Emergency plan event company,home fire disaster plan pdf,american movie on osama 911 - Step 1

Main ContentThe jurisdictional EOP provides action guidance for incident response at the level of the responding community. By incorporating basic ICS and emergency management principles, and by integrating public health and acute-care medical disciplines, a functional Tier 3 management structure is proposed. The Emergency Management Act defines emergency management as the prevention and mitigation of, preparedness for, response to, and recovery from emergencies.
Public Safety Canada developed the FERP in consultation with other federal government institutions.
Federal government institutions are responsible for developing emergency management plans in relation to risks in their areas of accountability. In order for this plan to be effective, all federal government institutions must be familiar with its contents.
The Minister of Public Safety is responsible for promoting and coordinating emergency management plans, and for coordinating the Government of Canada's response to an emergency. Pursuant to the Emergency Management Act, all federal ministers are responsible for developing emergency management plans in relation to risks in their areas of accountability. The FERP applies to domestic emergencies and to international emergencies with a domestic impact. The FERP does not replace, but should be read in conjunction with or is complimentary to, event-specific or departmental plans or areas of responsibility.
Canada's risk environment includes the traditional spectrum of natural and human-induced hazards: wildland and urban interface fires, floods, oil spills, the release of hazardous materials, transportation accidents, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, health or public health disorders, disease outbreaks or pandemics, major power outages, cyber incidents, and terrorism.
Past emergencies in Canada demonstrate the challenges inherent in protecting the lives, critical infrastructure, property, environment, economy, and national security of Canada, its citizens, its allies, and the international community.
During an integrated Government of Canada response, all involved federal government institutions assist in determining overall objectives, contribute to joint plans, and maximize the use of all available resources.
In most cases, federal government institutions manage emergencies with event-specific or departmental plans based on their own authorities.
An explanation of the roles of the primary, supporting and coordinating departments follows below.
A primary department is a federal government institution with a mandate related to a key element of an emergency. A supporting department is a federal government institution that provides general or specialized assistance to a primary department in response to an emergency. Public Safety Canada is the federal coordinating department based on the legislated responsibility of the Minister of Public Safety under the Emergency Management Act. As part of the coordinating department, the role of Public Safety Canada's Operations Directorate is to manage and support each of the primary functions of the Federal Emergency Response Management System (FERMS, see Section 2) at the strategic level, and Public Safety Canada Regional Offices perform the same role at the regional level.
The Director General, Operations Directorate, in consultation with the Federal Coordinating Officer, determines the type of expertise required in the Government Operations Centre during an emergency response.
Representatives from non-governmental organizations and the private sector may be asked to support a federal response to an emergency and to provide subject matter expertise during an emergency. Emergency Support Functions are allocated to government institutions in a manner consistent with their mandate (see Annex A for details on each function). One or more Emergency Support Functions may need to be implemented, depending on the nature or scope of the emergency.
The Federal Emergency Response Management System (FERMS) is a comprehensive management system which integrates the Government of Canada's response to emergencies. This system provides the governance structure and the operational facilities to respond to emergencies. The FERMS provides the mechanisms and processes to coordinate the structures, the capabilities, and the resources of federal government institutions, non-governmental organizations and the private sector into an integrated emergency response for all hazards. This section describes the key concepts related to the FERMS, including the federal governance structure, the federal response levels, the departmental roles, the primary functions of the FERMS, and the federal-regional component related to the FERMS. Governance refers to the management structures and processes that are in place during non-emergency and emergency circumstances. The following section describes the federal governance structure for an integrated Government of Canada response. Committees of Cabinet provide the day-to-day coordination of the government's agenda, including issues management, legislation and house planning, and communications. During an emergency, members of the Committee will receive summaries of decision briefs and other advice from members of the Committee of Deputy Ministers. During non-emergency (day-to-day) operations, the Committee of Deputy Ministers provides a forum to address public safety, national security, and intelligence issues.
The Deputy Minister, Public Safety Canada (or delegate) serves as the Federal Coordinating Officer on behalf of the Minister of Public Safety. The Federal Coordinating Officer may also approve options and recommendations by the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers for consideration by the Committee of Deputy Ministers.
During non-emergency (day-to-day) operations, the Committee provides a forum to discuss the Government of Canada's emergency management processes and readiness. The Associate Assistant Deputy Minister of Emergency Management and National Security and the Canadian Forces – Commander of Canada Command co-chair the Assistant Deputy Ministers Emergency Management Committee. Counsel from the Department of Justice, Public Safety Canada, Legal Services Unit, supports management by providing advice on legal issues.
The Director General of Public Safety Canada Communications assumes the role of Public Communications Officer. The Government Operations Centre may request federal departmental representatives to support some or all of these primary functions based on the requirements of the response. The purpose for establishing and communicating emergency response levels with regard to a potential or occurring incident is to alert federal government institutions and other public and private sector emergency response partners that some action outside of routine operations, may, or will be required.
The Government Operations Centre within Public Safety Canada routinely monitors a wide variety of human and natural events within Canada and internationally, and provides daily situation reports compiled from a variety of sources. The Director General, Operations Directorate, in consultation with the Associate Assistant Deputy Minister, will authorize the Government Operations Centre to communicate the response level of this plan to the Federal Government's emergency response partners. The three response levels defined below are intended to provide a logical progression of activity from enhanced monitoring and reporting to an integrated federal response. Note: Although the description of response levels are provided in a linear progression, it is often the case that, in response to a potential or occurring incident, linear escalation of response levels is not always followed. A Level 1 response serves to focus attention upon a specific event or incident that has the potential to require an integrated response by the Federal Government. Detailed authoritative reporting of significant information from a multitude of sources about the event is developed and disseminated to federal emergency response partners to support their planning or response efforts. The assessment then guides the development of a strategic plan for an inte­grated response (if required). As part of the contingency planning process, relevant Emergency Support Functions are used to identify departmental responsibilities and issues. The Government Operations Centre serves as the coordination centre for the federal response, and provides regular situation reports as well as briefing and decision-making support materials for Ministers and Senior Officials. When an integrated response is required, all plans and arrangements for the federal response are escalated. The scope of the emergency will determine the scale and level of engagement of each of these functions.
Public Safety Canada's Communications Directorate supports each of these functions and integrates the coordinated public communications response into the overall Government of Canada emergency response. The Situational Awareness Function provides appropriate emergency-related information to assist the Government of Canada and its partners in responding to threats and emergencies, and to help stakeholders make policy decisions. The Notification provides initial information on an incident, the source of reporting, current response actions, initial risk assessment, and the public communications lead. The Situation Report provides current information about an incident, the immediate and future response actions, an analysis of the impact of the incident, and issues identification.
The Decision Brief includes a Situation Report and it may also include options and recommended courses of action. Information obtained through the risk assessment process may be included in information products such as Situation Reports and Decision Briefs, as required. The Planning Function develops objectives, courses of action, and strategic advanced plans for the Government of Canada based on information from the Risk Assessment Function.
The Planning Function develops contingency plans for specific events or incidents that are forecasted weeks, months or years in advance, and for recurring events, such as floods or hurricanes.
A team of planners from both the Operations Directorate and other federal government institutions will devise and evaluate suitable approaches for response. The Planning Function establishes objectives and develops an Incident Action Plan for each operational period. The Incident Action Plan Task Matrix lists the actions which the Government of Canada must undertake during response in order to achieve the objectives set by the management team. Strategic Advance Planning identifies the potential policy, social, and economic impacts of an incident, the significant resources needed to address the incident, and potential responses to future incidents.
Like the Incident Action Plan, the Strategic Advance Plan is based on information provided by the Situational Awareness and Risk Assessment Functions. The Director General, Operations Directorate uses this tool to develop guidelines for planners prior to commencement of the planning phase. In this organizational flow chart, which primarily flows from top to bottom, there are seven levels, grouped into three areas. Next, connected just under the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers, the Management area has two levels starting with the Director General Operations Directorate, which leads to the management team connected below, consisting of, horizontally, Primary Departmental Representatives, the Department of Justice, Directors of Primary Functions and the Director General, Communications Directorate (Privy Council Office participation). The Government Operations Centre is a fourth area comprised of both Management and Primary Functions.
Public Safety Canada maintains a network of 11 Emergency Management and National Security Regional Offices. Federal departments frequently manage emergencies or provide support to a province or territory for events related to their specific mandate, within their own authorities and without requiring coordination from Public Safety Canada. When an emergency requires an integrated Government of Canada response, the Public Safety Canada Regional Director (Regional Director) coordinates the response on behalf of federal government institutions in the region. Regional public communications activities are consistent and integrated with the response activities of the Government of Canada. The Federal Coordination Steering Committee is a committee composed of senior regional federal government institution representatives. The Federal Coordination Group is a standing committee composed of emergency management managers from federal government institutions in the region. During a response, the activities of federal government institutions must be closely coordinated if the Government of Canada is to respond effectively.
Based upon the direction from Public Safety Canada's Communications, Ministers' offices, and the Privy Council Office, this group coordinates the government's communications response to the public, to the media and to affected stakeholders. In this organizational flow chart, which primarily flows from top to bottom, there are six levels, grouped into three areas.
Financial management, as it applies to the FERP, follows the established Treasury Board guidelines on expenditures in emergency situations. The costs of support actions in each department will be funded on an interim basis by reallocations from, or commitments against, available program resources. The purpose of this annex is to provide an overview of the Emergency Support Function (ESF) structure as well as the general responsibilities of each of the thirteen (13) primary federal institutions.
ESFs are allocated to federal government institutions in a manner consistent with their respective mandated areas of responsibility, including policies and legislation, planning assumptions and a concept of operations.
A primary department is a federal government institution with a mandate directly related to a key element of an emer­gency. Supporting departments are those organizations with specific capabilities or resources which support the primary department in executing the mission of the ESF. Both Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, share the role of primary department for ESF #3. The Federal Health Portfolio (Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and Health Canada (HC)), share the role of primary department for ESF #5.
Emergency Health includes: public health, medical care, environmental health, medical equipment, pharmaceuticals and health care personnel. Emergency Social Services includes: clothing, lodging, food, registration and inquiry, personal services, reception centre management and social services personnel. This ESF encompasses the provision of environmental information and advice in response to emergencies related to polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events. The scope of this ESF encompasses the provision of human and social services and the communication of information in response to emergencies related to the delivery of social benefits.
The scope of this ESF encompasses the coordinated provision of the full range of law enforcement services by the RCMP, and the police services of other jurisdictions, during all-hazard emergency operations. The intent of this document is to provide a description of how Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) responds to emergencies of a magnitude such that they require federal coordination, as well as to international emergencies, to ensure continued and effective delivery of the department's diverse emergency goods and services, as required, in support to the lead responding department(s).
The support function is one which demonstrates proactive leadership in assessing problems and scoping potential solutions to coordinate the mobilization and deployment of resources from their points of origin to the intended staging areas. This support function enables the dissemination of clear, factual, and consistent information about events of national significance and assisting, when possible, to minimize the threat to Canadians most likely affected by the event. The ESF primary department should coordinate a regular review of their respective ESF with all supporting departments. April 7, 2011 By Melissa Stacey Leave a Comment The recent devastation in Japan is a good reminder to all of us that we should be prepared in the event of an emergency. Disaster Kits – For a comprehensive list of items to be included in your kit to go the FEMA website. Communication Plan – Figure out how you will contact co-workers and family members if you are not together when disaster strikes, make sure all everyone has emergency contact information and plan a meeting place. Plan for Emergencies – This includes escape routes, family communications, utility shut-off (especially gas), vital documents, safety skills and much more. ICE – Program emergency contact information under ICE (In Case of Emergency) in your cell phone for paramedics and other emergency personnel.
If you do not have an emergency plan, I encourage you to create one and update it regularly as circumstances in your office or home change. By Melissa Stacey About Melissa StaceyMelissa Stacey with Feeling Organized specializes in organization for your home, office, and small business. Having an evacuation map is not just a good idea, it’s required by law to meet most local fire codes. For the map to provide instant clarity during a disasterous event, use simple black and white lines to show the architectural layout (walls, doors, etc). It’s also a good idea to orient each map (turn it) in a way that makes sense to the display location so users can quickly see where they are and how to exit. Holders of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Response Plan Implementing Plan for the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station are responsible for keeping it updated by incorporating amendments, which may be issued from time to time. This public document is administered by the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services of Ontario. The Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act (EMCPA) requires and authorizes the formulation of the plan. Procedures : Based on all of the above plans, procedures are developed for the various emergency centres to be set up and for the various operational functions required. It is necessary that everyone involved in the preparation and implementation of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Response Plan employ common terminology. An accident in which the effects, both actual and potential, are expected to be confined within the boundaries of the nuclear facility. An accident in which the effects are so localized that their impact can be satisfactorily dealt with by local emergency response personnel (police, fire, etc.) with possibly some outside technical assistance.
A declaration of a provincial emergency may also be made by the Premier if the urgency of the situation requires that it be made immediately.
The emergency requires immediate action to prevent, reduce or mitigate the dangers posed by the emergency. The Legislative Assembly may by resolution extend the length of an emergency for additional periods of no more than 28 days, for as many times as required. An emergency declaration made by the Premier lapses after 72 hours, unless confirmed by the LGIC.
The PNERP Master Plan sets out the principles, concepts, organization, responsibilities, policies, functions and interrelationships, which will govern all nuclear and radiological emergency management in Ontario. The PNERP Implementing Plans apply the principles, concepts and policies contained in the Master Plan, in order to provide detailed guidance and direction for dealing with a specific nuclear or radiological emergency. Separate response plans have been developed to deal with accidents at the Pickering, Darlington and Bruce Power nuclear generating stations as well as for the Chalk River Laboratories and the Fermi 2 installation in Monroe, Michigan. This Plan provides generic guidance on dealing with radiological emergencies caused by sources not covered by the other Implementing Plans. Provincial ministries, agencies, boards and commissions shall develop their own plans and procedures to fulfil the responsibilities as outlined in the appendices to Annex I.
The emergency plans and procedures of nuclear installations deal with their onsite responsibilities. This is a plan jointly developed and adopted by the federal governments of Canada and the United States for early notification, coordination of activities and provision of mutual assistance between the two countries in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency in North America with transboundary implications. Health Canada administers the Federal Nuclear Emergency Plan (FNEP), which can be activated to manage and coordinate federal response activities for a nuclear emergency requiring a multi-jurisdictional or multi-departmental off-site response.
The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), an independent agency of the Government of Canada, is the national regulator for the nuclear industry in Canada which includes any actions taken in response to the radiological or nuclear aspects of an emergency. In the event of a nuclear emergency, the federal government will liaise with the provinces and territories as well as with neighbouring countries and the international community as outlined in Appendix 19 to Annex I. The regulation of nuclear energy has been deemed to be a matter of national concern that goes beyond local or provincial interests.
The province has exclusive jurisdiction for matters of property and civil rights in the province and for all matters that affect the public health, safety and environment of the province.
Pursuant to section 6, the federal Governor in Council can declare a public welfare emergency, which includes an emergency caused by a real or imminent accident, pollution resulting in danger to life or property, social disruption or breakdown in the flow of essential goods and services, so serious as to be a national emergency. Pursuant to section 14, the Governor in Council must consult the provinces that are affected by the emergency before issuing a declaration of public welfare emergency.
Pursuant to section 8, while a declaration of a public welfare emergency is in effect, the Governor in Council may make necessary orders or regulations that are necessary to deal with the emergency.
This act assigns responsibility to the Minister of Public Safety for the coordination of emergency management activities including the development and implementation of federal civil emergency plans in cooperation with other levels of government and the private sector. The Commission is given exceptional powers including the power to make any order in an emergency that it considers necessary to protect the environment or the health and safety of persons or to maintain national security and compliance with Canada’s international obligations.
Compensation to third parties for injury or damage caused by a nuclear incident, as defined in the Nuclear Liability and Compensation Act, would be assessed and paid under the provisions of this Act. This legislation governs the transportation of dangerous goods (including radioactive goods) and the accidental release of ionizing radiation exceeding limits established by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act.
The provincial government has jurisdiction over public health and safety, property and the environment within its borders. The legislative authority for emergency management, planning and response for Ontario is the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act (EMCPA).
The PNERP is formulated by the Lieutenant Governor in Council (LGIC) under section 8 of the EMCPA. The LGIC assigns responsibilities for formulating emergency plans in respect of specific types of emergencies to ministers (section 6 of the EMCPA). Pursuant to section 3 (4) of the EMCPA, the designated municipalities shall formulate plans to deal with the off-site consequences of nuclear emergencies caused by the corresponding nuclear installation (Annex A). These plans should also contain, where applicable, arrangements for the provision of services and assistance by county departments, local police services, fire services, EMS, hospitals and local boards. As required by section 8 of the EMCPA, municipal nuclear emergency response plans shall conform to the PNERP and be subject to the approval of the Solicitor General (this function is fulfilled by the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services).
As required by section 5 of the EMCPA, plans of lower-tier municipalities shall conform to the plans of their upper tier municipality.
Pursuant to sections 2(3) and 3(4) of the EMCPA, every municipality, in developing their emergency management program, must identify and assess the various hazards and risks to public safety that could give rise to emergencies. Where the upper tier municipality is not the designated municipality under this PNERP it may, with the consent of its designated municipalities, coordinate the nuclear emergency plans for those municipalities.
In the event of a declared emergency, the LGIC or the Premier may order a municipality to provide support or assistance to designated municipalities or to affected municipalities. Support and assistance may include, but shall not be limited to, personnel, equipment, services and material. The responsibilities of provincial ministries, municipalities, federal departments and organizations, nuclear installations and their operators for nuclear emergency response and for the purposes of implementing this plan, are given in Annex I. The Province shall support and coordinate the response to the off-site consequences of a nuclear emergency and may, where warranted and appropriate, issue operational directives and, emergency orders (in the event of a declared emergency) under the EMCPA.
Even though nuclear facilities are designed and operated according to stringent safety standards, emergency preparedness and response must operate on the basis that mechanical failure, human error, extreme natural events or hostile action can lead to nuclear or radiological emergencies. All plans should be so devised as to be able to deal effectively with a broad range of possible emergencies. An appropriate balance should be struck between risk and cost when assessing the level of emergency preparedness required.
Exposure to radiation should be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) within the context of the risks and costs of such avoidance. As much preparedness as is practicable should be done in advance to enable a rapid, effective and efficient response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. Preparedness should include a program of public education for people who might be affected, to inform them of plans, and to help them cope with a nuclear emergency. As far as is practicable, operational measures (especially alerting and notification systems) and protective measures should be devised and implemented to avoid significant radiation exposure. A policy of truth and openness should be followed in providing information to the public and media during a nuclear or radiological emergency.
Remaining indoors with doors and windows closed and external ventilation turned off or reduced. Measures which protect against external contamination and radiation exposure (as a result of a radioactive cloud or plume or deposited contamination). Measures which protect the food chain from radioactive contamination, and prevent the ingestion of contaminated food and water. Banning consumption and export of locally produced milk, meat, produce, and milk-and meat-producing animals.
The main challenge that Ontario faces in this area would arise from an emergency at a nuclear installation4.


Taking the above into consideration, as well as the various types of nuclear accidents that could potentially occur in Ontario, a basic offsite effect has been selected to serve as the main basis for nuclear emergency management. Detailed planning and preparedness shall be carried out in Ontario for dealing effectively with the basic offsite effect of a nuclear installation accident. An accident or event could occur which could result in a more severe offsite effect, though the probability of such an occurrence is very low. Detailed planning and preparedness will establish an effective basis to deal with an emergency caused by any type of nuclear installation accident. The zone around the nuclear installation within which detailed planning and preparedness shall be carried out for measures against exposure to a radioactive plume.
A larger zone within which it is necessary to plan and prepare measures to prevent ingestion of radioactive material. A municipal evacuation plan will help streamline the evacuation process by providing an organized framework for the activities involved in coordinating and conducting an evacuation.
The aim of an evacuation plan is to allow for a safe, effective, and coordinated evacuation of people from an emergency area.
A municipal evacuation plan may be a stand-alone plan or part of a larger, overarching municipal emergency response plan.
Municipal Evacuation Plans should outline how needed functions will be performed and by what organization (e.g.
Consider the characteristics of the municipality that may affect the execution of an incident-specific evacuation plan.
Is the municipality single, upper, or lower tier and how will that affect responsibilities during an evacuation? Is the location of the municipality and the populated areas likely to impose particular challenges for an evacuation? List hazards that have the greatest potential to require an evacuation (Refer to the municipal Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (HIRA) or Community Risk Profile). Does the hazard have the potential to migrate outside of municipal boundaries or does it start elsewhere and migrate into the municipal boundaries? Identify the process for conducting real-time threat assessments and how the real-time threat assessment will inform the decision to evacuate. Since the presence of contaminants in an emergency area will greatly complicate evacuation operations, a municipality’s evacuation plan should take into account procedures and equipment for these situations.
In addition to the effects on emergency responders, residents may also be limited in their ability to move through the affected area safely. In order to prevent the spread of contamination, evacuees may need to be isolated from unaffected locations and populations until being decontaminated.
Emergency managers must understand the makeup of the population who are to be evacuated before they can make decisions about transportation modes, route selections, hosting destinations, and the many other elements of an evacuation. For planning purposes it may be advisable to increase the estimate of evacuees to account the evacuation shadow (these are the people who evacuate though they are not officially requested to do so.) This is a spontaneous evacuation, conducted when people feel they are in danger and begin to leave in advance of official instructions to do so or in spite of advice to shelter-in-place. Details on populations that may require special assistance during an evacuation may be obtained from the departments and organizations involved in planning, such as public health, social services, etc.
To ensure that considerations such as advance warning and transportation are factored into the planning, areas with high concentrations of people needing additional assistance to evacuate should be identified.
Long-term care residents may require vehicles equipped to serve riders in wheelchairs or medical transportation.
An evacuation involving incarcerated individuals would require secure transport and hosting arrangements. In municipalities where the majority of evacuees make their own transportation and shelter arrangements, it may not be necessary to compile lists of evacuees according to categories (Ideally, evacuees would still register to allow for tracking and inquiry).
Evacuations may take place prior to (pre-emptive), during (no-notice), or after (post-incident) an incident has occurred. Given adequate warning about a hazard, sufficient resources, and a likely threat, it is advisable to conduct pre-emptive evacuations.
It may be advisable to carry out an evacuation even while a threat is affecting a community. Partial evacuations typically are localized to a specific area of a municipality and may be caused by fires, hazardous materials incidents, etc.
Incidents that precipitate a wide-spread evacuation typically cause far-reaching damage and are therefore more likely to compromise critical infrastructure in a manner that hinders evacuee movement.
An internal evacuation is where evacuees are hosted at another location within the same municipality as opposed to being hosted by another municipality. Spontaneous evacuation (self-evacuation) is when people choose to evacuate without explicit direction to do so.
If the present location affords adequate protection against the particular incident, emergency managers should consider having people shelter-in-placevii to reduce the number of persons who become part of an evacuation.
Once emergency managers have determined the number and geographic distribution of potential evacuees, these statistics can be analyzed against the transportation network.
What is the distribution of the evacuating population with respect to roadways and highways?
What planning, operational staff, systems, and activities are needed to implement the chosen tactics during an evacuation? Should lanes be dedicated for high occupancy vehicles and any other special population groups (i.e. Recognize that different traffic management tactics (and different routes) may be more or less appropriate for certain types of situations. These figures are average and do not take into consideration an emergency situation or other factors that may be present during an evacuation. Pre-planning assists decision-makers in determining suitable transportation options for inclusion in the incident-specific plan.
The traffic management section outlines tactics that may be used to move traffic more efficiently. For incidents of longer duration, these assembly points can serve as collection points for evacuees who have walked or ridden transit from the at-risk area, and who now must wait for transport (buses, etc.) to longer-term sheltering facilities. The ability of a sheltering facility to accommodate such special needs groups will depend on its on-site design and capabilities.
By comparing shelter capabilities and capacities with the anticipated evacuation population, a jurisdiction can ensure it has made adequate sheltering arrangements, including the appropriate staffing levels for each shelter. By pre-identifying sheltering facilities, their locations can be evaluated in relation to proposed evacuation routes and other components of the transportation network.
In terms of First Nation evacuations, JEMS Service-level Evacuation Standardsx defines short-term shelter services as a period between 1 and 14 days. Municipalities may set-up and support shelters with municipal staff or they may have an agreement with another organization (e.g.
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be used to analyze available data, including highlighting key aspects of the potential evacuation populations. Pre-planning can be used to help determine specific evacuation strategies should one of the pre-identified incidents occur. The plan must state who has the authority to initiate the notification process and implement the plan. Evacuation should be considered when other response measures are insufficient to ensure public safety. The urgency of an evacuation is determined based on the immediacy of the threat to the community (life, safety, health, and welfare), the resilience of the community, and (depending on the nature of the threat) the availability of resources for evacuation or shelter-in-place.
Pre-planning and analysis conducted in the development of the municipal evacuation plan will be instrumental in creating an incident-specific plan (IAP). Based on the outcome of the real-time threat assessment, consider the type of evacuation required or if shelter-in-place is appropriate. Staging resources and phasing evacuations may alleviate some of the above complicating factors. Information may be pre-scripted and included as part of the Municipal Evacuation Plan or elsewhere (i.e.
Consider including information regarding language and communications barriers for at-risk populations. Ongoing communications should be maintained through the length of the evacuation until the return is completed. Detail what departments, organizations, and individuals would have a role in the implementation of the plan and list specific responsibilities.
What are the roles and responsibilities of the lead and other response organizations involvedxii? Who are the partners (additional subject matter experts required in the EOC to provide additional expertise)?
If a third party is contracted by a municipality to provide services in an evacuation, its roles and responsibilities should be outlined within the agreement (e.g.
Requests for additional assistance should be made through the PEOC (including requests for Government of Canada assistance).
A municipality may choose to identify an Evacuation Coordinator to lead an evacuation with minimum delay and confusion in the event of an emergency. Regardless of the stage of the evacuation operation there are four roles a municipality may assume while involved in an evacuation effort. Identify resources needed to support the evacuation and the process for acquiring them (e.g. When the emergency that prompted the evacuation has been resolved it will be necessary to plan for the return of evacuees.
Since the degree of damage will likely vary within the affected area it might be beneficial to initiate a phased re-entry process.
Evacuees who self-evacuated using their own means of transportation should be able to return on their own.
What media sources can evacuees use for the most up-to-date information on re-entry procedures?
Following the return of evacuees, consider when to terminate the declaration of emergency – reference the Municipal Emergency Response Plan. Discuss who generates the above, when they will be created, to whom they will be presented, and how the lessons learned will be incorporated into the evacuation plan.
Successful efforts for public education include community seminars and preparedness pamphlets distributed to residents and businesses. Based on recommended practices, consider including COOP as part of the risk management process.
This municipal evacuation plan will help streamline the evacuation process by providing an organized framework for the activities involved in coordinating and conducting an evacuation. The aim of this evacuation plan is to allow for a safe, effective, and coordinated evacuation of people from an emergency area in [insert the Name of the Municipality]. The sum of all activities related to developing and implementing the jurisdictional EOP represents preparedness.
In a mass casualty or complex medical event, the Tier 2 liaison will likely integrate at the Operations Section of the incident management team. The Federal Government can become involved where it has primary jurisdiction and responsibility as well as when requests for assistance are received due to capacity limitations and the scope of the emergency.
Under the Emergency Management Act, the Minister of Public Safety is responsible for coordinating the Government of Canada's response to an emergency. The FERP outlines the processes and mechanisms to facilitate an integrated Government of Canada response to an emergency and to eliminate the need for federal government institutions to coordinate a wider Government of Canada response. By this method, individual departmental activities and plans that directly or indirectly support the strategic objectives of this plan contribute to an integrated Government of Canada response. The Minister of Public Safety authorized the development of the FERP pursuant to the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act and the Emergency Management Act. Individual departmental activities and plans that directly or indirectly support the FERP's strategic objectives contribute to the integrated Government of Canada response. This plan has both national and regional level components, which provide a framework for effective integration of effort both horizontally and vertically throughout the Federal Government. This occurs at the national and regional levels as necessary, based on the scope and nature of the emergency. While federal government institutions may implement these plans during an emergency, they must also implement the processes outlined in the FERP in order to coordinate with the Federal Government's emergency response.
Public Safety Canada provides expertise in operations, situational awareness, risk assessment, planning, logistics, and finance and administration relevant to its coordination role. Several federal government institutions may be designated as primary departments, depending on the nature of the emergency. As such, Public Safety Canada is responsible for engaging relevant federal government institutions. In doing so, Public Safety Canada will work in cooperation with federal departmental representatives and other representatives to guide the integration of activities in response to emergencies. The Communications Directorate also provides support and strategic public communications advice on issues relating to the public and media environment as part of each of the primary functions of the FERMS. The Director General of the Operations Directorate will guide the Government Operations Centre in requesting federal departmental representatives via departmental emergency operations centres, when available, or through pre-established departmental duty officers. They include policies and legislation, planning assumptions and concept(s) of operations to augment and support primary departmental programs, arrangements or other measures to assist provincial governments and local authorities, or to support the Government Operations Centre in order to coordinate the Government of Canada's response to an emergency.
It is based on the tenets of the Incident Command System and the Treasury Board Secretariat's Integrated Risk Management Framework. The FERMS can scale operations to the scope required by an emergency with the support and emergency response expertise of other federal government institutions.
Although individual threats may be addressed in event-specific or departmental plans, the FERMS is the framework that guides an integrated Government of Canada response.
Trained and experienced managers and staff from the Communications Directorate of Public Safety Canada provide support. Under the FERP, the Government of Canada will engage existing governance structures to the greatest extent possible in response to an emergency. During an emergency, the Committee coordinates the Government of Canada's response and advises Ministers. The Legal Services Unit from the primary departments, from the supporting departments, and from the Department of Justice provides additional support or advice as required during a potential or actual emergency. The Public Communications Officer provides public communications advice as part of the management team, coordinates the integration of public communications within each of the primary functions, and provides leadership to the Government of Canada public communications community. They provide input on the support needs of their home institution in response to an incident. It is the principal location from which Subject Matter Experts and Federal Liaison Officers from federal government institutions, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector perform the primary functions related to FERMS.
However, a potential or occurring incident may require response beyond normal monitoring and situational reporting.
At the Regional level, the Public Safety Canada Regional Director, in consultation with the Director General, Operations Directorate and the Government Operations Centre, will authorize the Federal Coordination Centre to communicate the response level of this plan to regional response partners. Federal Liaison Officers and Subject Matter Experts may be called upon to provide the Government Operations Centre with specific information or may be requested to be physically located in the Government Operations Centre during this level of escalation. As an incident unfolds and the requirements for a federal response becomes clearer, a risk assessment is conducted. Subject Matter Experts are usually required during the development of risk assessments and contingency planning. Federal Liaison Officers and Subject Matter Ex­perts from federal government institutions and other public sector partners are consulted and may be asked to provide further information relevant to the situation, either electronically or through their presence in the Government Operations Centre.
Federal Liaison Officers are usually required to participate in the Government Operations Centre throughout this level of escalation, whereas Subject Matter Experts from Primary and Supporting institutions will be requested to contribute to the on-going risk assessment and planning activities as required. The Director General, Operations Directorate, in consultation with the Associate Assistant Deputy Minister, will guide decisions regarding the scale and level of engagement. For certain short-term events, the Operations Function performs all primary functions pursuant to standard operating procedures or to the applicable contingency plan. The Situational Awareness Function issues a Situation Report for each operational period (or as directed by the Director General, Operations Directorate). The management team consults with the Federal Coordinating Officer before approving the proposed objectives and courses of action. The Government of Canada will implement Contingency Plans based on the nature of the incident, and it will modify the response to an incident based on changing circumstances. The development of an Incident Action Plan is based on the output of the situational awareness and risk assessment function and planning guidance. It identifies issues and activities arising during a response for the next five to seven days. The Logistics Function is responsible for preventing the duplication of response efforts by government and non-government organizations. Horizontally, these include operations, situational awareness (Privy Council Office participation), risk assessment (Privy Council Office participation), planning, logistics and finance and administration.
These communications activities are coordinated under the authority of the Director General, Communications, Public Safety Canada, in consultation with the Privy Council Office. This position is critical in enabling the linkage between the National Emergency Response System and the FERP. The Federal Coordination Centre can carry out this responsibility and enhance the Federal Government's capability to respond to emergencies.
Under these guidelines, Ministers are accountable to the central financial departments and to Parliament for the emergency-related expenditures of their respective departments, crown corporations, or other government institutions. Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) will not fund such expenditures on an interim basis. The Operations Directorate will maintain the FERP and its components as an evergreen document. One or more federal government institutions may be designated as primary, depending on the nature and scope of the incident. In addition, this ESF collects, evaluates, and shares information on energy system damage and estimations on the impact of energy system outages within affected areas. It also addresses HRSDC's support to the Government of Canada requirements in regards to communication with Canadians in affected areas during an emergency.
In addition, this ESF coordinates federal actions to support the provision of law enforcement services within impacted regions. The ESF#12 is also the framework for Government of Canada institutions to share relevant communications information and to work collaboratively to achieve integrated and effective emergency communications.
Additional reviews may be conducted if experience with a significant incident, exercise or regulatory changes indicate a requirement to do so. Having a plan will help reduce anxiety in a difficult situation and will give you guidance on how to respond. The faster and easier that someone can look at your map and find out what they need to know, the better. Highlight important elements on the map (exit points, fire extinguisher locations, etc) in color. Show the outside of the property as well because you need to indicate a marshal or congregation area for people to go to in the event of an emergency. Use a blue cross and the appropriate labels to show the location of first aid kits and first aid rooms. You can also show certain things such as eyewash stations, stairways that lead out of the building, and other safety stations that might be specific to your industry or business. The best way to understand this is, if you’re facing the map and you remove it from the wall and lay it flat, the elements to the left of you will be to the left of your location marked on the map. The Major Organization Plans (as per Figure I on page ii) should be consistent with the requirements under these implementing plans.
These plans are based on, and should be consistent with the PNERP and with the Provincial Implementing Plans. The terminology contained in the Glossary, Annex K, should be used for this purpose by all concerned. In a nuclear emergency, therefore, the Province will take the leading role in managing the off-site response. The Province may issue operational directives1 and emergency orders (in the event of a declared emergency), where warranted and appropriate, as further detailed in this Plan. Such a hazard will usually be caused by an accident, malfunction, or loss of control involving radioactive material.
It is not possible, without the risk of serious delay, to ascertain whether the resources normally available can be relied upon. This declaration can be renewed for one further period of 14 days, as long as it meets the test of the declared emergency. These are combined in one document since many of the features will be the same for all such potential emergencies.
It would be applicable to accidents at nuclear establishments, transportation (of radioactive goods) accidents, satellite (containing radioactive material) re-entry, radiological dispersal devices (RDD), radiological devices (RD) and nuclear weapon detonation. Pursuant to sections 3 and 8 of the EMCPA, municipal nuclear emergency response plans prepared by the designated municipalities in respect of nuclear installation emergencies (Annex A) shall conform to this PNERP and, shall address the agreed-to responsibilities outlined in Appendices 15 and 16 to Annex I.
Municipalities in close proximity to, or with nuclear establishments within their boundaries should include, in their emergency response plans, the measures they may need to take to deal with a radiological accident. Other municipalities which have a radiological incident identified as one of their potential risks within their Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment should include, within their municipal emergency response plans, the measures they may be required to undertake to deal with such an emergency (see PNERP Implementing Plan for Other Radiological Emergencies). All municipal emergency response plans should provide for the development of plans and procedures involving local boards (defined pursuant to the Municipal Act, 2001, S.O. They should also include the measures required to discharge offsite responsibilities in accordance with the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and Regulations and with the responsibilities outlined in Appendix 13 to Annex I. This plan contains an Ontario Annex, which provides for liaison with Ontario, the provision of federal assistance, and provisions for obtaining international assistance, should any be requested by Ontario. In the event of a radiological or nuclear emergency, the CNSC will monitor and evaluate the on-site response of the licensee, or in the case of an event with no identified licensee, the CNSC will oversee and regulate the response activities of the responding organizations to ensure compliance with the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and Regulations, and ensure the health, safety and security of the response staff, the public and the environment, as well as maintain compliance with Canada’s international obligations.
The federal government will also manage nuclear liability issues and coordinate Canada’s response, should Canadians be affected by a nuclear emergency in a foreign country.
Therefore, the federal government maintains exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of nuclear energy in Canada. However, where the emergency is confined to one province, the Governor in Council may only issue a declaration of public welfare emergency or take other steps when the Lieutenant Governor of the province has indicated to the federal Governor in Council that the emergency exceeds the capacity of the province to deal with it. The orders or regulations made by the Governor in Council should not unduly impair the ability of the province to take measures, under provincial legislation, for dealing with the emergency.


Federal authorities also coordinate or support the provision of assistance to a province during or after a provincial emergency. Once a provincial declaration of emergency has been made (see section 1.3 above), the LGIC has the power to make emergency orders and may delegate these powers to a Minister or to the Commissioner of Emergency Management (CEM)2. Emergency orders are made only if they are necessary and essential, and they would alleviate harm and damage and are a reasonable alternative to other measures.
Emergency orders must only apply to those areas where they are necessary and should be in effect only for as long as necessary.
During an emergency, the Premier or a minister (delegated) is required to regularly report to the public with respect to the emergency.
The Premier is required to submit a report in respect of the emergency to the Assembly within 120 days following the termination of the emergency. Pursuant to section 11(1) of the EMCPA, Ministers of the Crown, Crown employees, members of municipal councils and municipal employees are protected from personal liability for doing any act done in good faith under the Act or pursuant to an Order made under the Act. Emergency plans authorize crown and municipal employees to take action under those plans where an emergency exists but has not yet been declared to exist (section 9 of the EMCPA). In the case of those assigned to a position, implementation should also be the responsibility of any substitute, alternate or the person next in line of authority if the permanent incumbent of that position is absent or otherwise unable to take the necessary action. In addition to the obligation of Cabinet to formulate this plan, nuclear and radiological emergencies are assigned to the Minister of Community Safety & Correctional Services. Pursuant to section 3(4) of the EMCPA, municipalities have been designated to prepare plans in respect of nuclear emergencies. Appendices 15 & 16 to Annex I address the main responsibilities of the designated municipalities. Municipalities in close proximity to, or with nuclear establishments within their boundaries, should include in their emergency response plans the measures they may need to take to deal with the off-site consequences of a radiological accident.
Other municipalities which have a radiological incident identified as one of their potential risks, within their Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment (pursuant to Section 2 (3) of the EMCPA), should include, within their municipal emergency response plans, the measures they may need to undertake to deal with such an emergency (see PNERP Implementing Plan for Other Radiological Emergencies).
The Solicitor General may make such alterations as considered necessary for the purpose of coordinating the plan with the Province’s plan. Where a municipality identifies radiological risks (as per PNERP Implementing Plan for Other Radiological Emergencies), the emergency plan for that municipality must include provisions to deal with such an emergency.
Once radioactive material enters the body, internal contamination decreases in accordance with the radioactive decay and biological elimination of such material. If there is a risk of radioiodine entering the body, the thyroid’s capacity to absorb it can be reduced or eliminated by taking a compound of stable iodine before, or even shortly after, the radioiodine enters the body. However, because resources are not available to make full preparations for dealing with all possible events, a judicious choice must be made to select the optimum basis for emergency management. Formal risk analysis of nuclear reactor accidents shows that there is generally an inverse relationship between the probability of occurrence of an accident and the severity of its likely consequences. The main hazard to people would be from external exposure to, and inhalation of radionuclides. The aim of this is to ensure, to the extent possible, that no person offsite will be exposed to intolerable levels5 of radiation as a result of such an accident.
Radiation doses could be high (greater than 250 mSv [25 rem] for the most exposed person at the facility boundary).
Environmental contamination could be quantitatively significant in both extent and duration. This requires planning and preparedness to enable detection and assessment of environmental contamination, protection of the food chain from contamination, and prevention of the ingestion of contaminated food and water. Priority evacuations, if necessary, shall be undertaken within this area because of its proximity to the source of the potential hazard.
Damage to property or the environment may also trigger an evacuation if it poses a risk to the safety, health, and welfare of people. The aim is achieved by detailing evacuation considerations, hosting arrangements, transportation management, and return planning. This includes details on the municipality, hazards that may necessitate an evacuation, and demographics.
Emergency responders may not be able to enter an area without subjecting themselves to an unreasonable level of risk, or they may need to wear and use specialized personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect themselves.
Decontamination could necessitate specialized screening and cleaning resources, and expertise, and may be required before people are transported to advanced care and sheltering facilities. All activities and efforts should be focused on moving these people from the at-risk area to places of safety in a timely manner. It has been estimated that between 5 and 20 percent of people will anticipate an evacuation and self-evacuate.
This list should contain the names of persons needed to restart systems that must be in place before evacuees can return home (e.g.
A pre-emptive evacuation may be undertaken when it is clear that if delayed, conditions (weather or other hazard) would impede evacuation. There is often on-scene activity by emergency response personnel who may direct the evacuation. Evacuations of this type often involve a large number of evacuees, possibly from more than one municipality. Structural damage to the transportation system, such as bridges, tunnels, and highway systems may render them unsafe for use. While the primary goal of any response action is to save lives, the ability to evacuate people quickly and efficiently should be weighed against the risks of remaining in place. Their understanding of the regional transportation network enables them to identify ways to improve the carrying capacity of roadways and transit systems in a safe manner. In most evacuation scenarios, the majority of evacuee movements will take place on roadways and highways, in both personal vehicles and transit vehicles. The plan may identify a number of options, but requires planners to select and implement only certain tactics based on the specific circumstances during the evacuation. The real-time threat assessment, type of evacuation, resources available and needed, and the number of people to be evacuated will dictate what transportation options are best.
The challenge lies in identifying those tactics that provide the greatest increase in carrying capacity while being realistic in terms of time and resource requirements. Due to the uncertain nature of incidents that trigger evacuations, the evacuees may be able to return directly to their residence or place of employment from the assembly point once it is safe to do so.
Evacuation planners should determine which special needs groups should be routed to particular shelters, and how to incorporate such direction into the evacuation plan. Planners should assess shelters’ locations, as well as their capabilities and capacities, facilities and resources, in relation to how evacuee traffic will be routed.
Municipalities may use this standard as a guide for selecting shelters and planning for shelter services.
Based on the location and type of hazard, a municipality can prioritize which areas (sectors) should evacuate first, and have pre-identified decision points and triggers for declaring an evacuation. That authority may lie with key individuals, such as any member of the Municipal Emergency Control Group or a department head. For known site-specific risks, incident-specific information may be added to the municipal evacuation plan. Determine the evacuation area given the emergency situation and estimate the time and resources required to safely evacuate the area.
In addition, consider public education campaigns to advise the public on plans to re-unify families in the event of separation during an emergency.
For example, once a building has been evacuated make a mark on the front door or most visible location. These phases include pre-warning, evacuation, ongoing communications, and return (discussed in the Return section).
It is important to ensure that they contain realistic expectations of each municipality’s capabilities. The municipality should work with its records management staff to review its registration and inquiry practices to ensure that they permit the disclosure of evacuee information to relevant parties (i.e. The Evacuation Coordinator may be responsible for making arrangements for shelter, food, clothing, and other essentials. This includes restoring the physical infrastructure where possible or desirable as well as addressing the emotional, social, economic and physical well-being of those involved. If a municipality provided transportation to shelters, it may have to organize return transportation for those evacuees.
Consider locations of municipal services, facilities and infrastructure as they may be affected by an evacuation. It assigns responsibilities to municipal employees, by position, for implementation of the [insert Name of the Municipality] Evacuation Plan. This includes establishing equipment and supply needs, educating and training personnel, and exercising the system to evaluate and improve procedures. In a primarily non-medical event, the Tier 2 liaison may integrate through the health and medical Emergency Support Function (ESF) or other functional group in the EOC (see IS-701, Lesson 2). The Federal Emergency Response Plan (FERP) is the Government of Canada's "all-hazards" response plan.
During escalation of the FERP, other federal government institutions provide support to these areas and are further defined in Section 2.
The regional component of the FERMS has similar functions as the Government Operations Centre when escalated. These decisions are based on the scope and scale of the emergency and the response required.
An Incident Action Plan Task Matrix tracks the achievement of each objective (see Annex B - Appendix 4). It also establishes and oversees the successful completion of the objectives set for each operational period. Primary departmental representatives are assigned by a primary department and are delegated authority to make decisions affecting that institution's participation in the response activities, following appropriate consultation with the leadership of their home institution. Federal government institution-specific operations centres support their departmental roles and mandates and contribute to the integrated Government of Canada response through the Government Operations Centre. Federal Liaison Officers serve as the link between the Government Operations Centre and their home institution. The levels of response are calibrated to the scope and potential impact of the incident and the urgency of the required response. As well, depending upon the situation, a Level 2 response may return to a Level 1 response once risk assessment and contingency planning has occurred in anticipation of an incident.
This assessment, conducted in consultation with Subject Matter Experts, identifies vulnerabilities, aggravating external factors and potential impacts. Departmental emergency response plans are escalated and materiel and resources readied in anticipation of provincial or other requests for federal assistance, and the Government Operations Centre maintains constant communication with those activated centres. The Operations Directorate and other federal government institution planners develop the Action Plan Task Matrix.
It is intended to facilitate interdepartmental and intergovernmental coordination, without unduly restricting operations. The Committee provides direction on emergency management planning and preparedness activities. The Regional Director co-chairs the local Federal Coordination Steering Committee and the Federal Coordination Group.
The group is composed of federal public communicators from affected federal government institutions. Each department must provide the necessary funds to pay the costs of their support actions, when payment is due.
The FERP will be formally reviewed based on lessons learned through exercises and actual events, and will be republished annually. It recognizes that, during an emergency, the Federal Government works with provincial and territorial governments, First Nations and Inuit health authorities, non-governmental organizations, and private health resources in Canada and internationally as required, depending on the nature of the emergency and the request for assistance.
Recommended changes will be submitted through the primary department to respective senior management for approval. Calm thinking goes out the window during a crisis, and the goal here is to save lives, so only the important elements need to be displayed. It should be a safe distance away from the building to provide adequate protection from fire and any onsite hazards such as chemicals or explosive materials.
You can also use the drawing tools in a program like Microsoft Word or a drawing program like Photoshop. Such action will be taken in order to protect public health and safety and the environment. In either case, the CNSC will implement the CNSC Emergency Response Plan CAN2-1 November 2001. Assistance could include financial assistance where the emergency has been declared to be of concern to the federal government and the province has requested assistance.
If the Assembly is not in session at that time, the Premier is required to submit a report within 7 days of the Assembly reconvening. The planning basis selected must strike an appropriate balance in considering these two factors. The guideline presents evacuation planning concepts that may be applied for various scales of evacuations and sizes of municipalities.
The plan also sets out the procedures for notifying the members of the Municipal Emergency Control Group, municipal and other responders, the public, the province, neighbouring communities, and as required, other impacted and interested parties, of the emergency.
Decisions should be made on the review and revision cycle of the plan, and who is responsible for it. Evacuations are often multi-jurisdictional activities, making extensive coordination amongst numerous departments and governments necessary.
More research and analysis will likely be undertaken in the pre-planning phase than is reported in the plan. Sectors may also be established by using census or enumeration areas, or natural geographic barriers.
The nature of the contaminants will vary and different contaminants may require different approaches to decontamination and treatment.
As a result, hazardous materials (HAZMAT) procedures should be incorporated into the evacuation plan. In such scenarios, sheltering in place must be considered as a strategy for protecting public safety (see the Shelter-in-Place section 2.5). The size and demographics of the population are significant factors in determining how to conduct an evacuation.
A partial evacuation is most often internal – that is the evacuees are hosted elsewhere within the municipality, rather than being hosted in a separate municipality. Decision-makers must be willing to make decisions with whatever information is available at the time. This will require intensive effort by emergency management personnel to coordinate, transport, and shelter the affected populations, and will place greater demands on staff and resources. If these sites are located on evacuation routes, those routes may be unavailable, and alternatives will need to be identified. Partners that could be involved include the local police service, Ontario Provincial Police, Ministry of Transportation, municipal transportation departments, etc. Given the potentially large numbers of vehicles that will be accessing the roadway network at the same time, it is important to consider what can be done to increase the capacity of roadways.
If possible, transportation staff should employ traffic modeling to test the routes and tactics to be included in the evacuation plan. Assembly points are typically well-known landmarks that have the capacity to handle large numbers of people, have bus access, and an indoor sheltering area.
As part of the planning process, planners should estimate the number of evacuees that may require shelter compared to those who will make their own arrangements.
If shelters are run by another organization, it is advisable for municipal staff to work closely with shelter operators to provide regular updates on the emergency situation and for the municipality to be aware of the status of evacuation operations.
Significant evacuee populations may be mapped against the proposed evacuation transportation and sheltering network to determine projected demand levels on their chosen travel routes. The person responsible for maintaining the notification list for internal personnel and external partners should be clearly indicated.
Determine the population requiring evacuation based on the type of evacuation required, the delineation of the evacuation area, and the population statistics compiled and analysed during pre-planning. Public alerting may be the responsibility of the Community Emergency Management Coordinator, the Emergency Information Officer, an Evacuation Coordinator, or other as identified by the municipality and outlined in the plan.
The agreement should also define the anticipated costs or fees associated with the delivery of the services. Evacuation operations will remain under the overall direction of the Municipal Emergency Control Group.
As with the initial evacuation, numerous resources, especially personnel and transportation related resources will be required to successfully return evacuees to the affected area. This plan also sets out the procedures for notifying the members of the Municipal Emergency Control Group, municipal and other responders, the public, the province, neighbouring communities, and as required, other impacted and interested parties, of the emergency. These risk factors include increased urbanization, critical infrastructure dependencies and interdependencies, terrorism, climate variability and change, scientific and technological developments (e.g. The management team sets objectives based on guidance from the Federal Coordinating Officer.
The responsible federal government institution's facilities manage Emergency Support Functions, which are integrated with the Government Operations Centre's efforts.
They provide knowledge of their home institution including roles, responsibilities, mandates and plans.
At the regional level, the Federal Coordination Centre is established to respond consistently to the scope and nature of the emergency. During an incident, the Federal Coordination Group provides emergency management planning support and advice to the Federal Coordination Centre in a timely manner. The group gathers information for public communications products, advises Senior Officials on the public environment; supports public communications activities on the ground, and develops public communications activities and products for its respective institution.
Each department should be prepared to initiate separate expenditure records and, if necessary, control system modifications, immediately upon receipt of information that an emergency has occurred and that it will likely be involved. This review will include assessing the relevance of existing event-specific plans, developing new event-specific plans as required, and maintaining operational processes consistent with changes to departmental roles and responsibilities. Upon completion of the review process, primary departments will provide Public Safety Canada, Plans and Logistics Division with their updated ESF as per established timelines. 25) and police services operating in the area to provide necessary support and assistance required by such plans, or that which may be needed in an emergency. The detail required in a Municipal Evacuation Plan may vary according to the needs of the municipality. The plan should identify lead departments and considerations for the development of incident-specific plans (Incident Action Plans). They may have little or no time to wait for additional information because any delay may have a significant impact on public safety. Emergency responders may require personal protective equipment, as responder safety will be critical.
In cases where the transportation network is severely restricted by such damage, sheltering in place may be a safer short-term alternative.
This will provide data to help quantify the benefits of different strategies and support an informed decision as to the best ones for the particular region and transportation network. Pre-identifying sufficient assembly points in relation to the transportation network and evacuation routes will allow these locations to be incorporated into the evacuation plan. In addition, planners should consider special needs that may need to be accommodated within a shelter (e.g. A clear and succinct notification process must show who is responsible for making the notification contacts and list the primary and secondary notification methods. List details of the population to be evacuated including numbers of evacuees and special requirements.
It may be necessary to establish agreements with other communities when an emergency is threatening or occurring if mutual assistance agreements are not in place or may be insufficient to address the emergency. If the municipality contracts registration to a third party, the municipality is still responsible for disclosure of the evacuee information. This plan also identifies lead departments and outlines considerations for the development of incident-specific plans (Incident Action Plans). Public Safety Canada Watch Officers and Senior Watch Officers staff the Government Operations Centre during non-emergency (day-to-day) operations.
They are also responsible for briefing their home institution on developments related to the incident and its response. However, the supporting federal department and the Regional Director keep each other informed of these activities.
These records must be supported by detailed operational logs, and they must be co-ordinated between headquarters and regions. The current edition of this plan supersedes and replaces all older versions which should be destroyed. By providing information about planning techniques, strategies, and tactics, the guideline aids emergency management staffi in determining what information should be considered when creating an evacuation plan. Different types of hazards may dictate variations in the criteria for these categories (e.g.
The Provincial Emergency Operations Centre (PEOC) should be notified of an evacuation as soon as possible.
Subject Matter Experts provide expertise in specific scientific or technological areas or aspect of the response. Departments may seek to recover these extraordinary costs through the process described in the Treasury Board guidelines referenced above. This guideline aligns with the Template for the Development of a Municipal Evacuation Plan (Appendix 1).



Survival store littleton ma
Arizona grid attack
Emergency preparedness and response meaning of


Comments to “Emergency plan event company”

  1. Leon writes:
    Than vast wilderness the hyperlink inside.
  2. GULAY writes:
    Emergency kit must the very same extensive overview of the differentiating factors essential to evaluating.
  3. mamedos writes:
    You talk about this as if it were meals.
  4. 4e_LOVE_4ek_134 writes:
    The use of cell phones by young berniebro.
  5. Judo_AZE writes:
    May well not one more foot of concrete followed.