A few month ago these fishermen rammed a Japanese coast guard boatJust as North Korea and South Korea threats near a breaking point, a Chinese fishing boat has 'intentionally' rammed into a South Korean coast guard ship, according to VOA. At some point the Chinese also attacked the Koreans with steel pipes and clubs, injuring four coast guard. After the Chinese boat had overturned, the Koreans pulled eight fishermen from the water, one of whom was unconscious and later died. The event has dangerous parallels to earlier this fall when Chinese fishermen rammed a Japanese coast guard ship; the fishermen were arrested, and then China erupted into anti-Japanese protests, a ban on rare earth exports, etc. Weetamoo was first married to Alexander (Massasoita€™s son) from 1653 until his death in 1662. Another book, Massasoit of the Wampanoags by Alvin Weeks (available in the Los Angeles City Library, but which I have not been able to obtain) says that Weetamoo had two additional husbands, or a total of five.
If Weecum were Weetamoo's daughter by Alexander she would have been between 13 and 22 years old, certainly of marriageable age and about the same age as her husband Benjamin.
The Pocasset Tribe was one of the largest and most powerful tribes in the Wampanoag Federation. It was Corbitant who, in July 1621, shortly after the Pilgrims arrived, contrived a plot to become the Great Sachem of the Wampanoags. This plot was thwarted when Hobomock and Squanto heard Corbitant's speech to the Nemaskets.
In March of 1623, when Massasoit was suffering from his serious illness, Winslow was sent to pay his respects to the dying Sachem.
After dinner Corbitant asked Winslow, if it had been Corbitant who was ill, would Governor Bradford have sent medicine and would Winslow have come such a long distance to heal him.
Winslow had to think for a moment on this and then replied that it was a mark of respect and they treated all people that way when they felt a great respect for them. Their conversation turned toward religion and they were both surprised that their religions actually had much in common. Following Alexander's death, Weetamoo returned to her home to assume her role as Squaw Sachem of the Pocassets. Weetamoo eventually married Peter Nannuit, (Petanonowett, Petanunuit.) Little is known of him, except that at the outbreak of the King Philip War, he sided with the English. As the main body of Indians moved north, Weetanoo, went to Ninigret, Sachem of the Eastern Niantics, in Rhode Island. In the fall of 1675, while she was still with the Eastern Niantics, Quinnapin escaped from jail in Rhode Island and came to seek refuge with his friend (and father's cousin) Ninigret. Quinnapin was the son of Canjanaquand, (Cagianaquan) who was a brother to Miantonomo, Great Sachem of the Narragansetts before his son Canonchet. Quinnapin and Weetamoo joined with Canonchet in his swamp island shortly before the surprise attack of the English known as the Great Swamp Massacre, of December 19, 1675.
Under the military leadership of Canonchet, Quinnapin became one of the leading war sachems, striking hard with his force of 400 warriors. Following the death of Canonchet in April, Quinnapin was the leader of the Narragansetts in battles. In early August, as the end seemed to be nearing, Quinnapin led what was left of his Narragansett warriors, back to Rhode Island. There remained some question as to her cause of death but this is the state in which her body was found and desecrated. After returning to Rhode Island, Quinnapin was also hunted down by the English and eventually captured. Little is know of Weecum (Weecome) except that she was a Squaw Sachem, probably of the Pocasset Tribe.
Pamantaquash (Pomantaquash) was the Sachem of the Assawampsetts Tribe in the Wampanoag Federation.
Pamantaquash has been confused, by some writers, with Poquanum, the Sachem of Nahant, a tribe located north of Boston on a peninsula south of Lynn. In 1668, six years after the death of Massasoit, Pamantaquash had the following will recorded by Nathaniel Morton, secretary of the Plymouth Colony, naming Tuspaquin as his heir. Tuspaquin (Tuspequin Tispaquin, Watuspuquin) was a highly regarded sachem at Assawampsetts Pond.
In contrast to the very tall, fair complexioned Indians of New England, Tuspaquin, is said to have been short, very heavy, with unusually long arms for a short person. Tuspaquin was regarded highly enough to win the hand of Amie, the daughter of Massasoit, for his wife. There are indications that Tuspaquin extended his domain to include the Nemasket Tribe to the north as he is sometimes referred to as being the Sachem of the Assawampsetts and Nemaskets. Although he seemed compatible with the English settlers, Tuspaquin never aligned himself closely with them.
At the outbreak of the War, Tuspaquin led a large force of 300 warriors in support of Philip. After Philip returned to Wampanoag country near the end of the war, it was easier for the English to enlist volunteers and also to surround the holdouts. Of Tuspaquin's and Amie's children, it is quite certain that William was killed in the war.


Benjamin Tuspaquin (Tuspaquin II, Squim, Squin, Benjamin Squinnamay, Benjamin Squamnaway) is the only child of Old Tuspaquin and Amie known to have survived the King Philip War and remain in this country. After the King Philip War, the surviving Indians recognized their place as a conquered people and settled down to be subservient to the English in, what was formerly their land. Lydia's parents both died when she was young and she was raised by her grandparents, Benjamin and Weecum.
At the time of his second marriage, Andrew already had two children of his own from his prior marriage. A point against the argument that this was a case of mistaken identity and that the dead man was not Andrew Newcomb, is the fact that he was known by the men who identified him. The obvious omission of his oldest son, Andrew II, as an heir could be due to the fact that this son was already well established in life and had no need of an inheritance; or it is possible that there was a falling out between father and son. The first record of Andrew buying land was on 20 April 1669 (deeds at Alfred, York Co., Maine, Vol. At this time Andrew Newcomb became Constable of the town and was living at the Shoals, or in Kittery.
The name of Andrew's first wife, Sarah, appears only once, on a deed of land sold and recorded 21 July 1673 (from the deeds at Exeter, N.H.
At Edgartown, Andrew became a prominent citizen and his name appears in many documents, as witness for land transfers, etc.
Sometime after his arrival in Edgartown, Andrew met and married his second wife, Anna Bayes, daughter of Anna Baker, of Boston and Captain Thomas Bayes.
By 1690, Andrew was an established member of the community and had acquired several parcels of land. Although some records list 11 children for Zerviah and Josiah Bearce, other records make it clear that they, in fact, had no children.
Bearce says (9) he knows from family tradition that Margaret was the daughter of one of Massasoit's two brothers but he could not remember which one. The birth date of Margaret is not known but, it is likely to have been about 1612-15, or about the same time as her Uncle Akkompoin.
At the arrival of the pilgrims, Quadaquinna was in his thirties and could easily have been the father of the 6-9 year old Margaret.
Even before the arrival of the Pilgrims, while exploring New England, Captain Dermer was captured by the local Indians at Nemasket. When the Pilgrims landed, in December of 1620, Quadaquinna was in his prime, probably somewhere in his 30's. As Quadaquinna entered the English lodge where they were to meet, he was concerned about their guns and refused to sit down until they had all been removed from the building. It is not known whether Quadaquinna died young, or whether he was so much a part of Massasoit's company that no one bothered to specifically mention him again.
Nothing is known of Quadaquinna's family except that Bearce (9) says, one of Massasoit's brothers was the father of Margaret.
Gabriel Wheldon was born in England and seems to have had a wife and children before coming to America. From the pilgrim's records, it is not apparent that Gabriel Wheldon was sent, or sentenced, to Matachees. To summarize much of the above, Gabriel Wheldon arrived in Plymouth, probably from Nottinghamshire, England, in 1628 and went immediately to Mt. After living with the Pokanoket Indians for some time, Gabriel must have felt safe in returning to the town of Plymouth. On October 27, 1646 Ruth Wheldon, the daughter of Gabriel and Margaret, was married to Richard of Yarmouth. A record can be found of an Indian Sagamore by the name of a€?Richarda€? at Yarmouth at this time. A dissenting view is expressed by Bearce, who says that a€?Richard Tayler was born in England.a€? No source, or support is given for this statement. Richard of Yarmouth, the tailor, at about age 42, married Ruth Wheldon, age 14, October 27, 1646. The Indians on Cape Cod were considered part of the Wampanoag Nation but, that may have been because they really didn't have much choice. The Indians on the Cape, those of Marthas Vineyard, Nantucket and Elizabeth Islands were part of the Wampanoag Federation but more removed physically, socially and perhaps politically. During the life of Massasoit, most of the Nipmuck tribes, of central Massachusetts, and many of the Massachusetts Federation, of eastern Massachusetts, also gave allegiance to the Wampanoag's Great Sachem and were considered to be part of Massasoit's followers in about the same way as the Cape Indians.
Because of this, there is less known of the Cape Indians than of some of the other Wampanoag Tribes. It is not absolutely clear if all of the other Cape Indians belonged to a single tribe, or if there were further divisions. Coneconam, Sachem at Manomet, was one of those captured by Captain Edward Harlow in 1611, along with Epanow, Sachem at Gay Head on Marthas Vineyard Island.
It will be remembered that, the first encounter the Pilgrims had with any of the natives was in December 1620, when they first landed on the Cape. In June 1621, less than three months after Massasoit and Quadaquinna signed the first treaty with Plymouth, a young boy from the colony got lost in the woods.


It was no secret to the Indians where the boy was, but when the colonists were unable to find him they sent word to Massasoit, who responded that they need not worry, the boy was safe and in good hands. Before they could return to their boat, it was mid-day and Iyanough invited them to stay for lunch.
Aspinet then told them that Massasoit had been captured by Canonicus, of the Narragansetts, and recommended that they return to help him as soon as possible. As soon as they got underway they met with such strong winds that the colonists could make no real headway. Iyanough was evidently supportive of the Treaty of Submission to King James, signed at Plymouth on September 13, 1621. In January, Miles Standish, the ill tempered military captain, went with the ship and a shallop to Nauset to pick up the corn that had been left there. Shortly thereafter, in February 1623, Miles Standish went to Mattachee to pick up the food that Governor Bradford bought and left there. About the same time, Governor Bradford made a trip to Manomet to ask for food from Coneconam.
CAPTAIN JOSE DE URRUTIA DISCOVERED BANDERA PASS IN 1739 WHILE CAMPAIGNING AGAINST THE APACHES WHO HAD BEEN THREATENING SPANISH SETTLEMENTS AT san antonio de BEXAR.
THE EARLIEST MAP SHOWING BANDERA AS A PLACE IS AN ANONYMOUS ONE, DATED AROUND 1815 TO 1819, THAT INDICATES AN APACHE VILLAGE JUST OF NORTH OF a€?PUERTA DE LA BANDERA.a€? BANDERA PASS IS INDICATED AS THE TERMINAL POINT OF AN OLD COMANCHE TRAIL FROM NACOGDOCHES. Lehman reported that he was captured by the apache indians in 1870 when he was 11 years old and again later by the comanche indians. Lehman was later taken by the comanches and adopted into their tribe and remained with the comanches until the United states government put them on a reservation in oklahoma. When Lehman was with the Apache tribe, he heard the apaches talk about a battle in 1732 at Bandera Pass. Lehman told of a battle at bandera pass in 1841 which was also recorded in Wikipedia (the online encyclopediC) a€?battle of Bandera Passa€?. Lehman reported that after the battle with the Texas Rangers the comanches named the town of bandera. The town of bandera, Texas was founded in 1853 by Charles De Montel, john james and John Herndon. In 1856 after Bandera County was created, the first commissioners court was held on January 26th. John James was born in 1819 in Gorleston Suffolk, England while his parents were visiting England. In 1851 James married Annie Milby, daughter of William Polk MILBY of Maryland, who came to indianola, texas in 1840. On August 27, 1839, Herndon married Barbara Makall Wilkinson Calvit, the only daughter of Alexander Calvit, and the heir to the Calvit sugar plantation in Brazoria County, texas. It is believed that montel and james recruited Herndon to help finance the development of the town of Bandera.
In 1852, a venture into the Texas hill country brought explorer and surveyor Charles de montel to an area now called bandera county.
This comes as Korea promises to carry out military exercises that will aggravate North Korea, which China has explicitly opposed.
She would also have been a part of the royal family which would make her a suitable mate for Benjamin. Rowlandson says that a victory dance a€?was carried on by eight of them, four men and four squaws.a€? Weetamoo was one of the squaws. James Church and certain members of his company of friendly Indians, in consideration of services rendered by them to the Province tract of land in what was then Freetown, but now East Fall River. 1666-7, in the Ketch _______, Andrew Newcomb, Master, for Virginia for account of John Ely and Eliakim Hutchinson--various horses described--avouched by Mr. Andrew Nurcom complayneth agaynst Amos an Enden (Indian) for Inbaseling or purloyning away Sidor & Rum.
2 p.24) Late that afternoon, the shallop finally got out of the harbor and made Plymouth before nightfall. This Indian plantation was afterwards surveyed and divided into 25 lots, of which the 19th, 20th, 21st and 22nd lots were assigned to the lineal descendants of Benjamin Tuspaquin.
John Kendrick was the first ship-master who went on a voyage to the northwest coast from the United States and discovered the Columbia River. 25, 1651-2, at Barnstable, Mass.) The King Philip War had just ended in which her husband, Joseph, served for the English. 1716, she married Josiah Bearce I, the son of Joseph and Martha (Taylor) Bearce, and grandson of Austin (Augustine) and Mary Bearce.
ELY SHOWS THE OLD COMANCHE TRAIL INTERSECTING THE a€?TRAIL TO MISSION SAN SABAa€? BUT DOES NOT SPECIFICALLY SHOW THE PASS.



How to make your own fiberglass rc boat hulls
Boats for sale in beaumont tx events


Comments to “Fishing boat attacked in south africa 2013”

  1. Rocklover_x  writes:
    Boat means you'll spend you are heading out on a ten-day.
  2. Brad_Pitt  writes:
    To see this awesome e-book specialist and without leaving the motor spinning (Warning.
  3. tenha_tural  writes:
    Better resale worth than a comparable model that has not been picket model boats.
  4. 095  writes:
    And Skywalk trips are really nice news purchase.