How to protect house from emp online,national geographic brain coral,book of revelations apocalypse four horsemen zip,blackout solar storm forecast - Step 1

EMP & Solar Protection Technologies specializes in products that offer EMP Protection from solar storms, electromagnetic disturbances and wireless identity theft. Emergency electric generators may provide the only source of electric power for days, weeks or even months following an EMP Catastrophe.  Protecting portable electric generators should be a national priority for every household and business. You might choose to start with an easy, inexpensive project right now such as constructing a DIY Faraday cage for your solar panels, or tuck a few mission-critical solar gadgets inside a couple of layers of Faraday bags to go in your rucksack. Next in increasing order of cost, complexity and difficulty, are solar panel installations on homes or retreats which are not connected to the grid.
Shielding large spaces is most easily and least expensively accomplished in the design and building phases of the home and its solar power system as opposed to retrofitting an existing home and installing solar panels on it. By creating a larger envelope of shielding, with the same shielding properties as a Faraday cage, all of the electronic devices in the shielded portion of the building will be protected. But shielding them to 80Mhz will give us a margin of error since our shielding will likely become somewhat compromised over time and by the wear and tear of life and the elements. To shield our grid-independent retreat, the entire outer skin of the structure must be shielded to our target 80dB. 2 layers of conductive 20 opening per inch wire screening covering the solar panels will allow light transmission to the panels while still providing the requisite shielding.
The outside skin of all walls must be shielded or the wiring within the walls will conduct the EMP into the electrical system. Install micro-inverters underneath the shielded skin that envelops each solar panel instead of a single, and large inverter cabinet that rests on a cement pad next to the structure. The most difficult and expensive solar installation is the protection of is a grid-connected home or building. The same principles apply to this project as applied to the simpler projects but since the home and its solar energy system is connected to the power grid, this one requires additional protective measures. This installation will be more vulnerable to the power charges induced by E3 because it is grid connected. The home’s connection to the power grid should have a mechanical, manual bypass circuit allowing the home to be physically disconnected from the grid. The home’s connection to the power grid must be fitted with the fast-clamping surge suppression previously mentioned. Being more along the lines of a remote cabin, the last model was assumed to be pretty self-contained. Non-conductive water and sewer pipes should be used where they penetrate the shielding envelope.
Fiber optic cabling can be substituted for copper data and voice cable runs since fiber optic cable is non-conductive and will not conduct surges caused by E3 EMP inside the shielding envelope. This last type of installation will raise the cost of a new home by about 30% including the cost of adding a solar installation with a battery bank and backup generator. Of course, costs would increase for a retrofit in proportion to the complexity of the build and the amount of material needed. With a little knowledge, insight and preparation, you can protect your solar panels from the effects of EMP.
Take this knowledge to prepare yourself or your family now so that you and yours are less vulnerable in the event of an EMP. It is all very well, but there is no way I can stop my solar cells generating enough current to blow my sine wave inverter in an emp attack, I have a 1KW rated Junction box for each 80 W rated panel but my inverter at 1.5 kw would not survive and most of the fine tabbing wire would probably arc. First of all, no one really knows what will or will not survive a massive EMP such as the type in the hugely popular book, One Second After.  Second, and more to the point, I am not well versed on the technical side of electronics even though I am a techy nerdy type when in comes to computers. Now, as to what’s going to “give” first (in the event of an actual emergency, eh?) that becomes anyone’s guess. You talk about turning ol’ George into a True Believer in the best surge protection you can afford!  Making a major commitment to solar and keeping it online during [whatever] involves a number of subtle design attributes and your readers are wise to think of these up front.
If you’re looking at a couple of discrete panels and a small $200-class inverter and a few car batteries?  Simply keep the charge controller in your metal (Faraday cage) garbage can and short the solar panel leads (not in bright sun, of course!) and don’t worry. In addition, when you sign up to receive email updates you will receive a free, downloadable copy of my e-book The Emergency Food Buyer’s Guide.
Bargain Bin: Getting the goods you need to in place to be comfortable during a power outage when the grid is down can be daunting when you are just getting started.
Ambient Weather Emergency Solar Hand Crank Radio: This is becoming a popular choice with Backdoor Survival readers. EcoZoom Versa Rocket Stove: Burning twigs and pinecones, this stove will cook a big pot of rice in under 20 minutes.
Coleman Rugged Battery Powered Lantern: This sturdy Coleman has a runtime of up to 28 hours on the low setting and 18 hours on the high setting but does require D cell batteries. Dorcy LED Wireless Motion Sensor Flood Lite: Don’t let the $20 price lead you to think this wireless flood light is wimpy. I too have heard that lightening protectors will probably not protect against the rapid EMP pulse. Cable Innovations makes surge protectors that are much faster than gas tube, mov, fuse type surge protectors.
Are you sure that solar panel arrays can be protected from an EMP with transparent conductive coatings ? I would really like to know how this can be verified as I am looking into purchasing my panels soon and really want to get to the bottom of this first. Even so, a person who puts in solar panels is still likely well-advised to install transient surge protection. Further note: Advanced regulation is when charging is managed according to time, current, and temperature.
Solar panels like all semiconductor devices are not protected against EMP, check the solar event in the 1800s, telegraph wires were melted, fires were started, anything a quarter inch long or longer will be a good antenna for an EMP Burst, so even if the solar cells themselves were not damaged, the leads to each cell will probably be destroyed. We are seriously considering buying a solar battery and panels to run a small refrigerator in case we go off grid. Imagine not having any electricity for days, weeks, months or even years… no lights, no communication channels, no water, no refrigeration, no navigation systems, no gas pumping, no food transportation, no waste pumping or garbage collecting. Understanding the probability of an EMP of sufficient field strength, during your lifetime, is sufficient to warrant action on your part to protect your devices and solar panels from it. There are differences in effect and magnitude between nuclear high-altitude EMP (NHEMP, or EMP caused by a nuclear weapon detonated high above the earth), geomagnetically induced EMP (GIEMP or EMP caused by solar weather), and nuclear low-altitude EMP (NLEMP or EMP from a nuclear weapon detonated near the ground).
NHEMP is not a single EMP pulse, but rather, it a pulse consisting of three separate components: E1, E2 and E3. E1 is an extremely fast and brief pulse that induces very high voltages in electronics within roughly line of sight of the detonation.
Unlike the previous two components, E3 induces extremely high voltages in long conductors that run parallel to the earth’s magnetic field such as power lines, phone lines, railroad tracks and metal pipelines. The affected area can be as small as a few hundred mile radius, or can be so large that it can affect the entire planet. NLEMP is similar to NHEMP, but it lacks the thousand-fold amplification caused by its higher-altitude sister. How can we shield solar panels against all three components and all against all three threats?
Current should be able to travel unimpeded through the conductive outer skin of the Faraday cage. Since most DIY Faraday cages are either too bulky, too heavy or too delicate to travel with you in your rucksack or backpack, another solution is needed to protect portable solar arrays, portable solar chargers and other portable solar gear in your pack. Since an NHEMP could produce almost double the field strength that 40dB of shielding will protect, take the added precaution of sealing your solar panels inside two layers of bags which each provide at least 40dB of shielding. Some shielding is definitely better than no shielding, but there is no reason to run the risk. Lastly, make sure that the bags that you choose have a non-conductive inner layer just like needs to be installed in a Faraday cage to prevent electricity from arcing from the conductive layer(s) of the bag into the solar gear that you are trying to protect. EMP caused by nuclear weapons has three different types of effects that need to protected against. Solar panel & electronics stored in inexpensive shielding solutions such as Faraday cages and Faraday bags are only protected from E1 & E2 while they are inside their shielded storage containers! And you know the principles involved in building an effective Faraday cage, what to look for in Faraday bags and that one layer of most of the bags on the market today is insufficient to protect against EMP.
Now you now know the basics of protecting your stored and portable solar gear against EMP in ways that almost anyone can afford! Watch for the second part of this article HERE to learn the principles involved in protecting grid-connected solar installations like you may have mounted to your rooftop or near your home. About the Author Latest PostsAbout Cache Valley PrepperCache Valley Prepper is the CEO of Survival Sensei, LLC, a freelance author, writer, survival instructor, consultant and the director of the Survival Brain Trust.
Part II of the article will be published tomorrow and it goes into more detail specifically about protecting a structure and its contents. Read Part II and if you still have questions about that, ask again and I'll answer your question in the comments section of Part II, OK? The short answer is, "EMP can affect some small batteries, so shield them." But this is a VERY important question and I'd really like to write an article (or perhaps a paper) addressing this topic since there is so much lousy advice circulating about it online.
Hi, I presume the generators were under load, or at least cycling, if they were damaged, correct? My understanding is that the generators were running and connected to energized and monitored sections of overhead telecom cables.
Since making and storing a faraday cage is more challenging for a 4' x 8' solar panel, are there any alternate ideas? Yes, whether your solar panels are mounted on the exterior of your vehicle or carried inside, they would be vulnerable to EMP unless you take steps to protect them.
Yes, I know for a fact that 1 mil thick aluminum foil provides enough shielding to protect against EMP of up to 50 thousand volts per meter. The amplitude, frequency and polarity of the wave(s) which impinge upon your equipment will be the determining factors in estimating the damage which will ensue from an EMP. Shielding the solar panel with a conductive medium will of necessity reduce the effectiveness of the panel by diminishing the amount of light it receives.
Shielding the output wires requires encasing them in a grounded conductive shield which is grounded at one end only to prevent ground loops.
Since we don't know the frequencies involved in a potential EMP threat we must design for a worst case scenario. An expensive way to proceed is to NOT shield the system and allow it to operate until (and if) an EMP strike occurs. I do not belive a person can be prepared to survive I do how ever believe you can have the education and tools for a fighting chance to prevail and this is a good start at an education for. We already have the technology available to us to protect the grid and homes from EMP, but it cost's more money, so a utility company that implements it won't be able to compete with a company that doesn't.


If you want to know more about what you can do to make that happen, sign up for the newsletter at EMPActAmerica.org to learn more about EMP, advances that our enemies are making in the field and when legislation is being proposed. First, I should make it clear that I do benefit in any way by recommending any particular vendor.
Water pump will be wind powered and the greenhouse and house heated by sun and an HHO furnace.
Be sure to check out Part II of this article since it contains information that applies to the type of project that you are working on. Pakalert PressCan This Material Protect Your Home From The NSA, Electromagnetic Radiation and EMP Attacks?Can This Material Protect Your Home From The NSA, Electromagnetic Radiation and EMP Attacks?
This concentration of EMP by metal wiring is one reason that most electrical equipment and telephones would be destroyed by the electrical surge. One simple solution is to use battery-operated equipment which has cords or antennas of only 30 inches or less in length. That said, there are some methods which will help to protect circuits from EMP and give you an edge if you must operate ham radios or the like when a nuclear attack occurs.
A new device which may soon be on the market holds promise in allowing electronic equipment to be EMP hardened. At the other end of the scale of EMP resistance are some really sensitive electrical parts. The only two requirements for protection with a Faraday box are:(1) the equipment inside the box does NOT touch the metal container (plastic, wadded paper, or cardboard can all be used to insulate it from the metal) and (2) the metal shield is continuous without any gaps between pieces or extra-large holes in it. The thickness of the metal shield around the Faraday box isn’t of much concern, either. For this type of application we will shield the solar panels themselves, all associated wiring, inverter hardware, the battery bank and as little space as a couple of rooms or as much as the entire building. Shielding large spaces eliminates redundant purchases and the hassle of storing spare electronics in a Faraday cage for possible future use. You will increase redundancy and avoid shielding the inverter cabinets, and installing surge suppression and shielded wiring. If a smart meter with a data connection is installed, the data connection would also need to be surge protected. Grid-connected homes typically have more connections penetrating the shielded envelope in addition to power such as copper phone lines, cable TV, satellite TV, radio antennas, etc.. EMP trapping baffles could be constructed where non-conductive pipe penetrations occur to reduce the amount of EMP entering through these points. Passing through 2 shielded doors to enter the building, but allowing only 1 door to open at any given time will maintain the envelope. But the added cost would be recouped over time through savings on future electrical bills and it is hard to put a price tag on piece of mind and the ability to maintain your standard of living after an EMP. Whatever your income and the level of complexity of your solar installation, there is a solution. What I can tell you is that lightning plays havoc (and is a very likely enemy of any off-grid installation, particularly in the South during spring tornado and thunderstorms). Always, start with food then branch out from there.  Here is a list of some gear to help you along the way. This unit will charge up to 2 pairs of AA or 1 pair of AAA batteries via USB or solar power. My guess is that I have 8 or 9 of these Tripp Lite SUPER7 Surge Protector Strips scattered throughout the house. I earn a small commission from purchases made when you begin your Amazon shopping experience here. My understanding was that EMP hit too fast for most lightning protection devices and commercially available surge suppressors. When I was writing After the Blackout I researched it and found it’s hard to get a straight answer. Conductors unshielded otherwise (such as wiring) can be somewhat self shielded by forming into twisted pairs. Our grandson is a Type 1 Diabetic and it is necessary to keep his insulin and other meds in a refrigerator. This is the potentially cataclysmic threat that EMP poses, and the reason to plan your survival. Gamma rays interact with the earth’s magnetic field causing it to re-radiate a powerful EMP and scatter high energy electrons, creating a thousand times the EMP that the same weapon would cause in a lower-altitude burst. It affects all electronics that have sufficient conductive area, whether they are connected to the grid or not.
Much of its effect on the grid would be protected against by lightening protection, if the lightening protection circuits were not already burnt out by E1 when E2 arrives. E3 travels through the grid, blowing fuses, destroying transformers, knocking out substations, power plants and burning out any sensitive electronics connected to the grid.
Although the GIEMP can affect a greater area, it can’t perturb any electronics that are not connected to the grid.
That’s because the nuclear weapon detonates too low to cause the earth’s magnetic field to re-radiate EMP.
Just protect them against NHEMP, since it packs all three components and is the most powerful type of EMP.
If you use an ammo can, for example, remove the paint where the lid touches the body of the box and remove the rubber gasket since they would impede the free flow of current through the can. Because of the large frequency range we must protect against a hole as small as a ? inch could compromise the integrity of the Faraday cage for our purpose.
Make sure to find out the strength of the shielding in the bags before you make a purchase.
Most bags are designed to protect sensitive semiconductor products from electrostatic discharge or to hide your passport and credit information from would be identity thieves so the most shielding currently offered in a bag is a little over 40dB. You may not be far enough away from “sky zero” for the field strength of the EMP to weaken enough that your panels will be safe. A descendant of pioneers, Cache was raised in the tradition of self-reliance and grew up working archaeological digs in the desert Southwest, hiking the Swiss Alps and Scottish highlands and building the Boy Scout Program in Portugal.
That should be easier since Part II goes into how to shield installed panels and larger spaces, but I'd be glad to go over some of the aspects of shielding a vehicle for you. Part II of this article, which will be released tomorrow, will talk about what is involved in protecting larger volumes and installed panels.
Part II of this article will be published tomorrow and it's about the principles of protecting installed solar arrays and larger spaces so be sure to check back. If only a small percentage of our largest transformers are knocked out it would take 3-4 years to get the power back since no protocol even exists to "cold start" modern power plants.
It is my understanding that the powers that be were told of maybe an impending EMP attack on America, And I am wondering if the power companys and the government have been work on a way to secure our power plants and sub stations, In my town there is a big power generation plant, and crews have been working on it for 2 years now nonstop, But as always secure your own gear people. Because of this, nothing will be done to shield our critical infrastructure until we pass legislation requiring it, so vote for the shield act! I'm working on building a camp and running everything on 12 volts with a small inverter for the fridge (until I can build a water-cooled unit), furnace blower and whatever small appliances I'll have. The trickiest part will be any cable runs since they should be shielded and surge suppressed.
Neither the service provider nor the domain owner maintain any relationship with the advertisers.
The letters spell burnt out computers and other electrical systems and perhaps even a return to the dark ages if it were to mark the beginning of a nuclear war. In such a case, the gamma radiation released during the flash cycle of the weapon would react with the upper layer of the earth’s atmosphere and strip electrons free from the air molecules, producing electromagnetic radiation similar to broad-band radio waves (10 kHz-100 MHz) in the process.
It’s believed that the electrical surge of the EMP from such an explosion would be strong enough to knock out much of the civilian electrical equipment over the whole country.
In the levels created by a nuclear weapon, it would not pose a health hazard to plants, animals, or man PROVIDED it isn’t concentrated. It isn’t that the equipment itself is really all that sensitive, but that the surge would be so concentrated that nothing working on low levels of electricity would survive. This short stretch of metal puts the device within the troughs of the nuclear-generated EMP wave and will keep the equipment from getting a damaging concentration of electrons.
The trick is that it must REALLY be hardened from the real thing, not just EMP-proof on paper. This includes large electric motors, vacuum tube equipment, electrical generators, trans- formers, relays, and the like.
These include IC circuits, microwave transistors, and Field Effect Transistors (FET’s). Despite what you may have read or heard, these boxes do NOT have to be air- tight due to the long wave length of EMP; boxes can be made of wire screen or other porous metal.
Grounding a Faraday box is NOT necessary and in some cases actually may be less than ideal. Care must also be taken that the door is covered with foil AND electrically connected to the shield with a wire and screws or some similar set up.
These shelters are covered inside with metal foil and have metal screens which cover all air vents and are connected to the metal foil. In practice, the entire system is not grounded in the traditional electrical wiring sense of actually making contact to the earth at some point in its circuitry.
The very prudent may wish to buy spare electronic ignition parts and keep them a car truck (perhaps inside a Faraday box). Unfortunately, a little-known Federal dictum prohibits the NRC from requiring power plants to withstand the effects of a nuclear war.
Also, you dona€™t ned to shield dozens of devices individually nor install surge protection and shielded wiring between them. It would be a shame to go to all the cost and trouble of this level of protection just to have an EMP occur when the door is open and compromise the contents of the structure. Just remember to give it a few weeks after an EMP before you drag out the spare, they just may hit with a second EMP to make sure! Some of the older ones used on telephone lines, particularly the real old ones with the spark gap between 2 graphite blocks seemed really effective.
One thing I learned is if there is no current running through the system at the time of the blast, you’re probably OK, but otherwise it depends on how long the wires are and how much shielding you have. It happens so fast (1-2 nanoseconds) that surge protection used in the power grid can’t clamp fast enough to stop it and will be disabled by it. We should round up to 80dB to allow for wear and tear that will occur to Faraday cage over time. But because large currents could be induced into conductors, it is a good idea to ground large cages to prevent electrical shock when you touch the cage to open it.


To protect portable solar equipment carried in my backpack, I use lightweight bags marketed as Faraday bags to shield them.
Cache was mentored in survival by a Delta Force Lt Col and a physician in the US Nuclear Program and in business by Stephen R.
The whole shell needs to allow the free flow of electricity so special attention must be paid to where the sheets join, windows, doors and where they seal. But keep in mind that it's a lot harder to shield an electric vehicle than an older vehicle that uses a gasoline or diesel engine.
But just Compton scattering was once new to us, we are constantly learning about new properties of EM energy.
Your vehicle should be made as EMP-resistant as possible, which would be a good topic for another article (or an entire book), but I'd be happy to give you some pointers on what's involved in protecting your vehicle once you've read Part II of this article since it talks about shielding larger volumes and installed panels, so be sure to ask again after you've read part II so I can address them both together.
Faraday cages work because they are made of electrically conductive materials as opposed to magnetic materials. You fill it out once and it will send letters to your representatives and you don't even have to buy a postage stamp or make a phone call!
In case of trademark issues please contact the domain owner directly (contact information can be found in whois). Below is a detailed write up about EMP (Electro-Magnetic Pulse) and how to protect yourself from it.
Adding to the problems is the fact that its effects are hard to predict; even electronics designers have to test their equipment in powerful EMP simulators before they can be sure it is really capable of with standing the effect. These electrons would follow the earth’s magnetic field and quickly circle toward the ground where they would be finally dampened. Protecting electrical equipment is simple if it can be unplugged from AC outlets, phone systems, or long antennas. These design elements can eliminate the chance an EMP surge from power lines or long antennas damaging your equipment. The Ovonic threshold device is a solid-state switch capable of quickly opening a path to ground when a circuit receives a massive surge of EMP. These might even survive a massive surge of EMP and would likely to survive if a few of the above precautions were taking in their design and deployment. If you have electrical equipment with such com- ponents, it must be very well protected if it is to survive EMP.
If the object placed in the box is insulated from the inside surface of the box, it will not be effected by the EMP traveling around the outside metal surface of the box. Ideally the floor is then covered with a false floor of wood or with heavy carpeting to insulate everything and everyone inside from the shield (and EMP). According to sources working at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, cars have proven to be resistant to EMP in actual tests using nuclear weapons as well as during more recent tests (with newer cars) with the US Military’s EMP simulators.
Discovering that you have one of the few cars knocked out would not be a good way to start the onset of terrorist attack or nuclear war. But it seems probable that many vehicles WILL be working following the start of a nuclear war even if no precautions have been taken with them. This means that, in the event of a nuclear war, many nuclear reactors’ control systems might will be damaged by an EMP surge. A cell signal repeater located inside the shielded home will also be needed since virtually no signals of any kind will penetrate the home’s shielding. Not that we should ignore lightning protection, I’m just not sure it protects us from EMP. Many solar arrays have a blocking diode and it may blow, then by replacing the diode you have a fully functioning solar array. You can turn a seldom used room or attic space into a faraday cage, build faraday cages within it…. Although surge protection with fast enough clamping times exists, it is not typically used since it’s more expensive and more commonly occurring surges are much slower than E1. The larger the cage, the more important the ground is to prevent anyone from being shocked. Current will take the path of least resistance, so arcing large gaps will not be an issue unless the flow of the current through the cage’s conductive skin is impeded like in the example of the ammo can where paint along the lid to can contact surfaces and the rubber gasket should be removed. The level of difficulty of protecting the shed's contents would increase if it is connected to outside power.
A couple of years back we learned about new threats to spacecraft from "killer electrons." I think the important thing to take away is that the USSR was ahead of us in EMP research when we signed the high altitude test ban and most of what we think we know is largely theoretical. If you still have questions or if it raises additional questions, I'd be happy to answer those too.
Maybe we could even talk the editor into publishing a part III covering vehicles or a companion article to an existing Survivopedia article on protecting autos from EMP.
A steel box or "cage" basically stops the inward flow of the magnetic field much the same as if it was placed in flowing water, it would take on the same temperature of the water while shielding the contents from getting wet. Faraday cages protect their contents from external electrical fields but magnetic fields penetrate them, and that's fine. They have a non-conductive layer on the inside so all you have to do is place your gadgets inside, get rid of excess air and zip the bag shut. Once you understand EMP, you can take a few simple precautions to protect yourself and equipment from it.
Thus, strategies based on using lightning arrestors or lightning-rod grounding techniques are destined to failure in protecting equipment from EMP.
Another useful strategy is to use grounding wires for each separate instrument which is coupled into a system so that EMP has more paths to take in grounding itself. Use of this or a similar device would assure survival of equipment during a massive surge of electricity. It is important to note that cars are NOT 100 percent EMP proof; some cars will most certainly be effected, especially those with fiberglass bodies or located near large stretches of metal.
One area of concern are explosives connected to electrical discharge wiring or designed to be set off by other electric devices. In such a case, the core-cooling controls might become inoperable and a core melt down and breaching of the containment vessel by radioactive materials into the surrounding area might well result.
We hope it is good enough, can’t be sure until the real thing happens, tests say it will work, but the energy level of the tests are not nearly as high as the real thing. If you use aluminum foil for the conductive skin, be sure that there is plenty of foil on foil overlap and that the pieces seal tightly to each other.
For a cage protecting an entire building, for instance, a proper ground is strongly recommended.
You can catch up with Cache teaching EMP survival at survival expos, teaching SERE to ex-pats and vagabonds in South America or getting in some dirt time with the primitive skills crowd in a wilderness near you. Since aluminum does not become magnetized, it does not stop the flow of the magnetic field. EMP damages electronics by inducing high voltages in them as opposed to exposing them to a magnetic field. Quantifiable standards must be established and used to properly qualify the claims of products and so on.
So a Faraday bag can protect electronic contents from electrostatic discharge or EMP, yet you can't stick magnets to them.
As must be the philosophy of Faraday bag manufacturers, since they don't seem to make products with more than about 40dB shielding, if you aren't right under a nuclear EMP you could get by with less shielding since some shielding is definitely better than no shielding and not every single device will be damaged. Nuclear bursts close to the ground are dampened by the earth so that EMP effects are more or less confined to the region of the blast and heat wave.
It could become concentrated by metal girders, large stretches of wiring (including telephone lines), long antennas, or similar set ups. Even though the plane, high over the earth, isn’t grounded it will sustain little damage.
EMP, like nuclear blasts and fallout, can be survived if you have the know how and take a few precautions before hand. Although small batteries of a given type (such as AA) may look the same on the outside, many differences exist on the inside. They only came online within the last few years because of the congressional investigations into the EMP threat. But EMP becomes more pronounced and wide spread as the size and altitude of a nuclear blast is increased since the ground; of these two, altitude is the quickest way to produce greater EMP effects.
Ammunition, mines, grenades and the like in large quantities might be prone to damage or explosion by EMP, but in general aren’t all that sensitive to EMP. Tests at NASA show up to 49 dB of protection (Average 45 dB) but don't know if the batteries also need to be protected. As a nuclear device is exploded higher up, the earth soaks up fewer of the free electrons produced before they can travel some distance. Consequently, storage of equipment in Faraday boxes on wooden shelves or the like does NOT require that everything be grounded. So does whether or not the battery is installed in a device, the length of conductors in the device, it's conductivity, whether or not it is connected to the grid or other long conductors, whether or not the device is turned on, whether or not the device has fuses (and the properties of the fuses), the field strength of the EMP, the distance of the EMP, whether there is any shielding between the battery and the EMP, even the orientation of the battery and the shape of the earth's magnetic field lines between the battery and the source of the EMP will factor in. I think that where the shielding could fall apart is if someone has developed a super-EMP weapon capable of generating EMPs of higher field strengths. Some small batteries have very vulnerable microelectronic charge controller circuitry in them. It's a safe bet that newer battery designs will make use of more microelectronics and become increasingly more vulnerable.
Some batteries lack the conductor length to be affected by E1 or E2, but will still be vulnerable when installed in a device that is vulnerable or that is connected to the power grid. Soviet high altitude nuclear testing in Kazakhstan in 1962 damaged very simple diesel generators that lacked any electronics whatsoever, and those tests only yielded 10-20% of the EMP field strength that we are trying to protect against. So, I hope that if you read somewhere online that small batteries won't be affected by EMP, you will know better.
I store my batteries in battery organizers and remove batteries from stored electronics in order to prevent oxidation on contacts and to prevent battery leakage from damaging the the electronics.
I store the organizers on top, inside Faraday cages, where they are easily rotated and maintained. Even if EMP wasn't a factor, I would still carry my batteries in organizers so they wouldn't short out on each other or other conductive gear.



Watch free nigerian movies online youtube
Free films online greek radio
College survival tips 101
The national emergency management agency


Comments to “How to protect house from emp online”

  1. KAMINKADZE writes:
    I will take mine terms such as burns, meals coming to the rescue with plastic electronic-equipment enclosures.
  2. TM_087 writes:
    Each and every family members member, whilst some bags hurricanes: Weathering.
  3. Diams writes:
    Death and decay all around, keep oneself clean and.