Subscribe to RSS

Using gene therapy, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School have restored hearing in mice with a genetic form of deafness.
The other type of mouse, called Beethoven, has a specific TMC1 mutationa€”a change in a single amino acida€”and is a good model for the dominant form of TMC1-related deafness.
To deliver the healthy gene, the team inserted it into an engineered virus called adeno-associated virus 1, or AAV1, together with a promotera€”a genetic sequence that turns the gene on only in certain sensory cells of the inner ear known as hair cells. In the recessive deafness model, gene therapy with TMC1 restored the ability of sensory hair cells to respond to sounda€”producing a measurable electrical currenta€”and also restored activity in the auditory portion of the brainstem. A scanning electron microscope image zooming into the v-shaped sensory hair bundles in the cochlea. AAV1 is considered safe as a viral vector and is already in use in human gene therapy trials for blindness, heart disease, muscular dystrophy and other conditions. Ultimately, Holt hopes to partner with clinicians at Boston Children's Department of Otolaryngology and elsewhere to start clinical trials of TMC1 gene therapy within 5 to 10 years.
Holt believes that other forms of genetic deafness may also be amenable to the same gene therapy strategy.
Holt's team showed in 2013 that TMC1 and the related protein TMC2 are critical for hearing, ending a rigorous 30-year search by scientists.
Although the channel is made up of either TMC1 or TMC2, a mutation in the TMC1 gene is sufficient to cause deafness.
A new gene therapy approach can reverse hearing loss caused by a genetic defect in a mouse model of congenital deafness, according to a preclinical study published by Cell Press in the July 26 issue of the journal Neuron. A specific protein found in the bridge-like structures that make up part of the auditory machinery of the inner ear is essential for hearing.
Dandruff is not caused by a fungus, as many believe, but by an imbalance between two competing bacteria that naturally colonise the human scalp, according to a study released Thursday.
It's rare for scientists to get what they describe as "clean" results without spending a lot of time repeating the same experiment over and over again.
Synthetic sugar-based molecule activates the immune system and could serve as a vaccine against C.
One of the most complex human organs is the digestive tract: Here, the body comes into contact with all manner of diet-derived compounds and with countless bacteria. Researchers partially restored hearing in deaf mice with a certain kind of genetic hearing loss by inserting working copies of the mutated genes. The Columbia University Medical Center scientists report their results in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The ear’s sound-sensing hair cells (see image above) convert noises into information the brain can process. The resurgence of the bed bug caught modern civilization flatfooted: an ancient pestilence dating back to the Pharoahs, gone for two generations, has returned with a vengeance, infesting fancy hotels and slums alike, lining our streets with mattresses spraypainted with the warning BEDBUGS.
A favorite demonstration in high school science classes of yesteryear, dropping sodium into water is spectacularly explosive.
Microsoft Office remains the world’s most powerful and widely used productivity suite. Boing Boing uses cookies and analytics trackers, and is supported by advertising, merchandise sales and affiliate links.


This journal is a member of and subscribes to the principles of the Committee on Publication Ethics. MNT – Hourly Medical News Since 2003 Sign in Your MNT Email address Password Remember me ?
Post-traumatic stress disorder occurs after a person is exposed to a traumatic event, though not everyone that experiences or witnesses such an event is affected by the condition. Researchers from the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) have identified two gene variants that could influence the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 6.8% of the adult population of the US experience PTSD at some point in their lifetime. Symptoms can vary in intensity over time and can be triggered by reminders of the traumatic event that caused the disorder to occur in the first place. Previous research in 2012 involving these samples led to the discovery that survivors carrying two gene variants associated withdepression were more likely to have PTSD than those that did not carry the variants.
For the study, published in the Journal of Affective Disorders, the team assessed the roles of two genes in the DNA samples, taken from 200 individuals. Anyone can be exposed to a traumatic event and be affected by PTSD, regardless of age and gender.
Recently, Medical News Today reported on a study finding that women experiencing large numbers of PTSD symptoms could have almost two times the risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with women who have not been exposed to trauma.
Their work, published online July 8 by the journal Science Translational Medicine, could pave the way for gene therapy in people with hearing loss caused by genetic mutations. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children's and an associate professor of Otolaryngology at Harvard Medical School. One type had the TMC1 gene completely deleted, and is a good model for recessive TMC1 mutations in humans: Children with two mutant copies of TMC1 have profound hearing loss from a very young age, usually by around 2 years.
In this form, less common than the recessive form, a single copy of the mutation causes children to gradually go deaf beginning around the age of 10 to 15 years. The researchers screened various types of AAV and various types of promoters to choose the best-performing combination.
Overall, severe to profound hearing loss in both ears affects 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births.
When sound vibrations strike the bundle, the hairs, or microvilli, wiggle back and forth, opening and closing channels formed by TMC proteins. Sensory hair cells in the inner ear contain tiny projections called microvilli, each with a channel at its tip formed by TMC1 and TMC2 proteins. However, Holt's study also showed that gene therapy with TMC2 could compensate for loss of a functional TMC1 gene, restoring hearing in the recessive deafness model and partial hearing in the dominant deafness model.
Hair cells need specific proteins to work properly, and alterations in the genetic blueprints for these proteins can cause deafness.
Whether it’s smokers transitioning to a less harmful pastime, or connoisseurs of exotic tastes and textures, the market for vaping enthusiasts continues to grow.
Histological examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of cochlea whole mounts was performed 12 weeks after β-tubulin primary immunization and photographed by light microscopy. New genetic research may now explain why some people develop the condition while others do not.


This discovery could lead to improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of PTSD in the future.
Goenjian traveled to Armenia in 1988 after a 6.8 magnitude earthquake hit the country, destroying many cities and killing more than 25,000 Armenians. The genes were COMT, an enzyme that degrades the mood regulator dopamine, and TPH-2, a controller of the production of serotonin. Goenjian says the team hopes that the study’s findings will lead to molecular methods for screening people at risk for PTSD and identify new forms of drug therapy to prevent and treat the disorder. They chose TMC1 because it is a common cause of genetic deafness, accounting for 4 to 8 percent of cases, and encodes a protein that plays a central role in hearing, helping convert sound into electrical signals that travel to the brain. To test hearing, the researchers placed the mice in a "startle box" and sounded abrupt, loud tones.
They plan to further optimize their protocol and follow their treated mice to see if they retain hearing longer than the two months already observed. When open, the channels allow calcium into the cell, initiating electrical signals that travel to the brain.
When sound waves wash over the microvilli, they wiggle and the mechanical stimulation causes the channel to open.
To combat the effects of two such mutations, the scientists injected viruses containing healthy genes into the ears of deaf baby mice. Representative spiral ganglion and organ of Corti sections are shown at the basal turn of the cochlea. During this time, many families agreed to have blood samples sent to UCLA so that the team could analyze their DNA for information pertaining to psychiatric vulnerability.
He recommends that research into this area continues in a bid to uncover more of the genes involved. This allows calcium to enter the cell, generating an electrical signal that travels to the brain and ultimately translates to hearing. And if I do I'll rule the world someday and crush all the people who give my posts lousy scores. It’s hard to get outer hair cells to respond to gene therapy, (otolaryngologist Lawrence) Lustig says. Genes and inherited traits may play a role determining an individual’s risk of developing PTSD. Researchers from the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) have identified two gene variants that could influence the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.



Tenis nike air max fitsole 2 2013
What causes loss of hearing in dogs




Comments to «Gene therapy hearing loss trial fusion»

  1. mikrob writes:
    I did that and spent most.
  2. Kamilla_15 writes:
    Can advantage you seasoned, no in some cases the noise can turn out.