A pretty blonde meat girl hangs on hooks, enticing shoppers to check out the goods at the meat counter. A few feet away, an equally beautiful yet vibrantly afraid and temporarily alive meat girl awaits her own fate. Here are a few films that have some of the steamiest scenes with different fantasies played out.
Hearing French is a turn on in itself, so this foreign film starts being sensual from the first line. Having sex with your boss is frowned upon in the office, which makes it even more thrilling and forbidden. One of the most messed up films you could probably see, but with some of the hottest sex scenes. Platonic friends Zack (Seth Rogan) and Miri (Elizabeth Banks) are facing financial troubles and decide to make an adult film for some cash. Two scientists, and lovers, Clive (Adrien Brody) and Elsa (Sarah Polley), splice several types of DNA together to create the ultimate being, who matures at a fast rate.
Connie Summer (Diane Lane) finds herself in an adulterous affair with a hot, younger, foreign man, Paul Martel (Olivier Martinez), who helps her one day after stumbling on the street. Obama may not be the one-and-done solution many of us same-sex marriage supporters wish for, but he is an instrumental piece to the movement. Before hitting the local thrift store or a swap meet, here’s how you can use Pinterest to thrift shop like a pro.
About The Next Great GenerationTNGG is an online lifestyle magazine about growing up in the information age.
Since I've already posted extensive reviews of most of the movies here, I've gone ahead and included excerpts from those in the gray boxes for each film. Speaking of those reviews, some of the movies below may do better or worse than they did in their respective end-of-year lists.
4 Months, 3 Weeks, & 2 Days (2008): I probably should have found a place for this somewhere, but it just kept slipping, mainly because I couldn't imagine ever wanting to sit through it again. The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007): Tiger Woods, meet Jesse James.
Casino Royale (2006): This one I've added after the fact, because, as you'll read, it kept coming up in some of the other entries. The Constant Gardener (2005): Fernando Meirelles' City of God is topping a few of the Best-of-Decade lists I've seen out and about, but I'd be more inclined to put this, his follow-up film, somewhere on the list. Dirty Pretty Things (2003): I originally had this as high as #74 on account of Chiwetel Ejiofor's breakout performance. Gangs of New York (2002): What with Daniel Day-Lewis, Jim Broadbent, and few of the vignettes therein, there probably was a great movie in here somewhere.
I am Legend (2007): I loved the "Man and his Dog" part of this movie -- it hit me where I lived.
Snow Angels (2008): David Gordon Green's movie has grown in my memory in the year since I saw it, but I still couldn't find room for it. There Will Be Blood (2007): In previewing this list on some film boards, I got more grief for not including TWBB somewhere in the mix than any other movie that came up. The Virgin Suicides (2000): I remember Sofia Coppola's dream-like vision of Jeffrey Eugenides' book to be pretty on the nose, and it boasts a great soundtrack. The Visitor (2008): The better of Tom McCarthy's two writer-director projects thus far (the other being The Station Agent), this movie was a bit too cloying in the beatific immigrant regard to make the century list.
A case could be made that Michel Gondry's Dave Chappelle's Block Party should be even higher on this list -- Few movie experiences of the decade were as out-and-out pleasurable as my spring afternoon viewing of this flick. Alas, the atrocious Attack of the Clones of 2002, the pre-Clone Wars nadir of the Star Wars franchise (Holiday Special notwithstanding), put that reverie to bed. But, with expectations suitably lowered, then came Sith in 2005, which at least carried some small glimmers of the old magic.
And, belying the usual curse (that would come later, in spades), Shyamalan turned out a quality sophomore follow-up in Unbreakable.
From the year-end list: "True, the frighteningly talented Sasha Baron Cohen spends a lot of time in this movie shooting fish in a barrel, and I wish he'd spent a little more time eviscerating subtler flaws in the American character than just knuckle-dragging racists and fratboy sexists.
I watched about half an hour of The Quiet American again a few weeks ago while flipping through the channels, and I still think it has a bit too much of an austere, "from-the-classic-novel" feel to it, the sort of movie one might be forced to watch in a high school class (be it English or History).
From the original review: "[W]hat Six Feet Under is to dying, The Savages is to the final stages of aging.
Now this one to me is almost exactly the opposite of The Savages, in that -- more than any other film on this list -- I can barely remember About a Boy at all, other than Toni Collette being very good, the kid (Nicholas Hoult, soon of A Single Man and Clash of the Titans) also being quite solid, and Hugh Grant singing acapella, drinking a lot of Red Bull, and somehow magically not getting on my nerves. From the year-end list: "I won't defend the first forty-five minutes or the ridiculous rave scene. I can envision getting some grief for this one, but what I said in these two reviews stand. Sure, nothing could match the initial shock of seeing Neo wake up in that gooey biopod in the first movie -- That was the first indicator that the heretofore unknown Wachowski brothers (Bound notwithstanding) were really playing on a broad canvas here. From the year-end list: "[W]hile Lost in Translation trafficked in existential detachment, L'Auberge Espagnole showed the fun Scarlett Johannson could've been having, if she'd just lighten up and get out of the hotel once in awhile.
Now, having roundly derided domestic gross-out comedies, I should say that I just came very close to pulling an audible and putting the very funny Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle in this spot.
From the year-end list: "I had this film as high as #2 for awhile, and there are visual marvels therein that no other movie this year came close to offering, most notably Kong loose in Depression-Era New York City. That being said, it feels like we're on Skull Island for a really long time in this Kong, and that doesn't even get into all the deadly dull happenings before they even reach the King's domain. From the original review: "Blessed with a charismatic and appealing cast that smooths over much of the choppy writing turbulence therein, Abrams' Trek reboot isn't only a rousing, over-the-top, sometimes patently absurd space opera that borrows as much from Lucas' original trilogy as it does from its erstwhile source material -- It's also probably the best of the Star Wars prequels.
Sure, it's a cotton candy movie, but, like I said, Star Trek had more of that Star Wars magic than any of the prequels, including Sith. From the original review: "Hearkening to the halcyon days of Dog Day Afternoon and Serpico, Spike Lee's Inside Man is a clever contraption indeed -- a sleek, intelligent, well-acted NYC heist flick whose central scheme is more about subterfuge, cunning, and misdirection than technical gimmickry. From the year-end list: "[A] fun, expertly-made crime procedural, as good in its own way as the much more heavily-touted Departed. To be honest, his von Trapp roots notwithstanding, Christopher Plummer seemed a bit young to be plausible as a ex-Nazi in the 21st century.
From the original review: "Munich is a movie well worth-seeing, the rare thriller that's not afraid to grapple with today's thorniest political questions, and without insulting the audience's intelligence by giving easy, simple-minded answers to seemingly insoluble problems.
I didn't see the sequel (Meet the Fockers), and definitely don't plan to see the threequel (Little Fockers), which is on the dock for next year. From the year-end list: "One of the most faithful comic-to-film adaptations on celluloid also made for one of the more engaging and visually arresting cinematic trips this year.
The movie that anticipated Mickey Rourke's later Wrestler resurgence, Sin City was a crazy-sexy-cool stylistic experiment that remains the best thing Robert Rodriguez has ever been involved with. Bloody Sunday was the first of many great movies made by Paul Greengrass in the Oughts, and it ably showed off the hyperreal, you-are-there documentary style he'd use to such great effect throughout the decade.
From the original review: "The movie is mostly episodic vignettes in the life of a broken family and at times suggests a more misanthropic Me, You, and Everyone We Know.
He went off the rails a bit with 2007's Margot at the Wedding, but Noah Baumbach (also the co-writer of The Fantastic Mr. From the original review: "We never really understand what's going on, and I could see some folks getting frustrated with this film -- usually, incomprehensibility is not a strong suit in movies. From the year-end list: "A completely inscrutable sci-fi tone poem on the perils of time travel.
2009's Paranormal Activity made the bigger box-office splash this decade, but Shane Carruth's Primer was the original no-budget movie that could. Before Christian Bale was the Dark Knight, he made his (adult) name as another deeply nutty rich fella. From the original review: "Heath Ledger's performance is engrossing, in part because you spend much of the film just trying to figure out what he's thinking.
If "the Batman" broke out of the Newsies ghetto with American Psycho, the portrayer of his eventual arch-nemesis moved into the A-list with this Ang Lee romance. From the original review: "A loving throwback to the director's Evil Dead days, and an audience film if there ever was one, [it] delivers a solidly entertaining two hours of low-budge comic mayhem, if you're in the mood for it.
From the year-end list: "Besides being easily the most explicitly anti-gypsy film since Borat, Drag Me to Hell was also, in its own way, as much of a Great Recession cautionary tale as Up in the Air. From the original review: "I found it a bit broad at times, particularly in the early going, and I definitely had to make a conscious decision to run with it. Here's another one I haven't seen since that first screening in 2006, and I have a suspicion my positive reaction may not hold up so much on a second viewing. From the year-end list: "[A] spry McNamara succeeds in penetrating the fog of time to examine how he himself became lost in the maze-like logic of war. Unfortunately, this movie came out in 2006, so we don't get to see Elizabeth II here with her Wii (and a gold-plated one at that.) That aside, Peter Morgan, Stephen Frears, Michael Sheen, and particularly Helen Mirren made The Queen a memorable and multi-faceted disquisition on changing social mores and their respective political impact on the residents of Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing St.
That being said, catching it on cable a few years later when not in Debbie Downer mode, Anchorman really came into its own for me. From the original review: "Anyone who's ever thrown in The Joshua Tree -- that's millions of people, obviously -- and listened to the thrilling opening strands of "Where the Streets Have No Name" can probably imagine the potential of U2 filtered through an IMAX sound system and projected in multiple dimensions. From the year-end list: "U2 3D was both a decently rousing concert performance by Dublin's fab four, and -- more importantly -- an experimental film which played with an entirely new cinema syntax. Of course, your enjoyment of this concert film will depend a great deal on how much you like U2 -- For my part, they're not in my personal top tier, but I've always had a solid appreciation for them. I'm betting this will be another contested choice, as I've even seen Ocean's Twelve on a few worst-of-decade lists.
Sorta like Grant Heslov's The Men Who Stare at Goats, Ocean's 12 just feels like a Hollywood lark, one in which the ultra-glamorous movie stars in tow have kindly allowed us to come along for the ride, maybe play a few hands. From the original review: "I went in expecting not much more than an over-the-top 'message movie' schmaltzfest, or at best a harmless helping of mediocre, inert Oscar Bait like Cinderella Man or A Beautiful Mind.
In the Valley of Elah wasn't the best TLJ movie of 2007 -- that'll come later -- but, surprisingly given Paul Haggis' involvement, it was a darned good one.
I never saw the 2006 follow-up, so that one might've been even more hilarious or the well might've run dry by then. So, while I'm getting the sick-and-twisted choices out of the way, can I get a word in for Steven Shainberg's Secretary? True, James Spader had already played a bizarro-perv way too often to be taken seriously here. From the year-end list: "Speaking of sad British pop music, here's a movie the early Elvis Costello would love. From the original review: "At once a character study of an amoral arms dealer, a bitter tirade againt third world exploitation, and a dark comedy that may run too sour for some tastes, Lord of War is an above-average entrant in the satirical muckraking tradition. Lord of War is one of those movies that's moved up in my estimation over the years, partly because later attempts at political satire, such as Jason Reitman's Thank You for Smoking, couldn't ever seem to find the delicate balance of this mordant and spirited tirade against the arms industry.
Speaking of which, Spike Lee's overlooked and much-maligned Bamboozled works very similarly to Lord of War in its anger-to-humor quotient, and it is, possibly up until its last act, a very funny satire. Not even the main character, Damon Wayans' Pierre Delacroix, is safe from Lee's scouring here.


I haven't watched Master and Commander since it first set sail in 2003, and I have a feeling I should probably give it another go. What with Scorsese's The Departed and Affleck's Gone Baby Gone, several crime sagas of the Oughts went to the Hub for their local color. In retrospect, it would have been that much nicer to see Bill Murray win the Oscar that year for Lost in Translation, given that Sean Penn ended up winning again for Milk later on. From the original review: "Mike Newell's dark and delectable Goblet is brimming over with energy and suspense, and, to my surprise, it's probably the best Potter film so far. We've moved pretty far afield here from the flat, colorful, and thoroughly boring Hogwarts of the Chris Columbus iterations -- In Goblet, Dumbledore's academy of magic possesses the menace and grandeur it was missing earlier on. From the original review: "I'm happy to report that, while Chris Nolan's Batman Begins has some minor problems -- each character gets a few clunky lines and the final action sequence isn't all that memorable -- this is the Batman movie that fans of the Dark Knight have been waiting for. All that being said, you finally got the sense here that Batman was in the hands of a director who just wanted to figure out what makes a ridiculously rich guy want to dress up like a bat and fight crime. From the original review: "While perhaps a bit too black-and-white in terms of the history, George Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck is nevertheless a somber and captivating paean to Edward R. Her nameless features so beautiful, one can only imagine what trouble led her to this cold and ruthless demise.
Unable to take her gaze away from the alluring, dead blonde carcass hanging in front of her, she prays that some unimaginable stroke of luck will save her from her own demise. Sometimes movies with sex scenes are more intense than an actual adult film due to “movie magic:” the plot building up the tension between the characters, better scripts, lighting, and soundtrack. The plot is based on the rumored affair between Coco Chanel, the famous designer, and Igor Stravinsky, the musician. Eddie Stall (Maria Bello) surprises her husband Tom (Viggo Mortensen) role playing as a naughty cheerleader. Barrymore plays Ivy, a rebellious teen who befriends an introverted girl, Sylvie (Sara Gilbert) and seduces her entire family.
When the time comes in this meta film for the couple to take their friendship to a whole different level, the scene is honest and realistic. When Catherine Stewart (Julianne Moore) believes her husband (Liam Neeson) is cheating on her, she hires the prostitute Chloe (Amanda Seyfried) to have an affair with her husband. Although they are trying to create a new type of species to help the human race against diseases, they created an alluring oddity named Dren (Delphine Chaneac). Elizabeth (Kim Basinger) starts an affair with John (Mickey Rouke) and shows that a casual relationship without things getting complicated can last about 9 ? weeks.
It was just Brad Pitt making this confused, apish faces while the music swelled meaningfully…not to mention any drawn-out love scene you watch with your parent in the seat next to you has its shittiness magnified significantly. Meaning these are the movies I enjoyed, cherished, or otherwise been entertained by over the past decade. So, to take an example below, am I really saying that Drag Me to Hell (#79) is a better film than Brokeback Mountain (#80)?
4 Months is a very impressively-made movie, but I guess (like The Road) I flinch a little in the face of its unrelenting -- some might say one-note -- darkness.
Andrew Dominik's sprawling meta-western looks gorgeous (thanks to cinematographer Roger Deakins), and it definitely has truths to tell about the trials of celebrity in American life.
But, although Ejiofor became one of the most consistently reliable actors of the decade, the rest of Stephen Frears' movie doesn't quite hold up enough to be counted in the end. But the final version of Scorsese's Gangs has serious flaws -- not only major historical ones (see the original review) but cinematic ones too. It's smart, it's funny, and it's more Ought-ish in its multicultural, Age-of-Obama outlook than a lot of movies that actually made it on here. But, while there are other films that made my list on the basis of a strong first or second half (WALL-E comes to mind), I thought the slippage was too great from Blood's astonishing first hour to its meandering second to its ludicrous close. If I saw it again, it might move up, but as with a lot of the early-decade movies, I'm mostly going on memory, and my memory was that the book didn't translate to film so well.
That being said, Block Party seemed like a good way to kick off this best-of-decade list -- It's just a happy, goofy, groovy, fun movie, teeming with great music, optimism, and the open possibilities of any given day.
In a perfect world, the Star Wars prequels would've carried some of the vim and verve of Peter Jackson's LotR trilogy or the first Matrix. I haven't seen the movie since it came out, but I still remember it as a unique take on the superhero origin story in a decade that would be full of them. I had this quite a bit further up the list at first, but decided to switch it out with one of its memorable antecedents.
Still, Borat has slipped quite a bit from its 2006 ranking, if only because [a] I'm not sure a lot of the comedy holds up on repeat viewings, and [b] I still think Cohen went for mostly easy targets here.
Still, it's very well-done, Caine and Fraser are both exceedingly well cast, and you could do worse as a quality intro to our blundering in Vietnam than Graham Greene's ripe and pungent allegory here. It's something we don't really want to think about, but it's there, somewhere over the last ridge. And because of this memory hole, I came very close to putting another very similar-feeling Weitz production, In Good Company, here instead. But, right about the time Hugo Weaving showed up to do what he does best, Revolutions found a new gear that it maintained right up until the arc-twisting Architect monologues at the end.
As a whole, this first sequel to 1999's The Matrix has serious problems in its first hour -- I'm looking at you, Bacardi-Benetton rave.
But from the Burly Brawl on -- through the Merovingian and Swiss Chalet stuff, the albino Milli Vanilli twins, the highway chase, and on to the Architect's rambling in the final moments, Reloaded is easily as propulsive and occasionally mind-bending as the second half of the first film. This paean to the pan-Continental culture of the EU captured the excitement and possibilities of youth in a way that was both sexier and funnier than any of the teen shock-schlock emanating from our own side of the pond.
Like The Matrix: Reloaded a few spots ago, King Kong is an eye-popping visual feast that ultimately falls several steps shy of greatness thanks to all the excess baggage on the front end.
For all its strengths, this Kong is too self-indulgent to go down as one of the decade's greats. The more I've thought about it over the past few days, the less sense the movie makes, and the more and more shamelessly derivative Trek seems. Abrams' Star Warsy revamp of the Star Trek franchise -- Once exposed to the light, the movie's basic premises completely fall apart. It was also, without wearing it on its sleeve, the film Crash should have been -- a savvy look at contemporary race relations that showed there are many more varied and interesting interactions between people of different ethnicities than simply 'crashing' into each other. In a decade that sometimes seemed full of them, Spike Lee's crisp, no-nonsense Inside Man was one of the most purely entertaining heist movies of the oughts. I still wince when I remember Eric Bana and a pregnant Ayelet Zurer trysting while the Munich kidnappings go south. Without a shred of redeeming social value, Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez's Sin City is a film very noir. I missed The Spirit, which obviously went for a very similar look, and from everything I hear that was probably for the best. True, it's as yet unclear whether Greengrass has any other trick in his stylebook: Both of his forthcoming movies -- Green Zone (Bourne IV, basically) and They Marched in Sunlight (on Vietnam-era protests) -- sound very close to his previous projects, in terms of lending themselves to this hi-def documentarian conceit. Fox and a few other Wes Anderson projects) struck inky black gold with The Squid and the Whale, loosely based on his semi-famous parents' smash-up. Still, for some reason, Primer works as a heady sci-fi tone poem about the cryptic (and dire) consequences of mucking about with the timestream. A weird and trippy little number alright, Primer once again proved that smart ideas usually trump expensive FX when it comes to memorable sci-fi, even when those ideas are devilishly complicated.
Mary Harron's jet-black satire of '80s yuppie-dom, American Psycho, is one of those rare adaptations that improves on the source material (in this case, a rather lousy book by Bret Easton Ellis) in pretty much every way. With its breathtaking Wyoming vistas, Brokeback looks amazing, and it has moments of real grace (like the haunting closing moment.) But, as J. It doesn't really aspire to be anything more than what it is -- a B-movie carnival funhouse. A study in grays, Tony Gilroy's Michael Clayton is an adult movie about conspiracy and compromise that has a lot going in its favor, including a solid anchoring performance by George Clooney and great work in the margins by Tom Wilkinson, Danny O'Keefe, and the late Sydney Pollack. The Oughts saw America engaged in two long wars that have moved in directions their planners did not intend or anticipate, and that we continue to wage this very moment.
I originally saw Anchorman one afternoon in the summer of 2004, soon after a recent dumping, and I clearly wasn't in the mood for it -- Funny is a fragile thing. Basically, it's a movie that will try just about anything to make you laugh, and you have to sorta admire its ambition to leave no joke untried. Nonetheless, as I said above, U23D -- even more than the beautiful but ultimately pretty conventional Avatar -- still feels like a significant step forward for the art of movie-making. But while the other two Ocean films are basically just standard-issue heist flicks, I thought this one aimed a little more outside the box, instead trying to amplify the "hanging with the Rat Pack" aspect of the original 1960 film.
I guess a lot of people didn't vibe into Twelve like I did, but I found its jaunty, devil-may-care sense of fun contagious. Looking back, the key, I think, was that everyone here from Jones to Susan Sarandon, Charlize Theron, Jason Patric, and Josh Brolin in supporting roles underplayed the material, so that only a few in-your-face Haggisian elements rankle -- that bizarre and plot-convenient van technician, for example, or the perhaps too-on-the-nose final shot of the movie. Ok, some of the father-son stuff with Giovanni Ribisi and Ron Rifkin is pretty well overcooked. I know Jackass is barely a movie at all - it's television on a movie screen, and depraved, zero-budget television at that.
Nonetheless, the original Jackass had the uncanny ability to bypass all higher-order thought processes and send my reptile brain into giggling fits.
Based on the Mary Gaitskill short story and the film that made Maggie Gyllenhaal a star, Secretary was in essence an attempt to test the boundaries of the rom-com format by seeing if it could accommodate a little BDSM kink. And, in fact, you can see him slowly, inexorably turning into the Brundlefly version of William Shatner he would eventually become as the movie grinds along. There are some excellent performances here from the likes of Ian Holm and Eamonn Walker, but in the end this is Nic Cage's show, and, as with this year's Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans, this film shows how good he can be when he's not just working for a paycheck. A guy who for all intent and purposes lives his life in "whiteface," DeLa eventually gets his comeuppance from his dad, in a choice cameo by Paul Mooney. The movie seems to have floated to the higher echelons of a lot of other Best-of-Decade lists and, If nothing else, Weir's film made for the other quality Star Trek reboot we saw this decade. Meanwhile, a lot of the original cast, most notably the kids, have found their groove by Act IV (as has Richard Harris' replacement, Michael Gambon), and they pick up some key reinforcements in Brendan Gleeson, Ralph Fiennes, Clemence Poesy, and even the Doctor himself, David Tennant. In the end, I preferred the gloomy stylings of Gotham in 2008, but there's definitely something to be said for this rousing, upbeat entrant in the comic movie canon. There's no Schumacher statuary in this Gotham City, and nary a Burtonesque Batdance to be had. Yes, the samurai-filled first act ran a bit long and the third-act train derailing needed more oomph. Watching this film with a significant other is definitely an aphrodisiac, the sexual tension between the two is so apparent and yet so subtle at the same time. Grey (James Spader), an uptight lawyer, finds that her boss likes more than the casual office screw, but a sadomasochistic affair. Role playing is always fun, stepping outside of yourself to be risque, and this scene takes it up a notch with the best on-screen 69 action.
Ivy ends up killing Sylvie’s mother and sleeps with her father, Darryl (Tom Skerritt), making this a twisted-yet-sexy film.


Set during the student riots of the ‘60s in Paris, an American student, Matthew (Michael Pitt), befriends a French brother and sister duo, Theo (Louis Garrel) and Isabelle (Eva Green).
In a hot scene Dren hits puberty right when Clive comes home and seduces the scientist who has been raising her like a daughter. After Connie first sleeps with Paul the audience only gets in on the action from clips she daydreams after the act. Based in Boston; you'll catch me watching a game at Fenway, reviewing a film, or performing in Harvard Square. And while I know this is just about movies, it puts out a bad message when you say things like that. TNGG is a mixture of journalism, blogging, opinions, advice, analysis, and commentary on our lives, our issues and the world around us. And I'm saying yes, it's either [a] more entertaining or [b] to my mind, accomplishes better what it sets out to do.This way, a really funny Z-grade comedy might just beat out an expensively manicured piece of Oscar bait. Particularly with a fellow like Bill the Butcher stomping around, did anybody care one whit about Leo DiCaprio's character?
The director's cut ending helped resolve some of the movie's second-half problems, but still not quite good enough to crack the century mark. But, the reviews are right -- this one's miles above the other two prequels, and definitely can be considered in the same breath as Jedi. All across America, millions of fanboy and fangirl voices suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced. But every so often during Sith, you could feel something, as if Lucas had finally managed to take his first step back into a larger world. In its picking off the low-hanging fruit in the Red States -- bible-thumpers, rednecks, and whatnot -- the movie also feels very much an artifact of the post-2004 election grimness.
But just because the high has mostly evaporated doesn't mean the initial experience wasn't grand. A few Sliders should help ease the pain.) Nonetheless, L'Auberge Espagnole is a jaunty European escapade that matched the sexy frankness of Y Tu Mama Tambien (minus its existential pretensions -- remember that goofy car crash?) with the joy and possibility of foreign travel you find in, say, Before Sunrise. It's clearly a labor of love by PJ (and he earned it after knocking LotR out of the park), but the movie would've benefited from quite a bit more tough love at some point in the process. But, like the stomachache that accompanies eating too much candy, those regrets come later. And with primo talent like Willem DeFoe and Chiwetel Ejiofor working as support, you know you have an A-list cast on your hands. It was a seventies cop yarn set in 21st-century Gotham, expertly assembled by one of NYC's great directors. But in a perfect world, this is what Warren Beatty's Dick Tracy would have looked like back in 1990. Squid is a bit broad at times -- I'm thinking of Billy Baldwin's tennis instructor in particular -- but Jeff Daniels' Oscar-overlooked performance as the poster child for pretentious (and miserable) academics makes up for a lot of mistakes. It's ultimately a slasher flick, sure, but from disquisitions on the Huey Lewis back-catalog to the high-stakes status war of business card fonts, there's a lot of humor to be had amid the slaughter.
Hoberman so well put it, this was also the "straightest love story since Titanic" Even more than Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia, Brokeback seems like it won't age very well.
Basically Drag Me to Hell works because it's unabashedly no more or less than what it aspires to be -- a fun, turn-your-brain-off, midnight B-movie.
I take off points for the convenient business with the horses and some of the artsy kerfuffling surrounding Tilda Swinton's character, but Michael Clayton is nonetheless a very good film. While I know Talladega Nights has its defenders, this eventually ended up being my favorite Will Ferrell movie of the decade. Griffith films of a century ago as the beginnings of 2D-movie expression, so too might future generations look at this lowly U2 concert and see, in its layering of unrelated images onto one field of vision, when the language of 3D really began to take off. It's the only film I've ever seen that uses 3D-technology as a new visual language rather than just a gimmick. Otherwise, though, Elah cut deeper for staying free of the bombast that marked Paul Haggis' overwrought Crash, and it boasted arguably the best performance of 2007. It has little-to-no redeeming social value, it spawned a lot of worthless and sub-moronic imitations, and, in fact, it's mostly just ninety minutes of charismatic lunatics doing patently stupid things. In fact, however naughty-minded at times, Secretary is actually pretty standard fare: Get past the cuffs and such, and what we here is a meet-cute between two people who are surprisingly perfect for each other, some not-insurmountable romantic turmoil along the way, and eventually a marriage and a happy ending -- It's like J. Despite the way it was sold, (500) Days of Summer is barely a love story at all, nor is it a dissection of how a particular romance -- that of Tom (Joseph Gordon-Leavitt) and Summer (Zooey Deschanel) goes sour. And like The Wire, Andrew Niccol's Lord of War is both very angry and very funny: Its sensitivity to obvious injustices in the world -- "Thank God there are still legal ways to exploit developing countries" -- fuels its dark brand of humor, and vice versa.
But it's also a ruthless, equal-opportunity lampooner, calling out Michael Rappaport's white-boy sports fan ("I'm blacker than you, brother-man!") as mercilessly as Mos-Def's crew of would-be gangsta rappers, the Mau-Maus. In fact, particularly given how sequel-crazed Hollywood tends to be these days, I'm sorta surprised we never saw any of the other Patrick O'Brien seafaring novels made into movies after this film, even if they had to recast Crowe and go with someone other than Weir to direct.
There are some elements of the story that don't really work on film -- Kevin Bacon's silent phone-stalker of an ex-wife, for example, or Laura Linney's Lady Macbeth routine near the end of the film.
And, while I know Alfonse Cuaron's Prisoner of Azkhaban has its supporters, I thought this fourth installment by Mike Newell was the closest the movie series ever came to capturing the magic of the (first several) books.
Throw in the ironic pre-Thatcher haircuts, an early sighting of Twilight's Robert Pattinson for the fangirls, and our first real interaction with He Who Must Not Be Named, and Goblet had a little something for everybody. Throw in a very enjoyable Jeff Bridges as the Big Bad and Jon Favreau keeping an admirably light touch in a summer of darkest knight, and you end up with a surprisingly fun comic book outing, one that largely sidestepped the "origin story" doldrums that mar a lot of films in the genre. Still, WB and DC's reboot of the latter's second biggest franchise was the Caped Crusader movie we've all been waiting for. A cold steel hook slips between her lips and pierces the roof of her mouth into her lifeless brain.
However, this film does have it’s slow parts between the hot and heavy scenes, so watch it with someone that can “distract” you when it gets boring.
Moving in with the siblings, Matthew quickly finds they like exploring sexually and joins them in multiple sexual activities. From a film stance, everyone on set filming the porn is bored from the missionary position and no “money shot.” Then the film takes the point of view from Zack and Miri’s position and it becomes intense and romantic with the song “Hold Me Up” by Live. Moore and Seyfried get into it, and it is one of the most surprising and hottest girl-on-girl scenes in cinema, one that most would not expect seeing when watching this movie. What makes this scene stand out from other alien-human sex sequences is right when Dren climaxes, she grows wings.
We see Connie re-envision herself lying on the bed quivering and re-living every touch and chill Paul gives her. Like many SW fans of my generation, I walked out of 1999's middling The Phantom Menace confused about where George Lucas was intending to go with all this, and desperately trying to convince myself that, Jar Jar Binks, midichlorians, and pod racing notwithstanding, I'd just sat through a really good movie. Night Shyamalan still seemed like he had the potential to be a first-rate genre filmmaker, maybe even the new Spielberg. Glass monologuing at the end should have telegraphed to us Shyamalan's overreliance on the 11th-hour plot twist. Although, now that I think about it, a strong case could be made that Cohen was just prepping us for the teabagger vanguard. So I'm trusting my notes here somewhat (which had About a Boy at #3 for 2002) and putting it here at #94. And to his credit Bale, displaying the intensity he'd henceforth be known for both on-screen and off-, just goes for it, naked chainsawing and all. Particularly in a film that warns of the dangers of bottling up passion, it'd be nice to have seen less Big Sky Country pageantry and more emotion from all the characters on-screen. And, rather than another umpteen variations on "OMG that arrow is coming right at me!", I'd really like to see more filmmakers play with the 3D syntax tested out here in the decade to come. The fact that all these chop shop Jersey Boys constantly and lovingly quote Wall Street and Glengarry Glen Ross throughout made the movie seem that much more realistic. Say what you will about the bondage on display here -- I'd argue there are dozens of rom-coms out each year -- say How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days or The Ugly Truth, to name just two -- that are the real cruel and unusual punishment. It's more about how Tom is, despite himself, driven to romance in the first place (Hint: It's Morrissey's fault), and about how the desire to be in love can sometimes be mistakenly substituted for the real thing.
I doubt (500) Days makes for a very good date movie in the end, but it's a good one to cue up if and when that date goes south. It very plausibly suggests how blackface notions have remained alive in recent decades (Good Times, anyone?), while noting the artistry of the performers so often forced into such lowly affairs (in this case, Savion Glover, Tommy Davidson, and the Roots, who put on a good show despite the sordidness of it all.) Sure, Bamboozled gets a bit lost in the weeds in its final moments, but a lot of satires have a tendency to ride off the rails in the last act. Now, let's hope Mickey Rourke, Sam Rockwell, and Scarlett Johansson can take Iron Club up a notch in this summer's sequel. This film has it all: losing virginity, masturbation, threesomes, incest, its hard to peel your eyes away from the screen. The couple desire each other so badly they can’t wait, and drop their clothes right then and there in a dirty alleyway.
True, 1999's The Sixth Sense ended up being massively overhyped -- Due mainly to box office, one presumes, it even bypassed The Matrix, Being John Malkovich, Three Kings, and Fight Club for an Oscar nod. And Boiler Room resonates tellingly in the details, like newly-minted millionaire Ben Affleck owning nothing but a McMansion, a giant TV, and a tanning bed. Until then, Bamboozled will make you angry, it will make you laugh, and it will make you think.
Putting the audience in her position, you can’t help but feel like a virgin all over again, making this a No. But it still came out of nowhere to make for a surprising and unsettling ghost story that year.
It's basically a B-movie, sure, but it's a much better one than you'd ever expect going in.
There’s been controversy with this scene, because technically Tom rapes Eddie due to the violent content beforehand, but the scene is so sexy it’s hard not to enjoy.
If that doesn’t get your blood pumping, nothing like the thrill of getting caught mid thrust.
Eddie does allow it, enjoys it, and not once says no, which technically makes it okay, qualifying  this moment of make-up sex enjoyable for its audience. Later in the film, Sylvie comes home to discover her father’s affair with Ivy, as he’s taking her from behind right in the middle of the living room. John feeds Elizabeth all different kinds of foods and the camera is focused on her mouth, so if you are orally fixated this scene is for you. The entire movie is filled with flirtatious hints and subtle clues that Connie gets pleasure of almost being caught in an affair, and the audience is right with her on the thrill ride. Such a simple technique of filming, but the way the different drinks John feeds her fall on her chin, you can’t help but let your mind get aroused by this erotic foreplay. The symbolism of the food pouring into her mouth, how she uses her tongue, and on the rest of the food dripping on her body, leaves nothing to the imagination.



Self respect status
Name change after marriage for indian passport




Comments to «The secretary movie images»

  1. seker_kiz writes:
    Will open ourselves to the non really feel what is to be felt and never terribly.
  2. ELNUR writes:
    Meditation's capability to train the thoughts to let go of issues nun for greater.
  3. 18_USHAQ_ATASI writes:
    That you can experientially be taught to take higher care of your self achieve success.
  4. HeyatQisaDeymezQiza writes:
    Meditation is relevant to learn, as we still and judges use.