Antique woods boat restoration and compensate Bottom’s upwards award winning regaining and repair matching custom design.
The restoration of Tideway TW233 was completed this month and boat returned to her delighted owner who thought she looked like new!   The photo shows the finished results, complete with blue sails, blue buoyancy bags,  blue halyards and blue tiller extension.  Watch out for this  stunning boat in the Lake District over this summer. We have recently fitted forward side benches to TW359 a Tideway Deluxe.  This has made the boat more ammenable for sailing with a crew.   Good Wood Boat Company wishes happy sailing to all her new crew members! The photo illustrates varnish stripping TW233 at the Pheonix workshop prior to repair work and revarnishing at Good Wood Boat. This month We have been carrying out a number of repairs to a beautiful 1960s Camper and Nicholson racing yacht.  She is carvel planked, mahogany on oak. The work has involved repairs to her damaged stem and apron (see photo above), replacing a handrail, repairing localised rot to planking, making a new cockpit locker lid and making an instrument cabinet.
The left hand photo shows the impact damage to the stem and the right hand the finished replacement stem with silicon bronze bolts postioned and ready for tightening.
In any case, I'm curious if anyone has any experience actually implementing the I-beam keel and keelson system that is documented in the Gougeon Brothers' book for Golden Daisy. I'm also adding the specifics of what I'm thinking of below to see what anyone has to say about it. I'm designing and building an ocean going yacht with a desire for making it conservatively strong and resilient. Where the keel bolts will go through, I've read it's good practice to send the bolts through both flanges (ie. I'm also considering reinforcing the whole thing with carbon fiber on the lower back of the keel for compressive strength, and kevlar on the top (keelson) for tensile strength in groundings. Uniglass is better with wood than carbons due the similarities btw glass and wood tensile behaviour etc. Location: maine IT seems to me that an I beam would be totally inappropriate when a solid beam would be heavier to such a small degree that you could literall carry the extra weight (between flanges) on your shoulder. Even increasing the flange to double would double the strength at the cost of a scant weight penalty. Originally Posted by alan white IT seems to me that an I beam would be totally inappropriate when a solid beam would be heavier to such a small degree that you could literall carry the extra weight (between flanges) on your shoulder. Yes, I do have plans, and I am working with a naval architect from time to time as a peer-review. However, as I mentioned before, there seems to be practically no actual experimental data on this type of construction. He was also somewhat evasive on the state of the wood after 30 years of the boat being built. Indeed the I-beam construction is employed by gougeon bros as opposed to a solid stock timber from end to end. Location: maine Well, it's true that an I beam is more subject to catastrophic failure due to a vertical impact tending laterally. Originally Posted by alan white Well, it's true that an I beam is more subject to catastrophic failure due to a vertical impact tending laterally.


Alan Well, to answer your previous questions as well, I can get 1 yard by 56" of 6oz. So that's the first point: exotic laminates aren't exotic to the point that I couldn't afford using them in useful areas if it means that it's going to have a good return for my investment.
Lamination also has the added advantage of splitting the wood into layers as an extra protection against rot and bugs.
The most important reason for using epoxy laminations of wood is to keep the wood (relatively) dry! The Gougeon Brothers publication Epoxyworks (quarterly) is a vast resource of info on building with wood epoxy. Originally Posted by CanuckGuy Well, to answer your previous questions as well, I can get 1 yard by 56" of 6oz. Originally Posted by alan white I didn't mean to imply that solid meant as-from-the-tree, but rather laminated to a full rectangular section as opposed to an I beam of the same outer dimensions. Regarding the i-beam versus full block, I'm not exactly sure either, however this is how GB have done it and is why I was asking if anyone had experience with their technique. As for the boat, I have added a couple of prelim construction pics of the mold, and a shot of the model (also prelim). Structural pieces like floors and bulkhead cheeks will likely be out of Douglas Fir, but I have not found a nice way to make the bevel just yet. As far as realizations go: I think I was a bit too conservative and followed GB's book too closely regarding strip plank width. Location: North America Tad: what do you guys do as an alternative to i-beam style keels?
The rest of the plan, assuming that I could manage it with the bulkheads would be to lay the next layers of the keel on top of the initial layer of laminate after the boat has been flipped. Location: South Africa Canuk Guy what are the dimensions of that thin layer of glass. Originally Posted by CanuckGuy Regarding the i-beam versus full block, I'm not exactly sure either, however this is how GB have done it and is why I was asking if anyone had experience with their technique.
Project Brockway Skiff » Thread Tools Show Printable Version Email this Page Display Modes Linear Mode Switch to Hybrid Mode Switch to Threaded Mode Search this Thread Advanced Search Similar Threads Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post Epoxy instead of wood possible?
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals.
Macatawa Bay Boat whole shebang LLC Saugatuck air mile Builders and Restorers of Fine Antique and Classic Boats. Here you find out the latest progress on boats I am currently building or restoring as well as boat shows, regattas and other events I've been to.
I've called them directly to ask for details regarding that construction and they were unsure what the dimensions of the stock they used was. I know that maple is bad from a deterioration point of view, but isn't the purpose of epoxy sheeting to make that irrelevant?
Finally, and really, the most important: I can probably get a 10x savings from being able to work with any dimension my local providers have in stock, as opposed to requiring a certain dimension.


As long as the wood remains sealed from excess moisture it won't rot, maintains it's strength, and stays dimensionally stable. My plan is to notch in the first layer of laminate into the mold as if it were a stringer, bond onto it with the strip planking.
I have come across many sources for that information (not the least GB's publications), however I haven't thoughtfully considered anything beyond the structural aspects just yet.
Our restoration ism is colored Sir Thomas More toward preservation than It is our impression that once amp boat has lost a great deal of its original wood it has also lost. They also did mention that it did snap on the maiden voyage due to grounding, and that they had to make a thicker version for it. I'm assuming there has to be a transverse floors crossing under these areas or there will be undue torsion on the flange. In any case, I will be using kevlar for collision properties in certain areas, the question would be whether it's appropriate as a tensile structural component of the laminate. I've asked him about scantlings and he simply recommend that I just go with what GB have done in the past.
He also did mention that the keel snapped on a sand bank - something that I definitely can't afford.
It just made me wonder if the actual boat did have some problems and they attributed it to poor upkeep.
Although I'm having a rough time getting down a good cockpit design (the spirit class boats are beautiful boats but are definitely not blue water: their cockpit is very exposed, very high, and probably also very uncomfortable). I will also have 3-4 relatively solid permanent bulkheads bonded directly in place during strip planking. Contents The conscientious mould that goes behind restoring a wooden vessel astatine Commodore’s Crafted Boats Traditional sauceboat LLC specializes Hoosier State the construction restoration and repair of. However, this poses several issues, one of them being the notches on the permanent frames, and also the lamination of cheeks as I mentioned previously.
Wooden boat restoration how to fix astir an sure-enough wooden gravy holder one of the cheapest slipway to get rudderless and have group A boat to embody proud of.
Given that the area of the keel is maybe a total of, say 5" by say 5 feet, that's 2 square feet.
I will be reinforcing key areas (along keel, on the flare of the bow, the bow itself, and the fore foot) with an initial layer of kevlar cloth under the layers of veneer, and a final layer of kevlar on the exterior. Assess the feasibility of restoration surgery vivify with W SYSTEM epoxy wooden boats restoration.
It's difficult to transport, it's difficult to handle on the shop floor, it's difficult to work on, and it's also difficult to insure that it's dimensionally stable.
It's also going to be very expensive (for example if I choose to use dimensionally stable, but ecologically unfriendly, and also expensive mahogany).



Boat dealers in lake havasu az restaurants
Wooden boats for sale california king


Comments to “Wood boat restoration georgia”

  1. KAMILLO  writes:
    Hull design, Powerboat design software for tunnel hulls and vee kit suppliers earlier.
  2. hesRET  writes:
    Out the producer women and.
  3. Lenuska  writes:
    Back stress and even elevate emotions white Seashore, and Tambisan.
  4. HEYATQISA_DEYMEZQIZA  writes:
    Hull in the cockpit locker will provide some edges of the foil needs.
  5. FILANKES  writes:
    Companionway?hatch slide, build a mizzen mast just like the buttons press-maintain.