preload

01.04.2014
GOFAR Services, LLC - Appliance Repair Houston, TX - Chapter 2PROBLEMS COMMONTO ALL BRANDSWashing machine designs vary widely, but there are some things that all washers have in common. If you do not read Chapter 2 thoroughly before you read this chapter, you probably will not be able to properly diagnose your machine!!!!In 1995, GE began manufacturing a new washing machine. They are commonly referred to as the "front-access" or "easy-access" machines, or simply the "new-style" GE washer, versus the "old-style" machine. The transmission converts the rotary motion of the motor to the back-and-forth motion of the agitator. A driveshaft extends from the top of the transmission to the agitator, where it is connected to the agitator, usually by a spline. Please keep a positive attitude with your replies and it should all be worth our efforts.Since Ia€™ve become a member of E2S, Ia€™m starting to see a lot of the JUNK work which others have paid a lot of money, only to end up in disappointment. The basket is attached directly to the transmission, which itself spins during the spin cycle. Ia€™d like to show and explain how things would be done from the a€?Old Doga€? perspective.
When the motor stops or reverses, a brake attached to the bottom of the transmission engages, keeping the transmission from turning during agitation.
During agitation, some washers use their pump to circulate water, sucking it from the bottom of the tub and pumping it to the top of the tub. The pump is driven by the same electric motor. Also during the agitation cycle, bleach or softener may be automatically added. Flexible fins on the agitator circulate water in the tub and through the self-cleaning lint filter in the basket hub. One of the features is that the drive motor does not drive the pump. This is usually done by a solenoid valve that allows some of the recirculated water to flush out the bleach or softener dispenser.
The drain pump in these machines is a separate unit with its' own motor. The suspension in these machines is reported to be VERY good.
In some models there is no water circulation involved; the solenoid simply opens a valve or door that lets the dispenser contents drop into the wash water. In one videotaped demo I saw, they put eight pounds of phone books in the machine during the spin cycle and the thing barely vibrated. The timer tells this solenoid valve when to open. SPIN AND DRAIN CYCLES After agitation comes a drain cycle, sometimes combined with a spin cycle.
In fact, if the washer is dancing around during the spin cycle, whoever installed the machine probably forgot to remove the suspension rod, inserted to keep the tub from moving during shipping. During the spin cycle, the same motor that drove the agitator now drives a spin tubewhich is concentric with the agitator shaft.
The washer will not agitate, drain or spin with the lid open. 2) There is a pre-pump function built into the water level switch. The water level must be quite low before the water level switch will allow the basket to start spinning. Most of the parts on these machines are designed to be thrown away. The triangle bracket that holds it on is a separate item and is very difficult to get off the hose. Replace the pump. Another common complaint is that water mysteriously leaks during the agitate cycle. Some brands have a lid lock that prevents you from opening the lid when the basket is spinning.At the end of the spin cycle, or whenever the lid is lifted, most models have a braking arrangement that stops the tub from spinning. What is happening is that the lower transmission ball bearings are worn so the brake is not engaging fully.
The basket then spins during the agitate cycle and and slings water over the edge of the tub. Just clamp the bar to the (cylinder base gasket area), in your vice instead of attempting to clamp the cylinder. Most modern washers use dual solenoid valves, which have both hot and cold solenoids in one valve body. If it turns easily by hand but won't drain the tub, replace the whole pump and motor assembly. The thermistor's signal goes to the washer's control board (computer,) which opens or closes hot and cold water valves to control the incoming water temperature.When the water in the tub reaches the desired level, the pressure or float switch closes the circuit to the fill valve.
Besides the fact that bleach is very hard on plastic and rubber parts, such as the hose itself, the hose chafes on one of the suspension rods until a hole develops. A few old washers used a pressure switch mounted on the BOTTOM of the tub; these are known as water weight switches. The strainers can get clogged up over time and prevent water flow. Shut off the water valves and remove the hoses. The problem here is that the clutch pulley is pressed together and the top half of it comes off.
If you cannot clean the screen sufficiently, you may need to replace it. In some instances, the screen is non-removable, and you will need to replace the hose or valve.
Obviously the machine does not agitate or spin. Another problem experienced, though it doesn't appear to be a widespread problem yet, is that there have been some transmission failures. The symptom is that you attempt to remove the agitator, and the whole agitator shaft comes out with it. Replace the whole transmission and brake assembly as described in section 6-5.6-3 CONSOLETo access the timer, temperature or water level switches, fill valve, or to remove the cabinet top, you must remove the console.
You can then pull the terminal blocks off the timer and any other switches in the console and set it aside.The fill valve is accessible on the left. If it is too hot or too cold, or if no water is coming out at all, test for voltage across each solenoid coil of the water valve as shown in figure G-5. It was suggested from a friend to use this hone while running the drill in A reverse direction.
They have a little tab in the middle that you can grab with a pair of needlenose pliers to remove and clean or replace them. Unlike switchblocks of the past, the selector switches and water level switch are not held in place by screws. Replace the valve. If you're not getting power to the valve, refer to the wiring diagram for your machine (see section 2-6) and trace the source of the interruption. Sometimes it's a broken wire, but more commonly, there will be a problem with the water level switch, timer, lid switch, or temperature switch.
Replace the defective switch.If your washer is a late-model digital machine with a fill thermistor, a defective thermistor might be sending the wrong signal to the control board.
To remove it, pull it until the timer clicks into the "run" position, then reach behind it with a flat screwdriver and poke the clip off. If your washer has a mercury-tube type lid switch, raising the top of the cabinet may have the same effect on the lid switch as raising the lid.
The front panel of these machines is held in place by two spring catches at the top, and rests on two tabs at the bottom. You will need to jumper the mercury switch to perform any tests when the cabinet top is raised. OVERFILLAs the tub fills, water pressure increases at the bottom of the tub. If so, physically turn the transmission until there is clearance. The whole clutch comes off in one piece as shown in figure FA-6 and is replaced as a unit. Before you insert the tube onto the switch, blow into the tube first, to clear it of any water that might have gotten in it. But some people would just seal it up so it couldn't overflow, instead of clearing the drain, as they should.
They contain springs, but they also seal and compress air, much like an air shock on a car.
Depending on how bad the drain is backing up, the washer might never fill completely; the solenoid valve will just stay open and water will just keep siphoning straight out the drain. Or, if the drain is a little more clogged and the water is flowing more slowly, the washer might fill and start agitating, but stop agitating after a few minutes and fill some more.
And since the power to the timer motor is being interrupted, the wash and rinse cycles may seem unusually long. There is a solution, even if you don't want to root out the drain blockage as you should.
Your appliance parts dealer has a drain line vacuum break valve, available for just a few bucks.
Remove the 5 screws holding on the backsplash and lift it off; the fill valve will come with it.


In all washers, it is used to pump water out of the tub at the end of an agitate or soak cycle. Remove the screws from the dampening straps (four rubber straps at the top of the tub.) If you are going to be removing the transmission, remove the agitator and basket.
Note that besides holding the agitator, the air bell contains air to keep water away from the transmission oil seal. So the O-ring on the bolt that holds the air bell in place is an important air seal and must be in good shape. Others use a solenoid-activated butterfly valve in the pump body to re-direct the waterflow. There is a special slugging spanner wrench to remove these nuts; unfortunately, they're not cheap.
The impeller blades can break off due to junk entering the pump; if this happens, the pump may seize up, or it may just stop pumping.
It's a little easier. Down below in the tub area, disconnect the pressure switch tube from left side of the tub, and bleach hose if installed.
If the pump is belt-driven (as it is in many washers) the pulley driving the pump may shear off, or the belt may break. The belt may ride over the locked pulley, or the motor pulley will continue turning under the belt; this will burn the belt and possibly break it. Then lift the tub and tilt it either forward or backwards to remove it from the cabinet. Pop off the eight clips holding on the tub crown.
There may even be enough tension on the belt to stop the motor from turning. The symptoms can be confusing. Note that three sides of the crown have forks that fit over knobs on the side of the tub, so it can only go on one way.) Remove the basket and the split ring and washer underneath it from the top of the transmission casing.
For example, a common complaint about a Whirlpool belt-drive washer is that it isn't spinning, accompanied by a strong burning smell.
Note that the ribs on the pulley stick upwards. The lower bearing assembly is now accessible.
The washer doesn't enter the spin cycle because the spin is interlocked with the drain cycle. A rebuild kit is available for (at the time of this writing) about $75, with the special tools necessary available for about $50 more. See section 6-6 to rebuild.To remove the transmission, cut the cable tie holding the overflow pipe to the motor platform.
Remove the four bolts holding the motor platform to the transmission, and the four bolts holding the platform to the tub.
If you can't see anything jamming the pump, feel around the inside of the pump inlets and outlets with a pair of needlenose pliers.
Using the handles of a pair of pliers, pop it out from the inside of the tub and press a new one in by hand.6-6 REBUILDING THE LOWER BEARING (Figure FA-8)There is a bearing kit to replace the lower bearing.
Depending on how badly the drain is clogged, there may be a little water or a lot, or it may only overflow every second or third load.
Several different pulley hubs are included in the bearing kit; each is a different thickness.
There are metal guages and instructions also included in the bearing kit. There's also a set of special tools to change it out. Even if you're not there when it happens and the paper dries out, it will have crinkled up, and you'll know your drain's backing up. If it isn't the drain, run the machine with a full load. Without moving the machine, get right down on the floor and look under the machine with a flashlight.
Some washer pumps have a hole that allows water to weep out when the seal starts to go bad.
If the bleach dispenser gets old and brittle, it can crack or break off, and the flush water can leak out.But since the dispenser may only be flushed at certain times in the cycle, this will appear as an intermittent leak. If a consistent imbalance in the basket has caused it to wear a hole in the tub (not an uncommon experience to old-style GE washers) then you may be able to fix it with an epoxy patch. One motor is used to do both.Within the transmission there is typically a crank gear and connecting rod arrangement to provide the reciprocating motion to the agitator. However, some designs use a differential gear, slider, eccentric, or other design. The spin motion comes directly from the rotary motion of the motor, through some clutch arrangement. Usually there is some kind of reduction arrangement in the belt or gearing. There must also be some mechanism to change between spin and agitate. There are two ways that this is most commonly done. Some washer designs use solenoids to engage and disengage clutches and transmissions.
For the agitate cycle, a solenoid (sometimes the same one) disengages the clutch and engages the transmission. For specific information see the chapter about your brand. Many washer designs use a direct-reversing motor. When the motor turns one way, a mechanical arrangement such as a helical shaft, centrifugal clutch or torsion spring engages and spins the basket.
When the motor reverses, the brake locks the basket and the transmission engages, so the agitator agitates.The basket braking arrangement is often a part of the clutch arrangement. If you see any of the problems shown in figure G-8, replace it. Broken or worn out belts are a common problem. See the chapter on your brand for specific details about changing the belt(s) on your model. If it turns easily by hand but won't drain the tub, replace the whole pump and motor assembly. If the shaft is rotating but the agitator is not, replace the agitator or spline insert.2-5(c) TRANSMISSIONSTransmissions in general are pretty bullet-proof, and rarely experience problems beyond a little oil loss. Try turning the motor by hand, or pull the belt so everything rotates. Be careful you don't pinch your fingers between the belt and pulley! Check to see that every pulley that the belt rides is rotating. Disengage the drive system (remove the belt, etc.) Try to turn the transmission drive pulley with your hand.
Also check the movement of the pump, and any tensioner or idler pulley that may be present. Do not try to rebuild your own transmission.
Typically, rebuilding requires special tools that drive the cost above that of buying a rebuilt transmission. Due to some parts business politics, I can't mention brand names in this book, but your parts dealer will probably be happy to privately let you know which ones they are.2-6 TESTING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTSSometimes you need to read a wiring diagram, to make sure you are not forgetting to check something. It is ESPECIALLY important in diagnosing a bad timer. If you already know how to read a wiring diagram, you can skip this section. If you're one of those folks who's a bit timid around electricity, all I can say is read on, and don't be too nervous. The wiring and switches that are shown as thick lines are inside of the timer. The small circles all over the diagram are terminals.
Any wiring enclosed by a shaded or dotted box is internal to a switch assembly and must be tested as described in sections 2-6(c) and 2-6(d). Switches may be numbered on the diagram, but that number will not be found on the switch. You must be able to trace the path that the electricity will take, FROM the wall outlet back TO the wall outlet. Following the gray-shaded circuit in figure G-9(a), the electricity flows through the black wire (L1) to the push-pull switch. This switch is located inside of the timer (you know this because it is drawn with thick lines) and it must be closed.
The power then goes through the violet wire to the water level switch (which must have a LOW water level,) then through the pink wire back into the timer. It then comes out of the timer in a red wire with a white stripe (R-W) that leads to the lid switch (which must be closed.) From the lid switch, it goes through a red wire to the spin solenoid.
Finally it leaves the spin solenoid in a white wire, which leads back to the main power cord (L2). If you're not sure whether a certain switch or component is a part of the circuit you're diagnosing, assume that it is and test it. If you have a motor problem that you think you've traced to the timer, don't bother trying to figure out which switch goes to which part of the motor. Looking at the diagram, the push-pull switch controls a lot of other things besides the spin solenoid.


You may need to use jumpers to extend the wire; for example, if one end of the wire is in the control console and the other end in underneath the machine. It will then be up to you to figure out exactly where that break is; there is no magic way. So you've just replaced the pump, and you're standing there with the lid open, admiring how well it's pumping out, when you notice it still isn't spinning.
For example, if your basket won't spin at all, you will check all the obvious stuff (lid switch, spin clutch solenoid, transmission, etc.) But will you think to check the imbalance switch? In some designs, it also prevents the tub from filling or the agitator from agitating while the lid is open.
I think that others will agree with me that the final fitting is far more important than the boring machine operation. To reset this interlock, the lid must be opened and closed or the timer turned off and back on.
THEY ARE THERE FOR A REASON.2-6(a) SWITCHES AND SOLENOIDSTesting switches and solenoids is pretty straightforward. If it shows no resistance, it's shorted.2-6(b) WATER LEVEL SWITCHESWater level diaphragm switches are usually shown on a wiring diagram by the symbol in figure G-10.
The numbering or lettering of the terminals may differ, but basically all switches are tested the same way. To test the switch, first fill the tub to the highest water level. See the chapter about your brand for details about the labelling of the switch leads.2-6(c) TIMERSThe timer is the brain of the washer.
The power stroker didn't turn out to be very practicle for one at a time cylinder work. In addition to telling the motor when and which way to run, it tells any clutch solenoids when to engage, the fill valve when to open, dispenser solenoids when to open, etc.Most washers still have mechanical, that is, motor-operated timers.
Some newer machines have digital timers and control (computer) boards. Diagnosing digital machines is often a matter of reading the digital fault code or performing a self test.
Testing procedures and fault codes for individual models can usually be found on a paper located inside the console. A mechanical timer is nothing more than a motor that drives a set of cams which open and close switches. Yet it is one of the most expensive parts in your washer, so don't be too quick to diagnose it as the problem.
If you buy one, and it turns out not to be the problem, you've just wasted the money.In a wiring diagram, a mechanical timer may appear in two different ways (Figure G-11). Replace the timer or timer drive motor, or have it rebuilt as described below. Timers can be difficult to diagnose.
If none of the other components are bad, then it may be the timer. Remember that a timer is simply a set of on-off switches. Timer wires are color-coded or number-coded.Let's say you've got a spin solenoid problem that you think you've traced to your timer. Make sure the timer is in the "on" position and slowly turn the timer all the way through a full cycle.
Whirlpool Direct Drive models (chapter 4) are this way.You must simply test the timer one click at a time.
Be patient!) You should see continuity make and break at least once in the cycle; usually many times. The Whirlpool Direct-Drive models (Chapter 4) are prone to this confusing problem, though it's not too terribly common.
The symptoms are that when you open the lid at the end of the cycle, the tub hasn't drained.
I spent a good part of the day hacking on a chunk of aluminum to turn it into a reed valve block. The motor doesn't get a chance to start in the opposite direction, so it continues to run in the same direction (agitate) until something interrupts the circuit and stops the motor. With a little forethought any person can do this kind of workmanship on entry level equipment.
Ia€™m attempting to encourage any of you people to add some machine shop capabilities to your work shop. As your capabilities grow so will your business grow.It takes time but certainly is rewarding to me. If it's a common one, your parts dealer may even have a rebuilt one in stock. For the most part, if your timer is acting up, you need to replace it.
Maybe a TIG welder first, Lathe, mill, & Cylinder service equipment, my family has always been lifelong machinery junkies. For example, with the temperature switch shown in figure G-13 set on "Warm wash, Cold rinse" all the switches marked with a "WC" will be closed. There is no WC marking next to the middle switch, so the switch should be open.You should see no continuity with your VOM. Wea€™ll do final fitting before welding it on.It took some thinking to figure out how to clamp the cylinder to the mill table. Test the switch similarly for all settings.2-6(e) DRIVE MOTORS, START SWITCH, AND CAPACITORSA motor that is trying to start, but can't for whatever reason, is using one heckuva lot of electricity.
So much, in fact, that if it is allowed to continue being energized in a stalled state, it will start burning wires.
To prevent this, an overload switch is installed on motors to cut power to them if they don't start within a certain amount of time. If the motor is trying to start, but can't, you will hear certain things. In some extreme cases, you may even smell burning. If you hear the motor doing this, but it won't start, disconnect power and take all the load off it.
For example, disconnect the drive belt, pump drive system, etc. Try to start the motor again. The last little problem is the need for enough clearance around the manifold for the TIG welding torch.
Next week we will start putting things together.After the reed installation we need to finish up the liner install. You can discharge it by shorting the two terminals on your capacitor with your screwdriver.
Be careful not to touch the metal part of your screwdriver with your hands while you do this. After discharging the capacitor, disconnect its leads and test it. IfA  you read my thread you will learn about machine shop procedures which you wona€™t learn many other places.
Initially, the meter should bounce towards the right of the scale (good continuity), then slowly move back to the left side a bit as the capacitor builds resistance.Reverse the two probes on the terminals. If you do not get these readings, replace the capacitor. STARTING SWITCH Only GE-built machines have an external, replaceable current-relay starting switch. There are some very foolish people on our E2S site who wish to wreck this for everyone else.
See the GE chapter for testing. Most other machines have a centrifugal starting switch mounted piggyback on the motor. Testing the switch is most easily accomplished by replacing it. Remember that starting switches are electrical parts, which are generally not returnable. If you test the switch by replacing it, and the problem turns out to be the motor itself, you will probably not be able to return the starting switch for a refund. There are also the Rottler & Van Norman machines which are also around if you look for them.
If youa€™re looking for a boring bar & the latter 2 are available, they are all top quality pieces of equipment.
I was introduced to the Kwik Way brand back in the 70a€™s & have never had any reason to switch to other brands.



Can i change my 4 year olds last name
Online the secret life of an american teenager
The book of secrets download
Medicine naproxen



Comments to «How long does it take to change oil pressure switch»

  1. RENKA writes:
    Meditation is best than the opposite the strolling.
  2. Natavan_girl writes:
    All it is advisable meditate that draw you.
Wordpress. All rights reserved © 2015 Christian meditation music free 320kbps.