preload

23.06.2015
Magnesium Liquid е течна форма на магнезий от марката Multipower, която подобрява здравето на костите и съединителната тъкан. MULTIPOWER Magnesium Liquid съдържа жизненоважния минерал магнезий, който има ключова роля при укрепването на ставите и хрущялите и стимулира синтеза на протеини.
Terrific combo for bone and muscle health Features the ideal two-to-one ratio of calcium to magnesium Delivered in our high bioavailability softgels Swanson Premium Liquid Calcium & Magnesium combines two essential minerals that work together to maintain strong, healthy bones and muscles. I am sure they work for others, but i couldn't take this product, each day i tried i would get a headache, decided to try taking it at night same thing not sure why as soon as i stopped no more headache, did this for a week because i couldn't believe it. Rated 5 out of 5A by fmayoubi I take this a lot in the evenings to help me sleep, seems to work well. Taking the calcium you need, with the appropriate related magnesium, AND AT BEDTIME, does everything you need AND gives you a great night's sleep! The price is great , my first time using this vitamin so I don't have the real results yet.The only minor problem I have is the tablet is so large, I like small pill.
I have enjoyed all the Swanson vitamins that I've tried but particularly glad to have the Calcium and Magnesium.
I've tried other kinds of calcium and magnesium products but had trouble absorbing them properly.
If you are dissatisfied for any reason, we'll give you a full refund and pay return shipping. Efficient Nutrient Usage: Studies have shown that magnesium helps the body process nutrients more effectively. Healthier Heart: Besides the fact that magnesium provides a boost to nutrient usage, which leads to heart health, it also can lead to lower blood pressure.
If you are currently taking and Bisphosphonate medications, you should not take Magnesium liquid at the same time. Well, now we know what it takes to get me to write a new blog post: The gentlest threat of legal action I've ever received!
I mean, compare and contrast the start of the Firepower debacle, or these guys, with this genteel and civilised missive. I have enjoyed reading several of your blogs - you have a naturally cynical humour much the same as mine!
I am the recently appointed Head of Digital for CT Healthcare Global, who owns Niagara Therapy, Equissage and Accell Therapy. The post on your site which was done back in 2012 is somewhat accurate and at the time, the company was finding flyer distribution a viable means of generating interest in their products.
I am more than happy to assist you in posting accurate information about the company if you wish to do so or since you are in Australia free to come to the HQ for a tour so you can see first-hand what we do and what our medical devices do and how they have helped millions of people since 1949?
One, I got a really impressive piece of junk mail from Niagara, except they didn't even admit what their name was on the junk-mail.
Three, Niagara have, as you say, been in business for an awfully long time, but have in that time found it difficult to take a moment to prove that their products actually are better than many far cheaper massage-y things. I wrote about that evidence at the time, in some detail, and I must note once more that despite your stated concerns about "untruths" you have not actually mentioned anything in my 2012 post, or even in the comments, that is wrong - only that it doesn't reflect the state of Niagara's operation today. In no particular order, I started my reading with "Influence of Cycloid Vibration Massage on Trunk Flexion". More importantly, however, and I'm afraid I'm going to be saying this rather a lot of times in this post, this study made no test of a simple vibrating massager versus a fancy "cycloid" one. And, in any case, even if cycloid massage was simply brilliant at increasing the trunk flexibility of healthy people, and even if it's better than a cheap massager, that doesn't prove anything about the claims being made to actually sell the Niagara products, which are not marketed to healthy people who'd like to be able to bend over slightly more.
Again, the people being tested were not sick - "Forty-two healthy young adult males", the same kind of university undergrads that show up in so many, many studies, for obvious reasons.
OK, on we go to "Results of a large scale clinical trial of the Niagara Thermo Cyclopad®", which is a substantial document that does speak to one of the Niagara sales claims - treatment of lymphoedema. None of this should be taken to mean that I think the Thermo Cyclopad® report is slanted research-for-hire, but given the plethora of extremely implausible and indeed mutually contradictory devices that use as their evidence a great big "scientific study" that was never published and was written by unknowns, I think I'd be remiss not to mention these details. Aaaaaanyway, in the Thermo Cyclopad® study there is another odd-sort-of-control, that being 20 "normal" people who did not have lymphoedema, using the Niagara massager to "determine if the normal population could gain some benefit". In this normal-participants section of the study, the massagey-thing reduced leg volume a bit, but only in the subjects' left legs. I think you'll find that anybody who's done science and stats can tell you that a result like this is a classic indicator that you're measuring nothing. I think my favourite "evidence of absence" result in the normal-subjects tests is that apparently three weeks of massage-pad use reduced the subjects' heart rate by 6%. Some basic health indicators - weight, BMI, that kind of thing - moved in healthy-looking directions in the "normal" cohort, but I'd venture that just knowing you're in a "medical study" of some kind may encourage you to walk a bit more and eat fewer burgers.
Okay, who cares about that first part of the study, those people were already fine, it didn't hurt to buzz 'em about a bit and see if anything happened.
Well, there are plenty of graphs in the, deep breath, "secondary lymphoedema and primary lymphoedema or mixed primary and secondary lymphoedema participants" section. Not much actually happened to the lymphoedema subjects' leg volume during the treatment period, but the follow-up four weeks later showed a considerable leg-volume reduction, suggesting that some kind of structural improvement may have happened. Then there are the subjective quality-of-life reports, in which about half of the cohort reckoned the massage treatment helped them in one or more areas.
Overall, I'd say this whole 94-page study probably looks great all leather-bound and sitting on Niagara's "Clinical Evidence" shelf, but if you actually read it, it's severely underwhelming. And there are various other case reports and testimonials, and the conclusion that cycloid vibration "possesses that advantage of relative innocuousness, of simplicity of use, and of ready availability", but of course nothing about even more readily available cheap vibrating massagers. It found the massager could cause muscle relaxation, which was probably not news even in 1961. Refers to other studies already mentioned, puts a rather small sample of obstructive-lung-disease patients in a couple of different versions of buzzy chair, discovers that they breathe slower but deeper when being buzzed.
One is all about whether it's safe to use electronic massagers when you've got a pacemaker. The other literature review mentions some of the above, plus a few studies that aren't on the Medical Research page. In the part at the beginning talking about how they searched for the papers and the things they excluded from the search, this literature review alerted me to the existence of something called "ejaculation therapy". Oh, and in a follow-up after a month with no Niagara-ing, this study found that limb volumes had returned to what they were, contradicting the big 2001 study mentioned above.
But in 2006, people with orthostatic hypotension - undesirable reduction of blood pressure when sitting quietly - had their problem suppressed by buzzing.
Also on the Medical Research pages are three Register of Therapeutic Goods certificates proclaiming that Niagara products are legal to sell in Australia.
And then there's a pamphlet about THE CYCLOID VIBRATION PRINCIPLE, which makes various assertions about, for instance, the "superb results" Niagara's special vibrators have had in the treatment of edema. Only the CYCLOID ET CETERA pamphlet, among these last five things, even loosely resembles "Medical Research". I have spent six hours reading through this stuff and writing this post, and I am confident in saying that it has absolutely one hundred per cent confirmed what I said before.
Niagara's alarmingly expensive buzzy things may be good for this or that, but people who do studies of Cycloid Vibrational Thingummies, which as you so proudly say has been an area of study for sixty years now, mysteriously never, never, never test Niagara products against cheap alternatives. The secret pricing of Niagara products was, you'll recall, a big part of the reason why my previous post was less than entirely, well, sold on your ideas.
I didn't put the quote marks around that statement, though, they're there already on the Web page as I write this.
Potential customers can, on the current site or your new one, not see what your products will actually cost them, but only request a quote. Which I presume, as before, will be delivered by a Niagara employee earnestly seeking to make a sale. And if the customer is advanced in years and limited in means, I am sure that Niagara, with its much-vaunted long commercial history, is entirely willing to patiently relieve said customer of the mere $AU780 per year which the minimum payment entails, until in due course Niagara is made entirely whole when the balance of the principal-plus-interest is paid by the customer's estate.
Oh, by the way - are you still presenting potential customers, by the nature of the kind of relief you promise tending toward the old and dotty end of the skepticism spectrum, with anatomical diagrams where pain in the customer's anything will surely be eased by a Niagara product of unknown price-tag? Are you still putting those diagrams on junk-mail and shooting outrageous amounts of said junk-mail all over the world?
But no, Andy, I am not going to take down a post about what an organisation did in the past because it promises not to do those things in the future. Apropos of nothing, the other day it occurred to me, as I am sure it has occurred to many other people, that there's a parallel concept to the Big Lie. What occurred to me the other day is that there's a converse to the Big Lie: The Big Truth.


A Big Truth is a truthful statement with such vast and terrifying implications that people refuse to believe it. There's a term for the logical fallacy of disbelieving something because its implications are unpalatable, the "argument from adverse consequences" or just "appeal to consequences".
The consequences of a lifelong addiction to clean heroin, in and of itself, are: Constipation. Many leaders of the free world are by their own admission guilty of crimes for which the punishment is death. The first and worse of all war crimes is the crime against peace, the starting of a war of aggression, because that's the one that makes all of the other war crimes possible. Lying about your enemy and saying they are lunatics who attack their own people and have terrible weapons pointed at us and really it's them that are starting the war et cetera does not get you off the hook, because that's how everybody starts a war of aggression in a "free" society. Climate change is happening, even if there are leaflets and novels with the author name bigger than the title that say it isn't. It took a couple of weeks longer to arrive than it should have - possibly because the sender didn't know the difference between Australia and the UK, as far as address labels go - but apart from that, the transaction was entirely unremarkable. I was going to cut into the bar to show it wasn't solid gold, but since it sticks to a magnet, I think we can pretty much take that as read. When I measured the volume of the bar more accurately via the immersion method (PDF), as per the liquid "bullion", I got 3.5 cubic centimetres. So yeah, this is indeed a chunk of cheap steel, as any fool who stuck a magnet to it could have told you without all the science stuff. There actually is a unit called a "mil", with one L instead of two; it's a thousandth of an inch. Given that the "mill" is not any kind of defined unit and seems to be interchangeable with the similarly un-defined "gold layered", though, I don't think it's excessively uncharitable to assume that the actual thickness of the plating on these things is as thin as possible without letting the colour of the underlying metal show through.
Listings, for instance, that don't make it quite as clear as they might that the item being sold is an empty box which at one point contained the new and exciting game console prominently featured in the listing title. I invite you, at this juncture, to check out the highest prices people have paid for "100 mills" or "gold layered" things on eBay, by searching completed listings.
As I write this, that search is headed by "1 OZ GOLD SOUTH AFRICAN 2010 KRUGERRAND COIN BULLION 100 MILLS 999.9 24K LOT 10", which a UK seller unloaded for ?670 ex delivery - more than a thousand US dollars.
Those were clearly not real Kruggerands, because the listing says: "This 2010 coin is layered with 100 mills thick of pure 24k Gold".
Unquestionably, the person who paid ?677.95 delivered for these ten shiny poker chips was under the impression that they'd just bought ten ounces of highly fungible gold at a huge discount.
Deals of this nature are, of course, not hard to find, and they're often being offered by large corporations, not eBay fly-by-nights.
What about rebate programs that require you to send the same cut-out barcode from a package to two different addresses simultaneously?
Advertising a near-worthless little chip of gilded steel as "Gold Bar 5 Grams 'Canadian Maple' 100 MILLS .999 24k Fine Bullion!" is not a good-faith act. This rather cumbersome eBay search is for several of these terms, but not the slight-honesty-indicating terms "not pure gold", "not 100% solid gold" or "not solid gold". People sometimes pay big bucks even for the eBay items whose listings do include "not solid gold" disclaimers, though. But not everybody is able to pay more attention, or aware of just how many scams there are on eBay.
I would also be willing to bet, given the long and depressing list of large green numbers in a completed-listings search for this gold-plated tat, that some people have spent a lot of money on these things.
Someone could still blow their entire retirement nest egg on the Buy-It-Now ones, but it'd take some effort. Some of these things also have pretty-much-honest descriptions, that clearly say something like "plated" or "replica" instead of "dipped" or "layered" or whatever. Even these better dealers do still love the magic word "bullion", but they're nonetheless more or less in "good-faith" territory, if you ask me. Oh, and just to confuse things even more, you can get real silver coins and bars that've been "layered" with gold. As I write this, a Completed Listings search for these gold-plated silver coins shows only six sold going back to May this year. High in the most-expensive-first Completed Listings searches you'll also find a number of people paying a few hundred dollars for one hundred plated coins or ingots. If you appreciate kitsch, do feel free to decorate your wall with the complete series of ULTRA RARE SOVIET NAZI JESUS ELEPHANT LUCKY MONKEY MARTIAN GOLD LAYERED ALMOST AN OUNCE HYPERBULLION INGOTS. They don't like to tell you exactly what metal this alleged "bullion" is, except they always swear it doesn't have any mercury in it. They generally say it's solid at room temperature, but will melt from the heat of your hands.
There seems to be some sort of tradition in the hobbyist low-melting-point-alloy business of casting your little ingots in unorthodox moulds. You could craftily fake this by casting wax in a chocolate tray, then using that form to make a sand mould, or something, but I don't know of any such scandals in the retail weird-metal market. All of the low-melting-point alloys exist because of the odd fact that mixtures of chemicals can have a lower melting point than any of the ingredients. But the most common low-melting-point alloy is ordinary tin-lead solder, which exhibits the melting-point-reduction effect.
And so, back to my "liquid bullion" ingot, which I bought on eBay Australia for $AU19.01 delivered after watching several people buy their own for prices that exceeded my modest snipe.
Our high-absorption softgels supply the ideal two-to-one ratio of these vital minerals, with 300 mg of calcium and 150 mg of magnesium apiece. Not only are these softgels easy to swallow but both the calcium and magnesium are in a higher dosage than most calcium supplements.
As in aging, we must keep up the calcium in our bodies, and I believe this product has kept my bones healthy and strong.
As such I have been made aware recently of a number of subjective blog posts on numerous sites that in many cases start off innocently, but tend to attract commentary that is full of misinformation, untruths and borderline libellous information about the company. In the past twelve months however and more specifically when I took over in October, I have made sweeping reforms to the way that data is collected and the type of data that is presented in the marketplace.
Having said that, being highly regulated by the TGA we are closely governed by the Australian Government in both our ISO manufacturing processes as well as our conscionable code of conduct. The form you have posted has not been accurate since 2013 and on that basis I was wondering if you wouldn't mind taking the thread down for no other reason than inciting subjective commentary based on outdated information? The gentleness of your language makes clear, I hope, that you know that actual legal threats would be ridiculous in this situation, if I have good faith, public interest and truth on my side. This seems to be because the prices are really, really high, and you don't want to scare off customers with a price tag before you can explain the many excellent qualities of your products which make them well worth the money.
There was again at least a partial control, because this was a crossover study - the control "treatment" was just sitting quietly in a chair, but every participant got the massage, and did the stretching exercises, and did the "control", just on different days. So far as I can see, the rest of the normal-participant results, all faithfully graphed, bear out this interpretation. Researchers try to control for this, but unless you keep all your study subjects locked up in a panopticon, you can never perfectly keep up with their behaviour. The first of those graphs, of leg volume - the measurement that was so weird with the "normal" cohort - is pretty good. Overall they slope a teeny bit in a promising direction - blood pressure is the best of these, but blood pressure isn't what this study is supposed to be about; measure enough things and you're guaranteed to find something you can spin as news. It starts with "No statistically significant results were obtained for this group", so I shortened my workday by zipping right on by to "Lipoedema participants", who were also bereft of statistically-significant results and thus saved me from poring over numerous further pages. This might have been helped a weeny bit, but had a sample size of only five, so who can tell.
Not least because, yet again, they tested the expensive Niagara massager but not against a cheap one. The researchers found the time to test four different kinds of "cyclo massage" to really nail down the certainty of this finding, but once again it somehow slipped their mind that they ought to try other kinds of massager as well. Unconscious cats and rabbits breathed ten to fifteen per cent more deeply when being buzzed.
A "preliminary report" from 1968, and this PDF is a really terrible facsimile of it, but the full text unfortunately doesn't seem to be online anywhere. There's also an ISO certificate verifying that whatever it is that Niagara does, they manage and document these activities to ISO 13485 standards. But never mind that supercilious feeling I get when I see a sign promoting "Fresh" fish or "Delicious" sandwiches, I'm sure you're sincere.


If nobody can believe that you would just make up reasons to exterminate a significant percentage of the population of Europe, or found a religion entirely upon stuff you pulled out of your arse, or throw trillions of dollars down the toilet in the pursuit of imaginary terrorists, then you can be successful in such ventures.
But everybody knows Dubya and Cheney and Rumsfeld and their minor lickspittle Blair and extremely minor lickspittle Howard will never see the inside of a courtroom over this.
It's actually of some interest as a novelty, but has little monetary value and is full of poisonous heavy metals.
It looks like gold, but it doesn't feel like gold or in any way beyond superficial appearance attempt to resemble gold. By definition, there's no such thing as "plated bullion"; it's as silly, though not as hazardous to health, as calling that low-melting-point alloy that has lead and cadmium in it "non-toxic".
That's obviously not what it means here, though, because a hundred mils is a tenth of an inch, which is 2.54 millimetres. See also people selling a picture of a fancy guitar, or a miniature dollhouse version of a big-screen TV. But right before that, the listing copies from Wikipedia and says, "The Krugerrand is a South African Gold Coin, first minted in 1967 to help promote South African Gold. Good-faith, as I've written before, is the undoing of a long list of "technically legal" rip-offs.
Payday-loan shops, dodgy mechanics, questionable sweepstakes, and umpteen outfits whose business model seems to accept a repeat-business level below one per cent and the kind of word-of-mouth goodwill usually only enjoyed by serial killers.
Reward-points programs predicated upon normal consumers' points expiring before they accumulate enough to be able to redeem them for anything? But at least all of those outfits generally are selling and buying actual gold, not plated slugs that only superficially resemble actual bullion.
It has plenty of hits even when it's only searching the titles, and hundreds of hits if you click the little "Include description" box and then click Search again. And everybody who buys one of these things for more than the couple of bucks it's worth should have paid more attention. Perhaps they're hoping to quickly flip this amazing bargain to local precious-metal dealers.
And the buyer would at least end up with a really big pile of almost worthless gold-plated novelties, which'd look good in an outraged local news story. Even a moron in a hurry might realise the product is not solid gold when it says "plated" right in the auction title. Those people have not been ripped off either, though I presume most of them are hoping to get in on this occasionally-lucrative business themselves.
The mould is usually something that clearly indicates that the metal was liquid at temperatures low enough that to not instantly destroy a chocolate-box tray, silicone ice-cube tray, or similarly non-refractory mould material. I mean, the universe should be nice and sensible and line up with the way ancient philosophers hoped it worked, from tiny billiard-ball atoms all the way up to clockwork galaxies. I remind you that defamation law in Australia was relatively recently changed to make truth alone a sufficient defence against a libel action. There is, however, some kind of control; some of the subjects just laid down quietly with no massage, which actually by itself seemed to slightly help trunk flexibility. It's never been published in a peer-reviewed journal, though, and its two primary authors aren't exactly monsters of academic publishing. Various things changed a little bit, some in a direction that'd be good if these subjects actually had lymphoedema, others in directions that wouldn't be. And left and right legs changed in the same way, which was no doubt good news for the sanity of the researchers. It makes various claims about the benefits of "cyclotherapy" (which, by the way, is also a term for some kind of cancer treatment unassociated with Niagara), not the least of which is that it was reported to reduce "spasticity in a large percentage" of multiple sclerosis patients. And maybe even do a blinded test where the people doing the massaging don't know that one thing they're using or lying on or sitting in is the Special Niagara Massager That We're Pretty Proud Of Don't You Know, and another is a Boring Vibrator That Probably Came From One Of Those "Sex Shops" And Is Probably All Sticky Eww.
Might be relevant for things like asthma and sleep apnoea, I suppose, except then they went on to try it on six humans and it didn't do anything - well, not anything good. Far be it from me to suggest that perhaps their role is to pad out this online version of the abovementioned Clinical Evidence shelf. Arguments against this are generally of the form "if you take way too much of that drug and don't eat right and never get any exercise then you'll be very ill", which can of course be said of alcohol, tobacco and even caffeine.
Others, though, only reveal their not-anything-like-solid-gold nature with odd terms like "100 Mills" or "gold layered".
If you can figure out a way to make something that's three millimetres thick yet plated with 2.54 millimetres of gold on both sides, a career as a TARDIS engineer awaits you. Given gross failures like this, I doubt the vendors spend a lot of time worrying about the actual thickness of their plating.
Anybody who's been on eBay for a while is probably familiar with its own special not-quite-scams.
The coin, Produced by the South African Mint, proved popular and by 1980 the Krugerrand accounted for 90% of the global coin market".
They are selling ten coins that look a bit like them, but are each worth no more than my little plated Jesus-bar. Another seller was pleased to relieve a customer of ?154.94 delivered for "NEW 2013 Royal Coronation & 2012 Jubilee 24k PURE GOLD Layered Double Coin Set", again allegedly "100 mill" plated and "Genuine Coins - Not Copies Or Reproductions"! If there is no way anybody would agree to a given deal if they knew exactly what it was, then camouflaging the true nature of that deal, however lightly, is attempted fraud.
Airlines that routinely sell more tickets than there are seats on the plane, in the expectation that not everybody will actually get there on time (thanks, interminable "security" nonsense!)? And "gold dipped", suggesting there's some worker out there spending all day dunking Krugerrand-resembling circles of steel in a cauldron of molten gold. There's almost always some clue, if only what turns up when you search for terms like "gold layered" or "100 mills". Those cost a few bucks more than the auctioned ones usually sell for, but by their very existence they provide a strong clue that both they and their auctioned cousins aren't what your slightly dotty grandparent with an iPad and time on their hands might at first assume them to be.
Then, the melting point of an alloy would be the melting point of its constituents, weighted by what proportion of the alloy each constituent took up. If you take this and don't take a K2 supplement that calcium can still be misapplied by your body, not a good thing. Since many blogs continually pump fresh content they index very well on search engines and therein lies the issues.
While you make reference to "misinformation" and "untruths", you seem to have neglected to actually name any such things I have written.
Some of this is stuff I talked about in the last post, but because my only real function in the world is processing information and attending to the needs of five cats, I read everything again and will write anew about it here. And did they get any information relevant to Niagara's core pain-reduction and illness-treatment claims?
A study that found that fluid injected into skin or muscle (not blood vessels) probably dissipated into the body faster when the body was buzzed!
Study observes that effects on respiration from vibration had been found in several other studies.
If the buyer cannot figure out why a "one ounce" gold bar is selling for $2.30, wasting money on eBay is probably not their biggest problem. And, of course, the worst invention in the history of capitalism, gift certificates, whose principal reason for existence is "breakage", that portion of the gift cards sold which are never redeemed. There's "thick layer", too, which I think always indicates a layer actually notable for its thin-ness.
All they're actually doing, though, is transferring their life savings to a person selling scrap iron, and possibly lining themselves up for criminal charges if they ever try to sell these damn things on.
The gold value of that coin is as usual negligible, but presuming the seller's telling the truth about the amount of silver in it, then it is at current spot prices worth about eighty bucks. And that only when you manage to find someone who'll listen to your story about how there really is some silver there under the silly gold plating. Without such specific complaints, you seem to me to just be unhappy about people's expression of their opinions based on disclosed information. You can get thicker plating that that, too, up to the point where it qualifies as gold-filled, with the gold accounting for a readily measurable fraction of the item's weight, rather than just a barely-weighable plating. Does not wonder whether a massage chair from SkyMall or something wouldn't be just as relaxing.



The secret movie download free in hindi
How to change your last name in butler county ohio
Secret base zone live
Curl secret conair cost



Comments to «Liquid magnesium replacement»

  1. Krutoy writes:
    Tips for coping with examination stress has been designed to assist directed, non-public, and silent 1996.
  2. Ubicha_666 writes:
    The mind, so that easy interior silence and deeper.
Wordpress. All rights reserved © 2015 Christian meditation music free 320kbps.