preload

22.03.2016
In What a Wonderful World, Marcus Chown, bestselling author of Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt You and the Solar System app, uses his vast scientific knowledge and deep understanding of extremely complex processes to answer simple questions about the workings of our everyday lives.
In 1904, Henri Poincare, a giant among mathematicians who transformed the fledging area of topology into a powerful field essential to all mathematics and physics, posed the Poincare conjecture, a tantalizing puzzle that speaks to the possible shape of the universe. As Donal O’Shea reveals in his elegant narrative, Poincare’s conjecture opens a door to the history of geometry, from the Pythagoreans of ancient Greece to the celebrated geniuses of the nineteenth-century German academy and, ultimately, to a fascinating array of personalities—Poincare and Bernhard Riemann, William Thurston and Richard Hamilton, and the eccentric genius who appears to have solved it, Grigory Perelman. A useful scientific theory, claimed Einstein, must be explicable to any intelligent person. Introducing readers to the world of particle physics, Deep Down Things opens new realms within which are many clues to unraveling the mysteries of the universe. David McRaney's first book, You Are Not So Smart, evolves from his wildly popular blog of the same name. Like You Are Not So Smart, YOU ARE NOW LESS DUMB is grounded in the idea that we all believe ourselves to be objective observers of reality-except we're not.
McRaney also reveals the true price of happiness, why Benjamin Franklin was such a badass, and how to avoid falling for our own lies.
Forager and naturalist Paul Chambers explores the coast, fields, streets and gardens to reveal over a hundred of Britain's most exciting edible plants, flowers and seaweeds. With chapters that cover all parts of the British countryside, including urban environments and the seashore, FORAGING offers a comprehensive guide that will suit beginners and experienced foragers as well as those with a general interest in the natural and cultural history of edible plants. With this book in hand, readers of any age will discover — just outside their own doors, no matter where they live—a world they never knew existed. This is the incredible true story of one man’s heroic battle against impossible odds, a tale of pain and anguish, bravery and utter solitude, a tale that ends in a victory not only over the implacable ocean but over himself as well.
At the age of forty-five, Gerard d’Aboville set out to row across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to the United States.
One hundred and thirty-four days after his departure, d’Aboville arrived in the little fishing village of Ilwaco, Washington, leaving his body bruised and battered, and weighing thirty-seven pounds less. In the Shadow of the Greatest Generation traces the shared experiences of Korean War veterans from their childhoods in the Great Depression and World War II through military induction and training,the war, and efforts in more recent decades to organize and gain wider recognition of their service. Largely overshadowed by World War II’s “greatest generation” and the more vocal veterans of the Vietnam era, Korean War veterans remain relatively invisible in the narratives of both war and its aftermath. In the Shadow of the Greatest Generation not only gives voice to those Americans who served in the “forgotten war” but chronicles the larger personal and collective consequences of waging war the American way. Tom Brokaw touched the heart of the nation with his towering #1 bestseller The Greatest Generation, a moving tribute to those who gave the world so much -- and who left an enduring legacy of heroism and grace.
These letters and reflections cross time, distance, and generations as they give voice to lives forever changed by war: eighty-year-old Clarence M. From the front lines of battle to the back porches of beloved hometowns, The Greatest Generation Speaks brings to life the hopes and dreams of a generation who fought our most hard-won victories, and whose struggles and sacrifices made our future possible.
In this superb book, Tom Brokaw goes out into America, to tell through the stories of individual men and women the story of a generation, America's citizen heroes and heroines who came of age during the Great Depression and the Second World War and went on to build modern America.
In this book you'll meet people like Charles Van Gorder, who set up during D-Day a MASH-like medical facility in the middle of the fighting, and then came home to create a clinic and hospital in his hometown. Through these and other stories in The Greatest Generation, you'll relive with ordinary men and women, military heroes, famous people of great achievement, and community leaders how these extraordinary times forged the values and provided the training that made a people and a nation great.
One of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s closest friends and the first female secretary of labor, Perkins capitalized on the president’s political savvy and popularity to enact most of the Depression-era programs that are today considered essential parts of the country’s social safety network. Frances Perkins is no longer a household name, yet she was one of the most influential women of the twentieth century.
Arriving in Washington at the height of the Great Depression, Perkins pushed for massive public works projects that created millions of jobs for unemployed workers. Written with a wit that echoes Frances Perkins’s own, award-winning journalist Kirstin Downey gives us a riveting exploration of how and why Perkins slipped into historical oblivion, and restores Perkins to her proper place in history.
The Reynolds tobacco family was an American dynasty like the Rockefellers, Vanderbilts, and Astors. Dick Reynolds was dubbed "Kid Carolina" when as a teenager, he ran away from home and stowed away as part of the crew on a freighter.
Despite his personal demons, Dick played a pivotal role in shaping twentieth-century America through his business savvy and politics. Unlike most white Americans who, if they are so inclined, can search their ancestral records, identifying who among their forebears was the first to set foot on this country’s shores, most African Americans, in tracing their family’s past, encounter a series of daunting obstacles. For too long, African Americans’ family trees have been barren of branches, but, very recently, advanced genetic testing techniques, combined with archival research, have begun to fill in the gaps. More than a work of history, In Search of Our Roots is a book of revelatory importance that, for the first time, brings to light the lives of ordinary men and women who, by courageous example, blazed a path for their famous descendants. The Cuban missile crisis was the most dangerous confrontation of the Cold War and the most perilous moment in American history.
Based on the author’s authoritative transcriptions of the secretly recorded ExComm meetings, the book conveys the emotional ambiance of the meetings by capturing striking moments of tension and anger as well as occasional humorous intervals. Stern documents that JFK and his administration bore a substantial share of the responsibility for the crisis. Previously unknown operations and new names continue to surface in the Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations.
In 1942, the Brooklyn-born Erickson was a millionaire oil mogul who volunteered for a dangerous mission inside the Third Reich: locating the top-secret synthetic oil plants that kept the German war machine running. After the war, Erickson's was revealed as a secret agent and received the Medal of Freedom for his bravery. Based on newly-discovered archives in Sweden, The Secret Agent is a riveting piece of narrative nonfiction that tells the true story of Erickson's remarkable life for the first time. Howard Zinn was perhaps the best-known and most widely celebrated popular interpreter of American history in the twentieth century, renowned as a bestselling author, a political activist, a lecturer, and one of America’s most recognizable and admired progressive voices.
His rich, complicated, and fascinating life placed Zinn at the heart of the signal events of modern American history—from the battlefields of World War II to the McCarthy era, the civil rights and the antiwar movements, and beyond. The greatest obstacle to sound economic policy is not entrenched special interests or rampant lobbying, but the popular misconceptions, irrational beliefs, and personal biases held by ordinary voters. Boldly calling into question our most basic assumptions about American politics, Caplan contends that democracy fails precisely because it does what voters want. The Myth of the Rational Voter takes an unflinching look at how people who vote under the influence of false beliefs ultimately end up with government that delivers lousy results. With the same compelling, you-are-there immediacy of his acclaimed fiction, Tom Clancy provides detailed descriptions of tanks, helicopters, artillery, and more -- the brilliant technology behind the U. Only the author of The Hunt for Red October could capture the reality of life aboard a nuclear submarine. After World War II the United States and Britain airlifted food and supplies into Russian-blockaded West Berlin. Back matter includes a biographical note, a historical note, a source list, an index, and a note from the author. During the battle of Iwo Jima, two enemy grenades landed close to Jack Lucas and his buddies. For this brave action seventeen-year-old Jack Lucas from North Carolina became the youngest Marine in history to receive the Medal of Honor.
Through meticulous research of the newly completed Lincoln Legal Papers, as well as of recently discovered letters and photographs, White provides a portrait of Lincoln’s personal, political, and moral evolution. A transcendent, sweeping, passionately written biography that greatly expands our knowledge and understanding of its subject, A. When assessing his arguments, Svolik complements these and other historical case studies with the statistical analysis of comprehensive, original data on institutions, leaders, and ruling coalitions across all dictatorships from 1946 to 2008. An outstanding collection of firsthand accounts from the front lines of our military history, drawn from letters, diaries, and reportage from the Plains of Abraham and the Red River Rebellion to the battlefields of two world wars and Korea, as well as the harrowing missions in Bosnia and Afghanistan.
In January 1991, eight members of the SAS regiment embarked upon a top secret mission that was to infiltrate them deep behind enemy lines.
Each man laden with 15 stone of equipment, they patrolled 20km across flat desert to reach their objective.
Bravo Two Zero is a breathtaking account of Special Forces soldiering: a chronicle of superhuman courage, endurance and dark humour in the face of overwhelming odds.
Starting with the Iran-Iraq War, through the First Gulf War and sanctions, Dina Rizk Khoury traces the political, social, and cultural processes of the normalization of war in Iraq during the last twenty-three years of Ba'thist rule.
The definitive military chronicle of the Iraq war and a searing judgment on the strategic blindness with which America has conducted it, drawing on the accounts of senior military officers giving voice to their anger for the first time.
The American military is a tightly sealed community, and few outsiders have reason to know that a great many senior officers view the Iraq war with incredulity and dismay.
As many in the military publicly acknowledge here for the first time, the guerrilla insurgency that exploded several months after Saddam's fall was not foreordained.
There are a number of heroes in Fiasco-inspiring leaders from the highest levels of the Army and Marine hierarchies to the men and women whose skill and bravery led to battlefield success in towns from Fallujah to Tall Afar-but again and again, strategic incoherence rendered tactical success meaningless. Famed investigative journalist Eric Schlosser digs deep to uncover secrets about the management of America’s nuclear arsenal. Written with the vibrancy of a first-rate thriller, Command and Control interweaves the minute-by-minute story of an accident at a nuclear missile silo in rural Arkansas with a historical narrative that spans more than fifty years.
Drawing on recently declassified documents and interviews with men who designed and routinely handled nuclear weapons, Command and Control takes readers into a terrifying but fascinating world that, until now, has been largely hidden from view. This book is a searching, lyrical exploration of the meaning of justice, one that invites readers of all political persuasions to consider familiar controversies in fresh and illuminating ways.
In this new edition of his acclaimed autobiography — long out of print and rare until now — Alan Watts tracks his spiritual and philosophical evolution.
Told in a nonlinear style, In My Own Way combines Watts's brand of unconventional philosophy with wry observations on Western culture and often hilarious accounts of gurus, celebrities, and psychedelic drug experiences. Mental_floss is proud to present a full-bodied jolt of inspiration for thirsty minds on the go.
This third revised edition of "Rebels & Devils" brings together some of the most talented, controversial and rebellious people of our time. In all of human history, the essence of the independent mind has been the need to think and act according to standards from within, not without: To follow one's own path, not that of the crowd. On a bleak New England farm, a taciturn young man has resigned himself to a life of grim endurance.
Included with Ethan Frome are the novella The Touchstone and three short stories, “The Last Asset,” “The Other Two,” and “Xingu.” Together, this collection offers a survey of the extraordinary range and power of one of America’s finest writers.
This is Newland Archer’s world as he prepares to marry the beautiful but conventional May Welland. When Leaves of Grass was first published in 1855 as a slim tract of twelve untitled poems, Walt Whitman was still an unknown. Throughout his prolific writing career, Whitman continually revised his work and expanded Leaves of Grass, which went through nine, substantively different editions, culminating in the final, authoritative "Death-bed Edition." Now the original 1855 version and the "Death-bed Edition" of 1892 have been brought together in a single volume, allowing the reader to experience the total scope of Whitman's genius, which produced love lyrics, visionary musings, glimpses of nightmare and ecstasy, celebrations of the human body and spirit, and poems of loneliness, loss, and mourning.
Alive with the mythical strength and vitality that epitomized the American experience in the nineteenth century, Leaves of Grass continues to inspire, uplift, and unite those who read it. From the conflicts in Northern Ireland, through the tactics of civil rights leaders and the problem of privilege, Gladwell demonstrates how we misunderstand the true meaning of advantage and disadvantage.
David and Goliath draws on the stories of remarkable underdogs, history, science, psychology and on Malcolm Gladwell's unparalleled ability to make the connections others miss. In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point, Blink and Outliers.
Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. In his landmark bestseller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant-in the blink of an eye-that actually aren't as simple as they seem.
Blink reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of "thin-slicing"-filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables. Nine-year-old Allen Brewster has a fantastic idea that might even win the silver trophy at the science fair: human photosynthesis. Readers of PRINCESS were gripped by Jean Sasson's powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil.
As second-generation members of the royal family who have benefited from Saudi oil wealth, Maha and Amani are surrounded by untold opulence and luxury from the day they were born. Throughout, Sultana and Sasson never tire of their quest to expose the injustices which society levels against women.
In this updated 20th anniversary edition, PRINCESS describes the life of Sultana Al Sa'ud, a princess in the royal house of Saudi Arabia. PRINCESS is a testimony to a woman of indomitable spirit and courage, and you will never forget her or her Muslim sisters.
A New York Times bestseller, PRINCESS was named one of the 500 Great Books by Women since 1300. The language of psychology is all-pervasive in American culture--from The Sopranos to Oprah, from the abundance of self-help books to the private consulting room, and from the support group to the magazine advice column. Saving the Modern Soul examines the profound impact of therapeutic discourse on our lives and on our contemporary notions of identity. Emotions And Culpability: How the Law Is at Odds With Psychology, Jurors, And Itself by Norman J. This book investigates why, when, and how ordinary human beings hold some individuals guilty of crimes, but others less so or not at all.
Problems arise because criminal law has no unified theory of emotion and culpability, and legal scholars often seem to misunderstand or ignore what psychologists know about emotion.
Ben Miller was working on his Physics PhD at Cambridge when he accidentally became a comedian. Drawing on thirty years of writing about Greek and Roman history, Mary Beard takes us on an exhilarating journey through the extraordinary riches of the classical heritage, and why it still matters. She also invites you into the places where Greeks and Romans lived and died, from the palace at Knossos to Cleopatra's Alexandria - and reveals the often hidden world of slaves. This Very Short Introduction to Classics links a haunting temple on a lonely mountainside to the glory of ancient Greece and the grandeur of Rome, and to Classics within modern culture-from Jefferson and Byron to Asterix and Ben-Hur. We are all Classicists - we come into touch with the Classics daily: in our culture, politics, medicine, architecture, language, and literature. In this extraordinarily original and profound work, Noam Chomsky discusses themes in the study of language and mind since the end of the sixteenth century in order to explain the motivations and methods that underlie his work in linguistics, the science of mind, and even politics. The relationship between the original edition (published in 1966) and contemporary biolinguistic work is also explained. From an award-winning New York Times investigative reporter comes an outrageous story of greed, corruption, and conspiracy—which left the FBI and Justice Department counting on the cooperation of one man . It was one of the FBI's biggest secrets: a senior executive with America's most politically powerful corporation, Archer Daniels Midland, had become a confidential government witness, secretly recording a vast criminal conspiracy spanning five continents. But as the FBI and federal prosecutors closed in on ADM, using stakeouts, wiretaps, and secret recordings of illegal meetings around the world, they suddenly found that everything was not all that it appeared.
In this gripping account unfolds one of the most captivating and bizarre tales in the history of the FBI and corporate America. A page-turning real-life thriller that features deadpan FBI agents, crooked executives, idealistic lawyers, and shady witnesses with an addiction to intrigue, The Informant tells an important and compelling story of power and betrayal in America.
Until the watershed leak of top-secret documents by Edward Snowden to the Guardian UK and the Washington Post, most Americans did not realize the extent to which our government is actively acquiring personal information from telecommunications companies and other corporations. In Spying on Democracy, National Lawyers Guild Executive Director Heidi Boghosian documents the disturbing increase in surveillance of ordinary citizens and the danger it poses to our privacy, our civil liberties, and to the future of democracy itself. Bruce Schneier, arguably the world's foremost authority on computer security, has explored security issues ranging from protecting your password to illegal wiretapping. In this ruthless, comprehensive, and thought-provoking analysis, Schneier shows us what we should be worrying about and how to get our national fingers off the panic button. As today's preeminent doomsday investor Mark Spitznagel describes his Daoist and roundabout investment approach, “one gains by losing and loses by gaining.” This is Austrian Investing, an archetypal, counterintuitive, and proven approach, gleaned from the 150-year-old Austrian School of economics, that is both timeless and exceedingly timely.
In The Dao of Capital, hedge fund manager and tail-hedging pioneer Mark Spitznagel—with one of the top returns on capital of the financial crisis, as well as over a career—takes us on a gripping, circuitous journey from the Chicago trading pits, over the coniferous boreal forests and canonical strategists from Warring States China to Napoleonic Europe to burgeoning industrial America, to the great economic thinkers of late 19th century Austria.
Spitznagel is the first to condense the theories of Ludwig von Mises and his Austrian School of economics into a cohesive and—as Spitznagel has shown—highly effective investment methodology.
The Dao of Capital provides a rare and accessible look through the lens of one of today's great investors to discover a profound harmony with the market process—a harmony that is so essential today. Revolutionary retail guru Paco Underhill is back with a completely revised edition of his classic, witty bestselling book on our ever-evolving consumer culture -- full of fresh observations and important lessons from the cutting edge of retail, which is taking place in the world's emerging markets.
The latest trends in online retail -- what retailers are doing right and what they're doing wrong -- and how nearly every Internet retailer from iTunes to Amazon can drastically improve how it serves its customers. A guided tour of the most innovative stores, malls and retail environments around the world -- almost all of which are springing up in countries where prosperity is new. The new Why We Buy is an essential guide -- it offers advice on how to keep your changing customers and entice new and eager ones. The financial markets create tremendous opportunities that, for many of us, would otherwise be out of reach. Taking full advantage of everything the markets have to offer requires not only becoming familiar with its unique instruments, practices, and risks, but understanding the ways the financial world and your own life are inextricably linked in ways both direct and indirect, visible and obscured. But with record-breaking highs one minute and economy-rocking lows the next—not to mention arcane rules and ambiguous terminology—it can seem as if there’s no way to feel truly comfortable in this mysterious world.
Financial Literacy: Finding Your Way in the Financial Markets is an essential primer on this domain, from its functions, strengths, and possibilities to its weaknesses and vulnerabilities. Introductory in nature but by no means taught at a surface level, this course provides the concepts and tools you need to draw direct connections between headlines made globally and what’s happening to your bottom line locally. To many of us, the financial markets seem to play by their own rules—and those rules make little logical sense. Presuming no prior experience in finance, Financial Literacy unravels these and other riddles as it walks you through the fascinating history of banking, which begins with medieval goldsmiths’ vaults, and the functions of the instruments and institutions that constitute the system as a whole. Carefully connecting the dots each step of the way, Professor Fullenkamp demystifies industry jargon and explains how businesses, governments, and—primarily—households inject funds into the market, revealing that it’s our money flowing through this labyrinthine network that forms the bedrock of the system.
You’ll start the course with an overview of the six essential jobs the financial markets perform for society and how every financial transaction or product attempts to carry out at least one. Along the way, you’ll learn answers to questions you’ve likely pondered, from the reasons hedge funds are permitted to sidestep SEC regulation to what the letter grades used by Standard & Poor’s and other credit rating agencies really mean.
Financial Literacy provides a solid foundation for both would-be investors and those who’ve been participating in this space for years without knowing how all the parts fit into the bigger picture.
In addition, these lectures offer a rare opportunity to peek inside hedge funds and the money market— territory typically closed to the average investor—as well as the turf battles that occur between the government’s appointed “referees.” You’ll also see how technology and the recent economic crisis are changing the rules around the world. In the second half of the course, you’ll investigate which major economic indicators have the biggest impact on the markets, including central banks like the Federal Reserve. You could work your way through the bookstore’s entire finance section or watch hours of cable TV shows on money, but you’ll never encounter a better resource for this kind of robust, reliable, unbiased information. Add the professor’s outstanding guidance to the many explanatory graphs, animations, and graphics featured in video formats, and Financial Literacy: Finding Your Way in the Financial Markets yields an unparalleled learning experience.
When you use Google’s “free” services, you pay, big time–with personal information about yourself. Unlike other books on Google hacking, this book covers information you disclose when using all of Google’s top applications, not just what savvy users can retrieve via Google’s search results.
This book is a wake-up call and a “how-to” self-defense manual: an indispensable resource for everyone, from private citizens to security professionals, who relies on Google. Whether it’s brusque, convincing, fraught with emotion, or dripping with innuendo, language is fundamentally a tool for conveying meaning—a uniquely human magic trick in which you vibrate your vocal cords to make your innermost thoughts pop up in someone else’s mind.
In Louder than Words, cognitive scientist Benjamin Bergen draws together a decade’s worth of research in psychology, linguistics, and neuroscience to offer a new theory of how our minds make meaning. Through whimsical examples and ingenious experiments, Bergen leads us on a virtual tour of the new science of embodied cognition.
The Chimp Paradox contains an incredibly powerful mind management model that can help you be happier and healthier, increase your confidence, and become a more successful person. Walking into the wilderness with a pack on your back is an empowering experience—all the more so when that pack on your back isn’t weighing you down. Written in the tradition of the successful Allen & Mike’s Really Cool Telemark Tips, with 153 trail-tested tips full of solid advice, as well as more than 100 humorous and helpful illustrations, Ultralight Backpackin' Tips is the ultimate guide for backpackers serious about traveling ultralight. As much a guide as a travelogue, How to Travel the World for Free will give readers ideas for alternative ways of traveling and will inspire many to go on new adventures.
The Last Viking unravels the life of the man who stands head and shoulders above all those who raced to map the last corners of the world. This gripping story of courage and achievement is the account of Robert Falcon Scott's last fateful expedition to the Antarctic, as told by surviving expedition member Apsley Cherry-Garrard.
Over a boozy Sunday lunch, flatmates James Adair and Ben Stenning made a promise to row across the ocean. When Emperor Meiji began his rule, in 1867, Japan was a splintered empire, dominated by the shogun and the daimyos, who ruled over the country's more than 250 decentralized domains and who were, in the main, cut off from the outside world, staunchly antiforeign, and committed to the traditions of the past. Despite the length of his reign, little has been written about the strangely obscured figure of Meiji himself, the first emperor ever to meet a European. Eschewing recent attempts to rehabilitate Aaron Burr (1756–1836), a brilliant member of the revolutionary generation but remembered mostly as Jefferson's vice-president who killed Alexander Hamilton in an 1804 duel, D.C. The Confederacy’s real “high tide” at Gettysburg had come the afternoon before, during the swirling conflagration when Longstreet’s corps first entered the battle, when the Federals just barely held on.


Barksdale’s brigade was already renowned in the Army of Northern Virginia for its stand-alone fights at Fredericksburg. David Kertzer’s absorbing history presents an astonishing account of the birth of modern Italy and the clandestine politics behind the Vatican’s last stand in the battle between church and the newly created Italian state.
When Italy’s armies seized the Holy City and claimed it for the Italian capital, Pope Pius IX, outraged, retreated to the Vatican and declared himself a prisoner, calling on foreign powers to force the Italians out of Rome. Since the Victorian era, London's Underground has had played a vital role in the daily life of generations of Londoners. The Subterranean Railway reveals London's hidden wonder in all its glory and shows how the railway beneath the streets helped create the city we know today.
The famous Middle English poem by an anonymous Northern England poet is beautifully translated by fellow poet Simon Armitage. The Battle of Flodden in 1513 was the largest battle ever to take place between England and Scotland. Carolly Erickson's sensitive and revealing portrayals bring new life to the big names, and light up some of our most neglected but intriguing royals.
When we think of Roman Britain we tend to think of a land of togas and richly decorated palaces with Britons happily going about their much improved daily business under the benign gaze of Rome. Britannia was a far-away province which, while useful for some major economic reserves, fast became a costly and troublesome concern for Rome, much like Iraq for the British government today.
Millions of readers have thrilled by bestselling authors Bill O’Reilly and historian Martin Dugard's Killing Kennedy and Killing Lincoln, page-turning works of nonfiction that have changed the way we read history. Now the anchor of The O’Reilly Factor details the events leading up to the murder of the most influential man in history: Jesus of Nazareth. Since the dawn of Christianity, artists have been fascinated and stirred by the figure of Christ. This richly illustrated book explores the various ways that Christ is rendered in art, from Cimabue’s Nativity scenes and Fra Angelico’s paintings of the Crucifixion to the provocative portraits of Salvador Dali and Andres Serrano. From the internationally bestselling author of No god but God comes a fascinating, provocative, and meticulously researched biography that challenges long-held assumptions about the man we know as Jesus of Nazareth.
Two thousand years ago, an itinerant Jewish preacher and miracle worker walked across the Galilee, gathering followers to establish what he called the “Kingdom of God.” The revolutionary movement he launched was so threatening to the established order that he was captured, tortured, and executed as a state criminal. Sifting through centuries of mythmaking, Reza Aslan sheds new light on one of history’s most influential and enigmatic characters by examining Jesus through the lens of the tumultuous era in which he lived: first-century Palestine, an age awash in apocalyptic fervor. Zealot yields a fresh perspective on one of the greatest stories ever told even as it affirms the radical and transformative nature of Jesus of Nazareth’s life and mission.
With wit, intelligence and his trademark eye for riveting detail, John Julius Norwich has brought together the most important and fascinating events from his trilogy of the rise and fall of the Byzantine empire. A Companion to the Roman Empire provides readers with a guide both to Roman imperial history and to the field of Roman studies, taking account of the most recent discoveries.
Thucydides called his account of two decades of war between Athens and Sparta "a possession for all time," and indeed it is the first and still most famous work in the Western historical tradition.
In any list of the Great Books of Western Civilization, The Peloponnesian War stands near the top. Nicknamed 'The Desert Fox' for his cunning command of the Afrika Korps, Erwin Rommel remains one of the most popular and studied of Germany's World War II commanders. He is the only original World War II Navajo code talker still alive—and this is his story . At the very heart of the special relationship between Britain and the United States lies an extraordinary sharing of secret intelligence. As the two leaders communicated almost daily by secret telegram and telephone, personal meetings and messages through intermediaries to develop an unprecedented level of trust, so their respective intelligences agencies began to share their closely guarded secrets in the fields of code breaking, human intelligence, and secret operations.
Yet simultaneously each national leader sought to protect and advance his own country’s interests and thus on occasion withhold rather than share his secrets.
Winston Churchill believed passionately in the value of secret intelligence, in times of war as well as of peace.
Historian David Stafford makes the compelling case that one cannot understand Churchill's astounding success as a modern day statesman without reference to his deep involvement in the world of espionage. If the past century will be remembered for its tragic pairing of civilized achievement and organized destruction, at the heart of darkness may be found Hitler, Stalin, and the systems of domination they forged. In the first major historical work to analyze the two dictatorships together in depth, Richard Overy gives us an absorbing study of Hitler and Stalin, ranging from their private and public selves, their ascents to power and consolidation of absolute rule, to their waging of massive war and creation of far-flung empires of camps and prisons. A World War II adventure story of epic proportions, this book tells the heroic tale of a dedicated band of men who refused to let their crippled ship sink to the bottom of the Pacific in late 1944. Surrounded by death, floodwaters, and fire, stalked by enemy subs, threatened by air attack, and running from a typhoon, the men of the Houston's remained towers of strength while knowing their ship was never more than minutes away from breaking apart.
The massive convoy itself, HX-305, of which these vessels formed a part, is fascinating In Darkest Before Dawn John Peterson presents the story for the first time of how U-482 managed to slip undetected into the busy shipping lanes of the North Channel and carry out the last great U-boat patrol of the war. With her love for all things old-fashioned, Jennifer Burns has often been told she's an ""old soul,"" but no one is prepared for the young woman's decision to set aside her modern life in favor of the Old Order Amish world.
Lucid, witty and hugely entertaining, it explains the basics of our essential existence, stopping along the way to show us why the Atlantic is widening by a thumbs' length each year, how money permits trade to time travel why the crucial advantage humans had over Neanderthals was sewing and why we are all living in a giant hologram.
In Deep Down Things, experimental particle physicist Bruce Schumm has taken this dictum to heart, providing in clear, straightforward prose an elucidation of the Standard Model of particle physics—a theory that stands as one of the crowning achievements of twentieth-century science.
A mix of popular psychology and trivia, McRaney's insights have struck a chord with thousands, and his blog-and now podcasts and videos-have become an internet phenomenon. This must buy guide uniquely blends the practical skills of foraging with the best elements of natural history writing.
Highly illustrated and expertly written, this invaluable guide also includes a seasonal calendar and a handy A-Z of edible plants. Stunning photography is combined with expert information to create an up-close-and-personal tour of the hidden lives of spiders, beetles, butterflies, moths, crickets, dragonflies, damselflies, grasshoppers, aphids, and many other backyard residents. Taking his rowboat the Sector, which had a living compartment thirty-one inches high, containing a bunk, one-burner stove, and a ham radio, d’Aboville made his way across an ocean 6,200 miles wide. Yet, just as the beaches of Normandy and the jungles of Vietnam worked profound changes on conflict participants,the Korean Peninsula chipped away at the beliefs, physical and mental well-being, and fortitude of Americans completing wartime tours of duty there. The Greatest Generation Speaks was born out of the vast outpouring of letters Brokaw received from people eager to share their personal memories and experiences of a momentous time in America's history. This generation was united not only by a common purpose, but also by common values--duty, honor, economy, courage, service, love of family and country, and, above all, responsibility for oneself. They answered the call to save the world from the two most powerful and ruthless military machines ever assembled, instruments of conquest in the hands of fascist maniacs. You'll hear George Bush talk about how, as a Navy Air Corps combat pilot, one of his assignments was to read the mail of the enlisted men under him, to be sure no sensitive military information would be compromised. Based on eight years of research, extensive archival materials, new documents, and exclusive access to Perkins’s family members and friends, this biography is the first complete portrait of a devoted public servant with a passionate personal life, a mother who changed the landscape of American business and society. As the first female cabinet secretary, she spearheaded the fight to improve the lives of America’s working people while juggling her own complex family responsibilities. She breathed life back into the nation’s labor movement, boosting living standards across the country. For the rest of his life he'd turn to the sea, instead of his friends and family, for comfort. He developed Delta and Eastern Airlines, single handedly secured FDR's third term election, and served as mayor of Winston-Salem, where his tobacco fortune was built.
Slavery was a brutally efficient nullifier of identity, willfully denying black men and women even their names.
For a reader, there is the stirring pleasure of witnessing long-forgotten struggles and triumphs–but there’s an enduring reward as well. Unlike today's readers, the participants did not have the luxury of knowing how this potentially catastrophic showdown would turn out, and their uncertainty often gives their discussions the nerve-racking quality of a fictional thriller. Covert operations in Cuba, including efforts to kill Fidel Castro, had convinced Nikita Khrushchev that only the deployment of nuclear weapons could protect Cuba from imminent attack.
This new edition contains updated information on Cold War spying, with over 350 A–Z main entries (over thirty of them new) biographical sketches, and an updated bibliography. CIA counterinsurgency officer Frank Rafalko was a member of the CHAOS special operations group. Rafalko refutes the charges made by the Times and takes issue with the government findings. Given exclusive access to the previously closed Zinn archives, Duberman’s impeccably researched biography is illustrated with never-before-published photos from the Zinn family collection.
This is economist Bryan Caplan's sobering assessment in this provocative and eye-opening book.
Through an analysis of Americans' voting behavior and opinions on a range of economic issues, he makes the convincing case that noneconomists suffer from four prevailing biases: they underestimate the wisdom of the market mechanism, distrust foreigners, undervalue the benefits of conserving labor, and pessimistically believe the economy is going from bad to worse. With the upcoming presidential election season drawing nearer, this thought-provoking book is sure to spark a long-overdue reappraisal of our elective system. Only a writer of Clancy's magnitude could obtain security clearance for information, diagrams, and photographs never before available to the public. And only Tom Clancy can tell their story--the fascinating real-life facts more compelling than any fiction. They are called on to perform at the peak of their physical and mental capabilities, primed for combat and surveillance, yet ready to pitch in with disaster relief operations. Jack threw himself on one of the grenades, grabbed the second, and pulled it beneath his body. Indestructible reveals the rocky road that led Jack Lucas to Iwo Jima, his arduous recovery, and the obstacles Jack overcame later in life. Lincoln.” In his lifetime and ever since, friend and foe have taken it upon themselves to characterize Lincoln according to their own label or libel. This is a book that animates our past in the words of those who lived the Canadian military experience.
Under the command of Sergeant Andy McNab, they were to sever the underground communication link between Baghdad and north-west Iraq, and to seek and destroy mobile Scud launchers. Yet in their attempts to understand Iraqi society and history, few policy makers, analysts, and journalists took into account the profound impact that Iraq's long engagement with war had on the Iraqis' everyday engagement with politics, with the business of managing their daily lives, and on their cultural imagination.
Drawing on government documents and interviews, Khoury argues that war was a form of everyday bureaucratic governance and examines the Iraqi government's policies of creating consent, managing resistance and religious diversity, and shaping public culture. Ricks's Fiasco is masterful and explosive reckoning with the planning and execution of the American military invasion and occupation of Iraq, based on the unprecedented candor of key participants. A ground-breaking account of accidents, near-misses, extraordinary heroism, and technological breakthroughs, Command and Control explores the dilemma that has existed since the dawn of the nuclear age: how do you deploy weapons of mass destruction without being destroyed by them? Affirmative action, same-sex marriage, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, national service, patriotism and dissent, the moral limits of markets—Sandel dramatizes the challenge of thinking through these con?icts, and shows how a surer grasp of philosophy can help us make sense of politics, morality, and our own convictions as well. A child of religious conservatives in rural England, he went on to become a freewheeling spiritual teacher who challenged Westerners to defy convention and think for themselves. A charming foreword by Watts's father sets the tone of this warm, funny, and beautifully written story. Blended with titillating facts, startling revelations, and head-scratching theories collected from around the world, Instant Knowledge will jumpstart riveting exchanges at cocktail parties, the watercooler, or any powwow. Inevitably, it follows that anyone with an independent mind must become "one who resists or opposes an authority or established convention": a rebel. But, when others--especially others with power--recognize an individual's 'disobedience,' the rebel becomes the REBEL.
Bound by circumstance to a woman he cannot love, Ethan Frome is haunted by a past of lost possibilities until his wife’s orphaned cousin, Mattie Silver, arrives and he is tempted to make one final, desperate effort to escape his fate. But when the mysterious Countess Ellen Olenska returns to New York after a disastrous marriage, Archer falls deeply in love with her.
But his self-published volume soon became a landmark of poetry, introducing the world to a new and uniquely American form. It's a brilliant, illuminating book that overturns conventional thinking about power and advantage.
Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand.
It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head." What the Dog Saw is yet another example of the buoyant spirit and unflagging curiosity that have made Malcolm Gladwell our most brilliant investigator of the hidden extraordinary. He has several obstacles to overcome, but Allen persists in his mission by using the scientific method and finally comes up with a concoction that turns him into a human plant.
Now, in the compelling sequel, Jean Sasson and Princess Sultana turn the spotlight on Sultana's two teenage daughters, Maha and Amani. And yet, they are stifled by the unbearably restrictive lifestyle imposed on them, driving them to desperate measures. Princess Sultana once more strikes a chord among all women who are lucky enough to have the freedom to speak out for themselves. Hidden behind her black veil, she is a prisoner, jailed by her father, her husband and her country. It was also an Alternate Selection of the Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club and a Reader's Digest Selection.
Eva Illouz plumbs today's particular cultural moment to understand how and why psychology has secured its place at the core of modern identity. Why, for example, do the emotions of the accused sometimes aggravate a murder, making it a heinous crime, whereas other emotions might mitigate that murder to manslaughter, excuse a killing ("by reason of insanity"), or even justify it ("by reason of self-defense")? The authors skillfully show that the law's culpability theories are (and must be) psychological at heart, and they propose ways in which psychology can help inform and support the law. But first love runs deep, and he has returned to his roots to share with you all his favourite bits of science.
Mary Beard is one of the world's best-known classicists - a brilliant academic, with a rare gift for communicating with a wide audience both though her TV presenting and her books.
She brings back to life some of the greatest writers of antiquity - including Thucydides, Cicero and Tacitus - and takes a fresh look at both scholarly controversies and popular interpretations of the ancient world, from "The Golden Bough" to "Asterix". What are the true roots of these influences, however, and how do our interpretations of these aspects of the Classics differ from their original reception?
This edition includes a new and specially written introduction by James McGilvray, contextualising the work for the twenty-first century.
This challenging volume is an important contribution to the study of language and mind, and to the history of these studies since the end of the sixteenth century. Mark Whitacre, the promising golden boy of ADM, had put his career and family at risk to wear a wire and deceive his friends and colleagues.
At the same time Whitacre was cooperating with the Feds while playing the role of loyal company man, he had his own agenda he kept hidden from everyone around him—his wife, his lawyer, even the FBI agents who had come to trust him with the case they had put their careers on the line for.
Meticulously researched and richly told by New York Times senior writer Kurt Eichenwald, The Informant re-creates the drama of the story, beginning with the secret recordings, stakeouts, and interviews with suspects and witnesses to the power struggles within ADM and its board—including the high-profile chairman Dwayne Andreas, F. As made startlingly clear, the National Security Agency (NSA) has collected information on every phone call Americans have made over the past seven years.
Boghosian reveals how technology is being used to categorize and monitor people based on their associations, their movements, their purchases, and their perceived political beliefs. This collection of Schneier's best op-ed pieces, columns, and blog posts goes beyond technology, offering his insight into everything from the risk of identity theft (vastly overrated) to the long-range security threat of unchecked presidential power and the surprisingly simple way to tamper-proof elections. We arrive at his central investment methodology of Austrian Investing, where victory comes not from waging the immediate decisive battle, but rather from the roundabout approach of seeking the intermediate positional advantage (what he calls shi), of aiming at the indirect means rather than directly at the ends.
In 24 eye-opening, plainspoken lectures, award-winning Professor Connel Fullenkamp of Duke University reveals the interconnected workings of the financial markets and how society’s financial strength—and your own—depend on money continuing to move through these channels. For example, when the unemployment rate rises, the stock market sometimes rises along with it. While you may regularly hear this enigmatic entity reported on in the media, you may not fully be aware of how the Fed’s monetary policy affects inflation, bank lending, and interest rates.
As both an accomplished educator and a consultant for the International Monetary Fund, Professor Fullenkamp presents each well-informed lecture in an encouraging, engaging manner that leads you to not only comprehend the material, but to get as excited about it as he does. Google is making a fortune on what it knows about you…and you may be shocked by just how much Google does know. West Point computer science professor Greg Conti reveals the privacy implications of Gmail, Google Maps, Google Talk, Google Groups, Google Alerts, Google’s new mobile applications, and more. You can use it to talk about all sorts of things—from your new labradoodle puppy to the expansive gardens at Versailles, from Roger Federer’s backhand to things that don’t exist at all, like flying pigs. When we hear words and sentences, Bergen contends, we engage the parts of our brain that we use for perception and action, repurposing these evolutionarily older networks to create simulations in our minds. A brilliant account of our human capacity to understand language, Louder than Words will profoundly change how you read, speak, and listen.
Steve Peters explains that we all have a being within our minds that can wreak havoc on every aspect of our lives—be it business or personal. Peters explains the struggle that takes place within your mind and then shows you how to apply this understanding. The reporter and journalist has traveled to many countries before, but this time he decided to make it more challenging: he would travel twenty-five thousand miles around the world by foot, bus, train, ship, and plane and not spend any of his own money. In 1900, the four great geographical mysteries—the Northwest Passage, the Northeast Passage, the South Pole, and the North Pole—remained blank spots on the globe.
Bown has unearthed archival material to give Amundsen’s life the grim immediacy of Apsley Cherry-Garrard’s The Worst Journey in the World, the exciting detail of The Endurance, and the suspense of a Jon Krakauer tale. Cherry-Garrard, whom Scott lauded as a tough, efficient member of the team, tells of the journey from England to South Africa and southward to the ice floes. At first they considered the Pacific, then the Atlantic, but once James Cracknell and Ben Fogle completed the high-profile Atlantic Rowing Race, their thoughts turned to the Indian Ocean, longer and tougher than the Atlantic and having seen fewer people row across its waters than have walked on the Moon.
To add to this, James had contracted Guillain-Barre syndrome at the age of 14, which had locked his body into total paralysis for three months (while his mind had remained completely active) and which had left him with paralysed feet. Before long, the shogun surrendered to the emperor, a new constitution was adopted, and Japan emerged as a modern, industrialized state. Most historians discuss the period that takes his name while barely mentioning the man, assuming that he had no real involvement in affairs of state. Later, during Japan's wars with China and Russia, we witness Meiji's struggle to reconcile his personal commitment to peace and his nation's increasingly militarized experience of modernization.
The Mississippians, with their white-haired commander on horseback at their head, utterly crushed the peach orchard salient and continued marauding up to Cemetery Ridge. Darkness, as well as Confederate exhaustion, finally ended the day’s fight as the shaken, depleted Federal units on their heights took stock. Drawing on a wealth of secret documents long buried in the Vatican archives, Kertzer reveals a fascinating story of outrageous accusations, mutual denunciations, raucous demonstrations, and secret dealings. The action set in motion decades of political intrigues that hinged on such fascinating characters as Garibaldi, King Viktor Emmanuel, Napoleon III, and Chancellor Bismarck. In The Subterranean Railway, Christian Wolmar celebrates the vision and determination of the nineteenth-century pioneers who made the world's first, and still the largest, underground passenger railway: one of the most impressive engineering achievements in history. This audiobook features a brilliant reading of the translation by Bill Wallis; as a bonus, Wallis also masterfully tackles the poem in its original Middle English text. James IV himself led an army of 30,000 men over the border into England, ostensibly in revenge for the murder of a Scotsman, but in reality to assist their ally the French by diverting the forces of Henry VIII. Hunchbacked Richard III, the Virgin Queen Elizabeth I, the grieving widow Victoria, and the romantic who gave up his throne for love, Edward VIII - often the colourful kings and queens of England seem like mere caricature, while less familiar rulers like William IV or Henry VI have faded into the shadows of history.
Here is the puny Charles I, nervous, tense and socially awkward, the frail slight Richard II, melancholic and sad, the homosexual James I with his handsome favourites, and the stuttering William II. Huge efforts by the state to control the hearts and minds of the Britons were met with at worst hostile resistance and rebellion, and at best by steadfast indifference.
Nearly two thousand years after this beloved and controversial young revolutionary was brutally killed by Roman soldiers, more than 2.2 billion human beings attempt to follow his teachings and believe he is God. Author Joseph Lewis French guides the reader through the most iconic representations of Christ in art – tender or graphic, classical or bizarre, these images of the Messiah reveal the diverse roles of the Son of God in the social milieus and personal lives of the artists. Scores of Jewish prophets, preachers, and would-be messiahs wandered through the Holy Land, bearing messages from God. Aslan explores the reasons why the early Christian church preferred to promulgate an image of Jesus as a peaceful spiritual teacher rather than a politically conscious revolutionary. The result is a thought-provoking, elegantly written biography with the pulse of a fast-paced novel: a singularly brilliant portrait of a man, a time, and the birth of a religion. Considered essential reading for generals, statesmen, and liberally educated citizens for more than 2,000 years, The Peloponnesian War is a mine of military, moral, political, and philosophical wisdom. Robert Strassler's new edition removes these obstacles by providing a new coherence to the narrative overall, and by effectively reconstructing the lost cultural context that Thucydides shared with his original audience.
This authoritative new edition will ensure that its greatness is appreciated by future generations. He got his first taste of combat in World War I, where his daring command earned him the Blue Max, Germany's highest decoration for bravery. This book looks at the life of this daring soldier, focusing on his style of command and the tactical decisions that earned him his fearsome reputation. But when the Marines turned to its Navajo recruits to develop and implement a secret military language, they created the only unbroken code in modern warfare—and helped assure victory for the United States over Japan in the South Pacific. This unique alliance was built during the Second World War thanks largely to the close relationship forged between the United States’ President Franklin D.
How Roosevelt and Churchill managed this delicate task and yet still laid the foundations of the closest intelligence relationship between two nations the world has ever known lies at the heart of this gripping narrative.


As a young correspondent and soldier in Cuba and South Africa, he experienced its worth first hand. With absorbing detail about the secret world of agents and double-agents, this groundbreaking work traces Churchill's connections with that world, from his days as a member of the Cabinet that established the Secret Service to the war years, when his extensive intelligence network provided him with superior information. The Nazi extermination camps and the vast Soviet Gulag represent the two dictatorships in their most inhuman form.
Based on over seventy eyewitness accounts and hundreds of official documents and personal papers, it records in rich detail the USS Houston's 14,000-mile perilous journey home to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. John Miller's action-packed account gives insights into the nature of heroism and leadership that remain valuable today.
In the Atlantic the U-boats had been beaten back through a massive programme of Allied shipbuilding combined with tactical, technological and intelligence improvements. Yet Jenny does exactly that, adopting Plain dress and settling in with Samuel and Rebecca Lapp while she works as a mother's helper for the bishop's wife--a far cry from her former job as an x-ray technician.
In this one-of-a-kind book, the work of many of the past century's most notable physicists, including Einstein, Schrodinger, Heisenberg, Dirac, Feynman, Gell-Mann, and Weinberg, is knit together in a thorough and accessible exposition of the revolutionary notions that underlie our current view of the fundamental nature of the physical world. As well as recipes, identification tips and collecting advice, you will also learn about the historical, cultural and medicinal uses for each plant as well as its ecological significance. Though he rowed twelve hours a day, battled cyclones and headwinds that kept him in one place for days at a time, was capsized dozens of times forty-foot waves that hit him like cannonballs, he never quit; even when he was trapped upside down inside his cabin for almost two hours while nearly depleting his oxygen trying to right the boat. Upon returning home, Korean War veterans struggled with home front attitudes toward the war, faced employment and family dilemmas, and wrestled with readjustment. In this book, you will meet people whose everyday lives reveal how a generation persevered through war, and were trained by it, and then went on to create interesting and useful lives and the America we have today. And so, Bush says, "I learned about life." You'll meet Trudy Elion, winner of the Nobel Prize in medicine, one of the many women in this book who found fulfilling careers in the changed society as a result of the war. Perkins’s ideas became the cornerstones of the most important social welfare and legislation in the nation’s history, including unemployment compensation, child labor laws, and the forty-hour work week. As head of the Immigration Service, she fought to bring European refugees to safety in the United States.
Dick disappeared for months at a time, leading the dual life of a business mogul and troubled soul, both of which became legendary.
Yet below the gilded surface lay a turbulent life of alcoholism, infidelity, and loneliness.
Yet, from that legacy of slavery, there have sprung generations who’ve struggled, thrived, and lived extraordinary lives. Jakes, neurosurgeon Ben Carson, and sociologist Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot; and famous achievers such as astronaut Mae Jemison, media personality Tom Joyner, decathlete Jackie Joyner-Kersee, and Ebony and Jet publisher Linda Johnson Rice. In accompanying the nineteen contemporary achievers on their journey into the past and meeting their remarkable forebears, we come to know ourselves. However, President Kennedy, a seasoned Cold Warrior in public, was deeply suspicious of military solutions to political problems and appalled by the prospect of nuclear war. He hung a portrait of Hitler in his apartment and “disowned” his Jewish best friend, then flew to Berlin, where he charmed Himmler and signed lucrative oil deals with the architects of the Final Solution. His inside account of the controversial operation provides information never before brought to light. He makes the case that their activities were justified and that the CIA was the logical agency to collect information.
Howard Zinn: A Life on the Left is a major publishing event that brings to life one of the most inspiring figures of our time.
Caplan argues that voters continually elect politicians who either share their biases or else pretend to, resulting in bad policies winning again and again by popular demand. Caplan lays out several bold ways to make democratic government work better--for example, urging economic educators to focus on correcting popular misconceptions and recommending that democracies do less and let markets take up the slack. Clancy presents a unique insider's look at the most hallowed branch of the Armed Forces, and the men and women who serve on America's front lines.
It is poised to shed a profound light on our greatest president just as America commemorates the bicentennial of his birth.
After a fierce fire fight, they were forced to escape and evade on foot to the Syrian border. Khoury focuses on the men and families of those who fought and died during the Iran-Iraq and First Gulf wars.
Ricks, and in Fiasco, Ricks combines these astonishing on-the-record military accounts with his own extraordinary on-the-ground reportage to create a spellbinding account of an epic disaster. But the officers who did raise their voices against the miscalculations, shortsightedness, and general failure of the war effort were generally crushed, their careers often ended.
Up to a thousand students pack the campus theater to hear Sandel relate the big questions of political philosophy to the most vexing issues of the day, and this fall, public television will air a series based on the course.
Justice is lively, thought-provoking, and wise—an essential new addition to the small shelf of books that speak convincingly to the hard questions of our civic life. Watts's portrait of himself shows that he was a philosophical renegade from early on in his intellectual life. Watts encouraged readers to “follow your own weird” — something he always did himself, as this remarkable account of his life shows. To experience the clean, rich flavor at home, just tear into a topic of your choice, and add conversation.
In language that is spare, passionate, and enduring, Edith Wharton tells this unforgettable story of two tragic lovers overwhelmed by the unrelenting forces of conscience and necessity.
Torn between duty and passion, Archer struggles to make a decision that will either courageously define his life—or mercilessly destroy it. The "father of free verse," Whitman drew upon the cadence of simple, even idiomatic speech to "sing" such themes as democracy, sexuality, and frank autobiography.
In David and Goliath Malcolm Gladwell takes us on a scintillating and surprising journey through the hidden dynamics that shape the balance of power between the small and the mighty.
He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate. Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error?
He turns green, craves sunlight and water instead of food, and sprouts baby roots if he stands in mud too long.
She examines a wide range of sources to show how self-help culture has transformed contemporary emotional life and how therapy complicates individuals' lives even as it claims to dissect their emotional experiences and heal trauma.
This disconnect has resulted in some inconsistent verdicts across different types of cases and thus has serious implications for whether the law will be respected and obeyed.
This is the stuff that you really need to know, not only because it matters, but because it will quite simply amaze and delight you.
In a series of sparkling essays, she explores our rich classical heritage - from Greek drama to Roman jokes, introducing some larger-than-life characters of classical history, such as Alexander the Great, Nero and Boudicca.
The fruit of over thirty years in the world of classical scholarship, "Classical Traditions" captures the world of antiquity and its modern significance with wit, verve and scholarly expertise. This introduction to the Classics begins with a visit to the British Museum to view the frieze which once decorated the Apollo Temple at Bassae. It has been made more accessible to a larger audience; all the French and German in the original edition has been translated, and the notes and bibliography have been brought up to date. Using Whitacre and a small team of agents to tap into the secrets at ADM, the FBI discovered the company's scheme to steal millions of dollars from its own customers. Whitacre became sucked into his own world of James Bond antics, imperiling the criminal case and creating a web of deceit that left the FBI and prosecutors uncertain where the lies stopped and the truth began. Ross Johnson, and Brian Mulroney—to the big-gun Washington lawyers hired by ADM and on up through the ranks of the Justice Department to FBI Director Louis Freeh and Attorney General Janet Reno. In that same time, the NSA and the FBI have gained the ability to access emails, photos, audio and video chats, and additional content from Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Microsoft, YouTube, Skype, Apple, and others, allegedly in order to track foreign targets.
She shows how corporations and government intelligence agencies mine data from sources as diverse as surveillance cameras and unmanned drones to iris scans and medical records, while combing websites, email, phone records and social media for resale to third parties, including U.S.
The monumental challenge is in seeing time differently, in a whole new intertemporal dimension, one that is so contrary to our wiring. You’ll not only gain a new appreciation for the variety of financial products and services available to you, but also for how crucial we as individuals are to the functioning of the entire system.
Googling Security is the first book to reveal how Google’s vast information stockpiles could be used against you or your business–and what you can do to protect yourself. And when you talk, your listener fills in lots of details you didn’t mention—the curliness of the dog’s fur or the vast statuary on the grounds of the French palace. These embodied simulations, as they're called, are what makes it possible for us to become better baseball players by merely visualizing a well-executed swing; what allows us to remember which cupboard the diapers are in without looking, and what makes it so hard to talk on a cell phone while we’re driving on the highway. Once you're armed with this new knowledge, you will be able to utilize your chimp for good, rather than letting your chimp run rampant with its own agenda. Outdoors expert and celebrated illustrator Mike Clelland offers advanced techniques on how to pack light without sacrificing the essentials or your safety yet staying well fed and comfortable.
From there began the unforgettable polar journey across a forbidding and inhospitable region. His background in the arts and humanities makes The Worst Journey in the World stand out as a literary accomplishment as well as a classic in the annals of exploration. Even Japanese who believe Meiji to have been their nation's greatest ruler may have trouble recalling a single personal accomplishment that might account for such a glorious reputation. Emperor of Japan conveys in sparkling prose the complexity of the man and offers an unrivaled portrait of Japan in a period of unique interest. His career in ruins, in 1806 Burr led an armed band down the Mississippi intending to detach western states from the Union and conquer Spanish-ruled Texas and Florida. For pure pageantry it was unsurpassed, and it also marked the centerpiece of the war, both time-wise and in terms of how the conflict had turned a corner—from persistent Confederate hopes to impending Rebel despair. The Federal left was not as vulnerable as Lee had envisioned, but had cooperated with Rebel wishes by extending its Third Corps into a salient.
Hancock, Meade, and other Union generals desperately struggled to find units to stem the Rebel tide. They had barely held on against the full ferocity of the Rebels, on a day that decided the fate of the nation.
No one who reads this eye-opening book will ever think of Italy, or the Vatican, in quite the same way again. From the early days of steam to electrification, via the Underground's contribution to twentieth-century industrial design and its role during two world wars, the story comes right up to the present with its sleek, driverless trains and the wrangles over the future of the system.
Gushing blood, the knight reclaims his head, orders Gawain to seek him out a year hence, and departs. The Scots were hampered by old-fashioned weapons and tactics, while the English deployed more accurate artillery and their vaunted longbowmen.
The end of the Roman Empire largely came as "business as usual" for the vast majority of Britons as they simply hadn’t adopted the Roman way of life in the first place.
Killing Jesus will take readers inside Jesus’s life, recounting the seismic political and historical events that made his death inevitable – and changed the world forever. Whether they show the spirituality of God Incarnate or the earthly characteristics of a flesh-and-blood man, artistic depictions of Christ are the most controversial, moving or inspirational examples of religious art.
This was the age of zealotry—a fervent nationalism that made resistance to the Roman occupation a sacred duty incumbent on all Jews. And he grapples with the riddle of how Jesus understood himself, the mystery that is at the heart of all subsequent claims about his divinity.
Based on the venerable Richard Crawley translation, updated and revised for modern readers. He followed this up with numerous successes early in World War II in both Europe and Africa, before facing his biggest challenge - organizing the defence of France.
And in boarding school at Fort Defiance, he was punished for speaking his native language, as the teachers sought to rid him of his culture and traditions.
As wartime Prime Minister, he built a centralized intelligence community, responded daily to raw ''Ultra'' reports, created the Special Operations Executive to work behind enemy lines and, with Roosevelt, built the intelligence alliance that endures to this day.
What results is a major contribution to the study of modern and military history and a crucial missing key to understanding Churchill himself.
Yet their dictatorships took shape within formal constitutional structures and drew the support of the German and Russian people. Part of Bull Halsey's famous Pacific Task Force 38, the Houston's had been supporting air strikes as a prelude to the Battle of Leyte Gulf, when she took an aerial torpedo hit that caused serious flooding.
The people of Hickory Hollow are curious about the beautiful young seeker among them, one handsome Amishman in particular. Schumm, who has spent much of his life emmersed in the subatomic world, goes far beyond a mere presentation of the "building blocks" of matter, bringing to life the remarkable connection between the ivory tower world of the abstract mathematician and the day-to-day, life-enabling properties of the natural world. Much of this information is based on Paul's own research and experience and will not be found in any comparable books.
Each creature is shown in its natural setting, and many are shown progressing through the stages of their life cycles. Not unlike other wars, Korea proved a formative and defining influence on the men and women stationed in theater, on their loved ones, and in some measure on American culture. His chaotic existence culminated in a surprise fourth marriage and was shortly followed by a strange death, the end of a life every bit as awe-inspiring as it was disturbing.
Kennedy Library, enables the reader to follow the often harrowing twists and turns of the crisis.
All the while, he was visiting the oil refineries and passing their coordinates to Allied Bomber Command, who destroyed the plants in a series of B-17 raids, helping to end the war early. In the book, Rafalko tells how by 1969 the group included sixty officers and their informants who reported on the activities of U.S. The author argues his point by providing details secretly collected by his group against the New Left and black extremists. He captures military life -- from the drama of combat to the daily routine -- with total accuracy, and reveals the roles and missions that have in recent years distinguished our fighting forces.
Now follow Tom Clancy as he delves into the training and tools, missions and mindset of these elite operatives.
White, Jr., offers a fresh and compelling definition of Lincoln as a man of integrity–what today’s commentators would call “authenticity”–whose moral compass holds the key to understanding his life.
First, dictators face threats from the masses over which they rule - this is the problem of authoritarian control. In the desperate action that followed, though stricken by hypothermia and other injuries, the patrol 'went ballistic'.
Self-taught in many areas, he came to Buddhism through the teachings of Christmas Humphreys and D. How do our brains really work-in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, and in the bedroom? But then Allen is deemed a threat to national security, and his project is suddenly top secret.
Through these sculptures, John Henderson and Mary Beard prompt us to consider the significance of Classics as a means of discovery and enquiry, its value in terms of literature, philosophy, and culture, and its importance as a source of imagery. How much power over your personal life are you willing to concede to the person you least want to see as president?
And in the high-stakes world of mergers and acquisitions, financial transactions are routinely done “on paper,” with massive companies being bought and sold despite no money changing hands.
Every day, those questions occupied his thoughts, but he always came up with creative solutions. Renowned for his determination and technical skills, both feared and beloved by his men, Amundsen is a legend of the heroic age of exploration, which shortly thereafter would be tamed by technology, commerce, and publicity.
On November 12, 1912, in arctic temperatures, the author, in a search party, found the bodies of Scott and his companions along with poignant last notebook entries, some of them recorded in this work. Renowned Japan scholar Donald Keene sifts the available evidence to present a rich portrait not only of Meiji but also of rapid and sometimes violent change during this pivotal period in Japan's history. But Pickett’s Charge was crushed by the Union defenders that day, having never had a chance in the first place. Hood’s crack division was launched first, seizing Devil’s Den, climbing Little Round Top, and hammering in the wheatfield. One of Barksdale’s regiments, the 21st Mississippi, veered off from the brigade in the chaos, rampaging across the field, overrunning Union battery after battery. Barksdale’s Charge describes the exact moment when the Confederacy reached its zenith, and the soldiers of the Northern states just barely succeeded in retaining their perfect Union. When King James IV was killed while leading a charge, and many of their officers were killed, the Scots were left in disarray and the English victory was decisive. Award-winning historian Erickson tells the human stories with her characteristic blend of authenticity, engaging style and psychological insight. And few figures better exemplified this principle than the charismatic Galilean who defied both the imperial authorities and their allies in the Jewish religious hierarchy. The Landmark Thucydides includes a vast array of superbly designed and presented maps, brief informative appendices by outstanding classical scholars on subjects of special relevance to the text, explanatory marginal notes on each page, an index of unprecedented subtlety, and numerous other useful features. But discrimination didn’t stop Chester from answering the call to defend his country after Pearl Harbor, for the Navajo have always been warriors, and his upbringing on a New Mexico reservation gave him the strength—both physical and mental—to excel as a marine. Nearly two-thirds of the crew abandoned ship before the damage-control officer convinced the captain she might be saved.
But it had not disappeared, and a lone U-boat on its first active patrol slipped into the North Channel; in just a few days five ships lay broken on the seabed including the Empire Heritage, one of the largest Allied ships lost in the entire war. Schumm leaves us with an insight into the profound open questions of particle physics, setting the stage for understanding the progress the field is poised to make over the next decade or two. This is a one-of-a-kind look at some of life’s most fascinating mysteries — surprising, captivating, and perfect for nature lovers of all ages. And you'll meet the members of the Romeo Club (Retired Old Men Eating Out), friends for life. A second, separate challenge arises from the elites with whom dictators rule - this is the problem of authoritarian power-sharing.
In understanding language, our brains engage in a creative process of constructing rich mental worlds in which we see, hear, feel, and act. He tried dumpster diving, eating flowers, couch surfing in the homes of strangers, sleeping under the stars, working on a container ship to cross the Atlantic Ocean, offering to pillow fight strangers for a dollar, and after 150 days, he reached his destination. Feted in his lifetime as an international celebrity, pursued by women and creditors, he died in the Arctic on a rescue mission for an inept rival explorer. There followed an extensive pursuit and spectacular treason trial during which a vindictive President Jefferson schemed and failed to convict Burr.
The collapsing Federals had to gather men from four different corps to try to stem the onslaught. His quest for the Green Knight involves a winter journey, a seduction scene in a dream-like castle, a dire challenge answered, and a drama of enigmatic reward disguised as psychic undoing.
A lot never adopted a Roman lifestyle at all and remained unimpressed and riven by deep-seated tribal division.
They came home to joyous and short-lived celebrations and immediately began the task of rebuilding their lives and the world they wanted.
He'd actually been one - a war profiteer who'd made millions of trading with Hitler before having a change of heart. The first book to reveal such details, it also calls attention to the consequences suffered by the American counterintelligence community because of the government investigations. Crucially, whether and how dictators resolve these two problems is shaped by the dismal environment in which authoritarian politics takes place: in a dictatorship, no independent authority has the power to enforce agreements among key actors and violence is the ultimate arbiter of conflict. For this, Elite World Records named him the First Person to Travel the World Penniless, and the documentary he filmed about this trip won best feature in the 2011 Accolade Awards.
Great men behaving badly make for entertaining reading, so readers may roll their eyes, but will keep turning the pages of this meticulous, almost day-by-day account of a plot so bizarre that it's hard to believe it actually happened. They married in record numbers and gave birth to another distinctive generation, the Baby Boomers. Black-listed by the Allies and disowned by his family, Erickson had volunteered for the spy mission in order to redeem himself, and ended up saving thousands of Allied lives. Eventually, he says, the program was expanded to include domestic leftists or counter-cultural groups with no discernible connection to the antiwar movement, including women's liberation groups, Students for a Democratic Society, and the Black Panther Party. A grateful nation made it possible for more of them to attend college than any society had ever educated, anywhere.
But, every contributor, in every article, in every aspect of their lives, has had but one focus: to bring freedom to their world. They gave the world new science, literature, art, industry, and economic strength unparalleled in the long curve of history.
Delivered to Baghdad, they were tortured with a savagery for which not even their intensive SAS training had prepared them.
As they now reach the twilight of their adventurous and productive lives, they remain, for the most part, exceptionally modest. They have so many stories to tell, stories that in many cases they have never told before, because in a deep sense they didn't think that what they were doing was that special, because everyone else was doing it too.



Meditation retreats western canada
Change last name facebook
Movie the secret keeper hearthstone
The secret of giving thanks



Comments to «The secret audiobook free youtube mp3»

  1. Angel_Xranitel writes:
    Session was again made more epic by stars one of many.
  2. Oxotnick writes:
    Because I feel that many people are turning in the direction of the.
  3. kisa writes:
    Irritable thoughts before you've blurted them out.
Wordpress. All rights reserved © 2015 Christian meditation music free 320kbps.