Reid has been obsessed with completing this, but over the last few weeks there has been little time available for cardboard boat building. This weekend we finally had some time and he brought out the instructions sent home which were very good.  We modified them a bit so he could produce this nautical masterpiece.
The middle band was punctured with a sharp object and a skewer was used as the mast.  We experimented with several different objects like straws and cardboard to see what would work the best, but the wooden skewer seemed to be the answer.
Some of the extra cardboard was folded over so that a dragon head was cut out.  A flap was left at the bottom so that it formed a triangle at the base of the dragon neck which could be attached and unattached* to the prow. Another long piece of cardboard was folded over and trimmed so that it could be used to attach the sail to the mast.  The sail was made out of 2 pieces of regular white printer paper and stapled inside this long piece of cardboard and set onto the mast. Reid used brown paint for the ship, striped the sail with red and painted red medallions to decorate the Viking Ship. April 27, 2012Welcome back to this week’s How To – where I made a Cardboard DIY Pirate Ship for the children! I like to layer my paper in different directions – you know how when you tear newspaper it one direction it tears really is easily, but not in the other?
7) Let dry again and add detail – I painted on some skull and cross bones and anchors.
I’ve been dying to see this since the teaser (prior to covering in paper mache) and it is amazing!


What a cute little pirate ship…my boys would have so much fun playing with one like that! After all the amazing things you’ve posted to Creative Juice Thursday over the past year, I just had to feature you {and much more in the future too} at the new site. We used an upturned baking tray as the cake board and covered it in shiny blue wrapping paper to look like water. Step 3: Using the baking paper as a guide, cut off the bits of cake that do not look like the front of a ship.
Step 11: Licorice strips arranged in circles make portholes and the candles are guns or canons.
The question how to make a simple titanic ship used cardboard has been asked 2158 times by our users.
She believes that you shouldn't have to buy stuff to have fun when there is a kitchen junk drawer full of possibilities.
I used some nail scissors (that I have especially for crafting) – as they have a nice round curve. The deck is quite fragile and is the part that probably benefits the most from the paper mache. Well, I believe that if you criss cross your paper layers when paper maching, you get a stronger final construction.


A kebab skewer with cut out bits of fabric featuring the Jolly Roger, make for a good pirate ship mast.
I knew straight away that the licorice railing would be difficult, because licorice is not fully flexible. Then glue all the discs together with strong (!) glue and finally glue in place on the boat. I reckon it would be a really good pinata for a birthday party if it was built a bit bigger with a weakened section – what do you think? I used those candy straps… in Australia one strap has 4 different coloured lines and you can tear off each colour seperately. See what you can find at home and amend our DIY Pirate Ship How to, to suite what you have at home! Near the middle I snipped the fabric, threaded through some string and with that tied the sail to the mast!
Best to cut your two side panels and the back, tape it all together and then to cut your base and desk to fit your boat.



Pontoon boats for sale indianapolis indiana jobs
Motor boat plans wooden
Free stained glass sailboat patterns


Comments to “How to make a ship with legos”

  1. narkusa  writes:
    Kids find out how vary from easy one roof shelters can be with the alternative.
  2. ANILSE  writes:
    Water, a paddle the amazing service.