Pontoon boat rental gulf shores 36542

Atlanta wooden boat association membership
Location: maine I believe red oak is fine with epoxy, but epoxy doesn't bond to white oak or live oak very well. I see a lot of old stripper canoes finished bright but now neglected and essentially ruined because the varnish wasn't kept up on a regular schedule. Originally Posted by alan white I believe red oak is fine with epoxy, but epoxy doesn't bond to white oak or live oak very well.
Thinning the EP does NOT make it bond better, especially not when you use universal thinners instead of special diluents they just destroy the good properties of Epoxy. When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Fiberglass is just what it sounds like: very fine strands of glass, just like the stuff in a window pane, woven into a cloth that vaguely resembles white burlap.
In any case, I'm curious if anyone has any experience actually implementing the I-beam keel and keelson system that is documented in the Gougeon Brothers' book for Golden Daisy. I'm also adding the specifics of what I'm thinking of below to see what anyone has to say about it. I'm designing and building an ocean going yacht with a desire for making it conservatively strong and resilient. Where the keel bolts will go through, I've read it's good practice to send the bolts through both flanges (ie. I'm also considering reinforcing the whole thing with carbon fiber on the lower back of the keel for compressive strength, and kevlar on the top (keelson) for tensile strength in groundings. Uniglass is better with wood than carbons due the similarities btw glass and wood tensile behaviour etc. Location: maine IT seems to me that an I beam would be totally inappropriate when a solid beam would be heavier to such a small degree that you could literall carry the extra weight (between flanges) on your shoulder.
Even increasing the flange to double would double the strength at the cost of a scant weight penalty. Originally Posted by alan white IT seems to me that an I beam would be totally inappropriate when a solid beam would be heavier to such a small degree that you could literall carry the extra weight (between flanges) on your shoulder. Yes, I do have plans, and I am working with a naval architect from time to time as a peer-review. However, as I mentioned before, there seems to be practically no actual experimental data on this type of construction. He was also somewhat evasive on the state of the wood after 30 years of the boat being built.
Indeed the I-beam construction is employed by gougeon bros as opposed to a solid stock timber from end to end. Location: maine Well, it's true that an I beam is more subject to catastrophic failure due to a vertical impact tending laterally.
Originally Posted by alan white Well, it's true that an I beam is more subject to catastrophic failure due to a vertical impact tending laterally. Alan Well, to answer your previous questions as well, I can get 1 yard by 56" of 6oz. So that's the first point: exotic laminates aren't exotic to the point that I couldn't afford using them in useful areas if it means that it's going to have a good return for my investment. Lamination also has the added advantage of splitting the wood into layers as an extra protection against rot and bugs.
The most important reason for using epoxy laminations of wood is to keep the wood (relatively) dry!
The Gougeon Brothers publication Epoxyworks (quarterly) is a vast resource of info on building with wood epoxy. Originally Posted by CanuckGuy Well, to answer your previous questions as well, I can get 1 yard by 56" of 6oz. Originally Posted by alan white I didn't mean to imply that solid meant as-from-the-tree, but rather laminated to a full rectangular section as opposed to an I beam of the same outer dimensions. Regarding the i-beam versus full block, I'm not exactly sure either, however this is how GB have done it and is why I was asking if anyone had experience with their technique. As for the boat, I have added a couple of prelim construction pics of the mold, and a shot of the model (also prelim). Structural pieces like floors and bulkhead cheeks will likely be out of Douglas Fir, but I have not found a nice way to make the bevel just yet.
As far as realizations go: I think I was a bit too conservative and followed GB's book too closely regarding strip plank width.


Location: North America Tad: what do you guys do as an alternative to i-beam style keels? The rest of the plan, assuming that I could manage it with the bulkheads would be to lay the next layers of the keel on top of the initial layer of laminate after the boat has been flipped. Location: South Africa Canuk Guy what are the dimensions of that thin layer of glass. Originally Posted by CanuckGuy Regarding the i-beam versus full block, I'm not exactly sure either, however this is how GB have done it and is why I was asking if anyone had experience with their technique. Project Brockway Skiff » Thread Tools Show Printable Version Email this Page Display Modes Linear Mode Switch to Hybrid Mode Switch to Threaded Mode Search this Thread Advanced Search Similar Threads Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post Epoxy instead of wood possible?
700 Kevlar ™ reinforced epoxy paste pigmented with a rust colored powder pigment for easy viewing).
Then I filled the 'hole' in, around, over, and under the wood insert mentioned above with the thickened epoxy. Next I draped plastic over the messy epoxy and smoothed it all out with my hand through the plastic. We then set the piece before and the back piece on a good board and then laminated the top and the bottom in two steps.
The same manipulation will be necessary to assemble the two pieces of marine plywood that make up the bottom. You will find in this chapter details the various steps with pictures (not very good quality, no doubt) but in my opinion quite explanatory. This small fishing boat is our first attempt at shipbuilding : as we will have to deal with some problems due to lack of experience. How to draw the boat plans on marine plywood panels ?This is the start : we'll draw the points obtained through the free software Delfship on marine plywood panel.
We will then simply lay the two sheets of plywood on each other to cut with a jigsaw both sides at once.
This operation is fast and rewarding because when it is completed our boat, suddenly takes form.
Two brackets for the front axle, two for the central trunk and three for the rear axle.Read more about Plywood Woodenboat building >>Cutting and fitting gunwale of the boat in exotic wood - IrokoThe strakes are edging in an old sheet of iroko can a twisted. Because our iroko plank is a little short, it is necessary to make an assembly of two parts. Read more about Plywood Woodenboat building >>Construction of the plywood daggerboardWe want to equip our boat with a sail. It used to tow the boat if necessary and hang it on the dead body with a stainless steel hook. Neither the service provider nor the domain owner maintain any relationship with the advertisers.
Bonded to the hull and deck of a boat with epoxy, it will provide a tough skin that will help minimize damage from impacts (that rock you didn't see) or abrasion (dragging the boat up on a rocky beach). I've called them directly to ask for details regarding that construction and they were unsure what the dimensions of the stock they used was. I know that maple is bad from a deterioration point of view, but isn't the purpose of epoxy sheeting to make that irrelevant? Finally, and really, the most important: I can probably get a 10x savings from being able to work with any dimension my local providers have in stock, as opposed to requiring a certain dimension. As long as the wood remains sealed from excess moisture it won't rot, maintains it's strength, and stays dimensionally stable. My plan is to notch in the first layer of laminate into the mold as if it were a stringer, bond onto it with the strip planking.
I have come across many sources for that information (not the least GB's publications), however I haven't thoughtfully considered anything beyond the structural aspects just yet. Call it 'distributor pricing for everyone' or ' half price' epoxy - whatever floats your boat! It will be necessary to join two sheets of marine plywood (3.10 m long) to get a total length of 6 m. The majority of reserves of buoyancy is placed in two coolers of a brave or we can keep the bait or fish on one side and the other cold beers. In case of trademark issues please contact the domain owner directly (contact information can be found in whois). They also did mention that it did snap on the maiden voyage due to grounding, and that they had to make a thicker version for it.


I'm assuming there has to be a transverse floors crossing under these areas or there will be undue torsion on the flange. In any case, I will be using kevlar for collision properties in certain areas, the question would be whether it's appropriate as a tensile structural component of the laminate. I've asked him about scantlings and he simply recommend that I just go with what GB have done in the past.
He also did mention that the keel snapped on a sand bank - something that I definitely can't afford. It just made me wonder if the actual boat did have some problems and they attributed it to poor upkeep. Although I'm having a rough time getting down a good cockpit design (the spirit class boats are beautiful boats but are definitely not blue water: their cockpit is very exposed, very high, and probably also very uncomfortable).
I will also have 3-4 relatively solid permanent bulkheads bonded directly in place during strip planking. Panels in front and rear axles of the boat and the two flaps of ice are cut from marine plywood 9mm. Styles short; acorns mature in 6 months, sweet or slightly bitter, inside of acorn shell hairless. However, this poses several issues, one of them being the notches on the permanent frames, and also the lamination of cheeks as I mentioned previously. Given that the area of the keel is maybe a total of, say 5" by say 5 feet, that's 2 square feet.
I will be reinforcing key areas (along keel, on the flare of the bow, the bow itself, and the fore foot) with an initial layer of kevlar cloth under the layers of veneer, and a final layer of kevlar on the exterior.
4-ounce is lighter but more difficult to apply because it wrinkles so easily. It's difficult to transport, it's difficult to handle on the shop floor, it's difficult to work on, and it's also difficult to insure that it's dimensionally stable. It's also going to be very expensive (for example if I choose to use dimensionally stable, but ecologically unfriendly, and also expensive mahogany).
Roughly trim the cloth to the sheerline, leaving maybe an extra inch all around. Gently smooth the wrinkles out, working from the middle of the boat towards the ends. You'll be surprised how easily the cloth conforms to the shape of the hull, even the stem and stern, without cutting darts or seams in the cloth.
In all likelihood, the only place you'll need to cut a dart is at the extreme stern. Spread the epoxy into the cloth on the sides of the boat by letting the goo run over the chine onto the sides. Repeat the process until the fiberglass has become completely clear everywhere, switching to a disposable brush to wet out the ends of the boat where the epoxy tries to run onto the floor. You shouldn't have any runs; the cloth should be entirely clear, but the weave should still show prominently.
Sometimes I can manage to fill the weave with just a second coat, but this time the weave of the cloth will not be soaking up resin, and an overly thick coat will run and make a big mess on the floor.
Ideally, when enough epoxy has been applied, the hull is smooth and glossy without the weave of the cloth showing anywhere.
Take a look at our Shop Tip When Have I Filled the Fiberglass Weave with Epoxy?  Fiberglassing the deck - The deck is 'glassed prior to the installation of the cockpit coaming.
It's economical to divide a shorter rectangle of fabric into two narrow triangles with a seam at the cockpit. Be careful not to let the epoxy run down the sides in big, hard-to-sand rivulets. 4- or 6-ounce fiberglass cloth will be almost perfectly clear and will look fine beneath coats of varnish. Some precautions, though: you'll want to be sure you have the fiberglass cloth completely filled with epoxy, even if it means extra coats. If you sand into the fabric anywhere, that area may show up under the varnish as a foggy spot in the finish.



Pedal boat rental newport beach ca weather
Canoe portage wheels plans




Comments to «Epoxy for wooden boat building»

  1. dddd writes:
    Dominant dreams are building brand new.
  2. Alinka writes:
    Pallets and I'm within sides of the boat skiff , Planked skiff, very old instructions (1876). Which.