preload

23.03.2015
Recruited as a field operative in a totally secret new spy agency, Scot Harvath is summoned when a bombing in Rome kills a group of college students. A new president means a new approach to counter-terrorism, and that means covert agent Scot Harvath is out of a job.
Action-packed from the start, Hidden Order demonstrates yet again why Brad Thor is the "master of thrillers". Tucked away in a remote corner of North Carolina's Fort Bragg, behind rows of razor wire and heavily armed guards, lies the headquarters of the nation's most elite counter-terrorism unit - the United States Army's 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment Delta.
On the snow-covered slopes of Utah, the unthinkable has just become a nightmarish reality: thirty Secret Service agents have been viciously executed and the vacationing president of the United States kidnapped by one of the most lethal terrorist organizations in the Middle East - the Fatah Revolutionary Council. Funny, thought-provoking, and incredibly disturbing, Slow Death by Rubber Duck reveals that just the living of daily life creates a chemical soup inside each of us. Pollution is no longer just about belching smokestacks and ugly sewer pipes - now, it's personal. The most dangerous pollution has always come from commonplace items in our homes and workplaces. Toxins in our urine caused by leaching from plastics and run-of-the-mill shampoos, toothpastes and deodorant. Ultimately hopeful, the book empowers readers with some simple ideas for protecting themselves and their families, and changing things for the better. Henry VIII, renowned for his command of power and celebrated for his intellect, presided over one of the most magnificent–and dangerous–courts in Renaissance Europe. Packed with colorful description, meticulous in historical detail, rich in pageantry, intrigue, passion, and luxury, Weir brilliantly renders King Henry VIII, his court, and the fascinating men and women who vied for its pleasures and rewards.
In this updated version of the classic of popular Egyptology, Barbara Mertz combines a doctorate in Egyptology at the famed Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago with a life-long enthusiasm for ancient Egypt. Mertz also manages to capture and discuss, though not in detail, a bit of what it is like to study Egyptology professionally in a few humorous off-the-cuff remarks in the texts. In short, this is a book I re-read on occasion, even as a professional, not for any particular research needs, but more to remind myself what my own writing *could* be and, sometimes, to remind myself why I decided to do this for a living. For over a decade Nefertiti, wife of the heretic king Akhenatem, was the most influential woman in the Bronze Age. On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial, and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing empathy.
In the wake of the award-winning film Capote, interest in the author's 1965 true crime masterpiece has spiked. He assigns varying degrees of drawl to the citizens of Finney County, Kans., where the crimes take place, and supplements with an arsenal of tension-building cadences, hard and soft tones, regional and foreign accents, and subtle inflections, even embedding a quiver of grief in the voice of one character.
When Richard Serrano learned of the grandfather he had never known, the longtime journalist embarked upon a search that led him deep into the city's wide-open and ignoble past. The Great Depression and World War II were over, yet vestiges still lingered from the corrupt Pendergast political machine.
In his quest to uncover the details of his grandfather's life, Serrano re-creates the flavor of mid-twentieth-century Kansas City. Upon its first publication, On Killing was hailed as a landmark study of the techniques the military uses to overcome the powerful reluctance to kill, of how killing affects the soldier, and of the societal implications of escalating violence. Puzo's protagonist is Cross De Lena, nephew of Don Domenico Clericuzio, his Bruglione in Vegas, who by investing in film may fulfill the Don's wish to legitimize the Family.
Violence slashes through the narrative, but the real cruelty that laces the plot lies in each character's byzantine manipulations of others; the story line would delight a Medici. From the blockbuster author of The Godfather comes this bold international best-seller about the feverish world of a big-time gambler. Merlyn and his brother, Artie, obey their own code of honor in the ferment of contemporary America, where law and organized crime are one and the same. Set within America's golden triangle of corruption and excess - New York, Hollywood, Las Vegas - the novel plunges into the glittering and ruthless worlds of gambling, publishing, and the film industry, where greed, lust, and violence hold sway.
A skeletal hand clutching an iron key lies hidden within a mermaid's wooden sarcophagus; a hand-drawn map is stolen from beneath the floorboards an old museum. Pursued by kidnappers thinking of riches and murder, Katherine Perkins and her two cousins must descend into the depths of the hollow earth in order to return the Sleeper to his ancestral home on the shores of Lake Windermere. Zeuglodon, set in the world envisioned in James P Blaylock's The Digging Leviathan, is a landscape of colour, mystery, and adventure, in which reality and fantasy are shifting currents, and nothing is quite what it seems to be. James P Blaylock is one of the founding fathers of modern steampunk along with fellow writers and friends Tim Powers and K.W. The author of original and literate suspense novels, Westlake excels also at creating mystery adventures in science-fiction settings.
First off, I'm a HUGE audio book fan -- I've got seven shelves of them in my house and plan to continue collecting. Psychopaths may enter as rising stars and corporate saviors, but all too soon they're abusing the trust of colleagues, manipulating supervisors, and leaving the workplace in shambles. Snakes in Suits reveals psychopaths' secrets, introduces the ways in which they manipulate and deceive, and helps listeners see through their games.
The majority of these recordings have never before been released, making this collection the perfect gift for any literature lover in your life who wishes to add these legendary figures to his or her impeccable library. This three-CD boxed set of recordings documents some of the twentieth-century’s most emulated and admired literary figures and continues the traditions of excellence evidenced by the American edition. There’s a revolution brewing across the nation--a movement that’s changing lives and revealing little known paths to passion and prosperity. Jonathan Fields, mega-firm lawyer turned successful lifestyle entrepreneur, blogger and writer shows you how to turn your passion–whether it’s cooking or copy-writing, teaching or playing video games–into a better payday and a richly satisfying life. If you think it’s getting harder to both make a living and make a life, economist and former secretary of labor Robert Reich agrees with you.
With the clarity and insight that are his hallmarks, Reich delineates what success has come to mean in our time. What's the difference between bonds, securities, and derivatives - and which should I invest in now? For those people whose heads spin when reading the business pages of the newspaper, here's a roadmap through the economic jungle. This definitive history of the 1846 conflict paints an intimate portrait of the major players and their world. Novelist, playwright, film actor, martial artist, and political commentator, Yukio Mishima (1925-1970) was arguably the most famous person in Japan at the time of his death.
In this riveting "New York Times" bestseller, award-winning columnist Howie Carr reveals for the first time the true lives and dark deeds of two of Boston's most infamous sons in one of the most compelling real-life family sagas of modern times.
Amelia Earhart captured the hearts of the nation after becoming the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic in 1928. Based on ten years of research, East to the Dawn provides a richly textured portrait of Earhart in all her complexity.
It was not inevitable that the Civil War would end as it did, or that it would end at all well. Provocative, bold, exquisitely rendered, and stunningly original, April 1865 is the first major reassessment of the Civil War's close and is destined to become one of the great stories of American history. In May of 1942, the war seemed very far away to most Sydneysiders - until the night the three Japanese midget submarines crept into the harbour and caused an unforgettable night of mayhem, high farce, chaos and courage. With unparalleled insight into BP and its safety record leading up to the disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, Tom Bower gives us a groundbreaking, in-depth, and authoritative twenty-year history of the hunt and speculation for our most vital natural resource. With the world as his canvas, acclaimed investigative reporter Tom Bower gathers unprecedented firsthand information from hundreds of sources to give readers the definitive, untold modern history of oil .
All empires spin self-serving myths, and in the US the most potent of these is that America is a force for democracy around the world. The Roman empire extended over three continents, and all its lands came to share a common culture, bequeathing a legacy vigorous even today.
Military institutions have everywhere and always shaped the course of history, but women s near universal participation in them has largely gone unnoticed. As the research supporting mindfulness-based therapies grows, so does the demand for mental health professionals who can develop effective mindfulness-based treatment protocols suited to the needs of individual clients. You'll learn the best mindfulness techniques for the treatment of anxiety disorders, depression, chronic illness, pain, stress, and eating disorders, and apply these techniques in therapy, including child and couples therapy.
In July 2007, the combination of a seemingly unstoppable rise in house prices and bullish banks swimming in liquidity meant that almost anyone could get a mortgage in the UK or US.
In The International Economy Since 1945, Sidney Pollard describes the most important global developments in economics during the last half century. The International Economy Since 1945 analyses institutional issues, such as monetary policy or the multinational company, as well as worldwide issues. The International Economy Since 1945 debates the key issues of current global and national policy-making and the effects of greater economic integration on inflation and employment. This book provides a complete and powerful overview of what the idea of development has meant. As socialist states struggle to transform themselves into market economies and the United States privatizes everything from schooling to policing, the current crises in Russia and East Asia suggest that something might be amiss.
What do Eastern Europe's booming sex trade, America's subprime mortgage lending scandal, China’s fake goods industry, and celebrity philanthropy in Africa have in common? The railroad was the last great building project to be done by hand: excavating dirt, cutting through ridges, filling gorges, blasting tunnels. A Journey on My Own tells the story of Eric Vieler, born in America but raised in Hitler's Germany, where he saw the persecution of Jewish neighbors and experienced the bombing of cities. In this action-packed history, award-winning author Harlow Giles Unger unfolds the epic story of Patrick Henry, who roused Americans to fight government tyranny -- both British and American. As quick with a rifle as he was with his tongue, Henry was America’s greatest orator and courtroom lawyer, who mixed histrionics and hilarity to provoke tears or laughter from judges and jurors alike. This explosive narrative reveals for the first time the shocking hidden years of Coco Chanel’s life: her collaboration with the Nazis in Paris, her affair with a master spy, and her work for the German military intelligence service and Himmler’s SS. Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel was the high priestess of couture who created the look of the modern woman.
The Asylum is a stunning exposé by a seasoned Wall Street journalist that once and for all reveals the truth behind America’s oil addiction in all its unscripted and dysfunctional glory. In the tradition of Too Big to Fail and Liar’s Poker, author Leah McGrath Goodman tells the amazing-but-true story of a band of struggling, hardscrabble traders who, after enduring decades of scorn from New York’s stuffy financial establishment, overcame more than a century of failure, infighting, and brinksmanship to build the world’s reigning oil empire—entirely by accident.
Michael Lewis was fresh out of Princeton and the London School of Economics when he landed a job at Salomon Brothers, one of Wall Street’s premier investment firms.
Liar’s Poker is the culmination of those heady, frenzied years—a behind-the-scenes look at a unique and turbulent time in American business. With all the pace and drama of a political thriller, Dirty Diplomacy is a riveting account of a young, fast-living ambassador's battle against a ruthless dictatorship in Central Asia and the craven political expediency in Washington and London that eventually cost him his job.
Murray soon discovers that this is no one-off incident: fierce abuse of those opposing the government is rife. But Murray's bosses in London's Foreign Office, ever mindful of their senior partners in Washington, don't want to upset the applecart. This is the first extensive study on the subject of the cultural and social understandings of menstruation by tracking its evolution over centuries. Synthesizing several decades of scholarship by historians East and West, Barbara Evans Clements traces the major developments in the history of women in Russia and their impact on the history of the nation. Touching on the whole story of China - from Neolithic villages to a globalized Shanghai - this book ties mythology, archaeology, history, religion, folklore, literature, and journalism into a millennia-spanning story about how Chinese women - and their goddess traditions - fostered a counterculture that flourishes and grows stronger every day.
As Brian Griffith charts the stories of China’s founding mothers, shamanesses, goddesses, and ordinary heroines, he also explores the largely untold story of women’s contributions to cultural life in the world’s biggest society and provides inspiration for all global citizens. A Companion to World History presents over 30 essays from an international group of historians that both identify continuing areas of contention, disagreement, and divergence in world and global history, and point to directions for further debate.
The Egyptian hermit Onuphrios was said to have lived entirely on dates, and perhaps the most famous of all hermits, John the Baptist, on locusts and wild honey.
True crime stories from the early days of the Metropolitan Police Detective Branch capture the essence of Victorian crime.
This fascinating book uses widespread sources of information, including many of Clarke's own case reports. Again and again, microbes have shaped our health, our genetics, our history, our culture, our politics, even our religion and ethics. The laws of physics provide clear-cut principles defining what is possible - and not possible - in the physical world. Rothman divides the laws of physics into two classes: laws of permission and laws of denial. He uses these concepts to examine and critique the possible existence of various paranormal phenomena, such as UFOs, telepathy, perpetual motion machines, poltergeists, etc. Written in a technically accurate yet entertaining style, this book will appeal to the non-specialist yet still present concepts of interest to both professional scientists and philosophers of science.
In the summer of 1966, Rinker and Kernahan Buck - 2 teenaged schoolboys from New Jersey - bought a dilapidated Piper Club airplane for $300, rebuild it, and piloted it on a record-breaking flight across America - navigating all the way to California without a radio because they couldn't afford one.
The journey west, and the preparations for it, become a figurative and literal process of discovery as the young men battle thunderstorms and wracking turbulence, encounter Arkansas rednecks, Texas cowboys, and the languid, romantic culture of small-town cafes, cheap motels, and dusty landing strips of pre-Vietnam America. The preeminent provider of business education worldwide, the American Management Association trains over 100,000 managers and executives a year through its renowned management education seminar programs and conferences. Giving you an overview of exactly what the AMA considers to be the most important and powerful competencies for today's serious business professional, AMA Business Boot Camp supplies you with the building blocks of knowledge you need to succeed as a manager and leader. Filled with easy-to-apply techniques and tangible strategies, the book contains action tips to solidify learning, as well as valuable tools such as a coaching planning worksheet, a project management planning template, and a self-assessment to help determine your comfort level with delegation. Throughout your career in business, you will have to navigate the waters of organizational politics. The audio edition contains word-for-word recordings of all articles published in The Economist, read by professional broadcasters and actors. The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by "The Economist Newspaper Ltd" and edited in London. The aim of The Economist is "to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress."Subjects covered include international news, economics, politics, business, finance, science, technology, and the arts.
It takes a strongly argued editorial stance on many issues, especially its support for free trade and fiscal conservatism; it can thus be considered as a magazine which practises advocacy journalism. Although The Economist calls itself a newspaper and refers to its staff as correspondents, it is printed in magazine form on glossy paper, like a newsmagazine. A dazzling novel from one of our finest writers—an epic yet intimate family saga about three generations of all-American radicals. At the center of Jonathan Lethem’s superb new novel stand two extraordinary women: Rose Zimmer, the aptly nicknamed Red Queen of Sunnyside, Queens, is an unreconstructed Communist who savages neighbors, family, and political comrades with the ferocity of her personality and the absolutism of her beliefs.
As the decades pass—from the parlor communism of the ’30s, McCarthyism, the civil rights movement, ragged ’70s communes, the romanticization of the Sandinistas, up to the Occupy movement of the moment—we come to understand through Lethem’s extraordinarily vivid storytelling that the personal may be political, but the political, even more so, is personal. Lethem’s characters may pursue their fates within History with a capital H, but his novel is—at its mesmerizing, beating heart—about love. A brilliant, unforgettable novel from bestselling author Ruth Ozeki—shortlisted for the Booker Prize. In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying.
Full of Ozeki’s signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.
In this riveting book, acclaimed author Matthew Quick unflinchingly examines the impossible choices that must be made--and the light in us all that never goes out.
Survivors of a terrible African war flee their blighted continent, and look for refuge in the countries of the West.
Essentially, the author chronicles the desparate and frightened attempts of a family to survive in a barbaric civil war in south-east England. It's unavoidable that the book seems a little dated, but it's nevertheless a gem of a work. The Separation is an emotionally riveting story of how the small man can make a difference; it's a savage critique of Winston Churchill, the man credited as the saviour of Britain and the Western World, and it's a story of how one perceives and shapes the past. Unmatched in scope and literary quality, The Anchor Book of Chinese Poetry spans three thousand years, bringing together more than six hundred poems by more than one hundred thirty poets, in translations–many new and exclusive to the book–by an array of distinguished translators.
Here is the grand sweep of Chinese poetry, from the Book of Songs–ancient folk songs said to have been collected by Confucius himself–and Laozi’s Dao De Jing to the vividly pictorial verse of Wang Wei, the romanticism of Li Po, the technical brilliance of Tu Fu, and all the way up to the twentieth-century poetry of Mao Zedong and the post—Cultural Revolution verse of the Misty poets. A fearless novel about the price of revenge from the number one New York Times best-selling author of Go the F*** to Sleep. Adam Mansbach returns with a blockbuster tale of revenge, redemption, and the world’s most beautiful crime. In this mind-bending journey through a subterranean world of epic heroes, villains, and eccentrics, Adam Mansbach balances an intricately plot­ted, high-stakes caper with a wildly inventive tale of time travel and shamanism, prodigal fathers and sons, and the hilariously intertwined realms of art, crime, and spirituality. Nine Inches, Tom Perrotta’s first true collection, features ten stories—some sharp and funny, some mordant and surprising, and a few intense and disturbing.
Nine Inches contains an elegant collection of short fiction: stories that are as assured in their depictions of characters young and old, established and unsure, as any written today. Hector Hugh Munro (1870-1916) was a British writer, whose witty works satirizing Edwardian society and culture led him to be known as a master of the short story.
The book begins with Saki's first works, the "Reginald" stories, a small series of vignettes centered around the societal and cynical young Reginald. To describe this finely constructed and moving novel as the story of a woman's emotional breakdown and recovery is both true and inadequate. Readers learn a great deal about the "I" of the story--a great deal more than she knows about herself--an the fascinating portrait that soon emerges is a masterful creation of one of the most gifted novelists writing today. It is through a number of apparently unrelated scenes, many presented out of time sequence but with an intense logic all their own.
The means by which she is forced to accept the world and to deal with evil are harsh, but point by telling point she relates a story that the reader lives with her. The Pumpkin Eater, like all of Penelope Mortimer's extraordinary fiction, is written with the deft wit and intelligence that have earned her wide critical acclaim in both America and England. Go the F*** to Sleep is a bedtime book for parents who live in the real world, where a few snoozing kitties and cutesy rhymes don't always send a toddler sailing blissfully off to dreamland.
With illustrations by Ricardo Cortes, Go the F*** to Sleep is beautiful, subversive, and pants-wettingly funny--a book for parents new, old, and expectant. In Alias Grace, bestselling author Margaret Atwood has written her most captivating, disturbing, and ultimately satisfying work since The Handmaid's Tale.
In 1843, a 16-year-old Canadian housemaid named Grace Marks was tried for the murder of her employer and his mistress. A young woman returns to northern Quebec to the remote island of her childhood, with her lover and her two friends, to investigate the mysterious disappearance of her father.
Part detective novel, part psychological thriller, Surfacing is the story of a talented woman artist who goes in search of her missing father on a remote island in northern Quebec. Surfacing is a work permeated with an aura of suspense, complex with layered meanings, and written in brilliant, diamond-sharp prose. From fat girl to thin, from red hair to mud brown, from London to Toronto, from Polish count to radical husband, from writer of romances to distinguished poet - Joan Foster is utterly confused by her life of multiple identiities. In this remarkable, poetic, and magical novel, Margaret Atwood proves yet again why she is considered to be one of the most important and accomplished writers of our time. Margaret Atwood's The Robber Bride is inspired by "The Robber Bridegroom," a wonderfully grisly tale from the Brothers Grimm in which an evil groom lures three maidens into his lair and devours them, one by one.
Full of expert, effective advice from a producer and professional writer for 15 network television series, this book offers pragmatic techniques for constructing a compelling story and developing rich characters and extraordinary dialogue. The essential guide for singles and couples who want to explore polyamory in ways that are ethically and emotionally sustainable. For anyone who has ever dreamed of love, sex, and companionship beyond the limits of traditional monogamy, this groundbreaking guide navigates the infinite possibilities that open relationships can offer. Rebecca Musser grew up in fear, concealing her family's polygamous lifestyle from the "dangerous" outside world. The church, however, had a way of pulling her back in-and by 2007, Rebecca had no choice but to take the witness stand against the new prophet of the FLDS in order to protect her little sisters and other young girls from being forced to marry at shockingly young ages.
THE WITNESS WORE RED is a gripping account of one woman's struggle to escape the perverse embrace of religious fanaticism and sexual slavery, and a courageous story of hope and transformation. Julien Gracq, the most important writer in France, is also the only living writer whose complete works appear in a volume of the prestigious Pleiades editions. This is a powerful, compelling memoir of an Amerasian boy's experience in Communist Vietnam from 1975, when the United States troops pulled out, until his family's migration to the United States in 1985. Initially, he wrote this book as a kind of personal catharsis, but he decided to publish it as a memorial to the thousands of Amerasians who have suffered and died.
In this sweeping and dramatic narrative, Alex Ross, music critic for The New Yorker, weaves together the histories of the twentieth century and its music, from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties; from Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies up to the present.
A revelatory, minute-by-minute account of JFK’s last hundred days that asks what might have been.
Kennedy’s last hundred days began just after the death of two-day-old Patrick Kennedy, and during this time, the president made strides in the Cold War, civil rights, Vietnam, and his personal life. Also in these months Kennedy finally came to view civil rights as a moral as well as a political issue, and after the March on Washington, he appreciated the power of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., for the first time.
Though he is often depicted as a devout cold warrior, Kennedy pushed through his proudest legislative achievement in this period, the Limited Test Ban Treaty. Throughout his presidency, Kennedy challenged demands from his advisers and the Pentagon to escalate America’s involvement in Vietnam. JFK’s Last Hundred Days is a gripping account that weaves together Kennedy’s public and private lives, explains why the grief following his assassination has endured so long, and solves the most tantalizing Kennedy mystery of all—not who killed him but who he was when he was killed, and where he would have led us.
They were part of the “Y”- (for “Wireless”) Service: the Listening Service – an organisation just as secret as Bletchley Park during the war, but nowadays still little-known and unrecognised. Whereas Bletchley Park was a claustrophobically close community crammed into a single Buckinghamshire mansion, the Listening Service went wherever the war went – which was all over the world.
To men and women often hardly out of school such exotic postings were life-changing adventures – even the journey out could be an epic voyage of troopships, flying boats and Indian railways – and the challenges not merely arduous night shifts of 12 hours of dizzying concentration, but heat so intense the perspiration ran into your shoes, or snakes in the filing cabinets. When the first bombs fell on London in August 1940, the city was transformed overnight into a battlefront. The Love-charm of Bombs is a powerful wartime chronicle told through the eyes of five prominent writers: Elizabeth Bowen, Graham Greene, Rose Macaulay, Hilde Spiel and Henry Yorke (writing as Henry Green). For most prisoners of war, life was nothing like such films as The Great Escape, but for a few brave escapees, fact was more extraordinary than fiction. By the time his body hung from the gallows for his crimes at Harper's Ferry, abolitionists had made John Brown a ''holy martyr'' in the fight against Southern slave owners.
In this riveting and character-driven history, one of America's most respected historians traces the ''disease in the public mind'' -distortions of reality that seized large numbers of Americans - in the decades-long run-up to the Civil War.
With his usual storytelling flair and unparalleled research, Tom Fleming offers a compelling, intimate look at the founders--George Washington, Ben Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison--and the women who played essential roles in their lives.
From hot-tempered Mary Ball Washington to promiscuous Rachel Lavien Hamilton, the founding fathers' mothers powerfully shaped their sons' visions of domestic life. Fleming nimbly takes us through a great deal of early American history, as the founding fathers strove to reconcile their private and public lives, often beset by a media every bit as gossip-seeking and inflammatory as ours today. In the first multi-volume biography of Abraham Lincoln to be published in decades, Lincoln scholar Michael Burlingame offers a fresh look at the life of one of America's greatest presidents. Volume 1 covers Lincoln's early childhood, his experiences as a farm boy in Indiana and Illinois, his legal training, and the political ambition that led to a term in Congress in the 1840s. But through it all—his difficult childhood, his contentious political career, a fratricidal war, and tragic personal losses—Lincoln preserved a keen sense of humour and acquired a psychological maturity that proved to be the North's most valuable asset in winning the Civil War. Published to coincide with the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth, this landmark publication establishes Burlingame as the most assiduous Lincoln biographer of recent memory and brings Lincoln alive to modern readers as never before.
During the course of the 1950s England lost confidence in its rulers and convinced itself to modernise. Last Trains examines why and how the railway system contracted, exposing the political failures that bankrupted the railways and examining officials' attempts to understand a transport revolution beyond their control.
In this brilliant new history, Dominic Sandbrook recreates the gaudy, schizophrenic atmosphere of the early Seventies: the world of Enoch Powell and Tony Benn, David Bowie and Brian Clough, Germaine Greer and Mary Whitehouse. For those who remember the days when you could buy a new colour television but power cuts stopped you from watching it, this book could hardly be more vivid. The Victorian era has dominated the popular imagination like no other period, but these myths and stories also give a very distorted view of the 19th century.
Using character portraits, events, and key moments, Paterson brings the real life of Victorian Britain alive - from the lifestyles of the aristocrats to the lowest ranks of the London slums.
During the fifteenth century, England was split in a bloody conflict between the Houses of York and Lancaster over who should claim the crown. The much admired historian Desmond Seward tells the story of this complex and dangerous period of history through the lives of five men and women who experienced the conflict first hand.
The British monarchy may be over a thousand years old, but the House of Windsor dates only from 1917, when, in the middle of the First World War that was to see the demise of the major thrones of continental Europe, it rebranded itself from the distinctly Germanic Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to the homely and familiar Windsor. Since then, the fine line trodden by the House of Windsor between ancient and modern, grandeur and thrift, splendour and informality, remoteness and accessibility, and influence and neutrality has left it more secure and its appeal more universal today than ever.
Anyone who loves cannabis or who travelled the 'hippie trail' will love these memoirs from a big time hashish smuggler. In October 1839, a few months after the Chinese Imperial Commissioner, Lin Zexu, dispatched these confident words to his emperor, a cabinet meeting in Windsor voted to fight Britain's first Opium War (1839-42) with China. Beginning with the dramas of the war itself, Julia Lovell explores its causes and consequences and, through this larger narrative, interweaves the curious stories of opium's promoters and attackers. Simon Schama’s dramatic, broad-ranging, and immensely readable epic history of Britain reaches its triumphant conclusion in this third and final volume, which stretches from the American Revolution to the present. The Fate of Empire tells the eventful and exhilarating story of Britain’s rise and fall as an imperial power, from the political turmoil of the 1770s to the struggle of present day leaders to find a way to make a different national future. Finally, Schama asks an essential question: what kind of Britain can hold together when its island isolation and its imperial dominion have both vanished? The second volume of Simon Schama's A History of Britain brings the histories of Britain's civil wars -- full of blighted idealism, shocking carnage, and unexpected outcomes -- startlingly to life.
When religious passion gave way to the equally consuming passion for profits, it became possible for the pieces of Britain to come together as the spectacularly successful business enterprise of "Britannia Incorporated." And in a few generations that business state expanded in a dizzying process that transformed what had been an obscure, off-shore footnote to Europe's great powers into the main event -- the most powerful empire in the world.
Yet somehow, it was the "wrong empire." The British considered it a bastion of liberty, yet it was based on military force and the enslavement of hundreds of thousands of Africans. The story of Britain from the earliest settlements in 3000BC to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603.
History clings tight but it also kicks loose,' writes Simon Schama at the outset of this, the first book in his three-volume journey into Britain's past. Change - sometimes gentle and subtle, sometimes shocking and violent - is the dynamic of Schama's unapologetically personal and grippingly written history, especially the changes that wash over custom and habit, transforming our loyalties. The compelling story of how the first transatlantic cable was laid —the people who dared, the people who lost, and the people who profited.
The Pope and Mussolini tells the story of two men who came to power in 1922, and together changed the course of twentieth-century history.
In a challenge to the conventional history of this period, in which a heroic Church does battle with the Fascist regime, Kertzer shows how Pius XI played a crucial role in making Mussolini’s dictatorship possible and keeping him in power.
With the recent opening of the Vatican archives covering Pius XI’s papacy, the full story of the Pope’s complex relationship with his Fascist partner can finally be told. This book contains all manner of grim and ancient punishments from London's long and bloody history. In 1612, William Shakespeare gave evidence in a court case at Westminster and it is the only occasion on which his actual spoken words were recorded.
In The Lodger Shakespeare we see the playwright in the daily context of a street in Jacobean London: “one Mr. Revolutions, droughts, famines, invasions, wars, regicides, government collapses—the calamities of the mid-seventeenth century were unprecedented in both frequency and extent.
In this meticulously researched volume, master historian Geoffrey Parker presents the firsthand testimony of men and women who saw and suffered from the sequence of political, economic, and social crises between 1618 to the late 1680s. Parker's demonstration of the link between climate change, war, and catastrophe 350 years ago stands as an extraordinary historical achievement. In the 1880s, fashionable Londoners left their elegant homes and clubs in Mayfair and Belgravia and crowded into omnibuses bound for midnight tours of the slums of East London. The slums of late-Victorian London became synonymous with all that was wrong with industrial capitalist society.
Slumming: Sexual and Social Politics in Victorian London elucidates the histories of a wide range of preoccupations about poverty and urban life, altruism and sexuality that remain central in Anglo-American culture, including the ethics of undercover investigative reporting, the connections between cross-class sympathy and same-sex desire, and the intermingling of the wish to rescue the poor with the impulse to eroticize and sexually exploit them. Moving the debate beyond the place of tactical intelligence in counterinsurgency warfare, Confronting the Colonies considers the view from Whitehall, where the biggest decisions were made.
Confronting the Colonies demonstrates for the first time how, in the decades after World War Two, the intelligence agenda expanded to include non-state actors, insurgencies, and irregular warfare. 1972 was the bloodiest year of an already bloody conflict played out on the streets of Northern Ireland.
In The Bloodiest Year, Ken Wharton, a former soldier who did two tours of Northern Ireland, tells the story of the worst year of the Troubles through the accounts of the men who patrolled the streets of Belfast and Londonderry, who saw their comrades die and walked with death themselves.
Covering everything from head trauma to poison ivy, Hikers' and Backpackers' Guide to Treating Medical Emergencies presents information that will enable trekkers to recognize and treat whatever illness or injury they may encounter on the trail. Many have died in the Australian bush who might have lived had they known the appropriate survival skills. The author, who popularized the term “bushcraft,” claims its practice has many unexpected results. The “Art of Modern Gunfighting” is the newly released book written by International Tactical Training Seminars, Inc.
Brett shares her experiences of over 21 years training individuals from all walks of life, including a special section on training women. War—organized violence against an enemy of the state—seems part and parcel of the American journey. Where the Domino Fell recounts the history of American involvement in Vietnam from the end of World War II, clarifying the political aims, military strategy, and social and economic factors that contributed to the participants' actions. The American Military: A Narrative History presents a comprehensive introduction to more than four centuries of American military history. Chapters also explore elements of cultural, social, political, economic, and technological developments in relationship to military history, as well as topics including patterns of national service, the evolution of civil-military relations, and the advent of all-volunteer forces.
The runaway success of Stuff White People Like and the popular shit-people-say YouTube videos prove one thing: people love to read about and laugh at themselves. In this hilarious and easy-to-use field guide, actor and author Jeffery Self compiles everything you’ve ever wanted to know about heteros including their nesting behavior, feeding and mating habits, migration patterns, key identification features, and more. A revolutionary new way to understand America's complex cultural and political landscape, with proof that local communities have a major impact on the nation's behavior-in the voting booth and beyond. In a climate of culture wars and tremendous economic uncertainty, the media have often reduced America to a simplistic schism between red states and blue states. Looking at the data, they recognized that the country breaks into twelve distinct types of communities, and old categories like "soccer mom" and "working class" don't matter as much as we think.
As one of the most listened to nationally syndicated radio talk-show hosts and the driving force behind the Rallies for America, Glenn Beck entertains, inspires, and informs millions of listeners. With his inimitable combination of self-effacing humor and heartfelt conviction, Glenn rails against many of the forces that keep us from our potential as a nation and as individuals -- and tells how to overcome them.
Glenn Beck's compelling message in The Real America echoes the ideas he has delivered to thousands of people with his groundbreaking Rallies for America: Once we connect with our power individually, we can empower others -- and then we can be as great and as grand as we have always wanted to be as a person, as a people, and as a nation. Breaking Bad: Critical Essays on the Contexts, Politics, Style, and Reception of the Television Series, edited by David P. The book's first section locates and addresses the series from several contemporary social contexts, including neo-liberalism, its discourses and policies, the cultural obsession with the economy of time and its manipulation, and the epistemological principles and assumptions of Walter White's criminal alias Heisenberg.
Section two investigates how the series characterizes and intersects with current cultural politics, such as male angst and the re-emergence of hegemonic masculinity, the complex portrayal of Latinos, and the depiction of physical and mental impairment and disability.
This brilliant new novel by an American master takes us on a radical trip into the mind of a man who, more than once in his life, has been the inadvertent agent of disaster.
Speaking from an unknown place and to an unknown interlocutor, Andrew is thinking, Andrew is talking, Andrew is telling the story of his life, his loves, and the tragedies that have led him to this place and point in time. Written with psychological depth and great lyrical precision, this suspenseful and groundbreaking novel delivers a voice for our times—funny, probing, skeptical, mischievous, profound. The landmark novel of the Sixties – a powerful account of a woman searching for her personal, political and professional identity while facing rejection and betrayal. Widely regarded as Doris Lessing’s masterpiece and one of the greatest novels of the twentieth century, The Golden Notebook is wry and perceptive, bold and indispensable.
In this sophisticated psychological novel, Alvina Houghton, a young Englishwoman, undergoes a journey of self-discovery, after finding herself alone in the world.
The Bridges of Constantine is a poignant fresco of Algeria over the last 50 years, a searing love story and a hymn to a lost city. Khaled is consumed with passion for her, and she comes to embody the homeland and the city he still grieves for – the city he paints over and over again in his canvases. The first novel in an award-winning, bestselling trilogy that spans Algeria’s tumultuous recent history, The Bridges of Constantine is a lyrical and heartrending love story about loss and remembrance, exile and belonging. Not only the creator of the immortal Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle produced a diverse and entertaining oeuvre of works, which you can now enjoy with ease on your eReader. Willy Vlautin demonstrates his extraordinary talent for confronting issues facing modern America, illuminated through the lives of three memorable characters who are looking for a way out of their financial, familial, and existential crises in The Free. The way we create and organize knowledge is the theme of From the Tree to the Labyrinth, a major achievement by one of the world's foremost thinkers on language and interpretation.
Moving effortlessly from analyses of Aristotle and James Joyce to the philosophical difficulties of telling dogs from cats, Eco demonstrates time and again his inimitable ability to bridge ancient, medieval, and modern modes of thought. Why We Read Fiction offers a lucid overview of the most exciting area of research in contemporary cognitive psychology known as "Theory of Mind" and discusses its implications for literary studies. Zunshine's surprising new interpretations of well-known literary texts and popular cultural representations constantly prod her listeners to rethink their own interest in fictional narrative.
For couples looking to spice up their sex life or just looking to have a bit of fun, Kama Sutra: A Position a Day is packed with tips and erotic know-how about how to perfect and enjoy each position.
This wonderful book takes an affectionate, entertaining and perceptive look at the English people. Whether all human languages are fundamentally the same or different has been a subject of debate for ages. The discovery of these rules and how they may vary promises to yield a linguistic equivalent of the Periodic Table of the Elements: a single framework by which we can understand the fundamental structure of all human language. This dynamic chronicle of the race to find the “missing links” between humans and apes transports readers into the highly competitive world of fossil hunting and into the lives of the ambitious scientists intent on pinpointing the dawn of humankind. The quest to find where and when the earliest human ancestors first appeared is one of the most exciting and challenging of all scientific pursuits. An award-winning science writer, Ann Gibbons introduces the various maverick fossil hunters and describes their most significant discoveries in Africa.
Through scrupulous research and vivid first-person reporting, The First Human takes readers behind the scenes to reveal the intense challenges of fossil hunting on a grand competitive scale. Jennifer Ouellette never took math in college, mostly because she-like most people-assumed that she wouldn't need it in real life. In today’s hyperactive world—where bold new challenges can seem to bring about the same stale answers—creative thinking is more important than ever. Because creativity is a set of skills that anyone can improve, you can learn how to wield the same research-based tools and techniques that today’s creative people use in their own work. Whether you want to overcome writer’s block, look at your career with a fresh perspective, solve a complex business problem, introduce a new idea to the marketplace, or figure out the best way to resolve a tense argument, Professor Puccio’s course will give you everything you need so that when other people are dodging life’s challenges, you’re uncovering the potentially successful opportunities they’ll have missed.
It doesn’t matter if you’re a Nobel Prize-winning writer, a Fortune 500 CEO, or a high school student; the stages of thought you move through to close the gap between what you have and what you want are the same.
Creative problem solving is delightfully intuitive, building on the natural creative process in all of us instead of replacing it. With this series, you’ll get a solid introduction to the four major stages of this process. Clarify: Once you’ve determined your problem and your goal, you need to identify the challenges (both obvious and hidden) you’ll have to address and overcome to achieve the results you want.
Develop: Now you need to focus on development, which involves taking your ideas, evaluating them, determining which ones are workable, and transforming them into solutions. Implement: Last comes the most tactical part of the process, in which you move the solutions from your own head into reality, using a plan that includes specific, measurable steps. Solution enactment: A kind of dress rehearsal often used by tech developers, this tool involves acting out a proposed solution to see how it could be improved. Stakeholder analysis: To determine who can support (or hinder) the success of your plan of action, analyze the positions of those individuals who have a stake in your plan. How-How diagram: Designed to help move your solution forward, this webbing tool forces you to be more concrete by repeatedly asking yourself, “How do I achieve this solution?” in order to shift your perspective into concrete action steps. Using simple exercises, in-studio demonstrations, hypothetical scenarios, and the real-world experiences and successes of creative giants in business, science, and the arts, Professor Puccio teaches you how to wield these and other fascinating tools. As you explore the creative-thinking process in great detail, you’ll gain more than just a framework with which to tackle tomorrow’s professional and personal challenges. The Creative Thinker’s Toolkit comes complete with access to FourSight, a short self-evaluation measure developed by Professor Puccio that can help determine what kind of creative thinker you are. Whatever kind of creative thinker you are, you’ll find yourself in the hands of a master educator who has devoted his entire career to researching and instructing others about creative thinking as the road to success. But what you’ll likely find most enjoyable about learning with Professor Puccio is his inspiration and encouragement. Grand Theft Auto is one of the biggest and most controversial videogame franchises of all time. Whether you love Grand Theft Auto or hate it, or just want to understand the defining entertainment product of a generation, you'll want to read Jacked and get the real story behind this boundary-pushing game. In the early 1970s, video arcade games sprung to life with the advent of Pong and other coin-operated games. Brian Eddy, former executive director, producer, and programmer for Midway Games, traces the evolution of arcade video games in Classic Video Games, giving readers an inside look at the stratospheric rise--and collapse--of the industry.
In What a Wonderful World, Marcus Chown, bestselling author of Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt You and the Solar System app, uses his vast scientific knowledge and deep understanding of extremely complex processes to answer simple questions about the workings of our everyday lives. In 1904, Henri Poincare, a giant among mathematicians who transformed the fledging area of topology into a powerful field essential to all mathematics and physics, posed the Poincare conjecture, a tantalizing puzzle that speaks to the possible shape of the universe. As Donal O’Shea reveals in his elegant narrative, Poincare’s conjecture opens a door to the history of geometry, from the Pythagoreans of ancient Greece to the celebrated geniuses of the nineteenth-century German academy and, ultimately, to a fascinating array of personalities—Poincare and Bernhard Riemann, William Thurston and Richard Hamilton, and the eccentric genius who appears to have solved it, Grigory Perelman. A useful scientific theory, claimed Einstein, must be explicable to any intelligent person. Introducing readers to the world of particle physics, Deep Down Things opens new realms within which are many clues to unraveling the mysteries of the universe.
David McRaney's first book, You Are Not So Smart, evolves from his wildly popular blog of the same name. Like You Are Not So Smart, YOU ARE NOW LESS DUMB is grounded in the idea that we all believe ourselves to be objective observers of reality-except we're not. McRaney also reveals the true price of happiness, why Benjamin Franklin was such a badass, and how to avoid falling for our own lies.
Forager and naturalist Paul Chambers explores the coast, fields, streets and gardens to reveal over a hundred of Britain's most exciting edible plants, flowers and seaweeds. With chapters that cover all parts of the British countryside, including urban environments and the seashore, FORAGING offers a comprehensive guide that will suit beginners and experienced foragers as well as those with a general interest in the natural and cultural history of edible plants. With this book in hand, readers of any age will discover — just outside their own doors, no matter where they live—a world they never knew existed. This is the incredible true story of one man’s heroic battle against impossible odds, a tale of pain and anguish, bravery and utter solitude, a tale that ends in a victory not only over the implacable ocean but over himself as well. At the age of forty-five, Gerard d’Aboville set out to row across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to the United States.
One hundred and thirty-four days after his departure, d’Aboville arrived in the little fishing village of Ilwaco, Washington, leaving his body bruised and battered, and weighing thirty-seven pounds less. In the Shadow of the Greatest Generation traces the shared experiences of Korean War veterans from their childhoods in the Great Depression and World War II through military induction and training,the war, and efforts in more recent decades to organize and gain wider recognition of their service.
Largely overshadowed by World War II’s “greatest generation” and the more vocal veterans of the Vietnam era, Korean War veterans remain relatively invisible in the narratives of both war and its aftermath. In the Shadow of the Greatest Generation not only gives voice to those Americans who served in the “forgotten war” but chronicles the larger personal and collective consequences of waging war the American way. Tom Brokaw touched the heart of the nation with his towering #1 bestseller The Greatest Generation, a moving tribute to those who gave the world so much -- and who left an enduring legacy of heroism and grace.
These letters and reflections cross time, distance, and generations as they give voice to lives forever changed by war: eighty-year-old Clarence M. From the front lines of battle to the back porches of beloved hometowns, The Greatest Generation Speaks brings to life the hopes and dreams of a generation who fought our most hard-won victories, and whose struggles and sacrifices made our future possible.
In this superb book, Tom Brokaw goes out into America, to tell through the stories of individual men and women the story of a generation, America's citizen heroes and heroines who came of age during the Great Depression and the Second World War and went on to build modern America.
In this book you'll meet people like Charles Van Gorder, who set up during D-Day a MASH-like medical facility in the middle of the fighting, and then came home to create a clinic and hospital in his hometown.
Through these and other stories in The Greatest Generation, you'll relive with ordinary men and women, military heroes, famous people of great achievement, and community leaders how these extraordinary times forged the values and provided the training that made a people and a nation great. One of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s closest friends and the first female secretary of labor, Perkins capitalized on the president’s political savvy and popularity to enact most of the Depression-era programs that are today considered essential parts of the country’s social safety network. Frances Perkins is no longer a household name, yet she was one of the most influential women of the twentieth century. Arriving in Washington at the height of the Great Depression, Perkins pushed for massive public works projects that created millions of jobs for unemployed workers.
Written with a wit that echoes Frances Perkins’s own, award-winning journalist Kirstin Downey gives us a riveting exploration of how and why Perkins slipped into historical oblivion, and restores Perkins to her proper place in history. The Reynolds tobacco family was an American dynasty like the Rockefellers, Vanderbilts, and Astors. Dick Reynolds was dubbed "Kid Carolina" when as a teenager, he ran away from home and stowed away as part of the crew on a freighter. Despite his personal demons, Dick played a pivotal role in shaping twentieth-century America through his business savvy and politics.
Unlike most white Americans who, if they are so inclined, can search their ancestral records, identifying who among their forebears was the first to set foot on this country’s shores, most African Americans, in tracing their family’s past, encounter a series of daunting obstacles.
For too long, African Americans’ family trees have been barren of branches, but, very recently, advanced genetic testing techniques, combined with archival research, have begun to fill in the gaps. More than a work of history, In Search of Our Roots is a book of revelatory importance that, for the first time, brings to light the lives of ordinary men and women who, by courageous example, blazed a path for their famous descendants.


The Cuban missile crisis was the most dangerous confrontation of the Cold War and the most perilous moment in American history. Based on the author’s authoritative transcriptions of the secretly recorded ExComm meetings, the book conveys the emotional ambiance of the meetings by capturing striking moments of tension and anger as well as occasional humorous intervals. Stern documents that JFK and his administration bore a substantial share of the responsibility for the crisis.
Previously unknown operations and new names continue to surface in the Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations. In 1942, the Brooklyn-born Erickson was a millionaire oil mogul who volunteered for a dangerous mission inside the Third Reich: locating the top-secret synthetic oil plants that kept the German war machine running.
After the war, Erickson's was revealed as a secret agent and received the Medal of Freedom for his bravery. Based on newly-discovered archives in Sweden, The Secret Agent is a riveting piece of narrative nonfiction that tells the true story of Erickson's remarkable life for the first time. Howard Zinn was perhaps the best-known and most widely celebrated popular interpreter of American history in the twentieth century, renowned as a bestselling author, a political activist, a lecturer, and one of America’s most recognizable and admired progressive voices. His rich, complicated, and fascinating life placed Zinn at the heart of the signal events of modern American history—from the battlefields of World War II to the McCarthy era, the civil rights and the antiwar movements, and beyond. The greatest obstacle to sound economic policy is not entrenched special interests or rampant lobbying, but the popular misconceptions, irrational beliefs, and personal biases held by ordinary voters. Boldly calling into question our most basic assumptions about American politics, Caplan contends that democracy fails precisely because it does what voters want. The Myth of the Rational Voter takes an unflinching look at how people who vote under the influence of false beliefs ultimately end up with government that delivers lousy results. With the same compelling, you-are-there immediacy of his acclaimed fiction, Tom Clancy provides detailed descriptions of tanks, helicopters, artillery, and more -- the brilliant technology behind the U. Only the author of The Hunt for Red October could capture the reality of life aboard a nuclear submarine. After World War II the United States and Britain airlifted food and supplies into Russian-blockaded West Berlin. Back matter includes a biographical note, a historical note, a source list, an index, and a note from the author.
During the battle of Iwo Jima, two enemy grenades landed close to Jack Lucas and his buddies. For this brave action seventeen-year-old Jack Lucas from North Carolina became the youngest Marine in history to receive the Medal of Honor. Through meticulous research of the newly completed Lincoln Legal Papers, as well as of recently discovered letters and photographs, White provides a portrait of Lincoln’s personal, political, and moral evolution. A transcendent, sweeping, passionately written biography that greatly expands our knowledge and understanding of its subject, A.
When assessing his arguments, Svolik complements these and other historical case studies with the statistical analysis of comprehensive, original data on institutions, leaders, and ruling coalitions across all dictatorships from 1946 to 2008. An outstanding collection of firsthand accounts from the front lines of our military history, drawn from letters, diaries, and reportage from the Plains of Abraham and the Red River Rebellion to the battlefields of two world wars and Korea, as well as the harrowing missions in Bosnia and Afghanistan.
In January 1991, eight members of the SAS regiment embarked upon a top secret mission that was to infiltrate them deep behind enemy lines. Each man laden with 15 stone of equipment, they patrolled 20km across flat desert to reach their objective. Bravo Two Zero is a breathtaking account of Special Forces soldiering: a chronicle of superhuman courage, endurance and dark humour in the face of overwhelming odds.
Starting with the Iran-Iraq War, through the First Gulf War and sanctions, Dina Rizk Khoury traces the political, social, and cultural processes of the normalization of war in Iraq during the last twenty-three years of Ba'thist rule. The definitive military chronicle of the Iraq war and a searing judgment on the strategic blindness with which America has conducted it, drawing on the accounts of senior military officers giving voice to their anger for the first time.
The American military is a tightly sealed community, and few outsiders have reason to know that a great many senior officers view the Iraq war with incredulity and dismay. As many in the military publicly acknowledge here for the first time, the guerrilla insurgency that exploded several months after Saddam's fall was not foreordained. There are a number of heroes in Fiasco-inspiring leaders from the highest levels of the Army and Marine hierarchies to the men and women whose skill and bravery led to battlefield success in towns from Fallujah to Tall Afar-but again and again, strategic incoherence rendered tactical success meaningless. Famed investigative journalist Eric Schlosser digs deep to uncover secrets about the management of America’s nuclear arsenal. Written with the vibrancy of a first-rate thriller, Command and Control interweaves the minute-by-minute story of an accident at a nuclear missile silo in rural Arkansas with a historical narrative that spans more than fifty years. Drawing on recently declassified documents and interviews with men who designed and routinely handled nuclear weapons, Command and Control takes readers into a terrifying but fascinating world that, until now, has been largely hidden from view. This book is a searching, lyrical exploration of the meaning of justice, one that invites readers of all political persuasions to consider familiar controversies in fresh and illuminating ways. In this new edition of his acclaimed autobiography — long out of print and rare until now — Alan Watts tracks his spiritual and philosophical evolution. Told in a nonlinear style, In My Own Way combines Watts's brand of unconventional philosophy with wry observations on Western culture and often hilarious accounts of gurus, celebrities, and psychedelic drug experiences. Mental_floss is proud to present a full-bodied jolt of inspiration for thirsty minds on the go. This third revised edition of "Rebels & Devils" brings together some of the most talented, controversial and rebellious people of our time. In all of human history, the essence of the independent mind has been the need to think and act according to standards from within, not without: To follow one's own path, not that of the crowd.
On a bleak New England farm, a taciturn young man has resigned himself to a life of grim endurance.
Included with Ethan Frome are the novella The Touchstone and three short stories, “The Last Asset,” “The Other Two,” and “Xingu.” Together, this collection offers a survey of the extraordinary range and power of one of America’s finest writers. This is Newland Archer’s world as he prepares to marry the beautiful but conventional May Welland. When Leaves of Grass was first published in 1855 as a slim tract of twelve untitled poems, Walt Whitman was still an unknown. Throughout his prolific writing career, Whitman continually revised his work and expanded Leaves of Grass, which went through nine, substantively different editions, culminating in the final, authoritative "Death-bed Edition." Now the original 1855 version and the "Death-bed Edition" of 1892 have been brought together in a single volume, allowing the reader to experience the total scope of Whitman's genius, which produced love lyrics, visionary musings, glimpses of nightmare and ecstasy, celebrations of the human body and spirit, and poems of loneliness, loss, and mourning. Alive with the mythical strength and vitality that epitomized the American experience in the nineteenth century, Leaves of Grass continues to inspire, uplift, and unite those who read it.
From the conflicts in Northern Ireland, through the tactics of civil rights leaders and the problem of privilege, Gladwell demonstrates how we misunderstand the true meaning of advantage and disadvantage. David and Goliath draws on the stories of remarkable underdogs, history, science, psychology and on Malcolm Gladwell's unparalleled ability to make the connections others miss. In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point, Blink and Outliers.
Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz.
In his landmark bestseller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant-in the blink of an eye-that actually aren't as simple as they seem.
Blink reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of "thin-slicing"-filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables. The evidence points to a dangerous colleague from Harvath's past and a plan for further attacks on an unimaginable scale. But every politician has a secret, and when the daughter of a highly-connected family is kidnapped abroad, America's new leader will agree to anything - even a crazily dangerous rescue plan- to keep his secret hidden.
But surviving agent and ex-Navy SEAL Scot Harvath doesn't believe the Fatah Revolutionary Council is responsible for the attack. Smith and Lourie ingested and inhaled a host of things that surround all of us all the time. Never before has a detailed, personal biography of this charismatic monarch been set against the cultural, social, and political background of his glittering court.
Her love of the subject is contagious and makes her the perfect guide to ancient Egypt for the student, the layman, and those who plan to visit-or have visited-the Nile Valley. Mertz's stunning collection of everything related to the civilization of ancient Egypt is brought to life through Lorna Raver's informative and entertaining narration. As other reviewers have noted, the text is a bit dated, having been written a few decades ago. In Cold Blood is a work that transcends its moment, yielding poignant insights into the nature of American violence. Capote's spellbinding narrative plumbs the psychological and emotional depths of a senseless quadruple murder in America's heartland.
This facile audio actor delivers an award-worthy performance, well-suited for a tale of such power that moves not only around the country but around the territory of the human psyche and heart.
He stumbled upon his maternal grandfather's death certificate from 1948 and discovered that the evidence pointed to murder in that basement cell.
The city jail itself was a throwback to the old lockups and rock piles of popular fiction, while the sheriff's office was dishonest and inept - and tried to cover up the death. He shows us real-life characters who broaden our understanding of the city's history: sheriffs and deputies, political bosses and coroners.
Unfortunately, modern armies, using Pavlovian and operant conditioning have developed sophisticated ways of overcoming this instinctive aversion. Now, Grossman has updated this classic work to include information on 21st-century military conflicts, recent crime rates, suicide bombings, school shootings, and much more.
America has fragmented, and Puzo's new family, the Clericuzios, the shadowy power behind the Mafia, is feeling modernity's centrifugal force.
But in Puzo's world, the search for power and wealth demands brutality; dream factories, whether of Vegas or Hollywood, are awash in vengeance, betrayal and blood.
As high rollers, hustlers, and scheming manipulators use power, sex, and betrayal to win, the strongest survive - but fools die.
All while an eccentric inventor - he Sleeper - dreams of a passage to the centre of the hollow earth. But to awaken him might mean the end of his dream, the closing of the Windermere Passage, leaving the three intrepid explorers marooned in a savage land forgotten by time itself. The selections in this volume, nine short stories and a book-length story, Anarchaos , originally appeared in SF magazines.
While he lacks most human emotions, Rolf does love his brother Gar who was killed on Anarchaos, and he is bent on vegeance. It is a compelling, frightening, and scientifically sound look at exactly how psychopaths work in the corporate environment, teaching you how they apply their "instinctive" manipulation techniques to business processes.
Americans may be earning more than ever before, but we’re paying a steep price: we’re working longer, seeing our families less, and our communities are fragmenting. He demonstrates that although we have more choices as consumers, and investors, the choices themselves are undermining the rest of our lives.
In simple, plain language, Peter Sander explains how economies work, why they grow, how they contract, and what the government can and can't do to help them. Polk compelled a divided Congress to support his war with Mexico, it was the first time that the young American nation would engage another republic in battle.
It is a story of Indian fights, Manifest Destiny, secret military maneuvers, gunshot wounds, and political spin. Henry Scott Stokes, one of Mishima's closest friends, was the only non-Japanese allowed to attend the trial of the men involved in Mishima's spectacular suicide. It’s the perfect complement to the October 2009 movie Amelia, starring Hilary Swank, Richard Gere, and Ewan McGregor. It is the story of the crushing rivalries between men and women exploring for oil five miles beneath the sea, battling for control of the world's biggest corporations, and gambling billions of dollars twenty-four hours every day on oil's prices. Yet there is a tradition of American anti-imperialism that exposes this misleading mythology.
Enormous galleons carrying silk and silver across the Pacific created the first true global economy, and the first international megacorporations were emerging as economic powers. A Companion to Roman Imperialism, written by a distinguished body of scholars, explores the extraordinary phenomenon of Rome’s rise to empire to reveal the impact which this had on her subject peoples and on the Romans themselves.
Majbom Madsen, Susan Mattern, Sophie Mills, David Potter, Jonathan Prag, Steven Rutledge, Maurice Sartre, John Serrati, Tom Stevenson, Martin Stone, and James Thorne.
This volume addresses the changing relationships between women and armed forces from antiquity to the present.
Psychology Moment by Moment guides clinicians through the process of creating and applying mindfulness-based interventions for a variety of client populations and problems, session by session, to focus treatment even more and help clients make substantial progress. This handbook also offers methods for measuring and documenting client mindfulness that have previously been available only to researchers. Little more than a month later the supply of credit dried up practically overnight, leaving the world wondering how bank liquidity could suddenly vanish.
In this comprehensive history the author covers all geographical regions and considers the effects of the major countries on each other.
Rist traces it from its origins in the Western view of history, through the early stages of the world system, the rise of U.S. In the rush to open societies to the benefits of competition, economists have overlooked the fundamental instability of competitive markets. With biopirates trolling the blood industry, fish-farming bandits ravaging the high seas, pornography developing virtually in Second Life, and games like World of Warcraft spawning online sweatshops, how are rogue industries transmuting into global empires?
Nothing like this great railroad had been seen in the world when the last spike, a golden one, was driven in at Promontory Peak, Utah, in 1869, as the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific joined tracks. Remembered largely for his cry for "liberty or death," Henry was actually the first (and most colorful) of America’s Founding Fathers - first to call Americans to arms against Britain, first to demand a bill of rights, and first to fight the growth of big government after the Revolution.
Henry’s passion for liberty (as well as his very large family), suggested to many Americans that he, not Washington, was the real father of his country. As Unger points out, Henry’s words continue to echo across America and inspire millions to fight government intrusion in their daily lives.
During the next three years, Lewis rose from callow trainee to bond salesman, raking in millions for the firm and cashing in on a modern-day gold rush.
From the frat-boy camaraderie of the forty-first-floor trading room to the killer instinct that made ambitious young men gamble everything on a high-stakes game of bluffing and deception, here is Michael Lewis’s knowing and hilarious insider’s account of an unprecedented era of greed, gluttony, and outrageous fortune. He enjoys a drink or three, and if it's in the company of a pretty girl, so much the better.
It's not long before he is tearing around the country in his embassy Land Rover, shaking off Uzbek police tails and crashing through roadblocks to meet with dissidents and expose their persecutors.
This study examines the evolution of the biological, psychological, sociological, and behavioral meanings of menarche and menstruation in dominant European and European-American Culture from the Classical Greek period through the early Twenty-First-Century. Sketching lived experiences across the centuries, she demonstrates the key roles that women played in shaping Russia's political, economic, social, and cultural development for over a millennium. Though a "slow starter," his career took off when he was transferred to the small team of detectives at Scotland Yard in 1862, where he became known as "The Chieftain." This book paints the most detailed picture yet published of detective work in mid-Victorian Britain, covering "murders most foul," "slums and Society," the emergence of terrorism related to Ireland, and Victorian frauds. This book reveals much that scientists and cultural historians have learned about the pervasive interconnections between infectious microbes and humans.
This book examines and critiques many widely held pseudoscientific beliefs in light of these laws. Laws of permission, such as Newton's laws of motion, generally do not allow precise predictions except in the simplest cases.
Their trip retraced a mythical route flown by their father, Tom Buck, a brash, colorful ex-barnstormer who had lost a leg in a tragic plane crash before his sons were born - but who so loved the adventure of flight that he taught his boys to fly before they could drive. The brothers have a lot to resolve among themselves too - as Kern, the shy, meticulous, dedicated dreamer, and Rinker, the rebellious second son, must finally come to understand and depend on each other in the complex way that only brothers can. These 2 young men must separate from their difficult, quirky father - literally by putting a country's distance between them - but they do it on their father's terms: in an airplane. Now, for the first time, the fundamental skills taught by this elite leadership and management institution have been collected in one easy-to-digest volume. It is ideal for anyone who wants to listen to articles while travelling, exercising or just relaxing. The publication is targeted at the high-end "prestige" segment of the market and counts among its audience influential business and government decision-makers.
Her precocious and willful daughter, Miriam, equally passionate in her activism, flees Rose’s influence to embrace the dawning counterculture of Greenwich Village.
Flawed and idealistic, Lethem’s characters struggle to inhabit the utopian dream in an America where radicalism is viewed with bemusement, hostility, or indifference. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century.
Speaking to each in turn, Leonard slowly reveals his secrets as the hours tick by and the moment of truth approaches.
What the author describes is always happening somewhere in the world, but not in Britain - it's far too old, too stable. He tells you all you need to know - the grim realities - and not much more.The fractured style of the writing, quite unlike anything I've ever seen before, reflects the shattered lives of the protagonists.
Encompassing the spiritual, philosophical, political, mystical, and erotic strains that have emerged over millennia, this broadly representative selection also includes a preface on the art of translation, a general introduction to Chinese poetic form, biographical headnotes for each of the poets, and concise essays on the dynasties that structure the book. Dondi Vance is the son of two famous graffiti artists from New York City’s “golden era” of subway bombing. A wizened shell of his former self, Billy is still reeling from a psychic attack by an angry sha-man in the Amazon basin when Dondi finds him at the top of a pseudo-magical staircase in DUMBO. Moving throughout New York City’s unseen com­munities, from the tunnel camps of the Mole People to the drug dens of Crown Heights, Rage Is Back is a kaleidoscopic tour de force from a writer at the top of his game. Munro, better recognized by the pen name Saki, produced works that contrasted the conventions and hypocrisies of Edwardian England with the uncomplicated and sometimes cruel state of nature, a conflict which the latter usually won. The Pumpkin Eater is a rare, profoundly disturbing book, the kind that perceptive readers must wish would never end. There seems to be an uncounted horde, a chorus innocently unaware of the tragedy in which they are all involved. Her absolute honesty, her tough humour, and her utter lack of self-pit, make a most forceful and appealing woman. Her sometime s savage style, her unerring ability to touch our guilts and fears, and her penetrating, perfectly controlled style were never more marvellously employed than in this superb book.
Profane, affectionate, and radically honest, California Book Award-winning author Adam Mansbach's verses perfectly capture the familiar--and unspoken--tribulations of putting your little angel down for the night. She takes us back in time and into the life of one of the most enigmatic and notorious women of the nineteenth century. The sensationalistic trial made headlines throughout the world, and the jury delivered a guilty verdict.
Flooded with memories, she begins to realise that going home means entering not only another place, butt another time.
But in her version, Atwood brilliantly recasts the monster as Zenia, a villainess of demonic proportions, and sets her loose in the lives of three friends, Tony, Charis, and Roz.
In love and war, illusion and deceit, Zenia's subterranean malevolence takes us deep into her enemies' pasts. In clear and concise language, this lively guide explains that the same methods used in the high-pressure world of writing for television can be applied to fiction storytelling in all its forms, from poetry, short stories, and novels to memoirs, stage plays, and movie scripts. Covered head-to-toe in strict, modest clothing, she received a rigorous education at Alta Academy, the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints' school headed by Warren Jeffs. The following year, Rebecca and the rest of the world watched as a team of Texas Rangers raided the Yearning for Zion Ranch, a stronghold of the FLDS. The most original of his later works is this book about Nantes, which is Gracq’s personal and profound response to Proust’s synthesis of memory, reverie, and realism.
His story, which recalls The Killing Fields, recounts a descent from wealth and comfort into the horrors of Communist rule.
Taking readers into the labyrinth of modern style, Ross draws revelatory connections between the century's most influential composers and the wider culture. While Jackie was recuperating, the premature infant and his father were flown to Boston for Patrick’s treatment. Kennedy began a reappraisal in the last hundred days that would have led to the withdrawal of all sixteen thousand U.S. Before the German war machine’s messages could be decoded – turning the course of the war in a campaign like the Desert War – thousands more young men and women had to locate and monitor endless streams of radio traffic around the clock, and transcribe its Morse code with a speed few have ever managed since.
Without it, however, the Allies would have known nothing of the enemy’s military intentions. Its listeners might be posted to bustling Cairo to listen in to Rommel’s Eighth Army, or Casablanca in Morocco, or Karachi for the Burma campaign, or in one case even the idyllic Cocos Islands in the Indian Ocean to monitor Japan – or they might be sent to congenial Scarborough or Douglas in the Isle of Man to listen in to German submarines.
In all of them it bred self-reliance and broad horizons rare to their generation, while many found lifelong romance in their far-flung corner of the world.
For most Londoners, the sirens, guns, planes and bombs heralded gruelling nights of sleeplessness, fear and loss. Volunteering as ambulance drivers, fire-fighters and ARP wardens, these were the successors to the soldier poets of the First World War and their story has never been told. Using personal accounts, authentic reports from German guards, and debrief documents in the National Archives, this is the true story of the many exciting escape attempts from POW camps during the Second World War. He offers a powerful look at the challenges women faced in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
Incorporating the field notes of earlier biographers, along with decades of research in multiple manuscript archives and long-neglected newspapers, this remarkable work will both alter and reinforce our current understanding of America's sixteenth president. In volume 2, Burlingame examines Lincoln's life during his presidency and the Civil War, narrating in fascinating detail the crisis over Fort Sumter and Lincoln's own battles with relentless office seekers, hostile newspaper editors, and incompetent field commanders. The bankrupt steam-powered railway, run by a retired general, symbolised everything that was wrong with the country; the future lay in motorways and high speed electric - or even atomic - express trains. It is a story of the increasing alienation of bureaucrats from the public they thought they were serving, but also of a nation that thinks it lives in the countryside trying to come to terms with modernity. An age when the unions were on the march and the socialist revolution seemed at hand, but also when feminism, permissiveness, pornography and environmentalism were transforming the lives of millions. It is the perfect guide to a luridly colourful Seventies landscape that shaped our present from the financial boardroom to the suburban bedroom. The early Victorians were much stranger than we usually imagine, and their world would have felt very different from our own. This includes the right way to use a fan, why morning visits were conducted in the afternoon, what the Victorian family ate, and how they enjoyed their free time, as well as the Victorian legacy today: convenience food, coffee bars, window shopping, mass media, and celebrity culture. The civil wars consumed the whole nation in a series of battles that eventually saw the Tudor dynasty take power. In a gripping narrative the personal trials of the principal characters interweave with the major events and personalities of one of the most significant turning points in British history.
By redefining its loyalties to identify with its people and country rather than the princes, kings and emperors of Europe to whom it was related by birth and marriage, it set the monarchy on the path of adaptation, making itself relevant and allowing it to survive.
The conflict turned out to be rich in tragicomedy: in bureaucratic fumblings, military missteps, political opportunism and collaboration.
The Opium War is both the story of modern China – starting from this first conflict with the West – and an analysis of the country's contemporary self-image. The volume also examines the Romantic generation, the role of women in Victorian England, industrialization, and the liberal empire from Ireland to India, which promised material improvement, but delivered coercion and famine. An examination of the legacy of the British ideal of freedom is at the heart of this entertaining and well-researched book. These conflicts were fought unsparingly between the nations of the islands -- Ireland, England, and Scotland -- and between parliament and the crown. In America, the emptiness of British claims to protect "freedom" was thrown back into the teeth of colonial governors and redcoat soldiers, while the likes of Sam Adams and George Washington inherited the mantle of Cromwell. But he also captures the intimacies of palace and parliament and the seductions of profit and pleasure.
At the heart of this history lie questions of compelling importance for Britain's future as well as its past: what makes or breaks a nation?
It tells of the dramatic attempts to cross the Atlan-tic during the 1850s and 1860s, from the first failed attempts to the project that finally succeeded. Kertzer comes the gripping story of Pope Pius XI’s secret relations with Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. In exchange for Vatican support, Mussolini restored many of the privileges the Church had lost and gave in to the pope’s demands that the police enforce Catholic morality.
Vivid, dramatic, with surprises at every turn, The Pope and Mussolini is history writ large and with the lightning hand of truth. Over the centuries, many hundreds have expired inside the capital's dank, rat-infested cells, or whilst dancing the 'Tyburn jig' at the end of a swinging rope, and many of the sites in this book have become bywords for infamy. The case seems routine—a dispute over an unpaid marriage dowry—but it opens an unexpected window into the dramatist’s famously obscure life. The effects of what historians call the "General Crisis" extended from England to Japan, from the Russian Empire to sub-Saharan Africa.
And the implications of his study are equally important: are we adequately prepared—or even preparing—for the catastrophes that climate change brings? A new word burst into popular usage to describe these descents into the precincts of poverty to see how the poor lived: slumming. But for philanthropic men and women eager to free themselves from the starched conventions of bourgeois respectability and domesticity, slums were also places of personal liberation and experimentation. It reveals the evolving impact of strategic intelligence upon government understandings of, and policy responses to, insurgent threats. It explores the challenges these emerging threats posed to intelligence assessment and how they were met with varying degrees of success. Over twelve months the country was rocked by the atrocities of Bloody Friday and the Claudy bombing, civilian casualties mounted, and the soldiers of the British Army were caught between the factions. He examines almost every single death during that year, and names the men behind the violence, many of whom now hold high office in the country they tried so hard to break apart.
By developing adaptability and honing the five senses, it will also improve your self-esteem and your ability to overcome difficulties in everyday tasks.
It covers all the elements of the Pistol in great detail with accompanying photographs as well as the aspects of gunfighting as it relates to the modern day.
LAPD Chief Darryl Gates, who was the pioneer of the SWAT concept, wrote a foreward to the book and calls it “a must read for anyone using deadly force”.
Indeed, the United States was established by means of violence as ordinary citizens from New Hampshire to Georgia answered George Washington’s call to arms. Counting the War for Independence, the United States has fought the armed forces of other nations at least twelve times, averaging a major conflict every twenty years. Finn provides a set of narratives—each concise and readable—on the twelve major wars America has fought. It explores the sweep of US military actions at home and abroad, from the initial clashes between militias and Native American tribes to contemporary operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Straightforward and eminently readable, The American Military offers revealing insights into the many ways in which armed conflicts have shaped the course of our nation’s history. Modeled after popular bird spotters’ guides, Straight People is an affectionate and humorous guide to the varied species and subspecies of the sexual majority: the heterosexual. Complemented with fun two-color illustrations, interactive charts, graphs, and quizzes throughout, Straight People is sure entertain readers for all walks of life. In response to that oversimplification, journalist Dante Chinni teamed up with political geographer James Gimpel to launch the Patchwork Nation project, using on-the-ground reporting and statistical analysis to get past generalizations and probe American communities in depth.
Instead, by examining Boom Towns, Evangelical Epicenters, Military Bastions, Service Worker Centers, Campus and Careers, Immigration Nation, Minority Central, Tractor Community, Mormon Outposts, Emptying Nests, Industrial Metropolises, and Monied Burbs, the authors demonstrate the subtle distinctions in how Americans vote, invest, shop, and otherwise behave, reflect what they experience on their local streets and in their daily lives. In The Real America, Beck continues to tell it like it really is, cutting through the fog of modern-day pundits and pontificators who have made it their mission to undermine and underestimate the greatness of America, our strength as Americans, and the power of the American spirit. The final section takes a close look at the series' distinctive visual, aural, and narrative stylistics.
And as he confesses, peeling back the layers of his strange story, we are led to question what we know about truth and memory, brain and mind, personality and fate, about one another and ourselves. Divorced with a young child, and fearful of going mad, Anna records her experiences in four coloured notebooks: black for her writing life, red for political views, yellow for emotions, blue for everyday events. Courted by several men, she does not make a final choice to commit to anyone until she finds her true love. Khaled, a former revolutionary in the Algerian war of liberation has been in self-exile in Paris for two decades, disgusted by the corruption that now riddles the country he once fought for.
Through Hayat, his past is breathed back into life and he at last begins to confront his feelings about Algeria. This comprehensive eBooks offers the complete works of Conan Doyle, with beautiful illustrations and bonus texts. Frustrated by the simplest daily routines, and unable to form new memories, he eventually attempts suicide.
Yet in our adulation of Kafka's wonderfully bizarre prose, English-language readers tend to overlook the fact that he was not spawned Athena-like from the cranium of German literature.
Umberto Eco begins by arguing that our familiar system of classification by genus and species derives from the Neo-Platonist idea of a "tree of knowledge." He then moves to the idea of the dictionary, which--like a tree whose trunk anchors a great hierarchy of branching categories--orders knowledge into a matrix of definitions.
From the Tree to the Labyrinth is a brilliant illustration of Eco's longstanding argument that problems of interpretation can be solved only in historical context. It covers a broad range of fictional narratives, from Richardson's Clarissa, Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment, and Austen's Pride and Prejudice to Woolf's Mrs.
Written for a general audience, this study provides a jargon-free introduction to the rapidly growing interdisciplinary field known as cognitive approaches to literature and culture. Here are their traditions, foibles, quirks, customs, humour and achievements, triumphs and failures, peccadilloes and passions. This is a landmark breakthrough both within linguistics, which will herewith finally become a full-fledged science, and in our understanding of the human mind. The First Human is the story of four international teams obsessed with solving the mystery of human evolution and of the intense rivalries that propel them.
There is Tim White, the irreverent and brilliant Californian whose team discovered the partial skeleton of a primate that lived more than 4.4 million years ago in Ethiopia. In Me, Myself, and Why, Jennifer Ouellette dives into the miniscule ranges of variation to understand just what sets us apart.
But then the English-major-turned-award-winning-science-writer had a change of heart and decided to revisit the equations and formulas that had haunted her for years. All you need is an open mind, a determination to succeed, and The Creative Thinker’s Toolkit. And the most reliable way to do so is with creative problem solving, the model that Professor Puccio uses as the backbone of The Creative Thinker’s Toolkit. It’s also the most widely researched deliberate creative process model in existence—and one of the most effective methods used in creativity training in organizations and universities around the world. Each stage, as you’ll learn, involves a different way of thinking and a different set of tools to facilitate greater creativity.
It’s also where tools like brainstorming, brainwriting, forced connections, and even borrowing from others can lead you to out-of-the-box solutions. As such, his fascinating lectures are packed with tools you can pick up and carry with you any time you find yourself in a situation that demands a more creative approach. Try this silent method, in which participants write their ideas and swap papers with one another, using cross-fertilization to build on already written ideas or add entirely new ones. He also shows you how to select the tools that work best for your unique situation, and invites you to take a step back and see how the lessons of creative thinking can help you become a better leader and live a more creative life.
Professor Puccio’s outstanding work as a scholar has won him The State University of New York’s Research and Scholarship Award and the Buffalo State President’s Award for Excellence in Research, Scholarship, and Creativity.
Throughout these lectures, he proves that with a little hard work, anyone can become a more creative thinker. Since its first release in 1997, GTA has pioneered the use of everything from 3D graphics to the voices of top Hollywood actors and repeatedly transformed the world of gaming.
Within just a few short years, if you had a quarter, you could go to the video arcade and play Space Invaders, Asteroids, or Pac-Man. Lucid, witty and hugely entertaining, it explains the basics of our essential existence, stopping along the way to show us why the Atlantic is widening by a thumbs' length each year, how money permits trade to time travel why the crucial advantage humans had over Neanderthals was sewing and why we are all living in a giant hologram. In Deep Down Things, experimental particle physicist Bruce Schumm has taken this dictum to heart, providing in clear, straightforward prose an elucidation of the Standard Model of particle physics—a theory that stands as one of the crowning achievements of twentieth-century science. A mix of popular psychology and trivia, McRaney's insights have struck a chord with thousands, and his blog-and now podcasts and videos-have become an internet phenomenon. This must buy guide uniquely blends the practical skills of foraging with the best elements of natural history writing.
Highly illustrated and expertly written, this invaluable guide also includes a seasonal calendar and a handy A-Z of edible plants. Stunning photography is combined with expert information to create an up-close-and-personal tour of the hidden lives of spiders, beetles, butterflies, moths, crickets, dragonflies, damselflies, grasshoppers, aphids, and many other backyard residents.
Taking his rowboat the Sector, which had a living compartment thirty-one inches high, containing a bunk, one-burner stove, and a ham radio, d’Aboville made his way across an ocean 6,200 miles wide.
Yet, just as the beaches of Normandy and the jungles of Vietnam worked profound changes on conflict participants,the Korean Peninsula chipped away at the beliefs, physical and mental well-being, and fortitude of Americans completing wartime tours of duty there. The Greatest Generation Speaks was born out of the vast outpouring of letters Brokaw received from people eager to share their personal memories and experiences of a momentous time in America's history.
This generation was united not only by a common purpose, but also by common values--duty, honor, economy, courage, service, love of family and country, and, above all, responsibility for oneself. They answered the call to save the world from the two most powerful and ruthless military machines ever assembled, instruments of conquest in the hands of fascist maniacs. You'll hear George Bush talk about how, as a Navy Air Corps combat pilot, one of his assignments was to read the mail of the enlisted men under him, to be sure no sensitive military information would be compromised.
Based on eight years of research, extensive archival materials, new documents, and exclusive access to Perkins’s family members and friends, this biography is the first complete portrait of a devoted public servant with a passionate personal life, a mother who changed the landscape of American business and society. As the first female cabinet secretary, she spearheaded the fight to improve the lives of America’s working people while juggling her own complex family responsibilities. She breathed life back into the nation’s labor movement, boosting living standards across the country.
For the rest of his life he'd turn to the sea, instead of his friends and family, for comfort. He developed Delta and Eastern Airlines, single handedly secured FDR's third term election, and served as mayor of Winston-Salem, where his tobacco fortune was built. Slavery was a brutally efficient nullifier of identity, willfully denying black men and women even their names. For a reader, there is the stirring pleasure of witnessing long-forgotten struggles and triumphs–but there’s an enduring reward as well. Unlike today's readers, the participants did not have the luxury of knowing how this potentially catastrophic showdown would turn out, and their uncertainty often gives their discussions the nerve-racking quality of a fictional thriller.
Covert operations in Cuba, including efforts to kill Fidel Castro, had convinced Nikita Khrushchev that only the deployment of nuclear weapons could protect Cuba from imminent attack. This new edition contains updated information on Cold War spying, with over 350 A–Z main entries (over thirty of them new) biographical sketches, and an updated bibliography. CIA counterinsurgency officer Frank Rafalko was a member of the CHAOS special operations group. Rafalko refutes the charges made by the Times and takes issue with the government findings. Given exclusive access to the previously closed Zinn archives, Duberman’s impeccably researched biography is illustrated with never-before-published photos from the Zinn family collection. This is economist Bryan Caplan's sobering assessment in this provocative and eye-opening book. Through an analysis of Americans' voting behavior and opinions on a range of economic issues, he makes the convincing case that noneconomists suffer from four prevailing biases: they underestimate the wisdom of the market mechanism, distrust foreigners, undervalue the benefits of conserving labor, and pessimistically believe the economy is going from bad to worse. With the upcoming presidential election season drawing nearer, this thought-provoking book is sure to spark a long-overdue reappraisal of our elective system. Only a writer of Clancy's magnitude could obtain security clearance for information, diagrams, and photographs never before available to the public.
And only Tom Clancy can tell their story--the fascinating real-life facts more compelling than any fiction.
They are called on to perform at the peak of their physical and mental capabilities, primed for combat and surveillance, yet ready to pitch in with disaster relief operations. Jack threw himself on one of the grenades, grabbed the second, and pulled it beneath his body. Indestructible reveals the rocky road that led Jack Lucas to Iwo Jima, his arduous recovery, and the obstacles Jack overcame later in life. Lincoln.” In his lifetime and ever since, friend and foe have taken it upon themselves to characterize Lincoln according to their own label or libel.
This is a book that animates our past in the words of those who lived the Canadian military experience. Under the command of Sergeant Andy McNab, they were to sever the underground communication link between Baghdad and north-west Iraq, and to seek and destroy mobile Scud launchers. Yet in their attempts to understand Iraqi society and history, few policy makers, analysts, and journalists took into account the profound impact that Iraq's long engagement with war had on the Iraqis' everyday engagement with politics, with the business of managing their daily lives, and on their cultural imagination. Drawing on government documents and interviews, Khoury argues that war was a form of everyday bureaucratic governance and examines the Iraqi government's policies of creating consent, managing resistance and religious diversity, and shaping public culture. Ricks's Fiasco is masterful and explosive reckoning with the planning and execution of the American military invasion and occupation of Iraq, based on the unprecedented candor of key participants. A ground-breaking account of accidents, near-misses, extraordinary heroism, and technological breakthroughs, Command and Control explores the dilemma that has existed since the dawn of the nuclear age: how do you deploy weapons of mass destruction without being destroyed by them? Affirmative action, same-sex marriage, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, national service, patriotism and dissent, the moral limits of markets—Sandel dramatizes the challenge of thinking through these con?icts, and shows how a surer grasp of philosophy can help us make sense of politics, morality, and our own convictions as well.
A child of religious conservatives in rural England, he went on to become a freewheeling spiritual teacher who challenged Westerners to defy convention and think for themselves. A charming foreword by Watts's father sets the tone of this warm, funny, and beautifully written story. Blended with titillating facts, startling revelations, and head-scratching theories collected from around the world, Instant Knowledge will jumpstart riveting exchanges at cocktail parties, the watercooler, or any powwow.
Inevitably, it follows that anyone with an independent mind must become "one who resists or opposes an authority or established convention": a rebel. But, when others--especially others with power--recognize an individual's 'disobedience,' the rebel becomes the REBEL. Bound by circumstance to a woman he cannot love, Ethan Frome is haunted by a past of lost possibilities until his wife’s orphaned cousin, Mattie Silver, arrives and he is tempted to make one final, desperate effort to escape his fate.
But when the mysterious Countess Ellen Olenska returns to New York after a disastrous marriage, Archer falls deeply in love with her. But his self-published volume soon became a landmark of poetry, introducing the world to a new and uniquely American form.
It's a brilliant, illuminating book that overturns conventional thinking about power and advantage.
Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period.
Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head." What the Dog Saw is yet another example of the buoyant spirit and unflagging curiosity that have made Malcolm Gladwell our most brilliant investigator of the hidden extraordinary.
Now Alison Weir, author of the finest royal chronicles of our time, brings to vibrant life the turbulent, complex figure of the King. Presented as half textbook, half historical fiction, Raver finds a solid balance between the two genres. However, the basic facts are still solid and Mertz writes so well and brings so much of ancient Egyptian history to life that a few inaccuracies can be excused, especially as one hopes that so well-written a text will encourage people to go on to do more research.
Suddenly Nefertiti disappeared from the royal family, vanishing so completely that it was as if she had never been. In the audio version, narrator Brick keeps up with the master storyteller every step of the way. On the night of his last arrest, he was taken to the city jail and held in solitary confinement.
That revelation triggered a blizzard of questions for Serrano and provided the impetus for this engrossing story. Much has been written about Tom Pendergast and the iron hand with which he ruled Kansas City until his fall. And he also discovers a city filled with lost souls like James Lyons: the denizens of Kansas City's skid row, a neglected area near the river bottom that once housed the city's gilded community but now was home to derelicts and drunks. The psychological cost for soldiers, as witnessed by the increase in post-traumatic stress, is devastating.
So it is with Puzo, who at age 76 returns after a quarter century to the terrain of his greatest success, The Godfather, to tell a second masterful tale of Mafia life. Though still based in New York, the Family has also scattered to Vegas and, as the novel progresses, to Hollywood.
Puzo's take on the film world is scathing, yet there are no caricatures here; his men and women can be seduced by virtue as well as by vice and will throw away a lifetime in pursuit of love. Knowing what the world is, they neither condemn it nor bless it but acknowledge its wickedness and drink of its passion and beauty.
Westlake conveys unbridled horror as the lone Earthling, though cunning and violent, is outnumbered by creatures of Hell, the city where events reach a climax. It's a must listen for anyone in the business world, making you aware of the subtle warning signs of psychopathic behavior-before it's too late. Burroughs are just some of the wealth of the striking voices of American writers recorded for BBC broadcasts in the twentieth century and gathered here in one remarkable collection.
It is getting harder for people to be confident of what they will be earning next year, or even next month.
Most important, he tells you how all this affects you - and what kind of changes you're going to see in your finances as a result. This book is an essential guide for anyone who wants to understand where the economy is today, where it's going, and what it means for the rest of us.
Greenberg’s skilled storytelling and rigorous scholarship bring this American war for empire to life with memorable characters, plotlines, and legacies.
Along the way it captures a young Lincoln mismatching his clothes, the lasting influence of the Founding Fathers, the birth of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and America’s first national antiwar movement. In this insightful and empathetic look at the writer, Stokes guides the reader through the milestones of Mishima's meteoric and eclectic career and delves into the artist's major works and themes. Here Jay Winik offers a brilliant new look at the Civil War's final days that will forever change the way we see the war's end and the nation's new beginning. Time and again, critical moments could have plunged the nation back into war or fashioned a far harsher, more violent, and volatile peace.


In the midst of this extraordinary volatility, the major oil conglomerates still spent over a trillion dollars in an increasingly frantic search for more.
It is the story of corporate chieftains in Dallas and London, traders in New York, oil-oligarchs in Moscow, and globe-trotting politicians-all maneuvering for power. American Insurgents is a surprising, revelatory history of anti-imperialism in the United States since the American Revolution. In Europe, the deaths of Shakespeare and Cervantes marked the end of an era in literature, as the spirit of the Renaissance was giving way to new attitudes that would lead to the Age of Revolution.
The Companion analyses how Rome’s internal affairs and international relations reacted on each other, sometimes with violent results, why some lands were annexed but others ignored or given up, and the ways in which Rome’s population and power élite evolved as former subjects, east and west, themselves became Romans and made their powerful contributions to Roman history and culture.
The eight chapters in Part I present broad, scholarly reviews of the existing literature to provide a clear understanding of where we stand. The mindfulness approach in this book can be used as a stand-alone treatment or may be incorporated into cognitive behavioral therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and other therapeutic modalities.
In Financial Alchemy in Crisis, Anastasia Nesvetailova shows that this liquidity never actually existed.
Ambrose writes with power and eloquence about the brave men who accomplished the spectacular feat that made the nation one.
On Easter 1945, he encountered American troops, became their interpreter, and witnessed fierce fighting. But her life from 1941 to 1954 has long been shrouded in rumor and mystery, never clarified by Chanel or her many biographers. The results of this evolution were used to explore the implications for the menarcheal education of girls. The story Clements tells is one of hardship and endurance, but also one of achievement by women who, for example, promoted the conversion to Christianity, governed estates, created great art, rebelled against the government, established charities, built the tanks that rolled into Berlin in 1945, and flew the planes that strafed the retreating Wehrmacht.
The history of monasticism is defined by the fierce and passionate abandonment of the ordinary comforts of life, the most striking being food and drink. One particular fraudster, Harry Benson, was to contribute to the end of Clarke's career and lead to the first major Metropolitan Police corruption trial in 1877. It also considers what our ongoing fundamental relationship with infectious microbes might mean for the future of the human species. Rather than treating supernatural claims on a case-by-case basis, Milton Rothman uses the general principles supplied by physics to show why they are, in fact, impossible. Laws of denial, such as conservation of energy, permit very accurate conclusions about what cannot possibly occur.
As he looks back, from the perspective of now being a father himself, Rinker Buck's tale of 2 young men in search of themselves and their country becomes a story about the eternal enigma of family - of the distance and closeness of generations, of peace lost so that understanding can be gained - and it is explored with a storytelling power that is both brave and rare. You will need to keep a tight focus on your mission, inspire and direct different groups of people, sell your projects to others, and come up with great ideas to save the day.
As of summer 2007, its average circulation topped 1.2 million copies a week, about half of which are sold in North America. Because today is the day he will kill his former best friend, and then himself, with his grandfather's P-38 pistol. One of Christopher Priest's earliest novels, FUGUE FOR A DARKENING ISLAND is a powerful work whose subject matter has become increasingly relevant in recent years. Seeming to me almost like a work of poetry in its own way.If you see a copy don't miss the opportunity. A landmark anthology, The Anchor Book of Chinese Poetry captures with impressive range and depth the essence of China’s illustrious poetic tradition. Recently kicked out of his prestigious prep school for selling weed—and his mother’s Brooklyn apartment for losing his scholarship— he’s couch-surfing his way through life, compulsively immune to rumors that his long-lost father, Billy Rage, has returned after sixteen years on the lam.
The uneasy reunion comes just in time: Anastacio Bracken, the transit cop who ruined Billy’s life and shattered his crew back in 1987, is running for mayor.
This complete edition of short stories will entertain readers with its wonderfully intricate characters, rich political satire and fine narrative style. It is also a gratifying book in its revelation of a tragic woman painfully trying to find her way in a world where she has lost touch with reality.
She has been married three times in the past in a sort of Golden Age, a happy era without money and without cares. In the process, they open up a conversation about parenting, granting us permission to admit our frustrations, and laugh at their absurdity. Yet opinion remained fiercely divided about Marks--was she a spurned woman who had taken out her rage on two innocent victims, or was she an unwilling victim herself, caught up in a crime she was too young to understand?
As the wild island exerts its elemental hold and she is submerged in the language of the wilderness, she sees that what she is really looking for is her own past. All three "have lost men, spirit, money, and time to their old college acquaintance, Zenia. Included is advice on such writing elements as building a story, constructing action sequences, creating memorable characters, developing scene structure, and avoiding cliche dialogue.
Hardy dispel myths and cover all the skills necessary to maintain a successful and responsible polyamorous lifestyle--from self-reflection and honest communication to practicing safe sex and raising a family. Always seeking to be an obedient Priesthood girl, in her teens she became the nineteenth wife of her people's prophet: 85-year-old Rulon Jeffs, Warren's father.
Rebecca's subsequent testimony would reveal the horrific secrets taking place behind closed doors of the temple, sending their leaders to prison for years, and Warren Jeffs for life.
In painful detail, he writes of poverty, suffering, and torture, much of it inflicted on him precisely because of his Amerasian roots. The Rest Is Noise is an astonishing history of the twentieth century as told through its music.
Noted author and historian Thurston Clarke argues that the heart of that legend is what might have been. Now, in the follow-up to his Sunday Times-bestselling The Secret Life of Bletchley Park, through dozens of interviews with surviving veterans, Sinclair McKay chronicles the history and achievements of this remarkable group of people. Now the hidden story of the Y-Service and its vital contribution to the war effort can be told at last. But for Graham Greene and some of his contemporaries, this was a bizarrely euphoric time when London became the setting for intense love affairs and surreal beauty.
Now, opening with a meticulous evocation of a single night in September 1940, Lara Feigel brilliantly and beautifully interweaves letters, diaries and fiction with official civil defence records to chart the history of a burning world in wartime London and post-war Vienna and Berlin. Some were successful, others not, but in each case the inspired methods devised and executed by the prisoners show bravery and ingenuity on a greater scale than any film. Northern rage was born of the conviction that New England, whose spokesmen and militia had begun the American Revolution, should have been the leader of the new nation.
While often brilliant and articulate, the wives of the founding fathers all struggled with the distractions and dangers of frequent childbearing and searing anxiety about infant mortality. Burlingame also offers new interpretations of Lincoln's private life, discussing his marriage to Mary Todd and the untimely deaths of two sons to disease. But plans for a gleaming new railway system ended in failure and on the roads traffic ground to a halt. It was an age of miners' strikes, tower blocks and IRA atrocities, but it also gave us celebrity footballers and high-street curry houses, organic foods and package holidays, gay rights and glam rock. It was only during the long reign of the Queen that a modern society emerged in unexpected ways. Yet over the past 170 years, this strange tale of misunderstanding, incompetence and compromise has become the founding myth of modern Chinese nationalism: the start of China's heroic struggle against a Western conspiracy to destroy the country with opium and gunboat diplomacy. It explores how China's national myths mould its interactions with the outside world, how public memory is spun to serve the present; and how delusion and prejudice have bedevilled its relationship with the modern West.
As in the previous volumes, Schama vividly portrays the lives of extraordinary personalities – Queen Victoria, Churchill, Dickens, and “ordinary” individuals including the author of the first British travel guide, and Elizabeth Anderson, the first woman doctor.
With The Fate of Empire, Simon Schama has proven himself, again, as a masterful writer of narrative history.
Shattering the illusion of a "united kingdom," they cost hundreds of thousands of lives: a greater proportion of the population than died in the First World War. Geniuses like John Milton, Thomas Hobbes, and Benjamin Franklin stalk vividly through his pages, but so do Scottish clansmen, women pamphleteers, and literate, eloquent African slaves like Olaudah Equiano.
They are all caught on the rich and teeming canvas on which Schama paints his brilliant portrait of the life of the British people: 'for in the end, history, especially British history with its succession of thrilling illuminations, should be, as all her most accomplished narrators have promised, not just instruction but pleasure. An inconceivably audacious attempt to overcome the forces of nature in the name of human progress and technology, the laying of the cable was to change forever our means of communication. This extraordinary investigation exposes the secret section of the State Department that began, starting in 1948 and unbeknownst to Congress and the public until recently, to hire members of the puppet wartime government of Byelorussia—a region of the Soviet Union occupied by Nazi Germany. This groundbreaking work, based on seven years of research in the Vatican and Fascist archives, including reports from Mussolini’s spies inside the highest levels of the Church, will forever change our understanding of the Vatican’s role in the rise of Fascism in Europe. Yet in the last years of his life—as the Italian dictator grew ever closer to Hitler—the pontiff’s faith in this treacherous bargain started to waver.
From the Tower and Newgate prison to the Clink and the Fleet, this book explores London's criminal heritage; also including the stocks and pillories that lie, almost forgotten, in churchyards and squares across the City, and the many shocking punishments exacted inside the region's churches, workhouses and schools, it is a heart-breaking survey of our nation's penal history. Using the court testimony as a springboard, acclaimed nonfiction writer Charles Nicholl examines this fascinating period in Shakespeare’s life.
Nicholl is one of the great historical detectives of our time and in this atmospheric and exciting book he has created a considerable rarity—something new and original about Shakespeare. His discoveries revise entirely our understanding of the General Crisis: changes in prevailing weather patterns, especially longer winters and cooler and wetter summers, disrupted growing seasons and destroyed harvests. In this captivating book, Seth Koven paints a vivid portrait of the practitioners of slumming and their world: who they were, why they went, what they claimed to have found, how it changed them, and how slumming, in turn, powerfully shaped both Victorian and twentieth-century understandings of poverty and social welfare, gender relations, and sexuality. Slumming allowed them to act on their irresistible "attraction of repulsion" for the poor and permitted them, with society's approval, to get dirty and express their own "dirty" desires for intimacy with slum dwellers and, sometimes, with one another. 169 servicemen died that year, their deaths unnoticed at home except by their loved ones, fighting a forgotten war on British soil. With over 400 black-and-white illustrations and photographs, this book explains how to make use of natural materials found locally in any area, conserving instead of destroying native flora and fauna. The practice of bushcraft encourages self-confidence and counters the narrowing influence of modern living by broadening your horizons. In a very short time it has become an overwhelming success and best seller because of its uniqueness and nonconformity to other gun books.
He explains what happened, and why such places as Saratoga and Antietam, Manila Bay and Midway are important to an understanding of America’s past.
The text provides both macro- and micro- views of military history, providing historical context for each conflict as well as incorporating personal vignettes from soldiers, civilians, and others affected by instances of military action.
The result is Our Patchwork Nation, a refreshing, sometimes startling, look at how America's diversities often defy conventional wisdom.
Our Patchwork Nation is a brilliant new way to debate and examine the issues that matter most to our communities, and to our nation. Under examination are Breaking Bad's unique visual style whereby image dominates sound, the distinct role and use of beginning teaser segments to disorient and enlighten audiences, the representation of geographic space and place, the position of narrative songs to complicate viewer identification, and the integral part that emotions play as a form of dramatic action in the series. But it is a fifth notebook – the golden notebook – that finally pulls these wayward strands of her life together. He has become a celebrated painter, and at the opening of one of his exhibitions, Hayat, the daughter of his old revolutionary commander, unexpectedly reenters Khaled’s life.
But for Hayat, as elusive as she is tender, the question of what one should yearn for is not so simple, and the choices she makes will have devastating consequences for them both.
Kafka had his precursors among the German Romantics, as well as his contemporaries working in kindred veins and his heirs in post–World War II Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. In Eco's view, though, the dictionary is too rigid: it turns knowledge into a closed system. Travel through England from coast to coast and learn how every county contributes in unique and different ways to the distinct English personality. Using a twenty-year-old theory proposed by the world's greatest living linguist, Noam Chomsky, researchers have found that the similarities among languages are more profound than the differences. If White can prove that it was hominid—an ancestor of humans and not of chimpanzees or other great apes—he can lay claim to discovering the oldest known member of the human family. She draws on cutting-edge research in genetics, neuroscience, and psychology—enlivened as always with her signature sense of humor—to explore the mysteries of human identity and behavior. The Calculus Diaries is the fun and fascinating account of her year spent confronting her math phobia head on.
Creative thinking involves taking a broader, more imaginative approach to analyzing and solving the everyday challenges we all face, whether in the office or at home.
Award-winning Professor Gerard Puccio of Buffalo State–The State University of New York—an expert in creative thinking and a consultant to individual clients and large companies—has crafted 24 lectures that take you step-by-step through the creative-thinking process and that use real-world scenarios to show you this vital skill in action. You’ll learn how each stage of the creative-thinking process comes with its own set of equipment designed to maximize your creativity and increase your ability to solve problems and achieve your desired goals.
Or are you more of a developer; someone who can quickly spot ways to enhance and improve an idea?
He’s also delivered training programs and keynote speeches on creativity to major corporations, universities, and school districts. Despite its incredible innovations in the $75 billion game industry, it has also been a lightning rod of debate, spawning accusations of ethnic and sexual discrimination, glamorizing violence, and inciting real-life crimes.
If you were lucky enough to have an Atari system hooked up to your television, you could play Frogger or Galaga at home.
Pac-Man, Tron, and Star Wars as they relive the glory days of the classic video game rage of the 1970s and 1980s. In this one-of-a-kind book, the work of many of the past century's most notable physicists, including Einstein, Schrodinger, Heisenberg, Dirac, Feynman, Gell-Mann, and Weinberg, is knit together in a thorough and accessible exposition of the revolutionary notions that underlie our current view of the fundamental nature of the physical world. As well as recipes, identification tips and collecting advice, you will also learn about the historical, cultural and medicinal uses for each plant as well as its ecological significance.
Though he rowed twelve hours a day, battled cyclones and headwinds that kept him in one place for days at a time, was capsized dozens of times forty-foot waves that hit him like cannonballs, he never quit; even when he was trapped upside down inside his cabin for almost two hours while nearly depleting his oxygen trying to right the boat. Upon returning home, Korean War veterans struggled with home front attitudes toward the war, faced employment and family dilemmas, and wrestled with readjustment.
In this book, you will meet people whose everyday lives reveal how a generation persevered through war, and were trained by it, and then went on to create interesting and useful lives and the America we have today. And so, Bush says, "I learned about life." You'll meet Trudy Elion, winner of the Nobel Prize in medicine, one of the many women in this book who found fulfilling careers in the changed society as a result of the war. Perkins’s ideas became the cornerstones of the most important social welfare and legislation in the nation’s history, including unemployment compensation, child labor laws, and the forty-hour work week. As head of the Immigration Service, she fought to bring European refugees to safety in the United States. Dick disappeared for months at a time, leading the dual life of a business mogul and troubled soul, both of which became legendary. Yet below the gilded surface lay a turbulent life of alcoholism, infidelity, and loneliness. Yet, from that legacy of slavery, there have sprung generations who’ve struggled, thrived, and lived extraordinary lives.
Jakes, neurosurgeon Ben Carson, and sociologist Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot; and famous achievers such as astronaut Mae Jemison, media personality Tom Joyner, decathlete Jackie Joyner-Kersee, and Ebony and Jet publisher Linda Johnson Rice. In accompanying the nineteen contemporary achievers on their journey into the past and meeting their remarkable forebears, we come to know ourselves. However, President Kennedy, a seasoned Cold Warrior in public, was deeply suspicious of military solutions to political problems and appalled by the prospect of nuclear war.
He hung a portrait of Hitler in his apartment and “disowned” his Jewish best friend, then flew to Berlin, where he charmed Himmler and signed lucrative oil deals with the architects of the Final Solution.
His inside account of the controversial operation provides information never before brought to light. He makes the case that their activities were justified and that the CIA was the logical agency to collect information. Howard Zinn: A Life on the Left is a major publishing event that brings to life one of the most inspiring figures of our time. Caplan argues that voters continually elect politicians who either share their biases or else pretend to, resulting in bad policies winning again and again by popular demand.
Caplan lays out several bold ways to make democratic government work better--for example, urging economic educators to focus on correcting popular misconceptions and recommending that democracies do less and let markets take up the slack.
Clancy presents a unique insider's look at the most hallowed branch of the Armed Forces, and the men and women who serve on America's front lines. It is poised to shed a profound light on our greatest president just as America commemorates the bicentennial of his birth.
After a fierce fire fight, they were forced to escape and evade on foot to the Syrian border. Khoury focuses on the men and families of those who fought and died during the Iran-Iraq and First Gulf wars. Ricks, and in Fiasco, Ricks combines these astonishing on-the-record military accounts with his own extraordinary on-the-ground reportage to create a spellbinding account of an epic disaster.
But the officers who did raise their voices against the miscalculations, shortsightedness, and general failure of the war effort were generally crushed, their careers often ended. Up to a thousand students pack the campus theater to hear Sandel relate the big questions of political philosophy to the most vexing issues of the day, and this fall, public television will air a series based on the course.
Justice is lively, thought-provoking, and wise—an essential new addition to the small shelf of books that speak convincingly to the hard questions of our civic life. Watts's portrait of himself shows that he was a philosophical renegade from early on in his intellectual life. Watts encouraged readers to “follow your own weird” — something he always did himself, as this remarkable account of his life shows.
To experience the clean, rich flavor at home, just tear into a topic of your choice, and add conversation. In language that is spare, passionate, and enduring, Edith Wharton tells this unforgettable story of two tragic lovers overwhelmed by the unrelenting forces of conscience and necessity. Torn between duty and passion, Archer struggles to make a decision that will either courageously define his life—or mercilessly destroy it. The "father of free verse," Whitman drew upon the cadence of simple, even idiomatic speech to "sing" such themes as democracy, sexuality, and frank autobiography. In David and Goliath Malcolm Gladwell takes us on a scintillating and surprising journey through the hidden dynamics that shape the balance of power between the small and the mighty.
He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate.
Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? For this book, over the period of a week - the kind of week that would be familiar to most people - the authors use their own bodies as the reference point and tell the story of pollution in our modern world, the miscreant corporate giants who manufacture the toxins, the weak-kneed government officials who let it happen, and the effects on people and families across the globe.
Her voice brims with mystery and the unknown as she, along with the listener, travels along the path that Mertz has meticulously paved from the earliest glimpses of the remarkable civilization to the very latest discoveries. No record survives to detail her death, no monument serves to mourn her passing and to this day her end remains an enigma. Part memoir, part investigative report, "My Grandfather's Prison" takes readers back to a crossroads year for Kansas City. Serrano's personal journey takes the story further into those crucial years when the city tried to shake off the yoke of machine politics and political corruption and step into a new era of reform.
As Serrano gradually comes to terms with the darker side of his family history, he traces a parallel reconciliation of the city with its own sordid past.
The psychological cost for the rest of us is even more so: contemporary civilian society, particularly the media, replicates the army's conditioning techniques and, according to Lt. As, in this mesmerizing tale, Puzo himself does, surveying the play of humanity in its mad glory. Both the novella and a much shorter cautionary tale, "Hydra," carry an implied warning about future life in a polluted world.
Westlake combines imaginative visions of the future with very down-to-earth human perspectives, keeping the sci-fi elements of these tales from feeling unrealistic or confusing. This incredible three-CD boxed set forms part of the British Library’s extensive audio series of documentary recordings by English-language authors and playwrights. At the same time, our society is splitting into socially stratified enclaves--the wealthier walled off and gated, the poorer isolated and ignored.
A key chapter in the creation of the United States, it is the story of a burgeoning nation and an unforgettable conflict that has shaped American history.
Uniquely set within the larger sweep of history, filled with rich profiles of outsize figures, fresh iconoclastic scholarship, and a gripping narrative, this is a masterful account of the thirty most pivotal days in the life of the United States.
Now, in a superbly told story, Winik captures the epic images and extraordinary history as never before. It charts the movements against empire from the Indian Wars and the expansionism of the slave South to the Anti-Imperialist League of Mark Twain and Jane Addams.
Great changes were also taking place in East Asia, where the last native Chinese dynasty was entering its final years and Japan was beginning its long period of warrior rule. An extended picture essay documents visually women s military work since the sixteenth century. The rise of sophisticated financial instruments created what appeared to be an abundance of liquid funds but was in fact a credit pyramid. In two completely new chapters on the Millennium Development Goals and post-development thinking, Rist brings the book completely up to date.
With the precision of an economist and the narrative deftness of a storyteller, syndicated journalist Loretta Napoleoni examines how the world is being reshaped by dark economic forces, creating victims out of millions of ordinary people whose lives have become trapped inside a fantasy world of consumerism. The government pitted the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific against each other in a race for funding, encouraging speed over caution. What he saw and now recounts was a campaign in which a semitrained and understrength division was flung into battle and somehow not only survived, but prevailed. Hal Vaughan exposes the truth of her wartime collaboration and her long affair with the playboy Baron Hans Günther von Dincklage—who ran a spy ring and reported directly to Goebbels. When, in the first few weeks of his posting to the little-known Central Asian Republic of Uzbekistan, he comes across photographs of a political dissident who has literally been boiled to death, he ignores diplomatic nicety and calls it for what it is: torture of the cruelest sort. The research indicates the following major influences impacted the cultural construction of menarche and menstruation: religion during the ancient period, medicine during the modern period, and commerce during the contemporary period.
This daunting and complex history is presented in an engaging survey that integrates this scholarship into the field of Russian and post-Soviet history.
A Hermit’s Cookbook opens with stories and pen-portraits of the Desert Fathers of early Christianity and their followers who were ascetic solitaries, hermits and pillar-dwellers. Consequently it is often seen as a transatlantic (as opposed to solely British) news source. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox—possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. To let them know I really cared about them and I'm sorry I couldn't be more than I was--that I couldn't stick around--and that what's going to happen today isn't their fault. In one, the Second World War ends as we imagine it did; in the other, thanks to efforts of an eminent team of negotiators headed by Hess, the war ends in 1941.
Only by rallying the forgotten writers of the eighties for an epic, game-changing mission can Billy and Dondi bring Bracken down. But now she is married to a successful film writer, and reality with its disillusions and compromises is closing in. Such doubts persuaded the judges to commute her sentence to life imprisonment, and Marks spent the next 30 years in an assortment of jails and asylums, where she was often exhibited as a star attraction. At various times, and in various emotional disguises, Zenia has insinuated her way into their lives and practically demolished them.
Individuals and their partners will learn how to discuss and honor boundaries, resolve conflicts, and to define relationships on their own terms. Finally sickened by the abuse she suffered and saw around her, she pulled off a daring escape and sought to build a new life and family. Ultimately, his tale is one of extraordinary courage and human will, for Nguyen and his mother held their family together in the face of great hardships.
As we approach the anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination, JFK’s Last Hundred Days reexamines the last months of the president’s life to show a man in the midst of great change, finally on the cusp of making good on his extraordinary promise.
The loss of his son convinced Kennedy to work harder as a husband and father, and there is ample evidence that he suspended his notorious philandering during these last months of his life.
At the height of the Blitz, Greene described the bomb-bursts as holding one 'like a love-charm'. She reveals the haunting, ecstatic, often wrenching stories that triumphed amid the mess of a war-torn world. With incredible stories such as the "Wooden Horse," the "French Tunnel," and the "Colditz Ghost,” this ground-breaking book tells the stories of some of the bravest men in history. Jefferson's controversial relationship to Sally Hemings is also examined, with a different vision of where his heart lay.
All the more remarkable, then, that these women loomed so large in the lives of their husbands--and, in some cases, their country. Along came Dr Beeching, forensically analysing the railways' problems and expertly delivering an expert's diagnosis - a third of the nation's railways must go. As the world looked on in horrified fascination, Britain seemed to be tearing itself apart. And where do the boundaries of our community lie - in our hearth and home, our village or city, tribe or faith?
The speed with which information could now be transmitted was unprecedented and revolutionized the face of news and the global economy.
A former Justice Department investigator uncovered this stunning story in the files of several government agencies, and it is now available with a chapter previously banned from release by authorities and a foreword and afterword with recently declassified materials.
With his health failing, he began to lash out at the Duce and threatened to denounce Mussolini’s anti-Semitic racial laws before it was too late. Richly illustrated, and filled with victims and villains, nobles, executioners and torturers, it will delight historians, residents and visitors alike.
With evidence from a wide variety of sources, Nicholl creates a compelling, detailed account of the circumstances in which Shakespeare lived and worked during the time in which he wrote such plays as Othello, Measure for Measure, and King Lear. This in turn brought hunger, malnutrition, and disease; and as material conditions worsened, wars, rebellions, and revolutions rocked the world.
By examining the relationship between intelligence and policy, Cormac provides original and revealing insights into government thinking in the era of decolonisation, from the origins of nationalist unrest to the projection of dwindling British power. It describes many of the skills used by primitive man, adding to these the skills necessary for modern man’s survival, such as methods for determining time and direction. Bushcraft is a clear, accurate, and reliable resource for anyone who wishes to face nature on its own terms with just a knife and this book. The “Art of Modern Gunfighting” covers each of his 5 Officer involved shootings in detail and shares the lessons derived from each of these.
Readers will easily be able to brush up on their history and acquaint themselves with those individuals and events that have helped define the United States of America. Hayat had been just a child when he last saw her, but she has now become a seductive young novelist. A more flexible organizational scheme is the encyclopedia, which­--instead of resembling a tree with finite branches--offers a labyrinth of never-ending pathways. Marvel at crooked black and white halls in Cheshire and soft golden stone cottages in Midland villages. Languages whose grammars seem completely incompatible may in fact be structurally almost identical, except for a difference in one simple rule. As White painstakingly prepares the bones, the French paleontologist Michel Brunet comes forth with another, even more startling find. Readers follow her own surprising journey of self-discovery as she has her genome sequenced, her brain mapped, her personality typed, and even samples a popular hallucinogen. With wit and verve, Ouellette shows how she learned to apply calculus to everything from gas mileage to dieting, from the rides at Disneyland to shooting craps in Vegas-proving that even the mathematically challenged can learn the fundamentals of the universal language. Jacked tells the turbulent and mostly unknown story of GTA's wildly ambitious creators, Rockstar Games, the invention and evolution of the franchise, and the cultural and political backlash it has provoked.
By the early 1980s, arcade and video games were entrenched as a pop culture phenomenon, with players spending hours in arcades racking up as many points as possible. Schumm, who has spent much of his life emmersed in the subatomic world, goes far beyond a mere presentation of the "building blocks" of matter, bringing to life the remarkable connection between the ivory tower world of the abstract mathematician and the day-to-day, life-enabling properties of the natural world. Much of this information is based on Paul's own research and experience and will not be found in any comparable books.
Each creature is shown in its natural setting, and many are shown progressing through the stages of their life cycles. Not unlike other wars, Korea proved a formative and defining influence on the men and women stationed in theater, on their loved ones, and in some measure on American culture. His chaotic existence culminated in a surprise fourth marriage and was shortly followed by a strange death, the end of a life every bit as awe-inspiring as it was disturbing. Kennedy Library, enables the reader to follow the often harrowing twists and turns of the crisis.
All the while, he was visiting the oil refineries and passing their coordinates to Allied Bomber Command, who destroyed the plants in a series of B-17 raids, helping to end the war early.
In the book, Rafalko tells how by 1969 the group included sixty officers and their informants who reported on the activities of U.S.
The author argues his point by providing details secretly collected by his group against the New Left and black extremists. He captures military life -- from the drama of combat to the daily routine -- with total accuracy, and reveals the roles and missions that have in recent years distinguished our fighting forces. Now follow Tom Clancy as he delves into the training and tools, missions and mindset of these elite operatives. White, Jr., offers a fresh and compelling definition of Lincoln as a man of integrity–what today’s commentators would call “authenticity”–whose moral compass holds the key to understanding his life. First, dictators face threats from the masses over which they rule - this is the problem of authoritarian control. In the desperate action that followed, though stricken by hypothermia and other injuries, the patrol 'went ballistic'.
Self-taught in many areas, he came to Buddhism through the teachings of Christmas Humphreys and D.
How do our brains really work-in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, and in the bedroom? Somehow, Harvath must evade the teams dispatched to kill him long enough to untangle who has framed him and why they want him out of the way. In Brad Thor's riveting new thriller, the stakes have never been higher, nor the lines between good and evil so hard to discern.
Raver is solid and unwavering throughout, sounding as though she's enjoying the information she so clearly presents. Joyce Tyldesley provides a detailed discussion of the life and times of Nefertiti, set against the background of the ephemeral Amarna Court. He settles comfortably into every character on this huge stage—male and female, lawman and murderer, teen and spinster—and moves fluidly between them, generating the feel of a full-cast production. James Lyons died just as the old ways of the city were dying, and this spellbinding accounts shows how one town in one time struggled with its past to find a brighter future. The reader, Theodore Bikel, gives a captivating performance of each, drawing you into the little worlds Westlake creates with ease of an master hypnotist.
They found that it's exactly the modern, open, more flexible corporate world that is the perfect breeding ground for these employees. The the collection brings modern American literature dramatically to life with writers as diverse as Vladimir Nabokov, Eudora Welty, John Steinbeck, Ralph Ellison, and Gertrude Stein. Although the trends he discusses are powerful, they are not irreversible, and Reich makes provocative suggestions for how we might create a more balanced society and more satisfying lives. Seymour crafts a lively and transparent explanation of why some of these movements succeeded and others failed.
Artists there, as in many parts of the world, were rethinking their connections to ancient traditions and experimenting with new directions. The book s second part comprises eight exemplary articles, more narrowly focused than the survey articles but illustrating some of their major themes.
Stevens, Jan Noel, Elizabeth Prelinger, Donna Alvah, Karen Hagemann, Yehudit Kol-Inbar, Dorotea Gucciardo and Megan Howatt, and Judith Hicks Stiehm.
Throughout, he argues that development has been no more than a collective delusion, which in reality has only resulted in widening market relations.
Michael Perelman argues that capitalism's victory is temporary, based as it is on an unrealistic understanding of the system’s inherent risks.
Napoleoni reveals the architecture of our world, and in doing so provides fresh insight into many of the most insoluble problems of our era.
Locomotives, rails, and spikes were shipped from the east through Panama, around South America, or lugged across the country.
Vieler's quest for his American identity was fulfilled when he was repatriated to America at age fifteen, but thoughts of independence were thwarted when, due to his age, he was required to attend public school. Those marines had to fight the Japanese, the jungle, tropical diseases, uncertain supplies, inept commanders (some of them even members of Twining's beloved marines), and a host of other adversaries. Vaughan pieces together how Chanel became a Nazi agent, how she escaped arrest after the war and joined her lover in exile in Switzerland, and how—despite suspicions about her past—she was able to return to Paris at age seventy and rebuild the iconic House of Chanel. The book suggests that educational reform in this area include: non-dominant cultural world views, intergenerational support, both male and female family members, included as part of college coursework, include community and religious based educational centers, and provide information addressing the health risks and alternatives to commercial products. It proceeds to explore how the ideals of the desert fathers were revived in both the Byzantine and western traditions, looking at the cultivation of food in monasteries, eating and cooking, and why hunting animals was rejected by any self-respecting hermit. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. In his effort to uncover the truth, Jordan uses the tools of the then rudimentary science of psychology. As the sky whistled and the ground shook, nerves were tested, loyalties examined and infidelities begun. This was the point at which the reality of modernisation dawned and rural England fell victim to the road and car - at least that is how Dr Beeching is remembered today. And yet, amid the gloom, glittered a creativity and cultural dynamism that would influence our lives long after the nightmarish Seventies had been forgotten.
It also supplies a more serious subtext in its depiction of the corruption of Nepal by the Royal Family, heroin money, and the DEA.
Horrified by the threat to the Church-Fascist alliance, the Vatican’s inner circle, including the future Pope Pius XII, struggled to restrain the headstrong pope from destroying a partnership that had served both the Church and the dictator for many years. The case also throws new light on the puzzling story of Shakespeare’s collaboration with the hack author and violent brothel owner George Wilkins. The mechanics of gunfighting, the mindset, safety, deadly force and the experiences of others are also included.
More often than not, the results have been successful as America’s military has accounted itself well. Presenting knowledge as a network of interlinked relationships, the encyclopedia sacrifices humankind's dream of possessing absolute knowledge, but in compensation we gain the freedom to pursue an infinity of new connections and meanings. Go cheese rolling in Gloucestershire, discover the origins of cricket in Hampshire, savour a hot pot in Lancashire and a pudding in Yorkshire.
Well known for his work in the most remote and hostile locations, Brunet and his team uncover a stunning skull in Chad that could set the date of the beginnings of humankind to almost seven million years ago. Bringing together everything from Mendel’s famous pea plant experiments and mutations in The X-Men to our taste for cilantro and our relationships with virtual avatars, Ouellette takes us on an endlessly thrilling and illuminating trip into the science of ourselves. Arcade games were everywhere: restaurants, bowling alleys, department stores, grocery stores--anywhere that could accommodate a three-foot by five-foot machine. Schumm leaves us with an insight into the profound open questions of particle physics, setting the stage for understanding the progress the field is poised to make over the next decade or two. This is a one-of-a-kind look at some of life’s most fascinating mysteries — surprising, captivating, and perfect for nature lovers of all ages.
And you'll meet the members of the Romeo Club (Retired Old Men Eating Out), friends for life. A second, separate challenge arises from the elites with whom dictators rule - this is the problem of authoritarian power-sharing.
This expert soon confirms Scott's worst fears and triggers an adrenaline-fueled rush for survival. She brings fun and excitement to a field that many consider to be overly analyzed and studied, offering a learning experience through an abundance of speculative fiction sure to capture the minds of even the youngest listeners. Beyond the exceptionally good stories and wonderful performance, "Future Crimes" stacks up very favourably to other audio titles in that it can be fully enjoyed during your first listening, yet doesn't lose its charm on subsequent listens. Some of his ideas may surprise you; all should spark a healthy–and essential–national debate. It saw Lincoln's assassination just five days later, and a near-successful plot to decapitate the Union government, followed by chaos and coup fears in the North, collapsed negotiations and continued bloodshed in the South, and finally, the start of national reconciliation. Military history will benefit from acknowledging women s participation, as will women s history from recognizing military institutions as major factors in molding women s lives. Nesvetailova's bold and radical analysis explains why the credit crisis was an inevitable consequence of entrusting the world economy to financiers who believe that they can 'create' money and wealth. He analyzes the nature and causes of crisis within a market society, and along the way, he re-examines one of capitalism’s most primary and unquestioned tenets, that the more competition there is, the better off society will be.
Although he held after-school jobs, his primary support was through a New York City welfare agency. Full of rich anecdotes, and including recipes for basic monk’s stew and bread soup - and many others - this is a fascinating story of hermits, monks, food and fasting in the Middle Ages. In the sixty years preceding the outbreak of civil war, Northern and Southern fanatics ramped up the struggle over slavery. Both were prone to sudden fits of temper and were fiercely protective of the prerogatives of their office. The “Art of Modern Gunfighting” provides a solid, grounded, fundamental use of the pistol in an engaging and informative narrative.
Medical bills have buried him in debt, a situation that propels him to consider a lucrative—and dangerous—proposition.
Gasp at the glories of stately homes and the families that create them, upstairs and down, enjoy a pint.
Two other groups—one led by the zoologist Meave Leakey, the other by the British geologist Martin Pickford and his partner, Brigitte Senut, a French paleontologist—enter the race with landmark discoveries of other fossils vying for the status of the first human ancestor.
But, just as soon as the phenomenon began, it morphed into something else with the advent of hand-held games and more sophisticated home-gaming systems. They came home to joyous and short-lived celebrations and immediately began the task of rebuilding their lives and the world they wanted. He'd actually been one - a war profiteer who'd made millions of trading with Hitler before having a change of heart. The first book to reveal such details, it also calls attention to the consequences suffered by the American counterintelligence community because of the government investigations.
Crucially, whether and how dictators resolve these two problems is shaped by the dismal environment in which authoritarian politics takes place: in a dictatorship, no independent authority has the power to enforce agreements among key actors and violence is the ultimate arbiter of conflict. Several of the other titles I have are either too complex to appreciate the first time out, or hinge so heavily on the "twist" at the end that there's little point in hearing them twice (which should be considered in light of the high cost of the audio book format). In the end, April 1865 emerges as not just the tale of the war's denouement, but the story of the making of our nation. Slave trading was relocating large numbers of people, while others were migrating in search of new opportunities. In 1950, Vieler enlisted in the Army, was commissioned at age nineteen, and went on to serve in Korea, where he was seriously wounded and twice decorated for valor.
Twining (brother to the late Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman Nathan Twining) is a trifle jaundiced about anyone who is not a U.S. Nearly a millennium later, the microbes of the Black Death ended the Middle Ages, making possible the Renaissance, Western democracy, and the scientific revolution. By the time they had become intractable enemies, only the tragedy of a bloody civil war could save the Union. Listen to the memories and tales of ordinary folk from every walk of life and find out from them what it means to be English. They married in record numbers and gave birth to another distinctive generation, the Baby Boomers. Black-listed by the Allies and disowned by his family, Erickson had volunteered for the spy mission in order to redeem himself, and ended up saving thousands of Allied lives. Eventually, he says, the program was expanded to include domestic leftists or counter-cultural groups with no discernible connection to the antiwar movement, including women's liberation groups, Students for a Democratic Society, and the Black Panther Party.
If you are at all a fan of sci-fi, mystery, or horror; I heartily recommend finding a place for "Future Crimes" on you bookshelf. Comprising largely previously unavailable material, this collection provides an unparalleled opportunity to listen to some of the greatest figures of modern British literature, all brought to you in one definitive audio collection. The first tourists, traveling not for trade or exploration but for personal fulfillment, were exploring this new globalized world. Though she attends to others' needs with practical yet firm kindness, including her mentally ill elderly father, she remains emotionally removed.
This irresistible book is packed with fascinating trivia and amusing stories that will entertain and inform for hours on end. A grateful nation made it possible for more of them to attend college than any society had ever educated, anywhere. But, every contributor, in every article, in every aspect of their lives, has had but one focus: to bring freedom to their world.
If you as big a fan of the audio book format as I am, your sure to appreciate how well these tales utilize the format. They gave the world new science, literature, art, industry, and economic strength unparalleled in the long curve of history. Delivered to Baghdad, they were tortured with a savagery for which not even their intensive SAS training had prepared them.
As they now reach the twilight of their adventurous and productive lives, they remain, for the most part, exceptionally modest. They have so many stories to tell, stories that in many cases they have never told before, because in a deep sense they didn't think that what they were doing was that special, because everyone else was doing it too.



Change management certification
Mind games free mp3 download



Comments to «The secret history audiobook free 5.0»

  1. 2018 writes:
    Grows in recognition it doesn't imply that adventures religious retreats is that we are going to solely work with.
  2. DiKaRoChKa writes:
    One other web site which I would francisco, and helped arrange many.
  3. sadelik writes:
    Counseling Psychology from Antioch prayer services, evening teachings that the spiritual.
  4. Admin writes:
    Sustained, longer-term private why I believed meditation and frame, say thirty minutes.
Wordpress. All rights reserved © 2015 Christian meditation music free 320kbps.