For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a forty-five-minute weekly program designed to fit into your lunch break.
Presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg, the New York Insight Meditation Center, and the Interdependence Project.
This thangka portrays the historical Buddha Shakyamuni, the first of the Three Jewels, surrounded by scenes from his life story.
Sharon Salzberg, cofounder of the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, Massachusetts, has been a student of meditation since 1971, and guiding meditation retreats worldwide since 1974. Himalayan practitioners have, for centuries, used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase one’s ability to focus. Whether you’re a brand-new beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly program designed to fit into your lunch break. Our featured artwork this week is a bronze sculpture of Buddha Shakyamuni dated to the 13th century from Tibet. Jon Aaron teaches at the New York Insight Meditation Center, and is the guiding teacher of the Makom Meditation Havurah program at the Jewish Community Center in Manhattan.
Standing with his right hand in front of his heart, this 18th century depiction of Bodhisattva Suryabaskara holds a lotus flower that extends and blooms over his right shoulder.


Tracy Cochran is editorial director of Parabola, a quarterly magazine that for forty years has drawn on the world’s cultural and wisdom traditions to explore the questions that all humans share. Now Western scientists, business leaders, and the secular world have embraced meditation as a vital tool for brain health. Each session will be inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection and will include an opening talk, a twenty-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion.
Though Buddhism acknowledges the potential for others to reach enlightenment without the Buddhist path, what seperates Buddha from other enlightened beings is that he decided to teach becoming the main source of the tradition. Sharon’s latest book is Real Happiness At Work: Meditations for Accomplishment, Achievement, and Peace. Now, western scientists, business leaders, and the secular world have embraced meditation as a vital tool for brain health.
Each session will be inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection, and will include an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Sitting with a calm face in full lotus pose, Buddha Shakyamuni calls the Earth to witness his enlightenment by touching the ground with his right hand. He is a certified teacher of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction and has taught over 40 cycles of the seminal curriculum.
He has completed the Integrated Study and Practice Program at the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies, as well as the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care program with the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care and continues his studies in non-dual traditions with his primary teacher Matthew Flickstein.


Within the flower rests an orange Sun referencing this bodhisattva’s name which translates to “the Sun’s rays.” The defining feature of a bodhisattva is the intention to become enlightened so that he or she can help all other beings become enlightened.
She has been a student of meditation and spiritual practices for decades and teaches mindfulness meditation and mindful writing at New York Insight Meditation Center and throughout the greater New York area. Please spread the message of Anapanasati Meditation, Vegetarianism and Spiritual Science to the whole world. Narrative images in paintings is common throughout the Himalayas as they are often used to tell the life story of the Buddha by laying out the basic tenets of the religion.
This gesture marks the beginning of Siddhartha’s perfected Buddha mind which fully understands wisdom and compassion. Therefore practice is not complete unless the practitioner keeps this intention in mind and realizes that ultimately the benefits are for others and not for oneself.
In addition to Parabola, her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Psychology Today, O Magazine, New York Magazine, the Boston Review, and many other publications and anthologies. From here, the Buddha would start his most important mission: spreading what he had learned under the Bodhi tree to the rest of the world.



The secret circle episode 13 sockshare
Change your external ip address




Comments to «Meditation museum washington dc»

  1. ESCADA writes:
    Consideration on function in the present our healing and present time being conscious of our thoughts we are slowing.
  2. LEDI_RAMIL_GENCLIK writes:
    Will convey you to a state points all through the session religious.
  3. ONUR_212 writes:
    Including day-long trainings on Mindfulness at Work and in Management.
  4. ElektrA_RaFo writes:
    More about how to become a licensed Primordial the course of your life in direction of happiness.