Subscribe to RSS

The middle ear is the space behind the eardrum, which is connected to the back of the throat by a passageway called the Eustachian tube. Middle ear infections are the most common illness that brings children to a pediatrician and the most common cause of hearing loss in children. Symptoms of otitis media usually improve within 48 to 72 hours, but the fluid that has built up in the middle ear may last for up to 3 months.
Breastfeed your child because breastfeeding seems to offer some protection against otitis media. Avoid rooms with secondhand smoke, because environmental cigarette smoke may increase a child’s risk of ear infections. The treatment of a middle ear infection depends on how bad the symptoms are and what’s causing the infection.
In cases of particularly severe infections or those that do not respond to treatment, a tube may need to be inserted through the eardrum.
Call your doctor if you or your older child complains of an earache or has trouble hearing. Redness of the ear canal, draining fluids and discharge of pus are signs of swimmer's ear (otitis externa).
It is not uncommon for infants and toddlers to experience fluid in the middle ear or ear infections at some point during their early years. The immature structure of a baby or toddler’s ear can make it more difficult for fluid to drain from the middle ear. This fluid does not always become the source of an actual infection, so the fluid can remain in the middle ear without causing the typical symptoms of an infection. Children first learn to speak by hearing, and the first three years of life are crucial to their language development skills.
Ear infections in childhood are often more easily recognized and therefore more quickly treated, reducing long-term consequences on hearing and speech development.
The first step is to have your child’s hearing tested and ears examined if you suspect fluid in the ear or another cause of hearing loss might be the cause of your child’s speech delays.
Once the hearing issues have been diagnosed, work with your pediatrician to see what kinds of speech therapies can be helpful for your child. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. Middle ear infections, also called otitis media, can occur when congestion from an allergy or cold blocks the Eustachian tube. Middle ear infections can also cause a hole (perforation) in the eardrum or spread to nearby areas, such as the mastoid bone.
The increased exposure to other infected children increases your child’s chances of getting infected. Inside the middle ear, three tiny bones (ossicles) normally transfer sound vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear, where they are turned into nerve impulses that your brain understands as sound. He or she will examine the ears with an otoscope — an instrument with a lighted, cone-shaped end piece for looking in the ear canal at the eardrum. Secondhand smoke disrupts the function of the Eustachian tube and changes the protection mucus provides. Many infections will go away on their own and the only treatment necessary is medication for pain. This is done by a specialist in illnesses of the ears, nose and throat (an otolaryngologist), usually under anesthesia. However, long-term ear infections or fluid in the middle ear that may go untreated can cause speech delays that may require some form of speech therapy.


Sometimes this fluid becomes infected, by either a virus or bacteria, and causes the tell-tale signs of a childhood ear infection: crying, pulling at the ears, general fussiness, fever, and difficulty sleeping. The signs of fluid in the middle ear can be as subtle as a slight loss of balance and changes in eating habits to hearing and speech related symptoms. During these years they are hearing sounds modeled for them, and while they might not be speaking in complete sentences, they are learning how to form the sounds needed for fluent speech.
You wouldn’t be the first parent, however, to not recognize the signs of uninfected fluid in the middle ear.
Some children with poorly formed or matured ear structures benefit from having tiny tubes placed in their ears to drain the fluid. Some children who miss that critical window of speech development because they had temporary hearing loss benefit tremendously from working with an SLP to get caught up with developmental milestones. In fact, 2 out of 3 times, when kids get colds, they also wind up with infections in their ears. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Fluid and pressure build up, so bacteria or viruses that have traveled up the Eustachian tube into the middle ear can multiply and cause an ear infection. In people with otitis media, however, inflammation and infection may change this normal process. The doctor will look for redness and bulging of the eardrum and will check to see if it moves normally by blowing a puff of air through the otoscope. If enlarged adenoids or tonsils cause recurrent or persistent infections, the specialist may recommend surgery to remove them. In severe cases that go untreated, the infection can spread, causing an infection in the mastoid bone (called mastoiditis) or even meningitis, but this is rare. Whether or not your child requires antibiotics to treat the ear infection depends on the source of the infection and your pediatrician’s recommendations. Because fluid in the middle ear that is not infected often causes no pain in children, the condition can go left undiagnosed and untreated for a long period of time, increasing the likelihood of more severe symptoms down the road. Ear infections and excess fluid in the ears can result in hearing loss, even if it is temporary. Many parents also find it helpful to work with an ENT – a doctor who specializes in the Ear, Nose, and Throat. You can also help your child at home by speaking clearly, using precise language (perhaps single words for specific items), reducing background noise, and remembering that your child might be older now but needs some patience to recover that lost time in speech development. The main reasons are that their immune systems are immature and that their little ears don’t drain as well as adults’ ears do. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. Other symptoms can include fever, general body discomfort, rubbing or pulling of the ears in children, vomiting and diarrhea in infants, dizziness, loss of balance and fluid draining from the ear.
Antibiotics are prescribed for any child younger than 6 months and for any person with severe symptoms. Some at home treatments include OTC pain relief and warm compresses to alleviate the initial and immediate pain. Imagine you are walking around underwater and the sounds are all distorted – this is what the world might sound like to a child with fluid in her ears, and this problem can be amplified if there is pain associated with it. Sometimes a doctor will write a prescription for antibiotics but will ask the patient or family to wait 48 to 72 hours before filling it, to see if symptms improve. While they are not necessarily permanent, they can affect the speech and language development of younger children.


When problems exist and hearing loss for any reason occurs, there is an increased risk that a child will have a speech delay.
But even if your kid hasn’t been swimming, a scratch from something like a cotton swab (or who knows what kids stick in there?) can cause trouble. Diagnosing an Ear InfectionThe only way to know for sure if your child has an ear infection is for a doctor to check inside her ear with a device called an otoscope. This is basically just a tiny flashlight with a magnifying lens for the doctor to look through. Inside Your EarThe Eustachian tube is a canal that connects your middle ear to your throat. Fluid in the EarIf the Eustachian tube gets blocked, fluid builds up inside your child’s middle ear. This makes the perfect breeding ground for bacteria and viruses, which can cause infections.
Your doctor may look inside your child’s ear with an otoscope, which can blow a puff of air to make his eardrum vibrate. Bursting an EardrumIf too much fluid or pressure builds up inside your child’s middle ear, her eardrum can actually burst (shown here).
The good news is that the pain may suddenly disappear because the hole lets the pressure go. Your child may be especially uncomfortable lying down, so he might have a hard time sleeping. Babies may push their bottles away because pressure in their ears makes it hurt to swallow.
Home Care for Ear InfectionsWhile the immune system fights the infection, there are things you can do to fight your child’s pain. Non-prescription painkillers and fever reducers, such as ibuprofen and acetaminophen, are also an option. Antibiotics for Ear InfectionsEar infections often go away on their own, so don’t be surprised if your doctor suggests a "wait and see" approach. Complications of Ear infectionsIf your child’s ear infections keep coming back, they can scar his eardrums and lead to hearing loss, speech problems, or even meningitis. Ear TubesFor stubborn ear infections that just won’t go away, doctors sometimes insert small tubes through the eardrums. Tonsils Can Be the CauseSometimes a child’s tonsils get so swollen that they put pressure on the Eustachian tubes connecting her middle ear to her throat -- which then causes infections. Preventing Ear InfectionsThe biggest cause of middle ear infections is the common cold, so avoiding cold viruses is good for ears, too. Other ways to prevent ear infections include keeping your child away from secondhand smoke, getting annual flu shots, and breastfeeding your baby for at least 6 months to boost her immune system. Allergies and Ear InfectionsLike colds, allergies can also irritate the Eustachian tubes and contribute to middle ear infections. If you can’t keep your child away from whatever’s bothering him, consider having him tested to identify the triggers.



Woke up with right ear ringing yahoo
Sudden hearing loss phil collins quote




Comments to «Ear infection or virus»

  1. sadelik writes:
    And women who are experiencing you.
  2. BAKILI_QAQAS writes:
    Less regularly and are posturography that is intended to be deployed side Effects.
  3. GULAY writes:
    You do not have a rare illness.
  4. midi writes:
    Far more plausible healthcare explanation, tinnitus the body becomes, the the one hundred% organic plan.