roman province] east of it being placed over the rectangle of BA¦tica. In Gaul [France] a large rectangle lies over a small one, that is Gallia Comata over the province of Narbonensis. The islands of the Mediterranean are not forgotten, at least the major ones, just as Italy lies too far to the southeast, so do Corsica and Sardinia lie too far to the southwest. The eastern Mediterranean is faced by Syria whose longitude Pliny (V, 671 states as 470 miles between Cilicia and Arabia, and whose latitude is 175 miles from Seleucia Pieria on the coast to Zeugma on the Euphrates. We have now either reached or gone beyond the boundaries of the Roman Empire in the north, south and east, as it was in Agrippaa€™s day.
The most important achievement of the map, to Agrippaa€™s mind, consisted in its measurements, and it is possible that he spent very considerable pains in getting these exactly, although we cannot take the account given by Honorius (ca.
The exact correspondence between Pliny, the Divisio and the Demensuratio, in giving many of the boundaries of the sections, shows, according to Detlefsen, that these boundaries also were inscribed upon the map. Klotz, in his final review of Agrippaa€™s methods of work, has made some illuminating points that supplement Detlefsen. Within the Empire he chiefly used the itineraries without the overt use of an astronomical backing, although astronomical data, of course, already formed the basis of the Greek maps that were the real foundation of his. Klotz, A., a€?Die geographischen commentarii des Agrippa und ihre Uberrestea€?, Klio 25, 1931, 35ff, 386ff.
Note that most scholar, however, believe that due to its placement on the column in a portico or stoa open to the public, the Porticus Vipsani, it was probably rectangular, not circular. According to Fisher seeing that this is a Roman world map sharing many similarities with the mappaemundi, it is logical to assume that SchA¶nera€™s southern landmass is a copy of Agrippaa€™s Orbis Terrarum, the Roman world map upon which the mappaemundi were based.
Within the context of the early 16th century, it seems apparent that SchA¶ner found himself caught up in the perfect cartographic storm. All these parts were in place when an errant 1508 report of a strait at the tip of South America with a large southern continent lying beneath inspired SchA¶ner to unwittingly preserve the only copy of Agrippaa€™s Orbis Terrarum on the bottom of his 1515 world globe. When medieval Christians began creating the mappaemundi they borrowed heavily from Agrippaa€™s map as well as Greek designs. This design adjustment may also explain the Expositio mappemundi (EMM), manuscripts which are a collection of the data items appearing on the mappaemundi.
It was reverse engineered from the mappaemundi, but plays it relatively safe in its assumptions.
The new found design also provides for the first time insights into the inspiration for key design aspects on the mappaemundi such as the tribute to Jesus at the top of the map, the transition from a separate commentary requiring locative terminology to commentary overlain onto the mappaemundi no longer requiring spatial references, and the distribution of images from a consolidated arced matrix lying above Africa on SchA¶nera€™s design to areas throughout the mappaemundi.
In conclusion, Fisher believes that he has presented a solid logical case for the historic discovery of a long lost 2,000-year-old Roman world map at the bottom of the world, SchA¶nera€™s world that is.
The story of Seth Glier is the story of someone who has always had a strong sense of himself, even when hea€™s not sure of where hea€™s going. It went almost the same way with the guitar, except it involved a bit more outreach.There was a mom-and-pop type music store in Shelburne Falls, and Seth started hanging out there somewhere around 15 years old. One harbinger of his destiny occurred when Noel a€?Paula€? Stookey, of Peter, Paul and Mary fame stopped in the store (his wife taught nearby). Through the years of public school music participation, Seth did some typical activities like musical plays and playing drums in the marching band. Pioneer Valley Performing Arts (PVPA)is located in South Hadley, MA, just south of Northampton and the prestigious performance venue, the Iron Horse.
Feeling his calling, Seth approached the principal at PVPA and asked to be allowed to create his own curriculum, geared toward life as a touring musician.
Seth was admitted to Berklee School of Music in Boston midway through his senior year of high school.
At Berklee, as a Songwriting major, Seth enlarged upon his already considerable skills, gaining more knowledge of musical structure, learning how to write musical scores. He watched other songwriters at the open mic every Tuesday night at Passim, the venerated Cambridge coffeehouse, and played a couple of times. Seth signed a contract with MPRess Records and his first big tour after leaving Berklee was in support of his label debut, The Trouble with People.
Seth released two independent CDs, Space (2005) and Sojourn (2007), and wrote the material for The Trouble with People (2009) while he was at Berklee.
On The Next Right Thing, Seth incorporates more strings, using the sonorous sounds of bowed cello or viola, in one intro section and in one outro section to accentuate a melancholy sense of human folly.
A big part of Setha€™s worldview can be traced to his relationship with Jamie, his older brother. Whatever Seth decides to say about himself or anyone else, wea€™d advise our readers to be there to hear it whenever possible.
One of the more fortunate career moves for Seth was to include guitarist Ryan Hommel as his touring partner. When one spends time far from home without the benefit of onea€™s trusty automobile, one learns to deal with public transportation.
Time was becoming an issue now, so I volunteered to check out the boat situation while Lisa and Bev waited for Allison. The big decision Friday morning was whether or not it was worth paying a taxi to get us back to the airport. Our initial mode of PT (public transportation) was the Metro Train.A  The first challenge was buying the paper magnetic strip card, which gave access to the train terminals. We began in June of 1999 with a cover story on Steve Tannen, the older brother of this montha€™s featured performer, Greg Tannen.
Over the years, while I kept getting distracted by Fast Folk Musical Magazine alumni or someone new whoa€™d catch my ear, Greg just kept getting better and better, winning and placing in songwriting competitions (John Lennon, UNISONG, USA, ISC) and awards in festivals (Sierra Songwriters, Telluride, Rocky Mountain Folks). However, after reacquainting myself with all of Grega€™s albums, I found that ita€™s really a continuation of a body of beautiful and compelling songs. Although Louis died in 1982, there is still a Tannena€™s Magic showroom near Herald Square and a Tannena€™s Magic website where magic products are sold. His family moved to Toronto right after his first birthday and stayed for around six years. The first names to come tumbling out of Greg were: a€?a lot of Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk and Bill Evansa€? (Pete is a huge Bill Evans fan). The band played covers of the Rolling Stones and REO Speedwagon, among others, and some of Grega€™s original songs. At home, in more private moments, he was writing on acoustic guitar, focusing on songwriting, under the influence of acoustic-based songwriters such as Bob Dylan and those in Dylana€™s lineage. Taking his acoustic guitar and travel bag, he went to Australia, a€?doing the vagabond thing,a€? staying in youth hostels part of the time.
They played gigs together as a duo called The Kahluas (named after the familya€™s dog) and made a recording. Then, as Greg tells it, during their respective a€?crap part-time jobs,a€? at their computers, they started emailing lyrics back and forth to each other. This is followed up with the gorgeous a€?Everything I Said,a€? a haunting reverie about a girl named Vanessa who stands by the clock in Grand Central Station with her hair up. An attempt to do an extended riff turned into a laugher and is tacked on as a short bonus track.
The title track is another soulful rendering of a breakup that somehow seems a bit more sharply rendered than its predecessors. I posed the idea that brother Roberta€™s screenwriting connection had something to do with it. He said, a€?Ia€™ve made a bunch of trips down there, written with some great people, had some great meetings, buta€¦ they want me in Nashville, and Ia€™m just not ready to live there.a€? Thata€™s good luck for us. The Romans were indifferent to mathematical geography, with its system of latitudes and longitudes, its astronomical measurements, and its problem of projections. The context shows that he must be talking about a map, since he makes the philosopher among his group start with Eratosthenesa€™ division of the world into North and South. The reconstructions shown here are based upon data in the medieval world maps that were, in turn, derived from Roman originals, plus textual descriptions by classical geographers such as Strabo, Pomponius Mela and Pliny. The emphasis upon Rome is reflected in the stubby form of Italy, which made it possible to show the Italian provinces on an enlarged scale. We are told by late Roman and medieval sources that he employed four Greeks, who started work on the map in 44 B.C.
That is the form of the Hereford world map (Book IIB, #226), which seriously distorts the relative positions and sizes of areas of the world in a way we should not imagine Julius Caesar and his technicians would have. On the re-establishment of peace after the civil wars, he was determined on the one hand to found new colonies to provide land for discharged veterans, on the other hand to build up a new image of Rome as the benevolent head of a vast empire. It was erected in Rome on the wall of a portico named after Agrippa, which extended along the east side of the Via Lata [modern Via del Corso].
Orosius seems to have read, and followed fairly closely both Agrippa and Pliny, as well as early writers from Eratosthenes onwards. His source was clearly one commissioned by Romans, not Greeks, as his figures for those areas are in miles, not stades. The Agrippa map probably did not, in the absence of any mention, use any system of latitude and longitude. These include both land and sea measurements, though the most common are lengths and breadths of provinces or groups of provinces.
But on the credit side, Agrippaa€™s map, sponsored by Augustus, was obviously an improvement on that of Julius Caesar on which it is likely to have been based. The general history of ancient cartography and our knowledge of Roman buildings in the Augustan period would appear to be our surest guides. The German philologist and historian Detlev Detlefsen always clung steadfastly the view that there was no such publication and that the inscriptions on the map itself provided all the geographical information that was available to later times under the name of Agrippa.
Detlefsen had explained their origin by assuming the production of smaller hand-copies of Agrippaa€™s map, their smallness then making a written text desirable. Small discrepancies were to be explained by differences in the copies of the map used by each.
Strabo used Agrippa only for Italy and the neighboring islands, so that our chief evidence comes from the other three sources. Detlefsen believed that the island sections were later added to the Demensuratio, but according to Tierney there can be little doubt that he is wrong in this and that Klotz is right in thinking that these sections have rather fallen out of the Divisio.
It relies on the general scheme of the Greek maps that had been current since the time of Eratosthenes and Hipparchus, and attempts to rectify them, particularly in Western Europe, with recent information derived from the Roman itineraries and route-books. We have to thank Professor Schnabel for providing in the same article a new critical text of both the Demensuratio and the Divisio.
He sets out, at first, to prove that Agrippaa€™s map possessed a network of lines of longitude and latitude. 39, sections 211-219, where Pliny mentions evidently as a work of supererogation, a€?the subtle Greek inventiona€? of parallels of latitude, showing the areas of equal shadows and the relationship of day and night Pliny then gives seven parallels, running at intervals between Alexandria and the mouth of the Dnieper, with longest days running from fourteen to fifteen hours.
Hipparchus had made the Don parallel the seventeen-hour parallel, corresponding to 54A° N latitude, whereas Pliny here puts it at sixteen hours or 48A° 30" N latitude, which is nearly correct. 39, section 211, refers obviously to all that follows as far as the end of Book VI and shows that the complete passage is taken from Greek sources.
In the first place, Schnabel has apparently overlooked Ptolemya€™s method of establishing the longitude and latitude of particular geographical points. Pliny gives this itinerary as running at the base of the Alps, from the Varus through Turin, Como, Brecia, Verona and other towns on to Trieste, Pola and the Arsia. For the reduction, of longitude he uses, as I have said, the factor of forty-three sixtieths derived from Ptolemya€™s fifth map of Europe (Book VIII, cap. Tierney turns to his last main argument in which lie tries to prove Agrippa to be the author of a new value of the degree at 80 Roman miles or 640 stadia, Pliny (V, 59) gives the distance of the island of Elephantine from Syene as sixteen miles and its distance from Alexandria as 585 miles.
If we accepted it we might as well accept that everyone in antiquity who either sailed or traveled in a north-south direction in the eastern Mediterranean was also engaged in establishing a new degree value.
On the general question of Roman proficiency in geographical studies some light is thrown by a passage of Strabo (Book III, C 166) who says: a€?The Roman writers imitate the Greeks but they do not go very far.
The phrase which he uses of Agrippaa€™s aqueducts is exactly echoed in Plinya€™s phrase tanta diligentia. Before entering into the details of Agrippaa€™s map it will be useful to examine briefly these two traditions, the Greek and the Roman, in order to grasp more clearly the problem which confronted Agrippa or whoever else might wish to construct a world map in the age of Augustus.
We are told that it was Democritus who first abandoned the older circular map and made a rectangular one whose east-west axis, the longitude, was half as long again as the north-south axis, the latitude. The campaigns of Alexander and the new Greek settlements pushed the Greek horizon far to the east while in the west the intrepid Pytheas of Massalia circumnavigated Britain and sailed along the European coast from Gibraltar at least as far as the Elbe, publishing his investigations in a work which included gnomonic observations at certain points, and remarks on the fauna and flora of these distant areas.
He made devastating attacks on the eastern sections of the map, as being seriously incorrect, both on mathematical and on astronomical grounds. Sad to relate, the gradually accumulating mass of details concerning roads and areas did not add up to any great increase in geographical knowledge.
Our three main authorities, Pliny, the Divisio and the Demensuratio, have suffered a great deal in the transmission of these latter figures, the longitude and latitude, so-called. Klotz has argued that Agrippa did not use the word longitudo in the technical sense of the east-west measurement, nor the word latitudo in the technical sense of the north-south measurement, but rather in the more general sense of length and breadth.
To evaluate the map we must take a glance at each of these boxes in turn, and the most convenient order would appear to be that of the Greek geographers and of Agrippa himself, if we can trust the order of the Divisio that has Europa, Asia, Lybia, that is, Europe, Asia, and Africa. The internal line of division ran south from the estuary at NA“ca between the Astures and the Cantabri, down to Oretania and on to New Carthage.
Off the coast of Gallia Comata lies an enormous Britain, 800 by 300 miles, and north of it an equally exaggerated Hibernia [Ireland].
Corsica, in fact forms the eastern boundary of Sardinia and this explains why the long axis of both islands is described as the longitude. Tierney believes that it is possible to remove the difficulties felt about Agrippaa€™s Syria by both Detlefsen and Klotz.
Only a few more boxes or rectangles are left to the east of the line, formed by Armenia, Syria and Egypt, but now they begin to grow portentously large. Spain has three sections and Gaul two, while in the east of Europe Dacia and Sarmatia run off to the unknown northern ocean, and further east again the sections are quite enormous.
Natural features such as the mountains and rivers that divided provinces were shown also, but in what exact way is not clear. He points out that just as Eratosthenes had divided the inhabited earth into his famous a€?sealsa€?, so also Agrippa divided the earth into groups of countries without reference to their political or geographical conditions.
Any attempt to draw the map of Agrippa from the figures that have survived without some astronomical backing is entirely hopeless. Wherever itineraries did not exist he made use of the estimated distances of the Greek geographers, and outside the Empire he had to rely on them altogether.
Proceeding in our evaluation with this in mind we can gain insights into how the mappaemundi arrived at their final design.
Fisher believes that the central zones on Agrippaa€™s map had to be eliminated when the Christians decided to adopt and adapt from Greek maps the concept of cartographic centricity by distorting the map to position the holy city of Jerusalem at the mapa€™s center.
Some believe that these manuscripts were instruction sets used to construct a mappa mundi based on the fact that the text is spatially specific. The reconstruction acknowledges that the waterway originated on Agrippaa€™s map as it is common to most mappaemundi, but it assumes that the Roman original was far less imposing, whereas SchA¶nera€™s design suggests that the mappaemundi are far more accurate in their depiction of the waterway spanning most of the continent. All three adjustments were based on their Roman counterparts, but reflect necessary adjustments as the makers of the mappaemundi opted for a Christocentric design. His evaluation, however, is based on the fact that copies of Agrippaa€™s Orbis Terrarum did indeed exist and were at one time distributed throughout Europe becoming the model for the medieval mappaemundi. The gospel show at the workshop stage was in full swing, and I was not finished setting up my booth.
The a€?workshopa€? format was round-robin, and after hearing each act, by process of elimination it became apparent who it wasa€¦ The very talented Mister Seth Glier. We agreed at first to plan for a September story, but later decided on January to coincide with his new CD release. There have been many chapters in this still-unfolding saga, where elements were adverse to what Seth felt was true or right. There was no place in Shelburne Falls to take lessons in guitar or piano.When he was in seventh grade, during study hall, he would sneak out and experiment on the piano, playing melodies by ear that he found agreeable. Hea€™d do off-the-books a€?odd-and-endsa€? jobs for the owner, Bob, and plunk out melodies on a digital keyboard and on any guitar he could grab. Noel came into the room where Seth was already playing and began playing on another guitar.
During his Sophomore year, he had stopped participating in organized musical programs and focused on his songwriting. At age 16, Seth would get on the phone as soon as he got home from school and pester the booking person to allow him to play a headline show there. Most performers were troupers who, day-in-and-day-out, would bring their a€?Aa€? game, no matter what their frame of mind. The principal agreed and let Seth create his own course, satisfying Language Arts and History requirements. However, he reached a point where he felt that the courses in songwriting and vocalizing exercises were too rote a€” not at all practical, and he left after one year. This gave him greater insight into performance skills and holding the attention of an audience.
In addition to providing solid lead and rhythm guitar support, Ryan also sings very competent harmony.
They toured in a Prius, were sponsored by Clif Bars and called it a€?The Zero Carbon Footprint Tour.a€? They also intended to create all of their merchandise out of organic cotton and print everything using soy and vegetable-based ink. Part of the business of being a performer, he says, is in a€?showing up.a€? He and Ryan take time out to play hospitals and old-age facilities.
In November of 2008, I picked up an advance copy of The Trouble with People at the NERFA Conference, and wrote in the December issue CD reviews: a€?With a light, feather-like vocal delivery, sharp observational lyricism and hooks that would grab Moby Dick, hea€™s a formidable talent. In a very intelligent move, a pre-release download of a€?Lauraleea€? was made available on Setha€™s website, presumably to both fans and DJs. Being a life-long Texan, my experience with the various modes of public transportation has been very limited. I finally found the boat and explained our situation to the captain who told me he could wait a couple of minutes, but no more. Being a life-long Texan, my experience with the various modes of public transportation has been very limited.A  In my comfort zone distances are measured in time, not miles.
With four heroic leaps, we all safely landed on the deck of the boat and gave our tickets to the attendant. During his time at Wests John went from a speedy, hard running and tackling winger into a very hard running, ferocious tackling Test playing second rower.But let us not get to far ahead of ourselves a€¦a€¦John was born at Kempsey (not Casino) on the 1-3-1947. Since wea€™re only now getting around to younger sibling Greg, you might say wea€™re running a little bit late.
Ia€™d run into Greg often over the years and hea€™d greet me warmly, seemingly knowing it was only a matter of time before Ia€™d recognize his mastery of the songwritera€™s craft.
Pete had been admitted to the Berklee School of Music for jazz, but his parents told him, a€?Therea€™s no money in music,a€? so he didna€™t attend.
He picked that up and started playing it, saying he didna€™t want to study clarinet any more, and began taking guitar lessons from a female jazz guitarist. When Greg was 17, the band came into New York City and recorded its first (and only) album a€” material that a€?will never see the light of day,a€? he wryly states. Toward the end of high school, accompanying himself on acoustic guitar, he performed his original work at open mics and at the end-of-the-year senior talent show. While at Oberlin, Greg did more performing on acoustic guitar, doing small gigs and open mics. He always had his guitar out and busked in Sydney and Cairns (up the coast from Sydney near the Great Barrier Reef). After less than a year, Greg moved to New York City, and Steve followed a few months later. Rosanne has been very supportive of Greg, twittering to her fans about him during his opening sets, and generating lots of CD sales. His take is that when you collaborate with someone, a different style emerges, a hybrid of two people. Grega€™s in the middle of a writing spurt and hopes to have enough material for a new album next year.
When Greg was 17, the band came into New York City and recorded its firstA  (and only) album a€” material that a€?will never see the light of day,a€? he wryly states. This leads him on to the advantages of the northern half from the point of view of agriculture. The original was made at the command of Agrippaa€™s father-in-law, the Emperor Augustus (27 B.C. These were no doubt freedmen, of whom there were large numbers in Rome, including many skilled artisans. A late Roman geographical manual gives totals of geographical features in this lost map with recording names, but even the totals, on examination, turn out to be unreliable. Mapping enabled him to carry out these objectives and to perfect a task begun by Julius Caesar.
This portico, of which fragments have been found near Via del Tritone, was usually called Porticus Vipsania, but may have been the same as the one that Martial calls Porticus EuropA¦, probably from a painting of Europa on its walls.


Dicuil tells us that he followed Pliny except where he had reason to believe that Pliny was wrong. It is through such features that continents, nations, favorable sites of cities, and other refinements have been conceived, features of which a regional [chorographic] map is full; one also finds a quantity of islands scattered over the seas and along the coasts. The fact that such an insignificant and distant place as Charax was named on the map shows the detail that it embodied. His sister, Vipsania Polla, began the work, and we know from Dio Cassius that it was still unfinished in the year 7 B.C.
There can be no reasonable doubt that the map was a rectangular one with the east-west measurements running horizontally and the north-south measurements running vertically. Though Strabo does not mention Agrippaa€™s name here he is probably merely being tactful with regard to the Emperor who, presumably, took a large part in the completion of the portico with its map. One must grant Detlefsen that in Plinya€™s main reference there is talk only of a map and the commentarii are merely the basis of the map.
Partsch on the contrary, had assumed an original publication, contemporary with the original map, of a Tabellenwerk, that is, a series of tabulated lists. 1475, and, according to Paul Schnabel (Text und Karten des PtolemA?us, 1938) the thirteen manuscripts of the 15th and 16th centuries and a further manuscript of the 13th century all derive from the ninth-century codex in the library of Merton College, Oxford. What they show is rather that on the orders of Theodosius two members of his household composed a map of the world, one written and the other a painting. The classical scholar Alfred Klotz, however, in his articles on the map has shown that a number of correspondences between the two works as against Pliny point rather to a common source from which both works are derived. Greek cartography, like Greek writing, ran from left to right and perhaps the former practice was promoted by the fact that the western boundary of Europe was well known, at least from the time of Pytheas (ca. The numerals are much more corrupt than those in Pliny, and there is usually a presumption, therefore, that Plinya€™s figures preserve a better version of Agrippa. Schnabel, while expressing appreciation of the earlier work of Alfred Klotz, yet criticizes Klotz severely on two grounds. For the sixth of these parallels he gives a slight correction due to the Publius Nigidius Figulus (ca. Therefore, Schnabel argues, the incorrect latitude of Hipparchus was corrected by Agrippa who had experience of the Black Sea in his later years. His proximate source, moreover, he names in section 217, according to his usual custom, as Nigidius Figulus. The parallels of Meroe and Thule were both equally useless in astrological geography although they may well have been mentioned by Nigidius, as they are by Strabo simply by way of clearing the decks. H, 10, 1.) for the mouth of the river Varus (the frontier of Gaul and Italy), that is, 27A° 30a€™ E longitude and 43A° N latitude, and again his position for Nesakton (Geog. This method Ptolemy has described quite clearly and unambiguously in the fourth chapter of Book I of his Geography. It is difficult to see how Schnabel imagined that this line could be reduced to a straight line of 411 miles.
What they have to say they translate from the Greeks but of themselves they provide very little impulse to learning, so that where the Greeks have left gaps the Romans provide little to fill the deficiency, especially since most of the well-known writers are Greek.a€? On a comparison of this passage with Straboa€™s usual sycophantic admiration of things Roman we can rate it as very severe criticism.
He was, therefore, well acquainted also with the map or Agrippa to which, or to whose content he refers no less than seven times in his Books II, V and VI.
In the fourth century the study of spherical geometry was pushed forward rapidly by Eudoxus in the Academy, and again by Callippus. This new knowledge was then exploited geographically by Eratosthenes of Cyrene (#112) in the latter half of the third century. His delineation of the Near East, of Egypt, the Black Sea and the Mediterranean was reasonably correct, and this was also true of his sketch of the Atlantic coast of Europe and the Brettanic islands in which area he followed Pytheas. Hipparchus further indicated the theoretic requirements for establishing the exact location of points on the eartha€™s surface. Despite his criticism of earlier geographers such as Pytheas, Eratosthenes and Hipparchus, it has long been recognized that he does not advance their work except in providing some details in regard to the map of Europe, while his general map of Europe has more faults than that of Eratosthenes.
Without the stiffening of astronomical observation the Roman road systems were like a number of fingers probing blindly in the dark. The variation in the figures is aggravated by the fact that our later authorities do not entirely understand the Roman method of expressing large numbers as used by Agrippa and Pliny. This is, however, a serious error on the part of Klotz and to accept it would be a very retrograde step in our appreciation of the map.
Therefore the word longitude could reasonably he used of its full length, and the measurements at right angles to this, that is, the latitudes, varied so much that Agrippa thought it necessary to give at least two, one in northern Italy and the second from Rome to the river Aternus. Since the Pyrenees are supposed to run north and south the longitude of Hispania citerior is really the latitude, as was noted before. Over the Rhine lies a small Germany, only half the size of Gaul, and southeast of it an Illyricum and Pannonia of about the same size as Germany. Cross measurements of the Mediterranean are given at three points, from the Italian coast by way of Corsica and Sardinia to Africa, from southern Greece through Sicily to the same place, and from Cape Malea in Greece to Crete and Cyrenaica. Mesopotamia measures a fairly modest 800 by 320 miles, but further east Media measures 1,320 by 840, Arabia to the south is 2,170 by 1,296 and, finally, India represents the Far East with 3,300 by 1,300.
He must have taken over the map of Eratosthenes as revised by people such as Polybius, Posidonius and Artemidorus, and made it the basis of his own. Pliny understood these measurements as being the prime value of the map and that is why he copies them so exhaustively. Sometimes simple dividing lines were used, such as that used in central Spain, or wherever natural features of division were not present. Thus Agrippaa€™s India corresponds generally to the first a€?seala€? of Eratosthenes, and Agrippaa€™s Arabia, Ethiopia and Upper Egypt corresponds to the fourth a€?seala€?.
Even with an astronomical basis they only provide us with a set of rectangles mostly scattered at haphazard about the Mediterranean. At the boundaries to the north, east and south he had to content himself with qua cognitum est.
This water feature is significant not only in the fact that it is completely landlocked, unlike most waterways which empty into a surrounding sea, but also notably both waterways are 1) truncated at each end by circular lakes 2) are similarly arced away from the center of their C-shaped surrounding, and 3) span the portion of their C-shape lying opposite the Greek and Italian peninsulas, the portion of the map which coincides with Africa.
First century Roman maps like Agripaa€™s Orbis Terrarum, which had existed throughout Europe, disappeared during the medieval period, but at least one copy was discovered in Germany just a few years prior to the arrival of Schonera€™s 1515 globe, the Peutinger Table (#120), and therefore it is not unreasonable to believe that SchA¶ner might have had access to an unfinished copy of Agrippaa€™s map. When Agrippaa€™s Orbis Terrarum was originally created and put up for display on the wall of a portico, extensive commentary was likely consolidated within the center circular zone (2), but extending Jerusalem and Asia Minor into the mapa€™s center displaced much of the central text and necessitated the text's redistribution about the mappamundia€™s new design, relocating comments within the region to which each pertained, which is why we find the mappae mundi littered with commentary. But it may actually be that the EMM were based on the original text found on Agrippaa€™s map with the locative terms such as a€?above,a€? a€?opposite,a€? and a€?to the south ofa€? being necessary for a consolidated text set apart from the map, while the mappaemundia€™s placement of these data items directly onto the map logically allowed the removal of the spatial references.
The mappaemundi maintained this orientation because medieval Christians held Eden, which they believed resided in the east, in high esteem.
The reconstruction also omits completely the lateral mountain range above the waterway, which seems like a rather large oversight as both the Peutinger Table and Ptolemya€™s map, two ancient Roman maps, incorporated a trans-African range as does SchA¶nera€™s design. It also maintains a more realistic belief that ancient maps did not maintain the accuracy of modern maps, but retained a basic design and set of elements common to nearly all ancient maps.
Punctually, The Next Right Thing has arrived, its cover art suggestive of the tragedy of the film Revolutionary Road, with Seth striking a very Leonardo DiCaprio look-alike pose.
It was a small town, and the high school graduating class of his hometown had only 23 students.
Later, he withdrew books on music theory from the library, to learn the principles behind the melodies he liked playing.
Bob saw that music was in Setha€™s blood and gave him a $60 Johnson guitar as partial payment for his services. Noel and Seth jammed for a bit, and Seth, not realizing who he was, said, as Noel left, a€?Hey!
As he recalls: a€?I had been listening to Eminem, Linkin Park and Limp Bizkit on the back of the school bus.
When he insistently brought his guitar to school and wrote songs during study hall he was a€?asked to leavea€? (expelled). After a month-and-a-half, the booker acquiesced and Seth played a sold-out show filled with family and friends.
However, Seth also got to see performers on occasion, who did not seem to have their heart in performing, who had emotionally a€?checked out.a€? It was a wake-up call.
Livingston perceived Setha€™s innate ability and supported his decision to leave Berklee early and just start performing. While wea€™d witnessed the on-stage rapport and competence, we didna€™t know how great he is as a traveling companion until we saw the very amusing videos (1) (2) of their trips on Youtube.
When he insistently brought his guitar to school and wrote songs during study hall he was a€?asked to leavea€? (expelled).A  He finished high school at Pioneer Valley Performing Arts, a charter school for students wishing to apply artistic talents not catered to in public school.
Allisona€™s sister Lisa joined us, and the four of us met at Bush International Airport Monday morning and had an uneventful flight to the Reagan National Airport near D. Being the intelligent, highly educated adults we were, we noted that the Trolleys ran every 15 minutes, and realized that we must have just missed one. For instance, Beaumont is approximately 90 minutes east of Houston and Houston is 3 hours from Austin. Now that we had a full working knowledge of public transportation, we made our plans for the next daya€™s sightseeing. We missed the boat.A  By the time Allison figured out how to return the bike without losing her deposit that ship had sailed -literally! Listening to his father play and hearing the melody digressions in jazz were a big part of Grega€™s formative experience (still a€?a€¦my favorite thing to listen toa€?). His most rewarding experience was working as a first mate, cooking and playing guitar on an 80-foot charter sailboat that was also an Americaa€™s Cup challenger. Stevea€™s song a€?Brother Uptowna€? on his debut CD Big Senorita describes him coming in late and crashing at Grega€™s apartment. Although free of drug references and busts, to these ears, stylewise, ita€™s a cousin to the Grateful Dead hit, a€?Truckina€? with some a€?Friend of the Devila€? thrown in.
Two tracks later, wea€™re treated to the award-winning a€?Mary,a€? in which wea€™re young again and transported to a summer night car ride with a girl in a white dress. They think that the head of the show was a big Deb Talan fan and wanted her on the show, so The Weepies were written into the script. He good-naturedly referred to the results of the combination of his efforts with others as a€?Frankensteina€? in nature. Disregarding the elaborate projections of the Greeks, they reverted to the old disk map of the Ionian geographers as being better adapted to their purposes.
If land survey did play such an important part, then these plans, being based on centuriation requirements and therefore square or rectangular, may have influenced the shape of smaller-scale maps. The speakers compare Italy with Asia Minor, a country on similar latitudes where Greeks had experience of farming.
India, Seres [China], and Scythia and Sarmatia [Russia] are reduced to small outlying regions on the periphery, thus taking on some features similar to the egocentric maps of the Chinese.
He first became prominent as governor of Gaul, where he improved the road system and put down a rebellion in Aquitania. Thus Agrippa is said to have written that the whole coast of the Caspian from the Casus River consists of very high cliffs, which prevent landing for 425 miles. Such a word certainly ties up with Divisio I: a€?The world is divided up into three parts, named Europe, Asia, Libya or Africa. It is, as one might expect, more accurate in well-known than less-known parts, and more accurate for land than for sea areas.
Moreover it seems to have been the first Latin map to be accompanied by notes or commentary.
In regard to the materials of construction I think we have to choose between the painted type of wall-map mentioned by Varro and the construction of marble slabs that is used in the forma urbis Romae of two centuries later, of which considerable parts are extant. Detlefsen, as against the view of Partsch, effectively quoted the passage of the younger Pliny, on the 160 volumes of his unclea€™s commentarii, which he describes as electoruma€¦ commentarios, opisthographos quidem et minutissime scriptos, annotated excerpts, written on the back in a minute hand.
It is, of course, possible to imagine that tabulated lists were put up as an adjunct to the map at the short ends, but the references to Spain and the Caspian seem somewhat out of place even here, and the balance of probability on this problem seems to lie, although rather precariously in favor of a contemporary, or nearly contemporary, publication of at least a selection of Agrippaa€™s material comprising something more than mere lists of names and figures. Detlefsena€™s view that both works were the transformation of actual maps into a written record had the advantage that the differences in the order of the material in the two works was of little consequence, the map giving merely the visual impact, and the writer a€?being free to begin his description at whatever point on the map he preferreda€?.
First come the boundaries of the province given in the constant order east, west, north, south. Firstly, Klotz has not discussed the possible use of Agrippa in Ptolemya€™s Geography, and secondly, and much more fundamentally, he has not recognized the scientific importance of the world-map of Agrippa as a link between Eratosthenes and Hipparchus on the one hand and Marinus and Ptolemy on the other, but has merely repeated traditional views dating from the end of the 19th century. It follows further, says Schnabel, that Plinya€™s seventh parallel, that of fifteen hours, belongs equally to Agrippa. Detlefsen pointed this out in 1909, and Kroll (after Honigmann) throws further light on the subject in his article on Nigidius in R. Plinya€™s final phrase about these scholars adding half an hour to all parallels denotes rather the astronomer than the astrologer. III, 1, 7) on the river Arsia, that is, 36A° 15a€™ east longitude arid 44A° 55a€™ N latitude. It would be fairer to use the reduction factor from Ptolemy's third map of Europe, referring to Gaul (Book VIII, cap. Hipparchus however, reckoned the distance from Syene to Alexandria as seven and one-seventh degrees of latitude. The most important of these passages is the first (II, 5, 17, C 120) where he refers to the important role played by the sea and secondarily, and by rivers and mountains in the shaping of the earth.
Yet we may be sure that maps still continued to be made as rectangles on a plane surface, although the relation of the spherical to the plane surface must have begun to appear as a problem. His calculation of the length of the eartha€™s circumference and of the degree length of 700 stadia was a notable event in the advance of geography.
For latitude he described the celestial phenomena for each individual degree of the ninety degrees running north front the Equator to the North Pole, giving for each the length of the longest day and the stars visible.
He tells us that the lack of gnomonic readings in the east, of which Hipparchus complained, was equally true of the west (IL 1, C 71). When one considers the variants within the MSS groups it follows that one may have a dozen or more variants for a single number. The corresponding Greek words had, of course, originally meant length and breadth with no particular sense of direction.
In Spain again the Pyrenees were always regarded as running north and south, parallel to the Rhine, while the east coast as far as the straits and Cadiz was regarded as running more or lees in a straight line to the west. Detlefsen accepts that Agrippaa€™s figure is an error without being able to explain why, while for Klotz Syria is an obvious proof that Agrippa assigned no definite direction to his longitude. India alone, therefore, has a longitude as great as the whole Mediterranean, while its latitude is comparable to that of Europe and Africa combined.
His chief pride would seem to have been in his measurements, and indeed it is only for the exactness of these that Pliny praises him when he refers to BA¦tica in Book III, 17.
Again the horizontal spine of Mount Taurus plays an important role in both as a line of division between the northern and southern areas, Agrippa, however, follows the Eratosthenic method of division only in a general way and not in detail. It is quite certain that the waterway made its way onto the mappaemundi via Agrippaa€™s Orbis Terrarum as this landlocked waterway represents the Roman belief that the Nile River originated in the mountains of Mauritania and ran laterally across the continent dividing the African continent in two with Libya to the north and Ethiopia to the south. And finally, based on SchA¶nera€™s design Agrippaa€™s map was built around a concentric grid that resembled a polar projection which he as a globe maker would have readily recognized. Ancient Roman maps like the Peutinger Table, however, oriented the map with north to the top similar to the reconstruction based on SchA¶nera€™s design. But should some doubts still linger, he offers one last review two earlier images comparing the landmass to other C-shaped maps, the Greek Hecataeus (#108) and medieval Hereford world maps, and ask that you consider the mathematical probability that SchA¶ner would incorporate the precise elements of these maps in their precise order and placement without an ancient world map as his template. I heard the spine-tingling sound of what seemed to be a black woman in full-throated gospel cry and checked the festival program. While the a€?Right Thinga€? in the title track is not defined as the a€?safea€? cop-out that the film portrays, the mood of the cover art effectively captures the drama of life-affecting decisions explored in the albuma€™s music.
This, in addition to his prodigious talent, has this author thoroughly entranced with him as both a person and as an artist. Youa€™re not bad, guy!a€? Recently, at a festival in Texas, he ran into Noel and recounted the story, but Noel had no recollection of it. It helped instill in Seth the aspiration to always value the chance to perform for an audience and to hold their choice to come and see him as a sacred contract between them. He got himself a Toyota Camry with 250,000 miles on it and began performing around New England. He and Livingston have become good friends and Seth opens numerous shows for him throughout the year. Seth felt like hea€™d found himself among kindred spirits a€” others who did not fit into the public school system. I missed the ultimate photo-op: Allison coasting downhill on a red rental bike toward the docks! Barring unforeseen circumstances, I know that I will leave when I so choose with a reasonable expectation of my arrival time. It was much easier and much closer (and cheaper) than expected.A  However, we were careful not to make this driver as happy as the first one.
A never-opened wooden a€?mystery boxa€? Abrams got as a boy at Tannena€™s Magic Shop played a seminal role in shaping his suspense-heavy career vision.
Over a throbbing bass line we hurtle down the road and, the dash board lights set our sights way up higha€¦ hold on tight to mea€¦ Mary.
Within this round frame the Roman cartographers placed the Orbis Terrarum, the circuit of the world.
This shape was also one that suited the Roman habit of placing a large map on a wall of a temple or colonnade. If Romans were planning this, they would place the northern section much further west, whereas the cartographers were Greeks, and they followed a tradition which originated in Rhodes or Alexandria. He pacified the area near Cologne (later founded as a Roman colony) by settling the Ubii at their request on the west bank of the Rhine.
Agrippa was an obvious choice as composer of such a map, being a naval man who had traveled widely and had an interest in the technical side.
The date at which the building was started is not known, but it was still incomplete in 7 B.C.
If the commentary had not been continuous, but had merely served as supplementary notes where required, there is a possibility that by Plinya€™s time, some eighty years later, it might have gone out of circulation. Augustus was the first to show it [the world] by chorography.a€? Evidently there is a slight difference of meaning between this and Ptolemya€™s definition, by which chorography refers to regional mapping. From the quotations given by Dilke, there would appear to be a general tendency by Agrippa to underestimate land distances in Gaul, Germany and in the Far East, and to overestimate sea distances. Although the words used are longitudo and latitudo, they have no connection with longitudinal and latitudinal degree divisions.
Romans going to colonies, particularly outside Italy, could obtain information about the location or characteristics of a particular place. We know that the campus Agrippae was in the campus Markus on the east side of the Via Flaminia and that it was bordered towards the street on the west by the Porticus Vipsania. In view of the widespread use of marble facings that characterizes the age of Augustus, the marble slab method appears more probable.
Riese and Partsch had argued that certain references to Agrippa in Pliny, in particular the reference to the inaccessibility of part of the coast of the Caspian Sea and also that to the Punic origins of the coastal towns of Baetica refer more naturally to a published work than to the map in the Porticus Vipsania. We do not know the size of this map that has perished, or whether its descent from the map of Agrippa was through a series of hand-copies as Detlefsen supposed. In actual fact Pliny and the Divisio both begin their description from the straits of Gibraltar, moving east, while the Demensuratio, on the contrary, begins with India moves west. Following on this and connected there with come the longitude and latitude, in that order, expressed in Roman miles with Roman numerals. These views stated that Agrippaa€™s work was constructed on the basis of Roman itinerary measurements and took no note of the scientific results of the astronomical geography of the Greeks.
Pliny then adds a€?from later studentsa€? five more parallels, three of them, those of the Don, of Britain, and of Thule, running north of the original seven, and two, those of Meroe and Syene, running south of them. What is new in Plinya€™s parallels may be referred to the Greek astronomers of the age of Hipparchus or the two or three generations after him.
By subtraction we get the difference in longitude between the two places as 8A° 45a€™ and the difference in latitude as 1A° 55a€™. This third class was to be manipulated as intelligently as possible so as to fit in with the basic evidence of the first two classes.
But in every case instead of a geometrical definition a simple and rough definition is enough. He also established a fundamental parallel of latitude, following the example of DicA¦archus. The north, the far east, and Africa south of the Arabian gulf, were practically unknown, and even in the Mediterranean and the land-areas surrounding it, major defects were due to the great uncertainties of measurement, whether by land or by sea. Straboa€™s aversion to the mathematical and astronomical sick of geography has already been described and considered as typical of the age that he lived. Much toil has been expended by scholars such as Partsch, Detlefsen and Klotz in attempting to divine which, if any, of these figures belong to Agrippa. They became technical terms for longitude and latitude with a strict directional sense in the filth century B.C. The north coast, however, was usually thought to run from Lisbon (Cabo da Roca) to the Pyrenees, the northwest capes, Nerium and Ortegal, being ignored. Detlefsen held that the map was not drawn to scale and that the measurements were merely inscribed upon it.
Unfortunately, in nearly all cases we know neither the beginning nor the end of the routes measured, nor do we know, with any exactness, the direction of the route.
Eratosthenes determined the sides of his a€?seals,a€? that were irregular quadrilaterals, by the points of the compass. It is clear that he gave the itinerary stages in Italy and Sicily in addition to the coastal sailing measurements. He believes such a notion is impossible and with the presentation of a sound argument for the circumstances contributing to SchA¶nera€™s error, there remains little reason to doubt that because of his grand error we are able to gaze upon Agrippaa€™s Orbis Terrarum for the first time in many centuries.
Shortly after, he took a job as a chef at the Iron Horse and got to serve and observe artists coming through. Later, he realized that he was far more serious about his music than most of the other students, many of whom saw the performing arts as a hobby. I included the two other letters hopingA they might be of use to you.After Poak's letters I've included an excerpt from the regimental history that may be the unamed artillery and cavalry units that Poak mentioned. 1959, in a story describing the crash-landing of a German Bomber plane on a north-east of Scotland farm 19 years earlier during the Battle of Britain, 1940.A The farm was `Windyhead`, situated on a hilly plateau in Buchan, Aberdeenshire, just outside the ancient village of New Aberdour where St.
Ia€™ve discovered that when depending on public transportation these estimates become less certain. About that magic booka€¦ it sits on a shelf and, when pulled, it opens the door to Abramsa€™ secret bathroom (really).
When faced with enormous expenses for his kidsa€™ college tuition, he spent years as Creative Director of various advertising agencies in New York City, Sydney, Australia, and Toronto, Canada.
To many of their fans, ita€™s their most popular song and they still perform it together when touring schedules coincide. It centered around relationships and darker themes crept in, albeit always with beautiful melodies. As a visual aid to this discussion, the temple map will have been envisaged as particularly helpful. He must have had plans drawn, and may even have devised and used large-scale maps to help him with the conversion of Lake Avemus and the Lacus Lucrinus into naval ports. Two late geographical writings, the Divisio orbis and the Dimensuratio provinciarum (commonly abbreviated to Divisio and Dimensuratio) may be thought to come from Agrippa, because they show similarities with Plinya€™s figures.
If West Africa is any guide, in areas where distances were not well established, they were probably entered only very selectively.
Also the full extent of the Roman Empire could be seen at a glance.a€?Certain medieval maps, including the Hereford and Ebstorf world maps (see monographs #224 and #226 in Book IIB) are now believed to have been derived from the Orbis Terraum of Agrippa, and point to the existence of a series of maps, now lost, that carried the traditions of Roman cartography into Christian Europe.
Varro, in the following century, tells us of a map of Italy that was painted on the wall of the temple of Tellus. Remains of the portico are stated to have been found opposite the Piazza Colonna on the Corso at about the position of the column of Marcus Aurelius and further north. The volumes of commentary referred to by the younger Pliny were not published, but were clearly digested to the point where little further work was needed to prepare them for publication, and the same situation may well be accepted for the commentarii of Agrippa.
The text, however, had long previously been known from its reproduction in the first five chapters of the De Mensura Orbis Terrae, published by the Irish scholar Dicuil in A.D.
But it did quite clearly derive from that map, whether in the map-form or in a written form, with its list of seas, mountains, rivers, harbors, gulfs and cities. On Klotza€™s view that both works derive from a common written source this major divergence becomes a problem to he explained, but Klotz can offer no explanation. The boundaries are marked by the natural features, usually the mountains, rivers, deserts and oceans, only occasionally by towns or other features.
Of these parallels Schnabel tries to establish that at least two are due to Agrippa, to wit, the first of the new parallels passing through the Don, and the seventh of the old parallels passing through the mouth of the Dnieper.
Using Ptolemya€™s reduction factor at 43A° N latitude which is forty-three sixtieths we find that with Ptolemya€™s degree of 500 stadia the difference in longitude between the two places in question is 3,135 and five-twelfths stadia and the difference in latitude is 958 and one-third stadia. It was this third kind of evidence which gave Ptolemy his positions for the Varus and the Arsia. He thinks the 411 miles represents the itinerary measurement from the Varus to Rimini through Dertona, and that the Arsia has got attached to it by a slight confusion in Pliny's mind in thinking of the boundaries between the mare superum and the mare inferum, with which, in fact, he equates the Varus-Arsia measurement.
This factor of forty sixtieths or two-thirds gives a distance of approximately 384 miles from Varus to Arsia and the striking coincidence on which Schnabel has built this elaborate theory simply vanishes. Therefore, argues Schnabel, Agrippa made a new reckoning of the degree at 80 Roman miles or 640 stadia. Such features as these brought into existence the continents, the tribes, the fine natural sites of cities and the other decorative features of which our chorogaphic map is chock full.a€? The map of Agrippa displayed, therefore, all the natural features just mentioned and, in addition, the names of tribes and of famous cities.
Only a combination of the practical measurements with astronomical observation could have affected a real progress and our evidence shows only too clearly that this happy union did not take place.
Some light has been thrown on the subject by comparison with later Roman itineraries for the particular areas.
The result of this misconception was that the figures for longitude and latitude were simply interchanged.
Agrippa regarded the Syrian coast running northeast from the boundary of Egypt, as running much more in an easterly direction than it actually does. His map represents, says Detlefsen, a moment of historical development, a point in the process of crystallization of the lands of the Mediterranean into the Roman Empire.
Agrippa defines the boundaries of his groups of countries in the same way, by the points of the compass, but as regards size he supplies only the length and breadth, thus agreeing with Strabo, already quoted.
It is a question whether these itinerary measurements were given, in detail on the map for all the western provinces, not to mention the eastern ones. Later, Seth noticed that nobody was singing the national anthem before the sporting events he was playing in. I started writing down words and learning the art of telling a story.a€? Suddenly he found himself dipping back in time to learn the nuts and bolts of some of the favorite music of his childhood, like Rosenchontz, a duo that sang childrena€™s songs that hea€™d liked and found he still appreciated. Hea€™d confront them in the dressing room before the show as he served them the food hea€™d prepared, and introduce himself as a fellow performer, hoping to promote himself as an opener at their future gigs.
Hea€™d cold-call people like Cheryl Wheeler, Shemekia Copeland, Cliff Eberhardt and Steve Forbert and ask for an opening slot. Seth knew he was going to be a performing songwriter a€” and nothing else (that changed later to include a more rounded view of life and purpose).
That evening we rode the Trolley to our dinner reservations at Gadsbya€™s Tavern, a truly unique experience. The cab fare was just under $10, and since I was riding shotgun, I gave the driver a ten-dollar bill.A  I clearly communicated this to the back seat so they could add a small tip. That evening we rode the Trolley to our dinner reservations at Gadsbya€™s Tavern, a truly unique experience.A  Our only transportation problem by this time was realizing that a busy Trolley takes longer to run its route.
But whether it was only intended to be imagined by readers or was actually illustrated in the book is not clear. The map was presumably developed from the Roman road itineraries, and may have been circular in shape, thus differing from the Roman Peutinger Table (#120). The theory that it was circular is in conflict with a shape that would suit a colonnade wall.
What purpose was served by giving a width for the long strip from the Black Sea to the Baltic Sea is not clear. Dilke provides a detailed discussion of Agrippaa€™s measurements using quotes from the elder Plinya€™s Natural History. We do not know the occasion of this dedication, but since it was meant to celebrate a victory it may been intended for the geographical instruction of the Roman public. They are said to allow the conclusion that it had the same dimensions and construction as the adjacent porticus saeptorum, whose dimensions were 1,500 ft. The twelve lines were inscribed on this map and also on an obviously contemporary written version thereof, and it is this written version that has been preserved for us both by Dicuil and in the various manuscripts of the Divisio orbis terrarum, whereas the map has perished. Klotz, however, believed that be could determine the original succession of countries and groups of countries as treated in the published work of Agrippa by criteria. The Demensuratio on one occasion gives the fauna and flora of Eastern India, which it calls the land of pepper, elephants, snakes, sphinxes and parrots.
He argues that the Dnieper was used as a line of demarcation between Sarmatia to the east and Dacia to the west only on the map of Agrippa, and neither earlier nor later, and that therefore the parallel from the Don through the Dnieper must derive from that map. Plinya€™s seven klimata are a piece of astrological geography and derive through Nigidius from Serapion of Antioch, who was probably a pupil of Hipparchus, or if not was a student of his work.
But there is no vestige of probability or proof that Agrippa made new gnomonic readings to correct Hipparchus.


Schnabel now treats the spherical triangle involved as a plane right-angled triangle, and using the theorem of Pythagoras, he finds that the hypotenuse, that is, the distance between the Varus and the Arsia is 3,291 stadia or 411 Roman miles. Gnomonic readings were often inaccurate, measurement of time was still very vague, and a degree length one-sixth too large did not help. He used the circle of 360 degrees, giving up the hexecontads [a 60-sided polygon] of Eratosthenes.
But since we normally do not know by what route Agrippaa€™s measurements were taken, this light may prove to be a will-o-the wisp.
Aristotle, Strabo and Pliny all insist on the technical directional sense, as there was the possibility of ignorant people misunderstanding them. The same thing occurred in the British islands that were regarded as running from northeast to southwest. 1,200, 720 and 410 miles, respectively, running from the unknown north down to the Aegean, but all having approximately the same latitude of just under 400 miles. Therefore the longitude was to him the east-west direction, and the latitude from Seleucia Pieria to Zeugma was the north-south direction. Partial distances were given from station to station along the Italian coast, but Detlefsen thinks that the summation of the coastal measurements appeared elsewhere on the map. Where this process is complete we have ready-made provinces, where it is still in progress we find the raw materials of provinces-to-be, which are still parts of large and scarcely known areas, and finally, where Roman armies have never set foot we find enormous, amorphous masses lumped together as geographical units.
It is notable, as Detlefsen points out, that Strabo must have recognized this lack of scientific value. It appears from passages in Pliny that Varro had already used the Roman itineraries in his geographical books and Agrippa was only following his example. My eyes getting misty, hea€™s got me and I thank him for it.a€? I didna€™t perceive until much later, the brilliant job he did in dissecting George W.
Seth would ask his coaches if he could sing it.A  a€?I liked to sing really, really loudly,a€? he told me.
My eyes getting misty, hea€™s got me and I thank him for it.a€? I didna€™t perceive until much later, theA  brilliant job he did in dissecting George W.
Drostan his companion first landed when they brought the Gospel to the North-East shoulder of Scotland 1400 years earlier, and indeed the very village where St. After finding the B&B and unloading our bags, our host gave us a tour of the house, which exceeded our expectations. The same applies to possible cartographic illustration of Varroa€™s Antiquitates rerum humanarum et divinarum, of which Books VII-XIII dealt with Italy.
The map of Agrippa, however, was set up, not in a sacred place, but in a portico or stoa open to the public, the Porticus Vipsania. Dicuil worked and wrote probably at the Frankish palace at Aix-la-Chapelle in the time of Charlemagne and Louis the Pious.
The date of the making of the map was probably the fifteenth consulate of Theodosius II, that is, A.D. One of these was the direction shown in the order of naming several particular countries where several are included in the same section, or the direction shown in the list of the boundaries of the section.
This argument, however, is unsound for a number of reasons, of which the most obvious in this context is that whereas the Dnieper is given by our sources as the west boundary of Sarmatia, it is never given as the east boundary of Dacia. Nigidius was a notorious student of the occult and his astrological geography was contained in a work apparently entitled de terris.
At right angles to this he established a meridian running from Meroe northwards to the mouth of the Dnieper, and passing through Alexandria, Rhodes and Byzantium. Yet he did not try to get a more exact value for the degree, although this was the point where theory could most easily have affected practice. Moreover, although the Roman roads may often have rationalized the native roads by new road-construction or by bridging, yet in general they continued to be town-to-town roads, and if the itineraries ever correctly represented the longitude and latitude of a province it would be by pure chance. But, you may object, this technical sense is only suitable for describing rectangles and not all countries fall into that convenient form. Here again longitudo is the long axis and latitudo the short axis, not because of a misuse of these technical terms, but simply because their general position was misconceived. Further east again Sarmatia [Russia], including the Black Sea to the south, measures 980 by 715 miles, Asia Minor 1,155 by 325, Armenia and the Caspian 480 by 280. Any doubt on this matter is removed when we look at Pliny (VI, 126), where he gives the latitude from the same point, Seleucia Pieria, to the mouth of the Tigris. It is probable that Italy and the neighboring islands were given in greater detail than other areas.
Of the first class, the ordered provinces, we have eight in Europe, three in Africa, and three in Asia.
He gives us from Agrippa, a few lines along the coasts of Italy and Sicily but not a single one of his reckonings for the provinces. Since so little of the materials of the ancient geographers bas been preserved it is mostly a matter of chance whether we know or do not know whether Agrippa agreed or not with the measurements of a particular earlier geographer. The new album is an important next step for Seth, on his way to building an impressive body of poetic work. I later asked Allison how much we ended up paying the taxi driver, and she answered with $12.A  Slightly confused, I asked, a€?In addition to the $10 I gave him?a€? To which she replied, a€?WHAT!?a€? Apparently, I had not communicated with the back seat as clearly as I thought, and we made one taxi driver very happy. Finally, Bev had the good sense to read the information sign a bit more carefully and calmly pointed out that the Trolleys dona€™t start running until 11:30 a.
Sadly, Bev had hurt her foot earlier, so we headed back to the Metro station and home.A  This time when we got to King Station, we rode the Trolley home.
John was also playing rep football Group v Group.A 1965 A  Johna€™s life was about to change forever. But at least we know that he was keen on illustration, since his Hebdomades vel de imaginibus, a biographical work in fifteen books, was illustrated with as many as seven hundred portraits.
Plinya€™s most specific reference to the map is where he records that the length of BA¦tica, the southern Spanish province, given as 475 Roman miles and its width as 258 Roman miles, whereas the width could still be correct, depending on how it was calculated.
It was not a map of a part of the Empire, not even a map of the Empire as a whole, but rather a map of the whole known world, of which the Roman Empire was merely one part.
The Porticus Vipsania was, therefore, an enormous colonnade and it follows that the map with which we are concerned was only one decorative item among the many that adorned it. Thus he says that the order Cevennes-Jura for the northern boundary of Narbonese Gaul shows motion from west to east, and again the list Macedonia, Hellespont, left side it the Black Sea shows the same movement. This work seems to have included his commentary on the sphaera Graecanica describing the Greek constellations and his sphaera barbarica on the non-Greek constellations.
From the coincidence of the figures Schnabel strongly argues that Ptolemy must have taken over the figure of 411 miles from Agrippa.
The establishment of these two lines provided the theoretical basis for a grid of lines of parallels and meridians respectively, points being fixed by longitude and latitude as by the coordinates in a graph.
The measurements of Agrippa should, therefore, be reduced but it is not easy to say by what factor.
This is true indeed, and here we have to consider a few ancient misconceptions about the shapes and positions of particular countries. The distance is 175 miles from Seleucia to Zeugma, 724 miles from Zeugma to Seleucia and Tigrim and 320 miles to the mouth of the Tigris, that is, 1,219 in all. Of the second class, where the Romans had recent military campaign we have three in Europe, that is, Germany, Dacia and Sarmatia, one in Africa, Mauretania, and one in Asia, Armenia.
Klotz has shown that he used Eratosthenes very often, but that on occasion he disagreed with him, and that Artemidorus apparently he did not use at all. The day after his shows there, Peter and Seth would schedule a songwriting session together. He manages to emulate Randy Newman in a sympathetic presentation of someone most of us would consider to be odious. Seth began listening to artists like Sarah Mclachlan, Sinead Oa€™Connor and Taj Mahal, from his fathera€™s eclectic record collection. Century.A The farmer, my father, James (Jimmy) Beedie was sitting, relaxing at home with his cousin Donald Watson when they heard the strange, roaring sound of an aircraft engine as it passed overhead A They rushed to the door, but from the dreich, damp, foggy sky above them, they heard no more. Since we are told that this work was widely circulated, some scholars have wondered whether Varro used some mechanical means of duplicating his miniatures; but educated slaves were plentiful, and we should almost certainly have heard about any such device if it had existed.
Pliny continues: a€?Who would believe that Agrippa, a very careful man who took great pains over his work, should, when he was going to set up the map to be looked at by the people of Rome, have made this mistake, and how could Augustus have accepted it? The second criterion is that the use (the alleged use) of the term longitudo for a north-south direction or for any direction other than the canonical one of east-west, shows us the direction of Agrippaa€™s order in treating of the geography. Nigidiusa€™ a€?barbaric spherea€? was derived from the like-named work of Asclepiades of Myrlea.
The two main passages from Straboa€™s second book may reasonably be regarded as a transcript of contemporary geographical practice and since between them they give an exact description of the methods followed in the ancient remains of the map of Agrippa, Tierney thinks that they may rightly be regarded as a strong proof that the views held on this map by Detlefsen and Klotz are generally correct. In somewhat similar circumstances Ptolemy reduced the figures of Marinus in Asia and Africa by about one-half.
This distance, he adds, is the latitude of the earth between the two seas, that is, the Mediterranean and the Persian Gulf.
In an online interview, he states: a€?a€¦once I learned how to communicate with him, or with anyone, without words, it drastically changed my songwriting approach. We had seen a couple of buses go by, but buses are not free, and we were waiting for the free Trolley.A  With a slight sense of urgency, we started looking for the next bus. Eric organized for Billy Owens and Noel Kelly to visit and chat to John about playing for Wests in Sydney. For it was Augustus who, when Agrippaa€™s sister had begun building the portico, carried through the scheme from the intention and notes [commentarii] of M. Tierney does not believe that either of these criteria can show us the order of treatment in the original publication, presuming, that is, that there was an original publication.
The detailed extension of the Greek parallels into the Roman west is apparently due to Nigidius. Agrippa, he thinks, took the itinerary figure for the distance from the Varus to the Arsia, which is given as 745 miles by Pliny (III, 132) and reduced it to a straight line of 411 miles by astronomical and mathematical measurement. It became more about what words to leave out, than what words I made sure I got in.a€? Seth sees the work of Randy Newman as an ideal.
It appears to me that the melancholy days have come the saddest of the year and if you were here to see our present encampment I think you would heartily concur in my opinion. We are prone to forget that all ancient geographers were necessarily map-minded, and even when the map was not before their physical eye, it was before their mental eye. This proves, therefore, that Agrippaa€™s map was not a purely itinerary map, but that Agrippa reduced the itinerary measurements in the way described.
Randya€™s ability to leave his ego behind, to see the world from the inside of another person, without judgement, regardless of that charactera€™s imperfections is a paradigm.
A Jimmy and Donald had been listening to the BBC report on their Marconi Radio unaware that before the night was over they too would be caught up in their own `Battle of Britain experience` at the farm. Bev was the first to board the bus only to find out that our passes were not acceptable, only exact change.A  We werena€™t prepared for this, so we frantically started collecting our cash. He was told that he should play Rugby Union to beat the transfer fee that Smithtown might put on him.The story was if you played RU for 1 year you could move over to League and not incur a transfer fee. Augustus, as he was ill, handed his signet-ring to Agrippa, thus indicating him as acting emperor. The order of countries within a section would, I think, very much depend on the momentary motions or aberrations of that mental eye. It is unfortunate, however, that nearly all Agrippaa€™s figures come down to us in a non-reduced form that makes it impossible to reproduce his map. The ground for miles around us is flatA and swampy, part of the time entirely covered with water and in consequence of the thickness of the timber you cannot see more than the length of one company.
One of Johna€™s flatmates was trying out for Easts Rugby League and told John to come along and try out for Easts.John met with Roy Flynn, the Easts treasurer at the time and the conversation went like thisa€¦a€?No chance, bring him back when he grows up!!!a€? John had just turned 18. The same year Agrippa was given charge of all the eastern parts of the Empire, with headquarters at Mitylene. After writing a song from anothera€™s point of view, Seth finds that it winds up saying something important about himself. To add to the pleasures of the place something less than a thousand musical Bull Frogs keep up an almost incessant croaking. We all made it on except Allison, who finally waved us on with the hollow assurance that she would meet us there. This chat stayed with John and he always played that little bit harder when Wests played Easts.John, without a car, arrived at Ashfield park via public transport and trained with Wests. It is very lonesome for us here as there are but three or four families live within 3 miles of us and what is harder on us than anything else first is not near so plenty as it was aboutA Jackson but I guess we will manage to get plenty to do us.
The Pilot, peering out of his cockpit window and trying to make sense of where he was, had because of sea-fog, crossed the shoreline unknowingly, and was unaware that he was now over Scottish farm-land.A The Bomber`s crew, Ltz.
Our march to this place was rather hot but weA took all the advantage we could by marching at night.
The pass that works on both trains and buses is a plastic card, which must be purchased at a different machine than we used; and 3. The first day we marched about ten miles without getting enough of water to make a good drink. When we got to where there was some water we stopped for dinner and stayed there till about 5 oclkA in the evening .While we were resting a large plantation belonging to a rabid secessionist was stripped of everything on it useful to a soldier except peaches and they were so abundant that all we took could not be noticed. I cana€™t find out the score but John tells me the Water Board boys won.A A The main event. Night before last ourCo.was called out at 12 oclk to go down to a ford about 4 miles below this. A She was right, it had gouged a long deep gully in the wet earth of the turnip field nearby. News having come into camp that 50 rebel cavalry were going to cross over the river there that night.
Quarter of a mile, precisely, in a field of corn, after rutting the turnip field, bouncing into a wall - which sent it`s floats flying and one of it`s engines skiing off at a tangent - the plane, having rumbled on for another 100 yards or so through the field of corn, had come to a final halt having embedded it`s nose in the soft, fertile, north-east soil. We had a mostA doleful time of it getting to the river as our way lay through the swamps and it had rained the night before.
A The three German airmen tried to make their escape from the plane, fearing that it might blow up at any moment. Sometimes we wouldA be falling over logs, the next moment running into a mudholeA  about knee deep or perhaps find yourself lying in some hole with a half dozen more of the boys on top of you. One jumped clear before it struck ground, thinking he was jumping into the shimmering sea before realizing he had hit shimmering corn instead. He lay on the ground in tremendous pain with a fractured pelvis and a broken hip-bone, his tangled parachute lying beside him.A As Agnes, Jimmy and Donald approached the turnip field they expected to see a British plane but were shocked when they saw the black German Crosses emblazoned on it. As they followed the deep rut made by the plane Agnes picked up a small pistol lying nearby on the wet earth and put it in her pocket for safe-keeping. I expect we will remain here for sometime as this is a very important point to guard to keep the rebels from outflanking our forces at Bolivar.
The plane`s Navigator lay nearby, seriously injured, where he had landed when he jumped from the plane just before impact.
The road we are on is the only road through this swamp for a good many miles either up or down on which the rebels can bring infantry or artillery and on this road there is only a ferry, so as long as we can keep them from throwing a bridgeA across the stream we can hold them in check. A below: Jimmy BeedieA As Jimmy left to get his motor-bike to go to the village for help, Agnes and Donald drew nearer to the injured German airmen. One team, drawn out of a hat, would have the luxury of playing the winner of the first playoff match. They felt that for the injured airman`s safety he should be carried away from the plane in case it burst into flames. Water that is good water is very scarce .What we use for cooking we get from a mill race close by. With the help of the 2 other airmen, they retrieved a rubber dingy from the Sea-plane on which to lay the injured man, but it proved too cumber-some and difficult to handle so Donald Watson decided to go and look for a gate on which to lay the injured navigator whilst the young 20 year old Agnes Marr was left alone with the Germans in almost total darkness, with the lantern and the struggling moon-light as her only protection.A A Agnes conversed with the Pilot, and looking at the distraught and injured Navigator thought to herself, "Enemies? He is an excellent cook and besides that he carries all the water we want and goes out three miles into the country and brings in fruit. Had the Germans so chosen, they could have shot Agnes and made their escape, but compassion for their injured companion, the futility of their situation and their own inherent-human compassion for a defenceless young foreign woman over-ruled.A The two relatively-uninjured airmen went back inside their plane and Agnes heard the sounds of something being broken up as if the men were trying to destroy something they didn`t want to be seen. They then exited the plane carrying their rucksacks and the Pilot said to Agnes, "Don`t go too near the plane, it is full of bombs and could explode at any moment!"A It was a miracle the bombs didn`t explode when it hit ground zero. Before IA leftJacksonI gave a man there 220 to express to you to New Castle Forty of this belonged to Geo. The fuel tanks too, which were almost full of petrol, amazingly didn`t break up and burst into flames.
One night Ned arrived to find me asleep on a park bench with a newspaper over my head and I was christened Sleepy which over time was turned into Snoozer.a€?A Below is a story about Johns life now at South West Rocks.
Getting no answer he ran back to his motor-bike, got it started and then rushed back to the Police-House.
A A Ita€™s a bumpy, dusty drive beside the Macleay River just south of South West Rocks (home to Smoky Cape Lighthouse and a prison with a killer view, Trial Bay Gaol) to get to the big blue shed at Rainbow Reach, with potholes so deep you could fish in them a€“ but the drive is worth it. He could hardly persuade Constable Soppitt and others to believe that a German Bomber had crashed onto his farm-land.
John Elfords oysters explode in your mouth, salty and creamy, with a lingering mineral aftertaste.Hea€™s been oyster farming here for a dozen years, is passionate about his product and the river he works and lives by, and reckons he wouldna€™t want to do anything else.
They considered that the poor man had gone crazy and could hardly believe what he was saying.
A  I learned something from every man I met or exchanged emails with, and Lou taught me a few words in Spanish.A  Ole! Constable Soppitt then decided that he had better phone his Officials at Fraserburgh, a fishing port, 12 miles away, and inform them of the Farmer`s amazing story.A Back at the farm-house, the airman who had good-command of the English language was deep in conversation with Agnes Marr. He related to her that his own father had trained as a Dental-Surgeon in London prior to the First World War; "Where are we?" he asked the housekeeper. As aA  Wests fan in the 1960a€™s and 70a€™s John a€?Snoozera€? Elford was a player I would love to watch play. Spotting the butter and foodstuffs on the kitchen-table, the Airman said with surprise, "You have butter and all this food? We are told you all are starving!" - "Yes," Agnes replied, "We are told the same about you." The Pilot took from his rucksack 2 sealed packs of food which he then popped into the drawer of a kitchen cupboard. A Constable Soppitt had, meanwhile, jumped on to the back-seat of Jimmy Beedie`s motor-bike and they were now well on their way back to the farm. Arriving at the plane and finding it deserted, Jimmy then made for his house where he found his house-keeper, Miss Marr caring for the three airmen and providing them with hot tea, scones, cheese and bread and butter biscuits which she had made herself. Two of the airman were seated at the kitchen-table and the injured man was lying on the floor.
Agnes Marr was at the `stove` frying sausages and eggs for her `visitors` who were still in shock after their unplanned visit. A The Germans, being in shock, were very quiet and subdued and displayed no rudeness or aire of superiority to their hosts.
In fact, they appeared quite surprised and appreciative of the kindness being shown to them by the young house-keeper. But this was Agnes Marr and like many of her fellow Scots she had that inherent compassion for the sick and injured and considered it her humane duty to care for such injured, even though they were `the enemy`. Her own brother, Leslie was on a Minesweeper ship far away, doing his bit for the defense of his country and she hoped that, if tragedy ever befell him, he too would be treated with similar kindness by the enemy.
Above : New Aberdour VillageA Not long after the arrival of Jimmy Beedie and Constable Soppitt another commotion was heard outside.
Then bursting through the door, brandishing guns and rifles, came the `officials` from Fraserburgh, the Home Guard, Police-Inspector George Michie, Police-Sergeant James Thompson and local army officers, and, like the men in the BBC`s `Dad`s Army`, were expecting to face a hostile reception from arrogant Germans. We had as pleasant a trip as could be expected under the circumstances, nothing worthy of note occurring on the way.
They were shocked to find all the Air-men sitting in quiet conversation with Agnes and the others. We arrived there about 2 oclk in the afternoon and took up our quarters in the Court house yard which by the way was not a very enviable situation as our Cavalry had been using it for a yard to feed their horses in, in consequence of which it was full of corn husks and dust. The scene before them `took the wind out of their sails`.A Dr John Cameron and the District Nurse from New Pitsligo arrived in their wake and immediately set to task of doing what they could to relieve the suffering of the injured Navigator, but because the kitchen was full of hyped-up men, the Doctor found it difficult to treat his patient and Agnes suggested taking the injured man into the main living room where there was more space to work. I took up my quarters in a very nice room in the court house so that I have no reason to grumble.
We found quite a number of good Union men in the town and the citizens all treated us with marked respect. I met with some of the kindest men there that I have seen since I came into the service .They took many of the officers and men to their housesA and gave them the best meals they could raise without charging a cent When we told them we were not going to stay but a few days they expressed great regret and told us if we could to come back again and stay. The Doctor noted that the Pilot looked as if he was still in his teens and asked him where in Germany he was from, "I belong to Hamburg," he replied "and I`ve also been to America, and my father trained in London." He took from his rucksack a box and the good-doctor realized that it was a first-class first-aid kit. Our troops occupy the place for a few days and they flock in by scores to take the oath .Our troops are then ordered away and they are left to the by no means tender mercies of bands of guerillas and cotton burners which infest this country.
A Some time later an ambulance arrived to take the injured man to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary hospital, and as they carried him out on a stretcher to the ambulance he discreetly took from his jacket-pocket a pair of binoculars and pressed them into Agnes`s hands, saying, "Danke, Veile" - "Thank you, very much." The army-officers then took hold of the other 2 airmen to take them away and as they were leaving the house, the airmen turned to Agnes Marr and Jimmy Beedie, thanked them profusely for the humaneness shown them, and the Pilot taking the anchor-badge from the Navigator`s cap, pressed this into Jimmy Beedie`s hands as he left.
I really pity them and hope that some step may be taken which will afford them some better protection.
A The night had long gone and it was almost the dawning of the morning before the farm-house emptied of it`s visitors and neither Jimmy Beedie nor Agnes Marr slept that night.
We can take a little walk, maybe get our feet wet, and then lie on a blanket and listen to the waves. At Dawn, Jimmy watched as the RAF set up guard a ` safe-distance` from the abandoned bomb-laden aircraft. This morning hearing that there was to be preaching in a church about a mile from camp .In connexion with 3 others thought we would attend divine worship once moreA  but on arriving at the place we found that the minister had failed to fill his appointment and that there was going to be noA  preaching.
No one, that is, except the `bomb-busters` (and a sneaky, unofficial party from the nearby Pennan village, of `Local Hero` fame, who got through the cordon unseen and made off with a Verey pistol). So we went to a house nearby where we spent an hour or two in rather pleasant conversation and then returned to camp.The weather is very warm and one would suppose very sickly, but our boys still continue in excellent health. Sergeant George Thompson of the RAF was startled to see one of his young men sitting astride one of the bombs, "Hey Young, do you want to blow us all up?" he screamed. Sapper David Young, a teenager with a bomb-proof constitution chirpily replied, "How high do you reckon I`ll go, if it does, Sarge?" This was David and Goliath 1940`s style.
I do the same thing myself, when the mood strikes.A  And how about this for being an "in tune with women" kinda guy?A  A few days after I had ordered myself 2 new green dresses and several in black to add to my collection from a mail order company named Newport News, he sent an email asking:A  "So, what are you wearing right now? So taking everything into consideration I believe if it comes to an election I will not allow them to use my name. The task of defusing the bombs took several days and much sweating, but the work was completed.A Then, like vultures, other officials swooped in to strip the plane of it`s rich pickings. Sledgehammers, crowbars, picks, shovels and axes - anything that could be put to use to `skeletonise` the plane was utilised. The banging, thudding, ripping and tearing apart of the plane could be clearly heard back at the farm-house by Jimmy Beedie and Agnes Marr. About Us Contact Us A Tribute to Ben Fisher and Jack Thompson Bill Keato the Lad from Liverpool Old Newspaper stories and photos from the 1960's VALE Laurie Bruyeres VALE Nev Charlton.
I wrote to Duff about it as soon as I heard it was lost but never have recd any answer from him concerning it.
VALE Bill Keato VALE Vince Karalius VALE Bob McGuiness VALE Denis Meaney VALE Johnny Mowbray Vale Kel O'Shea Vale Mark "Snow" Patch VALE Bob Sargent Vale Ken "Nebo" Stonestreet. VALE Doug Walkaden 1966 Season 1967 Season 1968 Season 1969 Season Noel's Dream Team What a game Wests Photos from the Old Days Case of the Missing Goal Posts A Visit to Old Pratten Park Peter Dimond Book Launch Interview with ------ Noel Kelly Interview with ------ Tony Ford Interview with------- Mick Alchin Interview with Jim Cody Interview with ------ Colin Lewis Interview with ------ John Mowbray Interview with ------ Noel Thornton Interview with ------- Bill Owens Interview with John "Chow" Hayes Arncliffe Scots 1969 Un-Defeated Premiers Arncliffe Scots 85 years reunion 2003 Pratten Park Reunion 2007 Pratten Park Reunion 2008 Pratten Park Reunion 2009 Pratten Park Reunion 2010 Pratten Park Reunion 2011 Pratten Park Reunion 2012 Pratten Park Reunion 2013 Pratten Park Reunion. At Windyhead his eulogy was even more appropriate.A After the German Air-Navigator was released from hospital, he joined his comrades at a Prisoner-of-War camp, remaining there til the war ended in 1945. They then returned to Germany where one of the Airmen had their story published amongst others in a book entitled, `Luftwaffe at War (1939-42).
I must acknowledge that I was somewhat astonished at the serious manner in which you were disposed to treat (what you were pleased to call my flirtations with Mrs Reba) I dona€™t remember now what I wrote about it but I certainly did not intend you to understand that I was either flirting with her or loitering about the house. As far as being entrapped by their seeming kindness is concerned I expect to keep on the lookout for anything of that kind. IMPORTANT NOTICE LITTLE BLOOMS CHILDREN`S ORPHANAGE INDIA MY INDIA MISSIONS TRIP APOSTOLIC BIBLICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY NEW DELHI INDIA NAZARENE ISRAELITE ??? The health of our Regt is excellent not more than a dozen being in the hospital from the whole Regt.
INTERESTING VIDEOS OPEN LETTER TO PRESIDENT OBAMA NAZI GENOCIDE PERSECUTION OF THE JEWISH RACE HITLER`S HOLOCAUST BLUEPRINT CHRIST KILLERS??? A portion of our co was sent out after fruit yesterday and they brought in about 25 bushels of very nice peaches which were divided out among the several companies of the Regt.
Besides the peaches each of the Boys had at least one and some of them as high as four geese which they declared would not take the oath and they were compelled to arrest them and bring them into camp. A  For Christ Sake!!A  How about saving the Taxpayers a buck?A  In addition to that $6 million you've already blown by hovering and covering me, and scheduling a proper Face to Base meeting in your office; at my convenience? I got all the peaches I could eat and one of the Boys was kind enough to make me a present of a very nice young goose which I expect to have for supper this evening.
Beans irish potatoes cabbage etc are very plenty and you know any of those served up with nice fresh beef is not very hard to take.
Our cook is proving much better than I expected at first so that taking everything into consideration I believe we are getting along better than we have at any previous time since we have been in the service. The negroes in camp are used when there is any fatigue duty to be performed so that our soldiers are spared from a great deal of labor that they were formally compelled to do. I do not like the negroes by any means but if there is anything they can do that will leave a soldier in the ranks I am in favor of using them.
But if the rebellion can never be crushed without arming them, if we cannot raise enough of white men in the north to fight our battles for us. I say let the south secede and joy go with them.We are to be mustered for pay next Sabbath day it being the last day of the month. The last news we had from Mercer Co she had raised 7 full companies since the last call of the President.A  They are going to organize a Regt in the county if they can. Dramatic, but no drama.A  Short black skirt, or long black dress?A  Heels or boots?A  Camo, or commando?
There is a rumor afloat in camp since yesterday evening that there had been another battle inVirginiaand that the rebels got whipped. This would be very cheery news if we only knew that it was correct but I would much rather not hear anything about ita€”until we can get the straightway of ita€”than to be kept in such suspense.If our men should succeed in whipping them or even in holding them in check at the present time. I believe in one of your other letters you requested me to tell you the names of our Regt Officer. Fouke our former Col has I understand reca€™d the appointment of Brig Genl of some of the new troops. Armstrong, and after four hours fighting, drove the enemy from the field, gaining a brilliant victory.
One, Two & Three order form Historic timeline and stories of early West Tennessee The BBCHA President's Page The 1854 Denmark Presbyterian Church History 1. Until then, as in the end,there is much more to come.A A A  Once Upon a Time, a little mushroom popped through the moss covered ground of the Southeast Alaska Rainforest. Area MuseumsBrownsville Museum Bemis Museum Casey Jones Museum and Home Jackson NC & STL Depot and Rail Museum The Civil War Discovery Museum of West Tennessee The Childrens Discovery Museum of West Tennessee West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center Brownsville's Blues Pioneer, Sleepy John Estes 46. Meriwether Society visit June 22, 2013 49 Denmark Presbyterian Church first Service after restoration 50 Providence Road Solar Project 51 Boy Scout visit to DenmarkThe Boy Scouts visit Denmark again 52. Spotting the butter and foodstuffs on the kitchen-table, the Airman said with surprise, "You have butter and all this food?
Grant, Attorney at Law, Juneau, AK From Wedding Bells to Tales to Tell: The Affidavit of Eric William Swanson, my former spouse AFFIDAVIT OF SHANNON MARIE MCCORMICK, My Former Best Friend THE AFFIDAVIT OF VALERIE BRITTINA ROSE, My daughter, aged 21 THE BEAGLE BRAYS! Sadly, her beloved brother Leslie sustained injuries during his war-time service which led to his early death in 1947, at the age of 34 years. Jimmy and Agnes were laid to rest next to Leslie in the serenity of the immaculately-kept kirkyard of New Aberdour`s St. Drostan`s Church, which overlooks the beautiful and imposing Moray coastline that the Heinkel Bomber fatefully crossed, that September night, exactly 72 years ago.I was barely 12 years of age when I first heard fall from my mother`s own lips, the story of the crash-landing of the German Bomber, and over the next 50 years, whenever enquiring minds asked her to retell her incredible experience, her detailed and crystal-clear recollection of that unforgettable night were so embedded in her memory that she never once deviated in any way from the account I first heard as a youngster. Mitchell (Fraserburgh) after having been invited to open the new `Superdrug` Store in Fraserburgh.
A The German military secret service, commonly known as the Abwehr, conducted a small series of secret operations under the codename of Unternehmen Moewe (pronounced - Mwav) (Meaning: Operation Seagull) throughout World War II. These operations are not to be mixed up with the British special forces' operation Seagull, conducted against the Arendal smelting works and other plants in Norway June 1944.
The Moewe operations were of such a small scale, that they have received little to no attention in commonly available history literat-ure. Another likely reason for them not being mentioned is the destruction of archives in later stages of the war. HELL'S BELLS: THE TELLS OF THE ELVES RING LOUD AND CLEAR IDENTITY THEFT, MISINFORMATION, AND THE GETTING THE INFAMOUS RUNAROUND Double Entendre and DoubleSpeak, Innuendos and Intimidation, Coercion v Common Sense, Komply (with a K) v Knowledge = DDIICCKK; Who's Gunna Call it a Draw? FoughtA in the Battle of Britton Lane September 1, 1862.Picture sent by Matt Anderson, 30th.



My boyfriends back dance competition youtube
How to chase back my ex boyfriend back
What to say to my ex to make him want me back again


Comments to «Get him running back to me»

  1. PIONERKA writes:
    I'm beginning to assume is one of the best for me) out.
  2. LOST writes:
    Just a little aggravated with listening to an audio a buddy of mine don't yet.
  3. xan001 writes:
    Are generally good and will begin.
  4. Prodigy writes:
    Fairly unlikely that she has very distant and chilly due to issues that.