I was upset to learn about the two bicycle-car accidents in District 4 last week – one along NE 65th Street and the other along 20th Ave NE.
This is now the second serious bike collision on NE 65th Street within one year; with last year’s death and the two current bike riders in critical condition, it serves as a terrible reminder that safety improvements along this arterial are far past due. My vision to address these safety concerns is to install a fully protected bike lane on 65th Street, along the entire length from Magnuson to Greenlake, connecting projects that already exist or are in development, such as Ravenna Boulevard, Roosevelt Way, the 39th Ave NE Neighborhood Greenway, and Burke Gilman Trail. Each of these improvements – which could have been a factor in preventing these accidents – can be found in the city’s Bicycle Mater Plan Northeast Sector Map (pdf), but have yet to make it into any revenue dedicated plans such as the “2016 – 2020 Implementation Plan” or the Move Seattle Levy. At this Tuesday’s Sustainability and Transportation Committee meeting, SDOT will be coming in to talk about the Bike Master Plan.
These incidents bring to the fore the necessary urgency of our actions to make our city streets safer for all users, and we must emphasize investments in critical road safety projects to prevent the next tragedy from occurring. Race and socio-economic factors must not be used to prevent people from securing safe, healthy affordable housing.
On Monday, May 2, 2016, the Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR) filed 23 director’s charges of illegal discrimination against 23 different property owners in response to the latest round of fair housing testing. As chair of Civil Rights, I will seek to balance the interests of rental housing providers with the interests of renters. To further address this issue, in July, the Mayor’s office will convene the Fair Chance Housing committee to develop proposals that address rental housing discrimination, provide wider access to rental assistance and increase enforcement of Seattle fair housing ordinances.  In the meantime, I believe sharing the HUD guidance with landlords and tenants alike will further the City’s interest in promoting opportunities to access housing. Secondly, an Ordinance to address source of income discrimination (SOID) proposes to add protected class to existing ordinances that already make it illegal to discriminate against a prospective renter whose primary source of income is a section 8 voucher, to include a pension, Social Security, unemployment, child support or any other governmental or non-profit subsidy. Late last week Sound Transit released the results of a telephone survey and online public comments regarding the Sound Transit 3 Draft Plan.
Improvements to the C and D lines to increase reliability and decrease travel time also scored highly in the North King survey, as did the Ballard line, and a potential station at NE 130th.
The Council plans to adopt a resolution on ST3 later this month; the Sound Transit board plans to vote on an ST3 ballot measure in June.
As noted in an earlier blog post, the Council sent a letter to Sound Transit that asked whether tunneling was considered from the bridge to the West Seattle Junction (the Draft Plan released in March includes elevated rail).  Sound Transit estimated a tunnel would cost approximately $500 to $600 million more than an elevated alignment. They noted the alignment would require environmental review, which would consider a reasonable range of profile and alignment alternatives.
The Council letter also asked about the rationale for eliminating the Delridge option included in the list of Candidate Projects released in December 2015. Sound Transit indicated they selected an elevated option to the Junction in the Draft Plan based on the result of their High Capacity Study.
SDOT has announced the bearing pad replacement project for the Fauntleroy Expressway will begin the evening of Monday, May 16. The contractor will replace 674 bearing pads, which provide a cushion between the bridge girder and the horizontal support for the girders, which help preserve the long-term integrity of the bridge. A few weeks ago SDOT decided to delay the nighttime Fauntleroy Expressway closure, given WSDOT’s closure of the Alaskan Way Viaduct for tunnel boring.
The City, led by the Office of Arts and Culture (ARTS), is developing the upper floors into an arts and cultural hub, in conjunction with the Office of Economic Development and SDOT. The first public meeting took place earlier this week; information about future meetings, timelines, an FAQ, and updates, is here.
If you recall, the project started out with a $66 million dollar budget and was slated to be completed in October of 2015.
The second presentation was from the Executive Steering Committee for the project, which includes members from SPU, SCL, and Seattle IT.
In January of 2016 the team conducted its third dress rehearsal, to practice switching over from the old system to the NCIS.
The first step of the audit is the “job design” phase, during this phase the auditors will work to clarify the objectives and determine what specific steps and tests the auditors will need to perform.
I will continue to keep my eye on this project, and continue to ask questions as they move through additional testing.
We women have made great strides toward equality in many ways, but this past week we learned a sad lesson: Scratch the surface in Seattle and some serious anti-women sentiment begins brewing. We five women who voted against the street vacation received hundreds of emails, tweets, voicemails and Facebook posts calling us c*nts, b*tches, who*es, even worse.
A day after the ranters tried to take over my phones, a tsunami of support followed for which I am grateful. Our vocal supporters were soon joined by the Mayor, our male colleagues, the Port, maritime workers, other members of the press, and the arena developer, among others. I know there are women across our city and nation who don’t have the support system the five of us on the Council have — women who are abused, insulted and belittled at home and work.  Their stories rarely make news and this is the problem I want to highlight. Consider our national election, where next year we may well be addressing the President of the United States as Madame President. I am pleased to announce that today after 7 committee meetings the Seattle City Council took action unanimously passing the proposed Seattle Housing Levy.
In 2009, the voters of Seattle passed a Housing levy to set aside property taxes to pay for affordable housing. The new proposed Housing Levy proposal seeks to create 2,150 new homes, provide services to prevent homelessness to 4,700 households and help an additional 380 households purchase their first homes. Throughout the council review process I advocated for a ways to keep people in their homes. The Civil Rights, Economic Development, Utilities and Arts (CRUEDA) Committee, is looking to appoint new commissioners to the Seattle Human Rights Commission. The Seattle Human Rights Commission consults with and makes recommendations concerning the development of programs which promote equality and justice. Last year when asked my position on the arena, I said that though I would not have been likely to vote for the 2012 Arena Co.
The City’s position was that the proposal was consistent with the Seattle Comprehensive Plan, yet the Container Port Element of the Comprehensive Plan, specifically calls for a.
I definitely heard support from some of my constituents in District 1, but the widespread concern from a significantly greater number of West Seattle and South Park residents about access to Downtown was concern that I, as a District 1 Councilmember, could simply not ignore.
District 1 is separated from Downtown by SODO, and the stadiums.  If transportation mitigation doesn’t work out, West Seattle and South Park would be the neighborhoods most affected by hindered access to Downtown.
50 state legislators signed a letter to the Council opposing the street vacation, saying “the site of the proposed street vacation represents the crossroads of international trade, manufacturing…that together form a key economic engine for our state” and said that vacating the street would deal a serious blow to our region’s global competitiveness. The letter was signed by legislators from all seven districts that include Seattle, including Representative Eileen Cody in the 34th District, a State Legislative District largely contiguous to my District 1 City Council district.
Finally, and significantly, the street vacation, and the Environmental Impact Statement, didn’t address the additional LA-Live style bars and restaurants that form a part of the overall development—so I believe that full parking and transportation were not adequately analyzed to consider those additional impacts.
In recent weeks, NBA Commissioner Adam Sliver has said that having a “shovel-ready” arena is “not a factor” in expansion considerations.
It’s unfortunate that the duration of the street vacation wasn’t linked to the duration of the agreement with Chris Hansen that the Council passed in 2012, which provides for public funding if Hansen obtains an NBA team and additional funding with an NHL team.
Councilmembers Lisa Herbold and Lorena Gonzalez announced today the launch of a study relating to scheduling practices, which will be used to better-inform forthcoming “secure scheduling” legislation. The study will survey both employers and employees from a diverse cross-section of industries and business sizes. Councilmember Herbold has hosted several discussions in her committee relating to secure scheduling, and will continue to dedicate committee time to the issue for every future meeting through July. This City of Seattle commissioned study is being conducted by Vigdor Measurement & Evaluation, LLC. On May 2, 2016, the Seattle City Council voted No on granting alley vacation on Occidental Street. Deciding how to vote on this item was not easy for me, and my staff and I have had to dig deeply on both sides to make up our minds. I have to say, the genuineness and sincerity of basketball and Sonics fans has been impressive. And on the other side, there are maritime and industrial workers, who have been fighting for decades to defend the industrial core of Seattle and defend our working waterfront. And, as a member of the labor movement, please let me share that these jobs are particularly important, because the unions that represent these workers have had a history of being willing to go on strike and fight back against the attacks of their bosses, preserving some important traditions of the labor movement – fighting traditions that we, as workers, are going to have to use to reverse this spiral of economic inequality. As a result of these battles that the labor movement has waged, the middle class jobs that we won over the last century have been lost over the last several decades, through massive deindustrialization and the loss of manufacturing.
I want to be very clear: I would never make a decision based on the claims of what is the bureaucracy of the Port of Seattle. But, on the other side, there are big developers who want to redevelop the industrial core of Seattle. I recognize that Sonics fans will not like my No vote on this matter, and I really don’t like that vote either. I do want to help bring back the Sonics, but I cannot do that on the basis of undermining our working waterfront and good paying unionized industrial jobs – not to say that other jobs are also not of value, especially if they’re unionized, living wage, and come with benefits. Those who say that this alley vacation vote has little to do with closing down the maritime industry may have a little bit of legitimacy. I support bringing back an NBA team to Seattle, as long as it is not linked to building a stadium that potentially threatens our working waterfront. I know that this is not an immediate alternative at this point, but I want to say that I will help in any way I can for us to demand that NBA commissioners allow for expansion and bring the Sonics back to the Key Arena.


Key Arena has been good enough for the Seattle Storm to play in, and it was good enough for the Sonics before the owners decided to screw over Sonics fans. If it wasn’t for the greed of the billionaires who control pro sports, it would still have been good enough.
I am voting against this street vacation because I am concerned about Seattle’s good paying unionized industrial and maritime jobs, and I don’t want to pit jobs against jobs, but I also think we have to have a much broader conversation about how the barons who own our professional sports teams are allowed to have monopoly control over entertainment for millions of ordinary working people who are sports fans.
Finally, I would like to thank everyone who helped me and my staff members learn the nuances of this issue, particularly all the Sonics fans like Adam Brown and Jason Reid, who made the important corruption-exposing documentary film called Sonicsgate, and all my sisters and brothers from the labor movement who have helped elucidate the history of SODO industry. The Full Council did not approve the conditional street vacation of Occidental Avenue South for the proposed arena project by a vote of 4-5 yesterday (Bagshaw, Herbold, Sawant, Juarez and Gonzalez voting no; Harrell, O’Brien, Johnson and myself voting yes).
I voted in favor of the conditional street vacation both in committee and at the Full Council meeting yesterday.
When determining my position, it was important to me that the street vacation would have been conditional on many factors. Per Council policy, the street vacation would have lasted for five years, but the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) approved in 2012 that commits partial public financing of this project expires in November, 2017.
My colleagues who voted the opposite way based their opposition on concerns about traffic impacts and the proposed arena’s effect on maritime jobs. This afternoon the Full Council will vote on an ordinance that would send a $290 million Housing Levy to voters for consideration on the August 2, 2016 Primary Election ballot.
Since 1981, Seattle has chosen to generously invest in affordable housing for our neighbors, with a particular emphasis on those most in need. Seattle voters will soon have an exciting opportunity to consider a ballot measure asking whether we will support a regional light rail system, including a light rail line connecting Downtown to Ballard, with stops at South Lake Union, Seattle Center, and Interbay.
The communities in my Northwest Seattle district are deeply invested in shaping this plan, and have begun to speak with a united voice about how this plan can best serve our neighborhoods. The Coalition is advocating for an alignment I affectionately call the “West is Best” option. I have voiced my support for the “West is Best” option, and the coalition of voices continues to grow. No Major Event at the arena can overlap with Major Events at each of the two other stadia if the combined anticipated attendance at all venues would exceed 45,000 on a Weekday or 55,0000 on a Weekend. For NBA regular season games, the Arena will make its best efforts to work with the NBA to avoid overlapping with Mariners and Sounders home games or other Major Events at CenturyLink Field. Major Events other than NBA games at the Arena cannot be scheduled to overlap with a Major Event at either of the stadia if the combined anticipated attendance at the two events would exceed 45,000 on a Weekday or 55,0000 on a Weekend. For events that occur on the same day but do not overlap, there will be at least 3 hours between the projected end time of the first event and scheduled start of the second event. The negotiated scheduling language will be offered as an amendment to the conditions of the street vacation requested by ArenaCo.
Tucked behind the Chelan Cafe, Terminal 5 (T5) has sat empty since late 2014 when the Port Commission authorized $4.7 million for modernization of the terminal.
While attending the Delridge District Council meeting last Wednesday I presented to the Port representative in attendance a letter supporting the concerns that I am hearing from constituents about the T5 project.
I have been working with the Office of Labor Standards (OLS) on the process and implementation of directed investigations for enforcement of our labor laws.
Businesses that do not adhere to these laws have an unfair advantage over businesses that do.
I am trying to leave no stone unturned when it comes to addressing the affordable housing crisis that is displacing many long-time Seattle residents and disrupting our communities. I responded to the February call to action by writing on op-ed in the Seattle Times on “Wall Street’s Impact on Seattle’s Housing Affordability.” Councilmembers then sent a letter that I drafted to HUD, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and Federal Housing Finance Agency asking Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac help delinquent homeowners receive mortgage principal reduction and stop selling mortgages to Wall Street at a discount. In response to this collective national effort on April 14, FHFA announced that it will newly offer principal reduction to certain seriously delinquent, underwater borrowers who are still struggling in the aftermath of the financial crisis to help them avoid foreclosure and stay in their homes.
But once you add another email address to your account, you can choose which of these should becomes the primary.
First and foremost, I wish a quick and healthy recovery to the bike riders who were both transported to Harborview as a result of their respective accidents.  It is clear that critical road safety improvements need to be made quickly across our city to ensure street safety for all – no matter your age, ability, or mode of transportation. As I stated last year on the campaign trail after Andy Hulslander’s death, even my young daughters know that this street is fast and dangerous: they argue over who gets to hold my hand as we walk along NE 65th everyday so they can stay as far away from the street as possible. At the very least, we should install Protected Bike Lanes, from Ravenna to 20th Ave NE along NE 65th Street (as well as the two planned Neighborhood Greenways adjacent to 25th Ave NE that run on 24th Ave NE north of NE 65th Street and on 27th Ave NE south of 65th Street). We need to begin making concrete steps towards Seattle’s vision for a fully connected, safe cycle network and I will work to ensure that we find the funds to move these improvements up the list of priorities. I plan on vocalizing my own concerns that were highlighted by the two accidents last week – and would encourage residents from District 4 and across the city to do the same through public testimony. Using HUD approved testing practices, it was revealed that prospective “tester renters” experienced different treatment than did “control group renters” across all three categories: familial status, disability, and use of a federal Section 8 voucher. In the next month, the Civil Rights, Utilities, Economic Development and Arts (CRUEDA) Committee will discuss two pieces of legislation to 1) help landlords comply with their duties and 2) uphold renters’ rights. Some of these employers are known to have workforce gaps based on gender and race, potentially resulting in negative impacts on underrepresented populations. The Draft Plan also includes a station at Graham Street, a high priority in Southeast Seattle.
They noted the West Seattle Junction has higher ridership and density of residential and commercial uses, and is centrally located on the peninsula. Her committee oversees Seattle City Light (SCL) while Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) is under my committee’s jurisdiction. It has now been delayed twice and is budgeted for $109 million and has a go-live date of September. Almond has also flagged risks for the project after the projected September go-live date, including the lack of IT expertise to manage the program.
They described the project, and explained its complexity; the NCIS is replacing a 15 year-old customer billing system, and supports account management for more than 400,000 customers.
The January dress rehearsal highlighted some major concerns that the Executive Steering Committee still needs to address, including data conversion from the current system to the NCIS, additional testing to safeguard quality, and additional training to ensure business and team readiness.
However, in the bigger picture, I want to continue conversations with Councilmembers and the Executive about the Council’s expectations regarding communication of scope and budget changes to major capital projects; we need more transparency, and I am considering a new policy to address this.
Hundreds of women and men from Seattle and around the country, encouraged by the National Women’s Political Caucus of Washington and journalists at Seattlish and C is For Crank, got the word out fast.
Hundreds — if not thousands — have categorically condemned the hate mail and urged a new tone of civility and respect.
For the next six months, I expect Donald Trump and his supporters to escalate their deeply hateful remarks, not just against Hillary Clinton, but against any woman who disagrees with him. That program brought us about 2,184 new homes, provided rental assistance and homeless prevention services to 2,442 households, and helped 187 households purchase their first homes.
Working with my colleagues I added language to the resolution directing the Office of Housing to ensure geographical diversity in the projects the levy funds.
As a result several city departments have identified ways that they can improve education and access to these programs.
Are you interested in promoting human rights for the residents of Seattle and facilitating the prevention and elimination of discrimination? It works with the Director of the Office for Civil Rights to end discrimination based upon race, religion, creed, color, national origin, sexual orientation, political ideology, ancestry, age, marital and parental status, disability, Section 8, and retaliation. It conducts appeals and holds hearings to identify and deal with acts of discrimination and assist in resolving racial tensions in the areas of employment, housing and public accommodations.
Many in West Seattle feel they already shoulder the greatest share of our City’s burden for professional sports facilities. This is a highly unusual letter, and testament to the importance of trade in Washington State’s economy. That agreement lasts until late 2017.The street vacation as proposed would have lasted 5 years, in line with city street vacation policies. Councilmembers Lisa Herbold, Lorena Gonzalez and the Executive are in conversation about developing legislation to address predictability in worker scheduling, as unpredictable scheduling most strongly impacts low-wage workers who are overwhelmingly women and people of color. Vigdor has prepared consultant briefs and reports for a variety of government agencies, non-profit organizations, and for profit firms. These are thousands of fans who have had their team stolen out from under them, and legitimately want an NBA basketball team back in Seattle. The Port workers and their nion, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), have been fighting again and again against these forces that have been slowly squeezing out our working waterfront.
I hate having to be in a position where, as an elected representative of this city, I have to pit sports against jobs, and jobs against jobs. But I think that the alley vacation vote is also a battle line in an ongoing war by big developers to gentrify Seattle, and I unfortunately cannot vote in favor of doing that.
But, again, my vote has nothing in common with those elected officials who say they’re voting No because they care about jobs after voting for the Amazon alley vacation earlier this year. This vote is a major disappointment for those who hope to bring an NBA team back to Seattle; at a minimum, the Council’s decision yesterday sets this effort back. After the expiration of the MOU in late 2017, any arena construction would have needed to be completely privately financed. While I respect my colleagues’ decision, I saw no convincing evidence to back up these claims.
This year, the Council and Mayor have thoroughly analyzed and crafted a package that will provide affordable housing for thousands of Seattle residents.


The most recent openings of the Capitol Hill and University District light rail stations have brought Seattle into the 21st century of transit, and the coming wave of transit investments contained in Sound Transit’s next package, known as ST3, will revolutionize how we live and get around our region (see the full draft package here).
The Northwest Seattle Coalition for Sound Transit 3 formed not months ago, and is composed of community leaders and more than a dozen organizations from Ballard, Interbay, Magnolia, Queen Anne, and Uptown. This proposal would run light rail parallel to 15th Avenue West (the equivalent of four blocks to the west) and cross the ship canal via a tunnel.
The expected ridership in the Downtown-Ballard corridor is projected to be roughly 140,000, the highest of any sub-area in the entire Sound Transit region. Before the Sound Transit Board closes the public outreach period today, let’s ensure they’ve heard our voices. At the Council’s request, the parties came together to draft the mutually agreeable language regarding scheduling and access.
If there are unavoidable overlaps, the NBA game will start at least one hour after the other event. The first would require an access easement on the proposed arena site’s east access road for the benefit of the other two facilities.
Directed Investigations are investigations that are initiated by the Director of the OLS without a worker introducing a complaint.
Directed investigations are important because our laws are only as strong as our enforcement and ensuring that all employers adhere to our laws is not only good for workers, but also for business.
FHFA expects that approximately 33,000 borrowers nationwide will be eligible for a Principal Reduction Modification.  Servicers must solicit borrowers eligible for a Principal Reduction Modification no later than October 15, 2016.
The one you pick is important for a couple of reasons: first, during the password-reset process, the verification code and link are only sent to your primary email address (though you can also get a security code sent to your phone).
I also mentioned then that we need to fix NE 65th Street before someone else is killed or seriously injured; we have unfortunately missed that mark and simply can’t continue to have tragedy dictate our neighborhood’s safety improvement investments. The SOCR has jurisdiction within Seattle city limits to investigate and file charges against landlords for violating the Fair Housing Act, which protects people from discrimination when they are renting, buying, or securing financing for any housing. As of 2012, the United States accounted for only about five percent of the world’s population, yet almost one quarter of the world’s prisoners, or 2.2 million adults, were held in American prisons. It was also rated highly in East King County, South King County, and Snohomish County—testament to strong regional resonance.
They further noted the plan includes a station on Delridge that can serve as a transfer point to light rail, and that the Draft King County Metro Long Range Plan includes Delridge for Future Rapid Ride Expansion (labeled as “Burien TC ? Westwood Village ? Seattle CBD”. We called this joint committee to bring more oversight to the New Information Customer System (NCIS). Additionally, “project staff is tired, [and] operational staff are working hard” reads a risk that Mr. It will be used by more than 600 City employees, and will produce 15,000 bills with $4.8 million in revenue daily. After evaluating the issues and working with third party vendors, they believe that they can meet a go-live date in early September.
They identified the negativity for what it was: hatred and fear of the strength we women bring to our community. In short, a lot of people have had our backs and want to change the way we all speak and listen to each other. The program exceeded nearly all its goals, specifically producing 25% more new affordable homes than we thought possible, making the program a great success in its ability to stretch every dollar to the fullest potential. I have heard from several elders in our community who are concerned that they won’t be able to stay in their homes with the continuing rise in property taxes while they are trying to live on fixed incomes. They have committed to better training and resource management; including finding more places to link to the information on their websites and pass along the information to those who are interested. If the arena location hadn’t been dependent upon this street vacation, it could have proceeded directly to the Master Use Permitting (MUP) process under the Department of Constructions and Inspections. The one true public benefit, and the reason we’ve been discussing this for four years, is an NBA team—and we don’t have that. They have expressed concerns about the long-term potential of the site, given the 2012 MOU arena agreement the Council approved. Business owners have expressed concern about gentrification, and losing access to goods and services in SODO.  One restaurant owner in West Seattle wrote to the Council that 14 unique locations in SODO provide goods and services to his business. Had we been able to amend the street vacation so that it only lasted until the end of the agreement, that might have partially satisfied my concern that approving a street vacation now would open us up next year to renegotiation of the MOU, but our Law Department advised against pursuing an amendment like this. Most information about Seattle-based scheduling practices to-date has been anecdotal, therefore, the City commissioned the study to better understand any intricacies or variants from practices documented at a national level. He has published dozens of scholarly articles in the areas of housing policy, education policy, and immigration policy, with a specific focus on disparities and inequality by race and ethnicity. He is experienced in litigation consulting, statistical consulting, and economic consulting. We also have hospitality workers and workers in the building trades who have successfully negotiated important labor agreements, which I, as a member of the labor movement, unreservedly support. I am in solidarity with not the Port of Seattle, but the Port workers and the ILWU who are trying to stand against these forces of gentrification. Their vote in favor of that vacation completely disregarded the major concerns of security workers that are contracted by Amazon – workers who have faced massive wage theft and retaliation against them. It could not have been vacated for a large office complex, even though that use is permitted on the parcels on either side of Occidental Ave S. If an arena was not constructed by 2021, the opportunity for a street vacation would have expired. This plan will ensure speed and reliability, preserve the existing lanes on 15th, and create an underground station in Ballard that would be the best option for future northern and eastern expansion. Second, if you've enabled login notifications -getting alerted when unknown devices login to your account- the alerts will only be sent to your primary address . Under Seattle Municipal Code, Chapter 14.08, a civil penalty could be assessed against each property owner ranging between $11,000 and $55,000. It was the only project to score in the top 5 in four of the five geographical areas, as the West Seattle blog noted (see slides 24, 26-29). The Move Seattle levy approved by voters in 2015 included funding for seven new RapidRide corridors, including on Delridge).
Almond warned of a lack of oversight and a deficiency in IT resources as well as expertise in implementing the program. The neighborhoods of Northgate, Lake City and Bitter Lake will continue to grow and we must ensure we have affordable housing as part of that new development as well as services for homelessness prevention and homeownership. We want to make sure that we are not only supporting those most in need but that we are also not pushing our neighbors over the edge. The signals we send to the global maritime and shipping industries matter, especially with increased competition from British Columbia and Southern California, which have been taking market share from Puget Sound ports in recent years. The West Seattle Chamber signed a letter stating that concerns about increased traffic congestion were not adequately addressed. It also would have been conditioned on a detailed scheduling coordination agreement we asked the arena proponents and other major teams to work out together. In addition, the letter underscores the need to implement a quiet zone for trains and utilize broadband back-up alarms to help with noise reduction. We currently have four labor laws: Paid Sick and Safe Time, Fair Chance Employment, Wage Theft, and Minimum Wage. Customer service representatives are training on this new program which has led to longer waiting times and more dropped calls. The new proposed Housing Levy would also, for the first time, include foreclosure prevention services. In short, I think it was only possible to meet the necessary public benefit threshold if we’d considered the legislation after attaining an NBA team. The creation of the Northwest Seaport Alliance, combining the Ports of Tacoma and Seattle, thereby creating the third-largest marine cargo load center in the United States, is designed to address this.
Our communities deserve infrastructure investments to meet the demands of regional ridership. Almond identified significant scope changes early in the product design phase that lead to significant delays. As a critical part of ensuring that we end homelessness we need to be sure that people are able to stay in their homes. In addition, though it wasn’t part of the street vacation decision, the lack of an NBA team also means the provision in the MOU requiring $40 million for a SODO Infrastructure Fund does not apply. These changes include cyber security, new workforce management software, and lessons learned from other similar project implementations.
If an address is no longer associated with your profile, people who have that address for you won't be able to find you that way. Save your change When you are done, click on the Save Changes button at the bottom - enter your password if prompted to do so. Within seconds, you'll receive a confirmation message to your NEW primary email address' inbox.



The secret history tv jobs
Secret saturdays drew wiki
The secret book rhonda byrne epub reader




Comments to «Change primary email address yahoo mail»

  1. BMV writes:
    Mindfulness training who weren't utilizing.
  2. AXMEDIK_666 writes:
    Vipassana motion, modeled after Therav?da Buddhism meditation friendly staff guided me to the small meditation supplies us the.
  3. H_Y_U_N_D_A_I writes:
    Emily Herzlin educated in MBSR workout routines is to be guided through them chapter, mindfulness has.
  4. LEDI writes:
    It's all about changing focus and acting particular leaf and you've got the opportunity to remove.