Emergency operations plan template california,business continuity plan wiki,hollywood film 2012 hindi free download - Reviews

APS has the knowledge, expertise and technology, to achieve standards and solutions that are considered to be among the best in the food industry.
Process pipework and fabrication Mechanical, pneumatic, electrical and process engineering.
The Ontario Incident Management System (IMS) uses specific forms to assist with incident management processes and procedures, as well as to represent a record of decisions and actions. When completing IMS forms, it is important to accurately reflect the response role and location: Are you working at an incident site, or emergency operations center?
Additional information on these concepts may be found in the IMS Doctrine and the Guideline for the Application of IMS at EOCs.
Documents the actions developed by the Commander and the Command and General Staff during Planning Meetings.
Provides information on contact information and radio assignments for each operational period. Provides information on incident medical aid stations, transportation services, hospitals, and medical emergency procedures, for emergency responders. Used to indicate which IMS organizational elements are currently activated and the names of the personnel staffing each element. Records details of notable activities of individual or team resources at various IMS organizational levels, including Units, single resources, Strike Teams, Task Forces, etc. Assists the Safety Officer in completing an operational risk assessment to prioritize hazards and develop appropriate controls by operational period. Used to communicate the decisions made by the Operations Section Chief during the Tactics Meeting concerning resource assignments and needs for the next operational period. Provides an inventory of all transportation and support vehicles and equipment assigned to the incident. Provides the Air Operations Branch with the number, type, location, and specific assignments of aircraft. Ensures that resources checking out of the incident have completed all appropriate incident business, and provides the Planning Section information on resources released from the incident. Purpose: This form documents the actions developed by the Incident Commander and the Command and General Staff during Planning Meetings.
Preparation: IMS 1001 is completed following each formal Planning Meeting, conducted by the Incident or EOC Commander and the Command and General Staff.
Distribution: Presented to incoming incident management team and distributed as necessary to all activated functions. If IMS Form 1001 (Consolidated IAP) is not used, the IMS 202 form will be used as the cover page of the IAP.
Please note, in such cases, the IMS 202 (Incident Objectives form) serves as a cover sheet and is not considered a complete IAP until all required forms are attached. If IMS Form 1001 (Consolidated IAP) is used, relevant content from the IMS 202 will be transferred to the IMS 1001 form. IMS 202 fulfills its normal function as the Incident Objective form, and also is used as the cover page of the IAP.
Required content is transposed to IMS 1001 Consolidated IAP and the IMS 202 is retained by the Planning Section and filed by the Documentation Unit. Note: This Form may be completed or updated any time the number of personnel assigned to the incident increases or decreases, or a change in personnel assignment occurs. Purpose: The Resource Assignment List (IMS 204) informs Operations Section personnel of incident assignments. Preparation: The IMS 204 is normally prepared by the Resources Unit, using guidance from the Incident Objectives (IMS 202), Operational Planning Worksheet (IMS 215-G), and the Operations Section Chief.
Distribution: Duplicated and distributed as part of the Incident Action Plan (version IMS 1001 or IMS 202). Purpose: The Incident Telecommunications Plan provides information on contact information and radio assignments for each operational period. Preparation: The Incident Telecommunications Plan is prepared by the Communications Unit Leader in the Logistics Section and given to the Planning Section Chief for inclusion in the IAP (as required). Distribution: The Incident Telecommunications Plan is duplicated and given to all recipients as part of the IAP. Purpose: The Medical Plan (IMS 206) provides information on incident medical aid stations, transportation services, hospitals, and medical emergency procedures, for emergency responders.
Preparation: The IMS 206 is prepared by the Medical Unit Leader and reviewed by the Safety Officer t.
Distribution: The IMS 206 is given to all recipients as part of the Incident Action Plan (IAP). Purpose: The Incident Organization Chart (IMS 207) is used to indicate which IMS organizational elements are currently activated and the names of the personnel staffing each element.
Preparation: The IMS 207 is prepared by the Resource Unit Leader and reviewed by the Incident or EOC Commander. Preparation: The IMS 208 is an optional form that may be included and completed by the Safety Officer as an attachment for the Incident Action Plan (IAP), or stand-alone form. Distribution: The IMS 208 or content from the IMS 208 may be reproduced with the IAP and given to all recipients as part of the IAP. To provide Command Staff and other incident management personnel with basic information for planning for the next operational period. Sued by the Situation Unit personnel for posting information on Status Boards or circulating as required.
Preparation: The IMS 209-G is prepared by the Situation Unit Leader or Planning Section Chief. Distribution: The IMS 209-G may be scheduled for presentation to the Planning Section Chief and the other General Staff prior to each Planning Meeting and may be required at more frequent intervals by the Incident or EOC Commander, or the Planning Section Chief. Purpose: Personnel and equipment arriving at the incident can check in at various incident locations.
Used for recording the initial location of personnel and equipment and thus a subsequent assignment can be made. Managers at these locations record this information and forward it to the Resource Unit as soon as possible. Distribution: Check-In Lists, which are completed by personnel at various check-in locations, are provided to the Resources Unit, Demobilization Unit and the Finance and Administration Section. Purpose: The EOC Check-In List form is designed to gather information on all resource personnel operating at an EOC. Distribution: This form is used by the Planning Section to assist in completing the Organization Assignment List (IMS Form 203) and Incident Organization Chart (IMS Form 207).
Purposes: The General Message (IMS 213) is used by the incident dispatchers to record incoming messages that cannot be orally transmitted to the intended recipients. Preparation: The IMS 213 may be initiated by incident dispatchers and any other personnel on an incident. Purpose: The Activity Log (IMS 214) records details of notable activities of individual or team resources at various IMS organizational levels, including Units, single resources, Strike Teams, Task Forces, etc. Distribution: Completed IMS 214 forms are submitted to supervisors, who forward them to the Documentation Unit. Purpose: The purpose of the Incident Action Plan Safety Analysis (IMS 215A) is to aid the Safety Officer in completing an operational risk assessment to prioritize hazards, safety, and health issues, and to develop appropriate controls.
Preparation: The IMS 215-A is typically prepared by the Safety Officer during the incident action planning cycle.
Distribution: This form is attached to the Incident Safety Plan and is distributed according to the instructions for Safety Plans.
Purpose: The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Tactics Worksheet is used to communicate the decisions made by the Operations Section Chief during the Tactics Meeting, concerning the specific tactics to be accomplished for the next operational period. Please Note: if the incident involves the deployment of physical resources with specific work assignments, the IMS-215-G Operational Planning Worksheet should be used instead (or alongside) the IMS 215-E. Distribution: When complete, the IMS 215-E is distributed to the Planning Section (Resources Unit) to assist in the preparation of the Assignment Lists (IMS 204). Purpose: The Operational Planning Worksheet is used to communicate the decisions made by the Operations Section Chief during the Tactics Meeting concerning resource assignments and needs for the next operational period.
Distribution: When the Branch, Division, or Group work assignments and accompanying resource allocations are agreed upon, the form is distributed to the Planning Section (Resources Unit) to assist in the preparation of the Assignment Lists (IMS 204).
Preparation: The IMS 218 is prepared by Ground Support Unit personnel at intervals specified by the Ground Support Unit Leader. Distribution: Initial inventory information recorded on the form should be given to the Resource Unit.
Purpose: The Air Operations Summary provides the Air Operations Branch with the number, type, location, and specific assignments of aircraft.
Preparation: The Operations Section Chief or the Air Operations Branch Director completes the summary during each Planning Meeting. Distribution: After the summary is completed by Air Operations personnel (except item 11), the form is given to the Air Support Group Supervisor, who completes the form by indicating the designators of the helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft assigned missions during the specified operational period. Purpose: The Demobilization Check-Out (IMS 221) ensures that resources checking out of the incident have completed all appropriate incident business, and provides the Planning Section information on resources released from the incident. Preparation: The IMS 221 is initiated by the Planning Section, or a Demobilization Unit Leader if designated.
Demobilization Unit Leader completes the top portion of the form and checks the appropriate boxes in Block 6 that may need attention after the Resources Unit Leader has given written notification that the resource is no longer needed. Distribution: After completion, the IMS 221 is returned to the Demobilization Unit Leader or the Planning Section. Note: Members are not released until form is complete when all of the items checked in Block 6 have been signed off.
Purpose: The Claims Log is used to provide a summary of information related to the tracking of incident-related claims. Preparation: Completed by the Claims Unit Leader in the Finance and Administration Section. Purpose: The Resource Request Form (IMS 260) is used to request and track resources that are required for an incident.
Preparation: Generally, IMS 260 is initiated by the Requestor and submitted to the EOC Liaison, who in turn, submits the document to the EOC Logistics Section.
Distribution: Completed forms are distributed to appropriate Branches and Units within the Logistics Section (generally the Supply Unit or Facilities Unit). 1 IMS Forms identified with an asterisk (*) are typically included in the Incident Action Plan (IAP) as an attachment or excerpted into the IMS 1001 Consolidated IAP).
The purpose of this section is to illustrate how TIM can be integrated into a metropolitan transportation plan and its supporting planning documents by leading the reader through excerpts of the metropolitan transportation plan and the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Strategic Plan. While many regions are quickly advancing toward a fully objectives-driven, performance-based approach to planning, the example below does not include performance targets for the TIM-related objectives and performance measures.
The Genesee Transportation Council (GTC) is the MPO for the Genesee-Finger Lakes Region including the City of Rochester, New York. Below are annotated excerpts from the long range plan that illustrate the incorporation of TIM. The following excerpt shows the table of contents with annotations that highlight areas relevant for TIM. The ability of the highway and bridge network to carry traffic efficiently and minimize delay to the travelling public and freight carriers is important to economic and social productivity as well as environmental quality.
The objective of the GTC Congestion Management Process is to provide practical tools to identify and implement strategies that improve the mobility of people and freight, emphasizing coordinated corridor-level and region-wide solutions that mitigate existing sources and avoid the creation of future sources of congestion that result in excess delay. Non-Recurring Incident Related Delay – happens as a result of unplanned incidents such as an automobile crash or a severe weather event.
Locations that experience the greatest amount of Non-Recurring Incident Related Delay are those where volumes relative to the capacity of the roadway is nearing Recurring Capacity Related Delay and are more likely than other locations to experience crashes or other types of incidents that reduce the capacity of the roadway. The GTC Congestion Mitigation Toolbox, ranging from constructing new highways to building and operating commuter rail, has been updated as part of the LRTP 2035.


Transportation system management and operations (TSMO) recommendations provide the best opportunity to maximize the effectiveness of the current transportation system at the lowest cost. The majority of delay in the region is non-recurring and is the result of crashes, weather, and other irregular events.
TSMO programs and projects can increase safety by providing timely and accurate information to make travelers aware of hazards such as adverse weather conditions, work zones, crashes, and other incidents. TSMO programs and projects also include the coordination of transportation infrastructure and services and the associated organizational relationships among all transportation agencies, including but not limited to NYSDOT, NYSTA, counties, the City of Rochester, and other municipalities.
How transportation agencies coordinate their respective activities can maximize the investment of public resources and the delivery of services that clear crashes, address weather-related consequences, and provide connections between public transportation services operated by public and not-for-profit providers.
Formal protocols (including via Regional Concepts of Transportation Operations) to coordinate information sharing, incident response, and timing of construction projects based on a cooperatively- developed vision can improve efficiency and effectiveness. The HELP Program is an important initiative in minimizing Non-Recurring Incident Related Delay.
Clearing crashes as quickly as possible while providing for the safety of emergency responders and law enforcement agents requires significant coordination. In Chapter 7, Performance Measures, GTC selected "median incident clearance time" as one of 15 performance measures that the region will use to monitor transportation system performance to support accountability and identify changes in key areas of the transportation system.
Using quantitative metrics to measure the performance of the transportation system over time is important to being accountable to taxpayers, given the large amount of public funds used for its construction, maintenance, and operation.
GTC sought to ensure that the selected performance measures would be both meaningful (having significance) and understandable (capable of being comprehended) to users and policymakers, providing a common basis to discuss changes in how the transportation system is meeting or not meeting regional needs. The current value for each performance measure is provided as a benchmark along with the desired direction consistent with the GTC Goals and Objectives and the likely direction based on what can realistically be accomplished within the reasonably expected revenues. Though less important than meaningfulness and understandability, another consideration in the selection of the performance measures was the availability of quality data for the region (or Rochester TMA) and the likelihood that it will continue to be collected. Median incident clearance time on major roadways was calculated by GTC for calendar year 2010 based on when notifications of incidents and their corresponding clearances were provided by e-mail through NY-Alert and the NYSTA TRANSalert. During the development of the region's long range transportation plan, GTC and its stakeholder agencies including public safety, created the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Strategic Plan for Greater Rochester. Source: Genesee Transportation Council, Intelligent Transportation Systems Strategic Plan for Greater Rochester, 2011. Below is an excerpt from the GTC ITS Strategic Plan of the incident and emergency management initiatives defined for the region. 25 Genesee Transportation Council, Intelligent Transportation Systems Strategic Plan for Greater Rochester, 2011. 26 Genesee Transportation Council, 2035 Long Range Transportation Plan for the Genesee-Finger Lakes Region, June 2011. In the event of a fire alarm or other emergency evacuation, all persons are to leave the MRL Building and to assemble on the sidewalk at the southwest corner of Engineering II. The MRL shall maintain an Emergency Response Kit and it shall be stored in the 2nd floor kitchen (Rm 2042).
In many emergencies, the campus will send a message to every voice mailbox on campus with a report about the status of the campus and any expectations about whether employees are expected to come to work. If there is an emergency that affects the entire campus, but the MRL seems relatively safe, such as an earthquake, brush fire, or flood, the first duty would be to determine the actual status of the MRL building. If it becomes necessary to evacuate the building or if any building alarm calls for evacuation, then every person should do so as quickly as possible. In the event of an emergency when people are not at work, people should come to work at the usual time, provided it is reasonably safe to do so and provided that roads are passable. Additional details about how to deal with the problems that follow are provided in the UCSB Laboratory Safety Program-Chemical Hygiene Plan black 3-ring binder in the section under Emergency Management. Remember aftershocks may occur at any moment with nearly the same force as the original quake -- so be prepared.
If possible, a small and not too harmful chemical spill should be cleaned up immediately by the person who caused the spill. The UCSB EH&S has written a model department EOP that contains a wealth of information and is very comprehensive. When all attachments are included, the IAP specifies the objectives, strategies, tactics, resources, organization, communications plan, medical plan, and other appropriate information for use in managing an incident response for the next operational period.
In addition to a briefing document, the IMS 201 also serves as an initial action worksheet and a permanent record of the initial response to the incident.
Once the Command and General Staffs agree to the assignments, the assignment information is given to the appropriate Divisions, Groups and Sectors. Provide a basic reference from which to extract information for handovers and inclusion in any after-action report.
When all attachments are included, the plan specifies the objectives, strategies, tactics, resources, organization, communications plan, medical plan, and other appropriate information for use in managing an incident response for the next operational period. Information may be directly inputted in designated cells (above), or attached separately (below).
In this case, the IMS 202 would become the IAP cover page and additional IMS forms attached to create a full IAP.
Ideally, the IMS 201 is duplicated and distributed before the initial briefing of the Command and General Staff and other responders as appropriate. This form is used to complete the Incident Organization Chart (IMS 207) and may be included or attached to the Incident Action Plan. Once the Command and General Staffs agree to the assignments, the assignment information is given to the appropriate Divisions, Groups and Sectors (often via the Incident Telecommunications Centre).
It must be approved by the Incident or EOC Commander, but may be reviewed and initiated by the Planning Section Chief and Operations Section Chief as well. Information from the Telecommunications Plan on frequency assignment is normally placed on the appropriate Assignment List (IMS 204). Information from the plan pertaining to incident medical aid stations and medical emergency procedures may be noted on the Assignment List (IMS 204). Personnel responsible for supervisory organizational positions should be listed in each box, as required. A chart is completed for each operational period and updated when organizational changes occur.
It should contain the most accurate and up-to-date information available at the time it is prepared.
Additional hazard or discipline-specific versions or sections may be developed or used as required.
In many cases, a specific check-in location or point may be established for an entire incident. Incident Dispatches, upon receipt of a check-in message by radio, record the information on the Check-In List and then give the information to the Resource Unit. The Resources Unit maintains a master list of all equipment and personnel that have reported to the incident. If additional pages are needed for any form page, use a black IMS 211 and repaginate, as needed.
Activity Logs should be maintained by all individuals involved in incident response (where feasible). All completed original forms must be given to the Documentation Unit, which maintains a file of all IMS 214 forms. This form communicates to the Operations and Planning Section Chiefs safety and health issues identified by the Safety Officer. When the Operations Section Chief is preparing for the tactics meeting, the Safety Officer collaborates with the Operations Section Chief to complete the Incident Action Plan Safety Analysis.
It may also be attached to the IAP, or influence General Safety Messages recorded in IMS 202 and IMS 1001.
Its completion often involves Logistics personnel, Planning Section Personnel, and the Safety Officer. The IMS 215-G is used by the Planning Section (Resources Unit) to complete the Assignments List (IMS 204) and by the Logistics Section Chief for ordering resources for the incident. Its completion often involves logistics personnel, the Resources Unit, and the Safety Officer. The Logistics Section will use a copy of this worksheet for preparing requests for resources required for the next operational period.
This information is used by the Ground Support Unit in the Logistics Section to maintain a record of the types and locations of the vehicles and equipment on the incident.
Subsequent change to the status or location of transportation and support vehicles should be provided to the Resource Unit immediately. General air resource assignment information is obtained from the Operational Planning Worksheet (IMS 215-G).
This information is provided to Air Operations personnel who, in turn, give the information to the Resource Unit. The individual resource will have the appropriate overhead personnel sign off on any checked box(es) in Block 6 prior to release from the incident. If additional pages are needed for any form page, use a blank IMS 221 and repaginate as needed. A copy of completed logs should also be submitted to the Documentation Unit for record purposes. The EOC Logistics Section will assign the resource request to the appropriate Branch and Unit Supply Facilities, to fill the request either from its inventories or by exercising its purchasing authority. Time lost in traffic and increases in emissions of pollutants due to congestion are detrimental to quality of life and economic development. This type of delay can occur anywhere on the transportation system, but is most likely to happen when an incident occurs on an already busy highway. The only location that is likely to be subject to Non-Recurring Incident Related Delay in the region outside of the Rochester TMA is located in the City of Batavia where NYS Routes 5, 33, 63, and 98 are in close proximity to each other in the heart of the City's central business district. An evaluation of the benefits and costs of the strategies included in it relative to the guiding principles (discussed later) and the transportation needs of the region through 2035 (discussed previously) was conducted.
There are three primary initiatives that serve as the basis for the TSMO recommendations in the LRTP 2035: Technology, Coordination, and Demand. TSMO programs and projects can effectively address non-recurring delay through improved incident response, more efficient deployment of resources to clear snow and ice, and timelier information to travelers.
By improving incident response and management, TSMO programs and projects can also shorten clearance times for crashes which reduce the likelihood of secondary crashes. Like the design of infrastructure and services, the relationships between transportation agencies can also appreciably improve the safety, efficiency, and reliability of the transportation system.
The structure of interagency collaboration between transportation, emergency management, and law enforcement entities is critical to efficient management and operation of the transportation system.
The program provides assistance to motorists that have experienced issues on major roadways that without quick action will limit capacity and cause congestion with the potential for secondary incidents as a result. The National Highway Institute Coordinated Incident Management (Quick Clearance) Workshop, developed by the I- 95 Corridor Coalition, was conducted in October for regional local law enforcement, first responder, and transportation system management agencies, as well as representatives from the local towing industry. There is no current Federal or State requirement that system performance be monitored and reported but there are increasing discussions at the national level on this issue. As a result, all of the data is collected either by a GTC member agency, GTC staff, or a New York State government agency that is not a GTC member agency. She is also a member of the campus Emergency Response Team (ERT) and responsible for most utility and construction issues affecting the MRL Building. This kit shall contain at least an AM-FM portable radio, a flashlight, extra batteries, and a first aid kit.
The procedure to check one's voice mailbox from off campus is to call 893-8800, enter the last 4 digits of one's campus phone number when prompted for the mailbox number, press the * key, and then enter the 4 digit password when prompted.
Even if the alarm is known to be a test or an exercise, all persons are required to exit the building. Each individual needs to take personal responsibility for their decision about whether it is possible to come to work or not.


Most injuries occur from falling glass, plaster, bricks, debris, and electrical lines as people are leaving the building. After the initial shock, and only after the shaking stops, survey your area for damage and trapped persons.
DO NOT do anything that might cause a spark, such as turning a light switch or any electrical equipment on or off. In the interest of brevity and with the expectation that MRL personnel will actually read it, this MRL EOP has been made as short as possible.
These forms are designed for all-hazard use and are applicable to both site-level and EOC-level responses. May also be used as a cover sheet for the IAP (if the IMS 1001 is not used), with other IMS forms attached, as required. It is important to ensure the sections on Background, Current Situation, Map and Summery of Current actions (3-6) are given to the Situation Unit, while the sections on Current Organization and Resource Summary (7-8) are given to the Resources Unit. Complete only the blocks where positions have been activated, and add additional blocks as needed, especially for Organization Representatives and all Operations Section organizational elements. The IMS 209-G is duplicated and distributed to the Incident or EOC Commander and staff, all section Chiefs, Planning Section Unit Leaders, and organization dispatch centers. Check-in consists of reporting specific information which is recorded on the Check-In List. Contact information for sender and receiver can be added for communications purposes to confirm resource orders. The form may be placed at the EOC reception for signature by all arriving staff, or completed independently within each IMS function at the start of each operational period and forwarded to the Planning Section.
This form is used to send any message or notification to incident personnel that require hard-copy delivery.
Activity Logs may also be maintained at the group level (units, strike teams, task forces, etc.).
Other, hazard-specific versions of this form may also be used, depending on nature of the incident. After the form is completed during the Tactics Meeting, it is shared with the rest of the Command and General Staff as soon as possible (at latest, during the Planning Meeting).
The Logistics Section may use a copy of this worksheet for preparing requests for resources required for the next operational period.
After the Tactics Meeting, the form is shared with the rest of the Command and General Staff ASAP (at latest, during the Planning Meeting). The Air and Fixed-Wing Support Groups provide specific designators of the air resources assigned to the incident. IMS 260 must be approved by the Operations Section Chief and circulated to the Logistics, Finance & Admin, and Planning Sections to complete their respective portions. Even though the Genesee-Finger Lakes Region consistently ranks low in terms of congestion compared to similar sized areas in the nation, the U.S.
According to the Texas Transportation Institute, incidents are estimated to cause between 52 and 58 percent of delay in all urban areas. Based on this evaluation, those mitigation strategies that are considered reasonable in the Genesee-Finger Lakes Region for each type of congestion are presented in Exhibit 18. Even in cases where the delay is recurring due to peak demand and fixed capacity, TSMO programs and projects that inform travelers of less costly options that could be more convenient have the potential to reduce demand on the system when use is at its highest level. This workshop or a similar training opportunity should be offered in the region on a regular basis.
Performance measures are included in the LRTP 2035 in order to monitor changes in key areas that matter to users of the transportation system. In the event of a major earthquake, all persons are to seek shelter in a door frame or other protected space. First aid kits shall be kept in the 2nd floor kitchen (Rm 2042), 3rd floor kitchen (Rm 3026), TEMPO 1023, and vestibule between Polymer lab and TEMPO (Rm 1137). Chemical spill cleanup kits shall be kept in the vestibule between Polymer lab and TEMPO (Rm 1137), and 1278 (contact Amanda Strom for access). If severe building damage has occurred or if life-threatening conditions are observed, evacuate the building as described above and go to the EAP, on the sidewalk at the southwest corner of Engineering II. Copies of the Model EOP are available at the MRL Safety Bulletin Board, from the HCC and from the MSO. Detailed instructions and a brief overview of the form’s purpose, preparation and distribution accompany each form. The composition and size of the organization is dependent on the specifics and magnitude of the incident and is scalable and flexible. In both cases, the appropriate boxes should be checked, indicating the purpose(s) of the IMS 208. These logs provide a basic reference from which to extract information for inclusion in any after-action report.
It may be useful in some disciplines or jurisdictions to pre-fill IMS 215-E copies prior to incidents (e.g.
Non- Recurring Incident Related Delay can be reduced through improved incident management such as quicker detection, response, and clearance times, as well as by using traveler information systems to help drivers avoid the incident scene altogether. The technologies used to monitor transportation system performance can also be used for homeland security purposes to prevent or respond to a terrorist attack, natural disaster, or other large-scale emergency. Like RTOC staffing, funding for the HELP Program has been and continues to be provided in the TIP and these financial resources will continue to be made available.
After the earthquake stops, and as soon as it is safe, all persons are to exit the building and to assemble on the sidewalk at the southwest corner of Engineering II.
Laboratories, offices, and storage areas are to be kept in a safe fashion and in compliance with all environmental and safety regulations and good practice. If possible, people should bring their valuables and lock their doors behind them as they leave the building. Contact information for the sender and receiver can be added for communications purposes to confirm resource orders (see also the IMS 260-RR).
For those assignments involving risks and hazards, mitigations or controls should be developed to safeguard responders, and appropriate incident personnel should be briefed on the hazards, mitigations, and related measures.
The campus has set up an out of area telephone line for emergency information that is expected to survive a regional disaster.
All people leaving the building from the upper floors should use the stairs and not use the elevator.
HCC and laboratory Development Engineers should attempt to come to the MRL to determine the status of the building and its laboratories.
If possible sit or stand against a wall or doorway, or get under a fixed object (desk, table, etc.) Otherwise, cover your head and protect your body until the shaking stops. After the spill is cleaned up, let both the HCC and the lab Development Engineer know what occurred. The IMS 207 may be used as a wall-size chart and printed on a plotter for better visibility. If there is no compelling reason to leave, personnel should stay at work keeping out of other hazardous areas, staying out of gridlocked traffic, and staying out of the way of emergency workers.
At this time, there are no disabled persons working in the MRL Building that would require assistance leaving the building.
Stay away from all glass surfaces and windowed hallways (windows, mirrors, etc.) and cabinets and bookshelves. If the fire cannot be put out, evacuate the area, close the doors to the room where the fire is located, and activate a Fire Alarm Pull Station or call 9-911 to report the fire.
In the event of a larger or more hazardous chemical release, evacuate the area immediately. If the odor suggests that a fire is in progress, activate the nearest Fire Alarm Pull Station or call 9-911. Campus Business Services guidelines about how medical service is to be provided in such cases has been inconsistent. The HCC or Alternate should determine if the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) has been activated.
Should a disabled person begin working at the MRL, someone will be assigned to assist them in an emergency evacuation.
They are usually the most structurally unsound part of the building, and the first to collapse or fall. Information about current policy for non-emergency treatment can be obtained by calling Mari Tyrrell-Simpson in Business Services at x4169. Researchers and other individuals are strongly encouraged to have copies of valuable and irreplaceable information stored away from campus, so that it is both safe and accessible if a building is temporarily or permanently closed. If it has, the HCC should see to it that a Departmental Emergency Status Report is filled out and delivered to the EOC. After leaving the building, all people should assemble at the Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) which is on the sidewalk at the southwest corner of Engineering II, see area map for location.
Any employee injured while working at or for UCSB is responsible to report the injury to the HCC or MSO as soon as possible. At least one member of the MRL technical staff should be a member of the campus Emergency Response Team (ERT). If the Emergency Operations Center is operational, they may have a recorded message about campus status at 893-8690.
Should it be unsafe to assemble there, then people should assemble at the courtyard in front of (north of) the Geology Building.
This person will receive training in hazardous materials, drill with the campus team, and may be called upon to assist the team in a campus emergency. If possible, the Emergency Response Kit should be brought to the EAP by Jennifer Ybarra or, if she cannot, by Melissa Ruiz. California law requires that the "Employee Claim for Worker's Compensation Benefits" be given to any injured employee within one working day from the time the injury was reported to the employer. An up to date home telephone list is to be maintained and distributed to key MRL personnel. No one is to re-enter the building until authorized to do so by County Fire or by UCSB Emergency Personnel.
This building is on the north side of campus between the Facilities Yard and the Rec-Cen on Mesa Road. After a big earthquake or other severe incident, the building may be closed for several days or longer.
The HCC should then check for any additional information and let the rest of the department know about the status of the campus and community.
At the EAP, each person working in each area of the building should gather with the other people from that area to determine if there is anyone missing. As a member of the ERT, the HCC may be called to work with the ERT during a campus emergency; if this happens, the Alternate HCC will assume all HCC duties at the MRL Building. Building areas would include the third floor, the second floor, the team room, the TEMPO lab, the Polymers lab, the Spectroscopy lab, and the X-Ray lab. If the Fire Department or other Emergency Responders are called to the MRL Building, the HCC or MSO will meet them at the MRL Building Fire Alarm Panel Box as soon as possible after an alarm and will then inform them about the status of the building and especially its personnel. The Fire Alarm Panel Box is located on the first floor, just outside the building on the south side, near the door to room 1278. In a campus wide incident, the HCC will see to it that a Departmental Emergency Status Report is filled out and delivered to the EOC as described above in Emergency Affecting the Entire Campus.



Free documentary films.com
Emergency response jobs oklahoma
Business continuity plan framework 2013


Comments to “Emergency operations plan template california”

  1. ANAR writes:
    Can develop an electromagnetic shockwave that knocks safety Verify.
  2. Leyla_666 writes:
    And kits from Cabela's blood or saliva), and remedy of the infected.