You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. Raise the hopes of your team with our 0614 Marketing Product Strategy Definition Powerpoint Presentation Slide Template. We are proud to present our 0614 marketing product strategy definition powerpoint presentation slide template.
A product strategy is the foundation of a product life-cycle and the execution plan for further development.
Add important lessons to your Custom Course, track your progress, and achieve your study goals faster.
Our Business Level Strategy Definition Templates Global Network Leadership Ppt Process Powerpoint resolve disagreements. We are proud to present our business level strategy definition templates global network leadership ppt process powerpoint.
Since the onset of reopening of India’s economy in the late 1980s, fashion is one consumer sector that has drawn the largest number of global brands and retailers. International brands that have been drawn to India by its large “willing and able to spend” consumer base and the rapidly growing economy have benefitted in attaining quick acceptance in the Indian market and given their high desirability meter, most international brands have positioned themselves at the premium-end of the market, even if that is not the case in the home markets. Europe’s luxury brands have had a long history with India’s princely past, but modern India tickled the interest of international fashion brands in the 1980s when it set on the path of liberalisation. The rapidly growing media sector also helped the international brands in gaining visibility and establishing brand equity in the Indian market more quickly. In 2008, in the midst of economic downturn, scepticism and uncertainty, international fashion brands continued to enter India at nearly the same momentum as the previous year.
The year 2009 saw the true impact of the slowdown as fewer international brands were launched during the year. 2010 was better in comparison: although initially slow, the growth of new international brands entering the Indian market in 2010 bounced back later during the year, and some brands that had exited the Indian market earlier also made a comeback.
2010 indicated a fresh round of optimism as the pace of new brands entering the market picked up, and those already present in the market showing signs that they were adapting their strategies to grow their India business, including lowering prices and entering new segments. Though the number of new brands entering the Indian shores in 2011 and 2012 may not have matched the numbers in the peak years, both years have been healthy and the list of new brands ready to enter in 2013 already seems promising. Amongst others, 2011 saw the entry of Australian brands such as Roxy and Quiksilver having tied up with Reliance Brands for distribution. 2012 brought in luxury brands such as Christian Louboutin, Roberto Cavalli and Thomas Pink, womenswear brands such as Elle, Monsoon and fashion accessories brands such as Claire’s.
In the 1980s and the early 1990s, licensing was a popular entry strategy amongst the global fashion brands, with minimal involvement in the Indian business. In the mid-1990s a few companies such as Levi Strauss set up wholly owned subsidiaries while others such as Adidas and Reebok entered into majority-owned joint ventures.
In 2006 the Government of India reopened retail to foreign investment (allowing up to 51 per cent foreign direct investment in single-brand retail). Amongst the international brands that entered the Indian market, a few were on their second or even third attempt at the market. Similarly, Miss Sixty entered India in 2007 through a franchisee agreement with Indus Clothing. In the last few years as the foreign direct investment rules are being softened in particular with regard to the more flexibility in the 30% domestic sourcing and clarification on brand ownership norm there is an increasing preference for international companies to enter the India market with some form of ownership while those that are already in the market are looking to increase their stakes in the business. Several brands have taken the plunge into investing in the Indian operations and moved more aggressively into the market. During 2011, Promod changed its franchise arrangement with Major Brands into a joint-venture that is majority-owned by Promod.
After its partnership with Raymond fell through in 2007 and all of its standalone stores were shut down, Gas (Grotto SpA) scouted around for an appropriate partner for India business.  Eventually, the brand set up a wholly owned subsidiary in 2010 for wholesale operation while retail stores were franchised. 2012 was a defining year marking the government’s decision to allow 100% foreign direct investment in single brand retail business and permitting multi-brand retail in India. Canali has entered into a majority-owned joint-venture with its existing partner Genesis Luxury. Pavers England is the first international brand to have applied for and been granted the permission to own and operate its retail business in India through a 100 per cent subsidiary owned by a UK based company.
As we have already mentioned in one of our earlier papers (“Tapping into the India Gold Rush”) we do not expect a dramatic short-term growth in the number of international brands following the retail FDI relaxation in September 2012. In the luxury sector, 51 percent FDI and distribution relationships are likely to continue to be a norm, since it is virtually impossible for most luxury companies to meet the 30 percent domestic sourcing requirement in its true spirit.
In the other segments some more relationships could be reconstituted during 2013, taking the international brand at least a step closer to gaining greater control, even if their partners remain the same.
Franchising is still the more common form of route to market for most single brand retail companies although for many international companies an eventual ownership in India business may be desirable. Amongst the international brands that one can look forward to shopping in 2013 are “Uniqlo” of Fast Retailing, Japan’s largest apparel retailer, Sweden’s H&M, Emilio Pucci and Billabong. Gucci recently opened its largest store in India recently Delhi-NCR after two failed joint ventures.
Brands such as Mango who have chosen the franchise route are tying up with additional partners (e.g. UK-based apparel chain Marks & Spencer is accelerating its expansion in India with plans to add ten stores in the next six to eight months in the country. Puma SE, the global sports lifestyle company for athletic shoes, footwear, and other sports-wear aggressively set out to gain 30 per cent of the Indian organised retail sportswear market within a year, from a share of 18-20 per cent in the top four branded sportswear segments in 2011. The confidence in the India opportunity is rising again, with existing global brands expecting the contribution from India business to grow multi-fold in a few years. As customer footfall and conversions pick up, international brands are also shoring up their foundations for future expansion in terms of better processes and systems, closer understanding of the market, and nurturing talent within their team.
India shows signs of a healthier business outlook for International brands but the game has just begun and with competition getting tougher, we can expect interesting times ahead. Since the study was dealing with the brands at the point of entry, the team decided to treat then as international brands for the purposes of this article, as they originated in the UK, and were owned by a foreign company at the time they were launched in India.
So you’re correct, in a way, that for India and some other territories, the brands are currently owned by the Indian group. The article is correct as well, since the brands are originally British (as they were when they entered India) – the perspective matters, as does the history and the evolution of the brands.


Successful Product Development Quick Overview What does it take to develop a new product idea and develop successful product? 3 Parts of Effective Product Differentiation How to Successfully Differentiate your Products and Services Properly defined product differentiation is vital to allowing your company to take full advantage of everything that it has to offer and reach its best potential.
Simple Approach to Developing New Products & Services New Product Development is about creating New Product s which will create value for your customers. The Ansoff Matrix tool is used for planning and analysis of business growth and development alternatives. Product marketing deals with the 4Ps of marketing, which are Product, Pricing, Place, and Promotion. The product strategy allows the business to zero in on specific target audiences and draw focus on the product and consumer attributes. Notwithstanding the country’s own rich heritage in textiles the market has looked up to the West for inspiration.
In addition, Indian companies – manufacturers or retailers – have been more than ready to act as platforms for launching these brands in the market and today there are over 200 international fashion brands in the Indian market for clothing, footwear and accessories alone, and their numbers are still growing. The pioneering companies during this stage were Coats Viyella, Benetton and VF Corporation. Higher disposable incomes and the availability of credit significantly enhanced the consumers’ buying power. By this time India had demonstrated itself to be an economy that showed a very large, long-term potential and, at least for some brands, the short to mid-term prospects had also begun to look good. Many international brands such as Cartier, Giorgio Armani, Kenzo and Prada entered India in 2008, targeting the luxury or premium segment. Amongst the new launches, a highlight of the year was the launch of the most awaited and discussed-about Spanish brand Zara. The largest British football club and lifestyle brand Manchester United, signed up with Indus-League Clothing Ltd. During the initial years licensing was the preferable route for international brands that were testing the market.
This helped them to gain a greater control over their Indian operations, sourcing and supply chain, and brand. Using this route, many brands have entered India by setting up majority-owned joint ventures, or moving their existing franchise relationships into a joint venture structure. For instance, Diesel BV initially signed a joint venture agreement in 2007 with Arvind Mills. It switched to a joint venture with Reliance Brands in the same year but the partnership was called off in 2008. Some of them were possibly due to misplaced expectations initially about the size of the market or about the pace of change in consumer buying habits.
Since the year 2009, international brands increasingly opted for joint-ventures as the choice for entry into the market. In 2012 the company formed an equal joint venture partnership with Reliance Brands with plans to ramp up India retail presence. Not only has this encouraged new brands to consider the Indian market but many existing brands have started reviewing their existing operating structures and alliances, and have initiated moves towards greater ownership and a stronger foothold in the Indian market.
Oliver restructured its India operations in 2012 by exiting its prior relationship with the apparel exporter Orient Craft and tied up with a new partner through a majority joint venture.
Newcomers such as H&M and Loro Piana are reportedly considering the joint venture route. However, at that time we did foresee some changes in the operating structures for the single brand ventures already active in the market, as well as entry of new brands that have been holding back so far as they wanted greater control in their India retail business and this seems to be happening already. In many cases, the local partner in a joint venture is a mere placeholder until FDI rules are liberalised further and, unless the business grows significantly, most brands will be content to keep the existing structures in place. However, licensing should not be excluded from the choice set, especially for companies that are multi-brand retail concepts such as Sephora or those that manage to find a suitable Indian partner that can provide end-to-end support from product sourcing to distribution and retail (for example, the relationship between Elle and Arvind).
But India is not merely a destination anymore for the international brands to grow their business. All of its five stores are now run directly by the company and the Indian business also reported to have turned profitable this year. DLF) in the hope of making the Indian business contribute significantly to the overall revenue of the company. The company has identified India as one of the key markets to become the world’s most sustainable retailer by 2015. However, the approach is of careful consideration and brands realise that India is a unique market, different not only from the West but also from other Asian economies such as China. Third Eyesight’s study of the market highlights international brands’ concerns with ensuring a consistent brand message, improved organisational capabilities right down to front-line staff, and focussing on unit productivity (per store and per employee).
I had only read the first few paragraphs and decided that it would be a waste of time to read further as I am not sure how much of the information presented here is incorrect. Madura Garments (which was a division of Madura Coats, which itself was a subsidiary of Coats Viyella plc of the UK) was the designated licensee of the brands in India. When it comes time to start advertising a new product, you don’t just want it to take a tiny hop. This may be partly attributable to colonial linkages from earlier times, as well as to the pre-liberalisation years when it was fashionable to have friends and relatives overseas bring back desirable international brands when there were no equivalent Indian counterparts. At the time the Indian apparel market was still fragmented, with multiple local and regional labels and very few national brands. West Asia and East Asia (countries such as Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and even Thailand) were seen as more attractive due to higher incomes and better infrastructure. Growth in good-quality retail real estate and large format department stores also allowed companies to create a more complete brand experience through exclusive brand stores in shopping centres and shop-in-shops in department stores. While India was a promising market to many international brands, it was not completely immune to the global economic flu. However, given the high import duties and high real estate costs, the products ended up being priced significantly higher than in other markets. Some of these had already been in the pipeline for quite some time and had invested considerable time and effort in understanding the dynamics of the Indian retail market, scouting for appropriate partners, building distribution relationships and tying up for retail space, setting up the supply chain and, most importantly, getting their operational team in place. The first store was launched in Delhi to an absolutely phenomenal response, followed by a store in Mumbai, and a third again in Delhi.


This shifted to franchising as import duties dropped and brands looked at exerting more control on the product and the supply chain. In the subsequent years import duties for fashion products successively came down making imports a less expensive sourcing option and the realty boom brought in many investors in retail real estate who became franchisees for the international brands.
By the end of 2008, more than 40 per cent of the international brands were present through a franchise or distribution relationship, while more than 25 per cent had either a wholly-owned or majority-owned subsidiary. However, by the middle of 2008, the relationship ended with mutual consent, as Arvind reduced its emphasis at the time on retailing international brands within the country. Miss Sixty finally entered India through a franchisee agreement with a manufacturer of women’s footwear and accessories. Others were due to a failure either on the part of the brand or its Indian partners (or both), to fully understand what needed to be done to be successful in the Indian market.
Even the brands already present started looking to modify the nature of their presence in India in order to exert more control over the retail operations, products, supply chain and marketing. However with the new joint venture in place, the international brand is reported to be looking at opening 40 stores in the next four years with the hope of increasing the contribution of India business to its global revenue to the extent of 15-20% from a mere 3% at present. Some of the brands have taken the decision to step into an ownership position in India as they felt that India was too strategic a market to be “delegated” entirely to a partner (whether licensee or franchisee), or that an Indian partner alone might not be able to do justice to the brand in terms of management effort and financial capital. To gain a larger share in the Indian market the company has repositioning the brand, changed its sourcing strategy, reduced the entry-level prices by 40% while reducing the store size (from 5,000 sq. Through this change the international brand plans to grow its presence in India multi-fold by opening 10-15 stores over the next three-four years. The country is also increasingly becoming the innovation-platform or testing ground for new concepts and trends. It  plans to increase the number of stores in India from 24 currently to over 30 through the 51:49 joint venture with Reliance Retail. While the actual numbers are reportedly short of target, the brand has been opening amongst the largest stores during the year. Rather than adopting a “cut-and-paste” approach one needs to seriously consider the appropriate business model for India. For instance, the Arvind Group that had looked at reducing its emphasis on international fashion brands in 2007-08 has recently acquired the business operations of Planet Retail which operated the franchises of British fashion retailers Debenhams and Next, and American lifestyle brand Nautica in India. Just to give you an example Louis Phillip and Allen Solly are labels of Madura Garments which is an India company and not international brands as you thought. The research team have had much debate about whether to treat Louis Philippe, Van Heusen and Allen Solly as foreign brands or Indian brands.
Subsequently (in 1999) Coats divested itself of the Madura Garments business which was bought by the Aditya Birla group, along with the rights to the brands in India and some other territories. This Leadership PowerPoint template can be used in presentations related to business, networking, organization, connections, team, teamwork and technology. Even today international fashion brands, particularly those from the USA, Europe or another Western economy, are perceived to be superior in terms of design, product quality and variety. Ready-to-wear apparel was prevalent primarily for the menswear segment and was the logical target for many international fashion brands (such as Louis Philippe, Arrow, Allen Solly, Lacoste, Adidas and Nike). In the mid-1990s there was a brief upward bump in international fashion brands entering the Indian market, but by and large it was a slow and steady upward trend. Many brands ended up discounting the goods heavily to promote sales, while a few gave up and closed shop. The Italian value fashion brand, OVS Industry, was launched in 2010 by Oviesse through a joint-venture with Brandhouse Retail from the SKNL group. More recently, brands seem to be opting for some degree of ownership, as they begin to take a long-term view of the market. By 2003, franchising became the preferred launch vehicle for an increasing number of international companies, while only a few chose to enter through licensing.
All these structures allowed the brands to have greater control of operations, particularly of the product.
Within a few months of ending this relationship, Diesel signed a joint venture with Reliance Brands as the iconic denim brand wanted to take on the Indian market full throttle and the Indian counterpart had indicated that it wanted to rapidly build its portfolio of Indian and foreign brands in the premium to luxury segments across apparel, footwear and lifestyle segments. Whatever the reason, the principals or their partners in the country decided that the business was under-performing against expectations for the amount of effort and money being invested, and that it was better to pull the plug. Brands that changed their operating structures and, in some cases partners, include VF (Wrangler, Lee etc.), Lee Cooper, Lee,  Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Burberry amongst others. Many of the global players have had to create a different positioning from their home markets. The company termed Debenhams’ franchise as a significant acquisition as it provided an entry into the department store segment.
Even the core target group for international brands tightened the purse strings and either down-traded or postponed their purchases.
While in its first year products were imported from Italy, the company had mentioned that it intended to bring in the merchandise directly from the supply source for speed and cost effectiveness, to achieve aggressive growth over the following five years. Amongst the brands that exited the market during 2008 and 2009 were Gas, Springfield and VNC (Vincci).
Mothercare, the baby product retailer, which was initially present through a franchise agreement with Shoppers Stop, formed a joint venture with DLF Brands Ltd to enable the expansion through stand-alone stores. Arvind plans to increase the India presence of Debenhams from 2 stores to 8 over the next three years. Italian brand United Colors of Benetton has recently introduced a global retail interior design concept which is present in major European cities but is the first-of-its-kind store in Asia and may well set the trend for the rest of Asia. Others are unearthing new segments to grow into; for instance, Puma and Lacoste are now seriously targeting womenswear as a growth market.
It also plants to grow the network of Next, the large-format speciality stores, from 3 to 12 in the same period. The change in FDI norms towards the end of last year may cause it to review its position further.



Emarketing strategy of dell company
Freemake video converter download per mac


Comments to «Product strategy definition marketing»

  1. SERCH Says:
    This is our premium package for superb job.
  2. RIHANNA Says:
    May possibly be tempted to purchase Marketo before or just following.
  3. FARIDE Says:
    However cost-free FLV video player quality digital content.
  4. 2PaC Says:
    Technologies Are you having a hard can delete and append components of videos.
  5. cazibedar Says:
    Video editing is a hard and can be dragged and dropped anywhere on the timeline.