January 9, 2014 By The Sweaty Betties 118 Comments I get emails with training and diet questions all the time. Some people gain and lose a ton of weight and have hardly any issues while others are covered in stretch marks and are trying to fix that sagging skin. Crunches, reverse crunches, planks or any abdominal exercise you can think of will not work. I would never judge and I’d be in line for a tummy-tuck if I worked my ass off to lose a bunch of weight and it was really bothering me. The article never said it wasn’t possible, it was just for once stating the cold hard facts. There are exercises that will help u tighten and tone but it will take time and dedication.
I have to say its truely great to finally have a honest answer, I have asked so many people about this an have gotten tons of answers an followed them all, i do belive you are right, only surgery will get the extra off.
I definitely have some loose skin on my belly resulting from my two little ones, and I get frustrated by it sometimes, but then I realize, those two little girls are WORTH a little extra skin!!! I was not unhappy with myself before, it was just frustrating because I know I worked so hard for something and could not see the results.
Yes, some ladies have 3+ kids with minimal issues, some have ONE baby and stomach is just stretched to bits.. I wear size medium shirts, size seven jeans, and (in case you were wondering) size eight shoes.
I have never experienced a doctor dismissing my concerns with a “lose weight, feel great!” remedy. And I can open an article with my measurements without fear of judgment. I walk through this world as a thin person. And as such, I have never experienced fat discrimination. Because it’s so easy to fall back on tired old excuses for why we’re not privileged – and I see this a lot when the topic of thin privilege is broached.
But I think it’s time for us to look at these excuses (and how they don’t hold up in the grand scheme of things) a little more closely. Because yes, sticks and stones may break your bones, but damn it, words really can hurt you. It is woven throughout social institutions, as well as embedded within individual consciousness. For example, if you make a “fat joke,” everyone around you is going to understand it – because the cultural belief that fat is something to laugh at is widespread. Structural limits significantly shape a person’s life chances and sense of possibility in ways beyond the individual’s control. Dominant or privileged groups benefit, often in unconscious ways, from the disempowerment of subordinated or targeted groups.
The negative attitudes toward you as a privileged person aren’t pervasive, restricting, or hierarchal. You aren’t losing out on anything just because someone’s words, actions, or beliefs had an emotional impact on you. And when you move past it – even if it takes years of work, which it very well may – that’s it. Oppression never goes away because everywhere you go, everything you see, and everyone you know reiterates and reinforces it.


I made a video this summer called ‘How to Get a Bikini Body.’ It repeated the oft-seen-on-social-media body-positive mantra “Put a bikini on your body!” theme. And people were quick to comment that my message lost its meaning because my body adheres to societal beauty standards. But the difference between these negative feelings and fatphobia is this: The only person worrying about whether or not I’m meeting beauty standards is me. And while your internal struggle is real and significant, the point is: You might hate your body, but society doesn’t. Before you worry that I’m going to disregard or otherwise undermine the bullying involved in skinny-shaming, let me reassure you: I’m not going to do that.
I would never tell you that jabs at your “chicken legs” or insinuations (or outright proclamations) that you must have an eating disorder aren’t hurtful or that their effects aren’t far-reaching.
But what I am going to argue is this: As horrible as skinny-shaming is (and it is!), what makes it different is that it does not involve a pervasive fear or hatred of thin bodies.
And while its personal effects are certainly influential, it is not restrictive on a social level. But these types of reclamations of fat pride wouldn’t need to exist if fat-shaming wasn’t a thing.
These types of phrases and attitudes were born of a need to say “I’m beautiful, too!” They’re responses to social norms.
And while you certainly shouldn’t encourage them if they feel like put-downs, what you need to remember about these phrases, in the words of Lindy West is, “’I’m proud to be fat’ is still a radical statement.
Society wants you to recognize that being thin is “in” – but not too thin, not that thin – because the goal is to keep you insecure. The “So-and-So Has Cellulite!” headline is right next to the “Does So-and-So Have an Eating Disorder?” story. They (and you can insert anyone you want here for “they” – society, the media, the dieting industry, the executive board for Patriarchy, Inc.) want women to continue to chase after unattainable goals. But the difference is that the discrimination that fat people experience is at the intersection of sexism and fatphobia. So while, yes, shaming anyone is wrong and bad and sexist, fat-shaming is rooted in extra factors that skinny-shaming is not. And when you feel trapped in and controlled by your body, when you’ve reached that level of self-consciousness, when you’re suffering every single day just to make it through, it’s unlikely that you’ll feel like you’re experiencing privilege.
That is: The marginalization that you experience as a person living with an eating disorder is a result of the disorder, not a result of your body. A person with an eating disorder can experience ableism and still benefit from their thin privilege. But the bottom line that we have to remember is this: Are my negative experiences related to my body grievances, or are they pervasive issues on a societal level?
And if you have your thin privilege in check, you’ll be better able to recognize that most of the time, these issues fall into the former category. Beth, the makeup artist, suggests that if you're chomping at the beauty bit to go thin first pluck only a small layer and hang for a week to see how you like it.  If you do then go at another layer until you like how your brows look.
That being said, if you worked hard, there’s no reason you should be held back because of some loose skin. I’ve always felt though, that if you can love and accept yourself before surgery than you will always be better off.


I chose the surgery not because I don’t love myself but because I worked hard and deserved it.
This was so fantanstic, I’ve been having the same argument with my 50 year old mother.
Battling with self image and how people perceive me and this was just what I needed to hear!
By virtue of not having access to these privileges, the lives of larger people are limited. If thinness is heralded as the status quo, then that continues to put thin people in positions of power when it comes to determining what “average” (or “preferable”) is.
I believe whole-heartedly that the body-positive community needs to be open to all body types. And referring to someone’s partner as a dog just because they like someone’s body is degrading. An able-bodied woman can experience sexism and still benefit from her able-bodied privilege.
It’s easy to feel defensive when you mistake someone’s asking you to check your privilege for their making assumptions about your life. Fabello, Managing Editor of Everyday Feminism, is a domestic violence prevention and sexuality educator, eating disorder and body image activist, and media literacy vlogger based out of Philadelphia.
I went down to 125 the day after having them and worked my butt off and got rid of almost all my lose skin and im sure it will go away because im 100% dedicated even majority of my stretch markswent away from over hydrating my skin wiyh lotions and scrubbing hard while taking warm baths. People who look to surgery to fix how they feel about themselves are always still dissatisfied. But I used to use bio oil on them and after a few months they started to seem like the color was fading.
I have got loose skin on my belly, but considering the fact that I have had 6 kids already, it is a minor problem for me as it is not as bad as one would expect it to be after having so many kids.
She enjoys rainy days, Jurassic Park, and the occasional Taylor Swift song and can be found on YouTube and Tumblr. My belly was hard and ripped but I still looked 4 months pregnant at 12% bodyfat (I also compete in amateur figure competitions and a poofy belly is frustrating).
So until the day I can I’m going to continue eating clean, lifting weights and embracing my body just the way it is! The surgery was expensive and recovery hasn’t been easy but I have to say I would do it again in a heart beat.
Since my muscles have been repaired I don’t have as many digestive problems and my core will be stronger for it.
I want to crawl out of my body and die:( I am not a vain person and can’t believe I did this!



How to get your ex back after a few years malaysia
How do you get a boyfriend in 2nd grade
Category: Back With Ex


Comments to «What can i do to get my girl back cover»

  1. Sen_Olarsan_nicat writes:
    Also true which you can push good as its.
  2. RRRRRR writes:
    Overview, you'll be able to learn about her.
  3. VUSALIN_QAQASI writes:
    Entire time and said we had been in two completely.
  4. TM_087 writes:
    Afraid of losing you more than you send her text messages or SMS out of your mobile.