Disaster planning companies nyc,emergency action plan for dams,survival book genre types,zombie diary survival cheats apk - Videos Download

The disruption from a disaster can threaten your organization’s operations, profitability, and quality of service and image. Disaster recovery planning (DRP) is a major concern of the entire organization, not just data processing. To determine the Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP) critical needs of the organization, each department should document all the functions performed within that department. Once the critical needs have been documented, management can set priorities within departments for the overall recovery of the organization. Essential activities, a disruption in service exceeding one day would jeopardize seriously the operation of the organization. Recommended activities, a disruption of service exceeding one week would jeopardize seriously the operation of  the organization. Nonessential activities, this information would be convenient to have but would not detract seriously from the operating capabilities if it were missing. The first step in the disaster recovery process is to perform a business impact analysis that considers all of the the potential impacts from the disaster senarios put forward. For a successful Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP),  the DR plan  must be integrated with the entire enterprise, strong business unit involvement, senior management buy-in and must be regularly tested through drills and exercises that validates your plans. DomeFest competition winners will showcase "fulldome" work at Bay Area's Chabot Space and Science center. In the past five years the annual RSA Conference has grown from a techie meeting to a major business event. Q&A Linda Sanford explains why the handoff to an offshore partner should be embraced, not feared.
Carmaker announces companies it has chosen for one of the largest tech outsourcing efforts by a single corporation. New products include entry-level and high-end storage arrays, plus software that speeds movement of large files.
Q&A William McDonough brings his eco-intelligent perspective to clean technology investing.
It's Comdex all over again as the tech world moves to Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronics Show. Scary stories and Windows' developments are what ZDNet News readers clicked on most in 2005. Across the country, thousands each year are affected by large-scale disasters, from wildfires to floods to hurricanes. While most disasters are impossible to predict, you can plan for them and reduce disruptions in your services to youth and families.
This manual teaches the “Ps and Rs” (prevention and preparedness, response, and recovery) of disaster planning. Understanding the demographics of the young people you serve will help you begin to understand the unique needs of your disaster plan.
Are you running a single shelter, or are the young people you serve scattered across numerous sites around the community? Adequate disaster planning requires that you stockpile supplies for emergencies that require either an extended period of sheltering in place or an evacuation. While building evacuations will be handled on a site-by-site basis, local and regional evacuations raise additional questions.In the event of a local evacuation, consider the following:If one site is affected by a disaster, could you relocate youth to another of your sites?If the answer is yes, is each site prepared to handle a short-term influx of youth from another site?
To effectively plan for a disaster, you must develop individualized response plans for those disasters most likely to affect your facility. All the preparation in the world will not matter if you do not also plan out the specific course of action you will take when a disaster strikes.
Organizations are constantly evolving through growth, down-sizing, new initiatives, and overall technology innovations. Be a better judge of how to improve the value of your network and enhance your security practices. Such a customized analysis maximizes the productivity, communications and collaboration between your employees, as well as with vendors and partners.
Incorporating your technology assessment with an IT plan can yield an environment that is stable, secure and efficient. For example, phone systems, alarm systems, and computer data networks used to be separate resources, but now have become more unified.
IT planning gives you the opportunity to think ahead about your organization's future needs as they relate to your business goals. Many organizations are content to have a disaster recovery plan that provides for minimal basic services in the event of a disaster because of the expense and complexity involved in providing geo-redundant capabilities across all systems. Have you thought about true business continuity while the original IT infrastructure is being rebuilt? We provide a Virtual CIO to work with you in a consultative manner to design and deliver an IT solution that complements your business goals and objectives. Our experience saves you time by enabling you to learn from our past mistakes, eliminates frustration, and helps you to achieve your goals - on time and on budget. Vendesco provides integrated, innovative infrastructure-based marketing services and that allow our clients to cross-market consumer products from an array of suppliers following inbound voice, e-mail and web interactions. Vendesco provides integrated, infrastructure-based marketing services that allow our clients to cross-market consumer products from an array of suppliers following inbound voice, e-mail and web interactions.
Natural disasters, severe network and physical security breach, and local emergencies can cause devastating disruption to you vital business processes.
For the rest, this means the recovery of technical environments, such as Information Technology IT systems, networks infrastructure and communications equipment, following an unplanned interruption or outage.
This IT DR plans is part of the Business Continuity plans and preparations which are necessary to minimize loss and ensure continuity of the critical business functions of an organization in the event of disaster. A comprehensive and up-to-date Disaster Recovery Plan ( DRP ) prepares your organization for the worst case scenario or key disaster scenario. In order, to develop an effective plan, all business units and departments should be involved. Organizations should also develop written, comprehensive disaster recovery plans that address all the critical operations and functions of the business. Company could start from a smaller scale testing a specific application defined in the IT disaster recovery plan. Disasters can also occur on a smaller scale, caused by everyday events such as power outages, kitchen fires, or burst water mains. It includes worksheets and checklists to guide you step by step through the process of creating an emergency-preparedness plan for your youth-serving agency. You must take stock of your current situation, considering such factors as location, population, and available resources.
Each of these scenarios requires different considerations.Single facilityBecause you are only planning for one site, issues such as evacuations, supplies, staff management, and communication become less complex than if you were managing several sites at once. If you installed one of these recently without making sure it integrated with the others, you know the frustration and expense of having to build and manage separate networks.
The process of planning will help you understand how information flows in your organization and provide a clear set of priorities to on which to focus. Vendesco's Virtual CIOs have decades of experience in assessing and planning IT environments for organizations of all sizes and complexity. In some cases, businesses simply don’t know where to start when devising their DR plan.
Within all departments the critical needs should be identified and prioritized, critical needs include all information and equipment needed in order to continue operations should a department be destroyed or become inaccessible. In the second year, move to partial warm data center to an actual production fail over to the DR site. The transient nature of an emergency shelter population means that you will likely not be able to get your young people involved in disaster planning. One comprehensive disaster guide is almost certainly sufficient.Multiple sitesDo you shelter youth with host-home families? The location should be easy to access, but it should also be locked so that supplies won’t be tampered with.
The most effective way to combat these destructive elements is to have a clear, comprehensive, well-practiced response plan in place.
Disaster recovery planning protects your IT investment from unforeseen system failures, and provides business continuity. Leveraging and IT Plan ensures that your installed systems integrate effectively and perform better and at lower costs as the business grows. This will ensure the ongoing availability of critical resources and continuity of operations. This is usually dependent on the risk tolerance and IT audit compliance of the organization. At the end of each question, there will be a checklist that breaks down the concrete actions you can take. On-duty staff (especially the emergency manager) should be able to access the supplies at all times.Emergency Supply Checklist What supplies are essential for your emergency stockpile? It should also include the purpose for the DR plan and different levels of the scope of damage related to disaster. Possible formats for these quick guides might include flash cards, pocket guides, and quick reference lists. Do you operate several of your own facilities around town?For programs with multiple sites, the disaster planning process is complex.
You should have enough seating in facility vehicles to guarantee evacuation for every member of your population.


This evacuation involves leaving the affected area, in which alternate local facilities are no longer available, and retreating to a removed area, usually outside a 50- to 100-mile radius.
These quick guides should be included with the orientation materials you hand out.With transitional living youth, who can stay in residence for a year or more, you should conduct disaster training and drills.
The likelihood of small-scale, facility-specific disasters (kitchen fires, basement floods, or power outages, for example) means that each site should have its own unique disaster plan in place. Your staff must, as well.Taking stockJust as you took stock of the young people you serve and the attributes of your facility, it is important to take stock of your staff as well. Each person should have access to a gallon of water a day (2 quarts for drinking, 2 quarts for food preparation and sanitation). For example, if your facility can house 15 youth and, during peak hours, has 3 full-time staff working, you must be prepared to immediately evacuate 18 people—a number that exceeds the capacity of most large vans. Effective disaster planning requires that you consider all three of these evacuation scenarios. And what about smaller-scale disasters, such as medical emergencies and structural fires?By carefully assessing the real-life risks you face from both large- and small-scale disasters, you can allocate your valuable time toward developing detailed plans for only those scenarios you are most likely to face.
A Team Leader for Recovery should be assigned to each group and should report to the Disaster Recovery Lead who will keep each group organized and on task.DR Call TreeThis should include a list of contact information for each team leader. By walking you through the process of preparing for disasters before they happen, it will help ensure that you have an effective response ready. You might also consider involving them in the planning process.How many youth are present in your facility at any given time?
For instance, if your facility has room for 10 youth and typically has 2 staff people on site, you should store 36 gallons of water (3 days x 12 people). On a larger scale, though, you must ensure that your disaster plans address how the different sites will communicate with one another, particularly in events requiring region-wide evacuations or the sharing of limited resources (such as transportation). Who is trained to administer medication? How is important information relayed to staff in your facility? Is your staff able to contact one another when off site?
Double that number if your facility is in a very hot climate.Store water in clean, sealed plastic containers.
How would you transport the remaining three people?There are three transportation scenarios to consider. This could be virtually anywhere from a bunker to a warehouse off-site of your main facility. Since it’s impossible to anticipate exactly how many youth will be present onsite during a disaster, plan for your maximum occupancy.Is your population mixed gender or single-sex?
It is critical that you decide early on in the planning process how your sites will work together in the event of an emergency!What if I have multiple sites?
Bank accounts, credit card accounts, annual budgets, payroll records.Chances are, you keep most of these documents on paper. If you have a mixed-gender population and must evacuate, how will you handle the need for separate sleeping spaces at your evacuation site?Does your population include single mothers and their children? For example, during the day, when there are usually multiple staff on duty to respond to an emergency, one person might be tasked with calling 911, another with retrieving emergency supplies, and a third with overseeing the building evacuation. Ideally, though, these critical documents will be stored in both paper and electronic formats. In either of these cases, you will have staff provide their own vehicles to help facilitate an evacuation.The third requires relying on public or third-party transportation.
This map might be a store-bought local map that you cut out and highlight, or it might be something you draw from scratch. An evacuation plan must take into account transportation and livable space for young children or infants.
Spend an hour or two touring your facility and completing the following worksheet:How many smoke detectors does your facility have? By replacing your food and water supplies regularly, you ensure that what you have will be usable when you need it.
This redundancy can help ensure that key documents survive any disaster scenario, including one in which the facility itself is destroyed, such as a fire or tornado.
That means you must have clear protocols in place for emergency decisionmaking in your absence.
While it is probably not necessary to bring along everything during a building evacuation, plan on having youth bring their Go-Bags with them. To keep your bottom line above the red, and keep vital processes in motion, be sure to have an effective back up and recovery plan designed by an IT company who specializes in DR.Practice, Adapt, AdjustAs your business grows and changes, be sure to adapt your sample disaster recovery plan accordingly. Special needs can refer to any number of unique issues present among the young people you serve. It also provides space for you to list the people riding in it (including its driver) during an evacuation. It may, in the event of a blizzard or large-scale power outage, simply require that everyone should stay put and wait for the crisis to pass.
Practice scenarios with staff and continue to train employees on their responsibilities during and after an emergency.For more information of designing a DR plan that includes crucial system and data backup and recovery, please contact the experts with Invenio IT.For further assistance please contact a Technology Strategist646-395-1170Like what you read?
In the following pages, you will have the opportunity to answer questions or complete worksheets. If, for example, you have a youth with hearing disabilities, your alarms should be equipped with strobe lights.
Focus on keeping canned food, dry mixes, and other staples that do not require refrigeration, cooking, or extensive preparation.
You might also consider storing original copies of critical documents in an offsite, secure location, such as a bank’s safe deposit box.
In the event of an evacuation, you can use this list to take attendance at pit stops and ensure that nobody is accidentally left behind. This will allow you to take roll once you reach the rally point, ensure that critical medications are on hand, and provide access to other resources such as your staff list and emergency money.What if there are young children on the premises?Local evacuationsIn a local evacuation, youth and staff will move to another building within the local community for an indeterminate period of time, until the crisis is resolved. Each one of them can also have a significant impact on your facility’s daily operations. It may also require aggressive action on the part of facility staff (for example, to put out a fire or resolve a medical emergency). Various templates are also included in the appendices to add to your own disaster preparedness binder.This manual is in no way a final word. Avoid salty foods that make people thirsty!?Some good food choices for your emergency stockpile include:ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits, and vegetablesprotein or fruit barsdry cereal or granolapeanut butterdried fruitnutscrackerscanned juicesnonperishable pasteurized milkcomfort foods (chocolate, candy, cookies)Keep in mind special dietary requirements. In addition, duplicate paper documents as electronic files as soon as possible, both to increase their redundancy (and, therefore, security) and make them more easily transportable in the event of an evacuation.Electronic documentsElectronic documents have many advantages over paper documents, particularly when you consider the space required to store them and the ease involved in duplicating them for backup. Preparing to cope with these small-scale disasters is at least as important as preparing for the larger ones.Can you think of other small-scale disasters? You may also have youth with language barriers, strict dietary requirements, or ongoing medical needs, such as daily insulin injections.
If, for example, your facility houses young mothers and their infant children, you will need to stockpile infant formula.Date stored food and replace it every 6 months. Regular oil changes as well as inspections to check hoses, belts, brakes, tires, and fluid levels are critical. Be sure to consult with your local or regional government and inquire about existing plans.Now, grab a pencil and let’s get started!
This is acceptable as long as the drive is password-protected, with access to sensitive files limited only to trusted staff. Consider the large-scale disasters that you selected in the previous chapter-which ones would require evacuation, and which ones would have you sheltering within the facility?On the next page, you will see a completed disaster response plan that uses the template found in Appendix H. However, electronic documents stored on a computer’s hard drive are not secure from disaster. This space is for breaking down, in as much detail as possible, the steps that you, your staff, and youth will take in response to the disaster at hand. Who is trained to administer medication?Since medical emergencies are among the most common crises you can face, having a staff well-trained in basic first aid and CPR is a critical part of disaster planning.
The answer to the big question, in this case, is to remain in place—the staff and youth will take shelter in the facility safe room. Are they clearly labeled?What area within the facility offers the most protection for a “shelter-in-place” scenario?Where are the water and gas shut-off valves located? If your State doesn’t require that all staff be trained in CPR and first aid, ensure that there is always at least one certified staff person on duty and that all other staff can easily reach that person by cell phone or pager.
Consider getting a NOAA (that’s the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Weather Radio with tone alert.
Finally, schedule a regular time to save the most current version of these documents so that your backup files are always up to date.An even better solution than external storage devices, though, is network storage.
Staff who might drive the vehicle should be trained to use it.If GPS devices are unfeasible, supply each vehicle with local and regional maps with evacuation destinations clearly marked (and the most direct route to each highlighted in an easy-to-see color). While the on-duty support staff take responsibility for moving youth there and handing out critical supplies, the director (or lead staff person) takes responsibility for turning off the gas, closing exterior doors and windows, and shutting off lights. Storing your electronic documents on a network, either a local network or the Internet, means that your files will not be affected should some disaster befall your computer. Once the entire facility population is in the safe room, they use their battery-powered radio to listen for weather updates; when the all-clear is announced, they leave the safe room and check the facility for damage. Since certifications expire after a set period of time, you will need to ensure that staff take regular recertification courses. Network file storage also allows you to access your files from anywhere by logging onto the network, which can be very useful in the event of an evacuation.In the best-case scenario, you should protect your electronic files by using both a storage device and network storage. Research various local options—churches and community centers are great places to start, and schools, local hotels, or even apartment buildings can provide other possibilities.


If the facility is no longer habitable, the local or regional evacuation plan comes into play.Below the procedures area is a space to list the critical supplies and resources that the specific disaster scenario demands.
In cases of power outage, do you have the means to provide emergency lighting?Do any areas of the facility require repair or extra attention?How many smoke detectors does the facility have?
Work on locating a facility (or two) that will agree to become your local evacuation site should an emergency arise.
Since there is a possibility that an evacuation will be necessary in the wake of a tornado, this plan calls for distribution of all the facility’s Go-Bags. You can never have too many trained responders!How is important information relayed to staff within your facility?During a crisis, your staff must be able to quickly and accurately communicate with you and each other.
The first aid kit, if not already in the safe room, would be brought there as well, in addition to extra flashlights and a battery-powered radio for listening to weather updates as they are broadcast.The area below the supplies and resources section is for listing emergency contact information that applies to the specific disaster scenario.
Ideally, staff should carry walkie-talkies that enable them to contact one another regardless of where they are.
Spell out clearly expectations regarding cost, duration of stay, notification requirements, and so forth. For example, a response plan for a medical emergency might list the local fire, rescue squad, and police emergency numbers.
What about fire alarms?Your facility should have, at a minimum, one smoke detector per floor. Carrying extra gas inside your vehicle is dangerous, and a full gas can should not be part of your emergency supplies. Since the only real response to a tornado involves sheltering and riding it out, there is no number listed here.The final area on the form is for detailing the recovery processes that will help return life to normal when the disaster is over.
Depending on the distance to the evacuation facility, walking or public transportation may be an option—but you need to know before a crisis strikes how your population will get there. If a hurricane is coming, for example, how will your staff know if regional authorities give an evacuation order? It is critical, however, that you identify these vehicles before an emergency takes place—you do not want to be in a crisis situation with no volunteers to donate their cars!
You should also ensure that they are dual-sensor smoke detectors, which combine ionization alarms (which detect flaming, fast-moving fires) and photoelectric alarms (which detect smoldering, smoky fires) into one unit.Every smoke detector in your facility should be tested once a month.
Keep a radio or television in a central area of your facility, and ensure that, during a regional disaster, it remains tuned to a local news station so that your staff can remain abreast of developing situations as they occur.If your facility has a voicemail system, consider creating a special extension on which you can record an emergency message. Plastic sheeting and duct tape can be used to secure cracks in or around windows, while towels are excellent for stuffing into the space beneath doors. Because local evacuations last for an indeterminate time, you will probably want to bring the bulk of your emergency supplies with you as well. Review everything you’ve done so far and consider your facility, your resources, and your staff.
In the event of a large-scale emergency, off-duty staff can call in and receive critical information and instructions (such as when and where to bring vehicles). There is room for common sense here—if, for example, your evacuation site has agreed to provide food for your population, there is little reason to bring your stockpile of food and water. Track this regular maintenance in the log in Appendix B.If your facility has pull-handle fire alarms, make sure youth and staff know where they are located. This includes stocking vehicles with supplies, ensuring there is communication between vehicles, using vehicle logs (Appendix D), especially for the purpose of tracking occupants, and so forth.Third-party transportationThird-party transportation includes buses, taxis, rental cars, and trains. If you do not have pull alarms, you must have some other means of sounding a facility-wide alarm (such as a PA system or an air horn) in the event that an immediate evacuation becomes necessary.How many fire extinguishers do you have on site? Regularly update the list to ensure that it is as current as possible.How often does your staff rehearse disaster response scenarios?Once you have completed your disaster plan, develop a schedule of drills so that your staff (and, possibly, the young people you serve) can rehearse one or two disaster responses every couple of months. Where emergency evacuations are concerned, third-party transportation is the least ideal option, primarily because widespread emergencies that might require regional evacuations will often overwhelm the systems that provide such transportation in the first place.
Once the crisis is resolved, you might return to your normal facility or enter local evacuation mode, if your regular facility is unusable.Planning a regional evacuation is essentially the same as planning a local evacuation.
Evacuating 20 people on a bus may seem feasible now, but in a disaster scenario, when hundreds or even thousands of people may be competing for the same seats, you may find yourself faced with an impossible dilemma.But what if third-party transportation is your only viable option? The complication is that the partnerships you arrange will be with facilities far away from you.
In that case, it is vitally important that you secure your travel arrangements well in advance of a disaster.Once again, the first question to ask yourself is how many seats you need. A good starting point is to consider what connections you or other members of your staff have to areas far outside your local community—perhaps some members of your staff have friends or relatives who live far away and could provide ideas about possible evacuation sites.
No one plan can account for every possible nuance of every disaster—the best you can hope for is that, by taking the time to anticipate your response, you will be prepared to handle any situation when it arises. Have they been recently inspected?Fire CategoriesClass A: Fires involving ordinary combustible material (wood, paper, most plastic). Schedule a regular check (at least once every 3 months) of the first aid kit to ensure that it is complete and ready to use. All evacuation plans should assume that your facility is full to capacity, with a maximum number of youth and staff present. Work from the contacts you and your staff have to choose a good evacuation area, then visit that area and research sites with which you could form partnerships.When you find an evacuation site, create an evacuation site agreement to put your arrangement in writing (Appendix G). But take a few moments now to walk through the fire response plan above.Obviously, the answer to the big question here is evacuation. The first step requires the person responding to the fire to pull the fire alarm, which is the facility’s signal for an immediate building evacuation, the plan for which is referenced in the procedures.
Water will spread these fires!Class C: Fires involving electrical equipment (wiring, outlets, appliances). This shock, called defibrillation, can help the heart to reestablish an effective rhythm of its own.
The best (and least expensive) option is to seek out a partnership with individuals in the community or with other agencies (churches, other youth facilities, community centers).
This plan, already designed, specifies who is responsible for gathering needed supplies, what the procedures are for getting to the rally point, and so on.Next, the responder must evaluate the situation.
Water can cause electrical shock!There should be at least one easily accessible fire extinguisher in your facility’s kitchen, as well as in any other area where open fires take place. If your staff needs additional training, contact the local chapter of the Red Cross to explore your options. Depending on the extent of the fire, he or she would either attempt to extinguish it using a portable fire extinguisher (step 3) or seal off the affected area to help prevent the fire’s spread to other parts of the facility (step 4).
Up to a quarter of those deaths could have been prevented had an AED been on hand.Ideally, your facility will have at least one AED. You will also need to ensure that you have enough qualified drivers available (either from the person or agency providing the vehicle or your own staff). At least once a year, each extinguisher should undergo a more complete maintenance check, which may require you to contract with a fire safety company or the local fire department.
You can schedule and track these monthly and yearly inspections on your maintenance log (Appendix B).How many exits does the facility have? Also place copies of the list with your emergency supplies and inside each facility vehicle. Go-Bags allow individuals, both youth and staff, to carry with them important records and other personal supplies.
Ideally, every sleeping room will also have its own means of emergency exit—typically, a window fire escape.
When one youth leaves your facility, empty his or her Go-Bag and reassign it to the next youth who arrives.Go-Bag for StaffYou only need to have one Go-Bag for your staff. Spare keys should be available to all staff.All exits should be clearly labeled, ideally with a lit sign. Each floor plan should show people where they are in the building and give them two possible ways to get outside. Look for a room that doesn’t have windows and can be closed off from the rest of the facility. Shutting off the gas in the event of disasters like tornados and fires can prevent explosions.
Your shut-off valves and the circuit breaker box should be clearly labeled and easily accessible to all staff. Likewise, every circuit in the circuit breaker box should be plainly identified.Are all areas of the facility well lit? In cases of power outage, do you have the means to provide emergency lighting?Good lighting is an important element of disaster prevention. The exterior of your facility should remain lit at night for security.Electrical outages during disaster scenarios are common. While keeping an emergency generator on site is probably an unnecessary expense (and a potential safety risk as well), having a good supply of battery-powered or hand-crank flashlights is a simple and cost-effective way to provide emergency lighting. Ideally, there will be at least one flashlight in every sleeping room, common room, and office.
Minor maintenance problems can lead to larger, more expensive, and potentially more dangerous issues down the road. Take stock of what repairs and general maintenance your facility requires, and then prioritize. Revisit this list regularly, and set a specific timetable for completing each item.Check your facility regularly, at least once every season.



American airlines movies may 2015
Best outdoor survival gear


Comments to “Disaster planning companies nyc”

  1. LoVeS_THE_LiFe writes:
    Less susceptible to harm attitude toward foreign years ago, we started.
  2. isyankar writes:
    Exactly where Wednesday's solicitation for.
  3. hesRET writes:
    Maintain an infant warm if the??Read A lot more material services that are posted on the Service.