Can tension cause tinnitus 2014,sudden hearing loss out of one ear 2014,vintage costume jewelry logos,wellbutrin xl ringing in ears 900s - Downloads 2016

GOFAR Services, LLC - Appliance Repair Houston, TX - Chapter 7MAYTAG "NEWTON" MACHINES (for Maytag Performa and Atlantis models,see Chapter 7a)NOTE: Chapter 2 covers problems common to almost all washer designs.
THIS chapter covers only diagnosis and repairs peculiar to CERTAIN Maytag-designed machines.
If you do not read Chapter 2 thoroughly before you read this chapter, you probably will not be able to properly diagnose your machine!!!!7-1 BASIC OPERATIONThe design uses a reversing motor, which is belted to both the pump and the transmission, using two different belts.
If you do not read Chapter 2 thoroughly before you read this chapter, you probably will not be able to properly diagnose your machine!!!!Speed Queen has undergone several major design changes in the past few years. If you do not read Chapter 2 thoroughly before you read this chapter, you probably will not be able to properly diagnose your machine!!!!The Whirlpool belt-driven design is well over thirty years old.
Parts for the old (pre-1980) fluid drive machines are generally not available anymore, and they are no longer economical to repair, so they are no longer included in this manual. When viewed from the top, the motor turns clockwise for the agitation cycle, and counterclockwise for the spin cycle.
When ordering or buying parts, it is wise to bring with you the production number, found on the nameplate along with the model number.
Fortunately, having been around for so long, the peculiarities of the design are pretty well known.3-1 BASIC OPERATIONThe design uses a single direction motor, with solenoids to engage and disengage the agitate and spin cycles and pump.
To replace the rollers, remove the drum as described in section 3a-3. 2) No heat, caused by a broken ignitor. During agitation, the brake keeps the transmission casing from turning, and the drive pulley turns the transmission shaft. Might save you a trip. Even among the new style machines, there have already been two MAJOR design changes. During the spin cycle, the brake releases and the whole transmission starts slowly spinning around. Inside the tub, they went from the old-style agitator post and drive block (similar to those found on the old fluid drive machines) to a short-shaft air-bell agitator connection. If the belt breaks, the motor will not run.   If you hear a loud, regular clackety-clacking as the dryer drum is turning, and you do not have any metal zippers or buttons inside the drum, some coins may have gotten inside the vanes.
At the end of the spin cycle, the motor stops and the brake brings the basket to a stop. In the late '80's, Maytag redesigned the transmission.
The result is the "orbital" transmission, which has just a few moving parts and is serviceable in the machine. After that, the pump was driven directly off the bottom end of the motor shaft; these are commonly referred to as "direct drive" machines. Remove the screws that hold the vane in place and remove any coins that have gotten in the vanes. 3a-3 CABINET ACCESS and DRUM REMOVALFigure WA-2 shows how to remove the cabinet access panels on this machine. Slippage in the belt, allowed by the tensioner, permits a "pre-pump" action, allowing the basket to come slowly up to speed. The bottom of the transmission casing is connected to a brake.
Springs attached to the motor mounting plate keep tension on the belts. The pump reverses with the motor, but there is no recirculation. During the agitate cycle, the brake engages and prevents the transmission casing (and thus the basket) from turning.
The front bulkhead and drum can then be easily removed. The four drum support rollers will now be easily accessible. Follow the safety precautions described in section 1-4(2).To open the front of the cabinet, remove the two screws at the bottom of the front panel. The timer and most other switches can then be removed by opening the console and removing the switches' terminals and appropriate mounting screws or nuts. However, some switches on late model machines are different. The cam bar moves towards the front of the washer, pushing the clutch bar and yoke upwards.
Oil tends to attract dust and lint, and over-oiling them can actually shorten the life of them. While you have the dryer dismantled, vacuum out all the dust you can. Also, it's a good idea to replace the belt and belt tensioner whenever you have the dryer dismantled to this point. In order to diagnose these machines, you need to keep the lid up far enough to look inside, without tripping the lid switch. When the drum and front bulkhead are in place, make sure the belt is flat on the drum and closely line up the belt on on the old belt skid mark on the drum.
To tension the belt, make a loop of belt and stick it under the tensioner as shown in figure WA-3. Push the tensioner with your thumb and slip the belt loop around the motor pinion with your fingers.
Figure WA-3 is a little misleading; the belt, pulley and pinion are on the backside of the motor. The water displaces the oil and forces it out through the seal and into the clothes.If you want to keep the machine, the transmission must be replaced. But this is the direction you will be pushing the idler with one hand, so the process was shown this way for clarity. After installing the dryer front, roll the dryer drum around several times by hand.
This is a difficult and expensive repair, often costing more than 200 dollars just for parts. You may want to price out the job before you start and decide whether it might be more worthwhile to just replace the machine.
Also check to see that the switch striker is not broken off. If this doesn't solve the problem, test for power at the left (spin) wigwag solenoid when in the spin cycle. The thermal fuse is in series with the drive motor and will shut it off if the exhaust air is too hot. Replace as described in section 7-10. With the machine in "spin," look at the pump pulley beneath the machine with a mirror.
The easiest way to do this is to unplug the washer and switch the red and yellow wigwag leads as shown in figure W-6. The thermistor is actually a variable resistor (see section 2-4(c) that controls the operating temperature of the air inside the drum. The two on the heater box are a high-limit thermostat and a thermal cut-off. If it is spinning, but water is not pumping, check for a clog in the hose between the tub and pump. Both prevent overtemperature of the drum by cutting off the heater in the event of overheat. If you hear the motor buzzing, but it doesn't start in either or both directions, test the capacitor (if any) and starting switch as described in sections 2-6(e) and 7-8.
Test the switch as described in sections 3-4 and 2-6(b). Often one of the wigwag wires will break, usually very near the wigwag itself. If it does start with the load removed, turn the pump and transmission pulleys by hand, in both directions, to see which is locked up. Test for continuity through the spin solenoid circuit of the timer as described in section 2-6(c). Note that the transmission pulley will normally be very stiff when turning it in the clockwise direction, as you look at the bottom of the washer.6) If the washer spins but does not agitate, check the agitator splines as described in section 7-11.
If the motor turns with no load, check the drive pulley and pump pulley to see which is locked.


Sometimes the pump can get siezed up pretty good on the motor shaft and make the pump difficult to remove. See section 7-13.7-4 PUMP AND PUMP BELTRemove the pump belt and check to see if the pump will turn freely by hand. Wiggle it just a little if you must.When you put the new pump back on the motor, make sure the belt goes around the pulley and straddles the rear pump mounting leg. Make sure the belt is positioned inside the idler, and slip the belt around the transmission pulley.
Please read this entire section and determine which you have before trying to remove the agitator, or you may damage the machine, or even yourself!EARLY TWO-BELT "LONG-SHAFT" MACHINESThe early two-belt machines had an agitator post and drive block. Also, it's a good idea to replace the belt and belt tensioner whenever you have the dryer dismantled to this point. I have found it just as easy to take your belt off, slip it around the underside of the agitator and tug sharply upwards on the belt.
See section 3-15. If the centerpost (spin tube) bearings are worn, replacing the basket drive will not solve your noise problem.
You will need to call a qualified service technician to replace the bearings, or simply junk the washer. Be careful when you do this, or the agitator may hit you in the face when it pops off!Figure SN-8: Agitator Removal and Drive BellOnce you've got the agitator off, you'll see the small plastic drive bell.
If the machine is making a squealing or groaning noise, the problem is more likely to be the basket drive. Test as described in section 2-6(e). Maytag motors have a piggyback centrifugal starting switch. If it is more like a rattling sound, the centerpost bearings are probably worn out.A secondary check is to look at the clutch lining.
It also traps air beneath it and keeps water away from the seal and out of the transmission. It is critically important that this "O"-ring or plug be in good condition or water will get into the transmission and ruin it. To make matters worse, the motor wire colors do not always correspond with the colors marked on the switch. Whenever you remove the drive bell screw, replace the "O"-ring or plug.Once you remove the mounting screw, the drive bell can be difficult to get off. Whenever removing the motor or switch from the machine, mark which wires came off which of the switch terminals.Draw a picture if you must.
Make sure you differentiate in your notes between a motor wire and a wiring harness wire of the same color, and where each goes on the switch. If the drive motor does not start, try replacing the starting switch as described in section 2-6(e). The factory sells a special puller; however, since a new drive bell comes with the seal kit, I've found that it's cheaper and easier to chisel off the old drive bell. With a cold chisel, just cut two slots along the hub of the drive bell to loosen it from the splined shaft beneath. If the motor STILL doesn't start, replace it. To remove the motor, first remove power from the machine.
Be careful not to chisel anywhere near the screw threads, or you might damage them. Beneath the drive bell is a water seal.
Remove the plastic water shield from the motor, and mark and remove the wires. Remove the drive belts. The factory has a special tool to install it evenly, but if you're careful, you can do it by hand. However, most intermittent problems with these machines come from mechanical causes.For example, if the belt is loose, the machine may not spin sometimes, may not pump out at other times, and still other times it may not agitate. Remove the four motor baseplate screws and lift the motor and baseplate out of the machine. Installation is the opposite of removal. The solution is obviously to tighten the belt (or replace it if it is badly worn.) Another aggravating and difficult to diagnose symptom is caused by worn cam bars.
The new seal kit comes with pretty thorough instructions.8-6 BASKET REMOVAL AND TUB WATER SEAL REPLACEMENTIf you are replacing the tub water seal, make sure you get the upper seal kit and replace it, too. Make sure you check the box that the new motor comes in for a wiring diagram.7-9 TRANSMISSIONI do not recommend the novice trying to replace a transmission in a Maytag washer, for several reasons. Using a screwdriver, pop the tub ring clips holding the plastic tub ring to the top of the tub, slowly lifting up on the tub ring as you work your way around it. The bolt can be replaced without removing the transmission, but it's a real bear of a job.3-4 WATER LEVEL SWITCHThe water level switch is located in the control panel on top of the cabinet. And by the time you throw in a brake package, stem and seal kit, etc., it is usually just not worth it.
If both break, there will be NO tension on the belts and in addition, the motor shaft will probably be hitting the washer baseplate, causing a heck of a racket. The roller tracks can get clogged up with dirt, soap deposits or other obstructions.
Do not remove the hub nut.If you are replacing the tub water seal, you will need to remove the drive hub. The hub is held onto the top of the transmission casing by either a hex nut or a spanner nut.
Lubricate the rollers and tracks with a little wheel bearing grease. Examine the condition of each belt as described in section 2-5(a). Pump belt tension is explained in section 7-4.7-11 AGITATORMost Maytag washers have an agitator that lifts directly out. These models have a rubber stop ring around the agitator shaft at the bottom of the splines.
Note carefully the order and orientation in which things come off; there are some models out there with an parts that are slightly different than shown in Figure SN-9. If you have a standard frame timer, mark the timer wires before removing them, so you can get them on the correct terminals of the new timer.
The problem is holding the transmission and getting a good grip on and turning the pulley at the same time; once the brake starts to release, the transmission will be free to turn. Then once you get the brake released, the problem becomes holding it in that position while you replace the brake pads. Sometimes, the switch may burn out altogether and it will seem as if the machine isn't getting any power at all. The factory sells a tool for releasing the springs, but you can fashion one out of a coathanger, or simply remove one of the front springs and use the hook on it to remove the other springs. When you've got the springs off, disconnect the pressure hose from behind the tub.
Rock the tub forward and out of the machine and flip the module upside down. (Note: DO NOT lubricate the pivot friction pads!
Any lubrication on the friction pads will cause the machine to trip the out-of-balance switch too easily!) Disassembly of the module is pretty straightforward; see figure SN-10. However, there are one or two tips and tricks: Figure SN-10 Module AssemblyThe brake spring must be seated in the notch in the transmission casing. The factory makes a special tool for this; however, it is possible (but difficult) to get the spring on with a couple of flat-bladed screwdrivers. To remove the threaded cap or nut, hold the agitator (this will keep the driveshaft from turning) and unscrew. Figure W-13: Agitator Mounting Stud AccessBut what if the agitator splines are stripped?


I say buy the tool if it's available. Coat all transmission surfaces that contact the upper and lower bearings with an anti-sieze compound. You can hold the agitator all you want, and the shaft will keep turning with the nut or the threaded cap. Here's a good confirmation of a stripped spline.
For example, in some earlier models, a needle bearing was used in place of the thick and thin washers.
Block up the tub so the tub remains in line with the cabinet. Beneath the washer, in the center, is the brake package. The brake package changes the machine from the spin to the drain cycle and back when the motor reverses. It also brakes the spinning basket at the end of the spin cycle or when the lid is lifted. The brake lining is normally lubricated by a few drops of oil.
The nut will back off with each sweep of the agitator shaft. If you have a threaded cap, you can do the same thing by hand. If the lining gets too dry, it can start squeaking at the very end of the spin cycle, when it is braking the basket. YOU MAY HURT YOURSELF OPENING IT, AND IT IS IMPRACTICAL FOR YOU TO TRY TO REBUILD IT YOURSELF. BRAKE PACKAGE REMOVALRemove the center screw from the driveshaft. Simply twist the ring counterclockwise to remove. The air dome is the fitting that attaches the water pressure switch hose to the tub.
This will help you to thread the brake package into the base plate without cross-threading it. With the tub blocked up, grab the bottom of the transmission casing and move it by hand until you can slip the brake package onto the splines.
If you don't, you will be trying to overcome brake pressure to turn the package.Turn the transmission and brake package until the brake package is hand tight in the baseplate. Loosen the motor mounting bolts and remove tension from the belt. Lean the washer back against the wall, following the safety tips in section 1-4. Rocking the pump away from the drive belt will help disengage the belt, and also the pump lever from the cam bar. DO NOT MOVE THE PUMP LEVER YET.Check the belt for wear as described in section 2-5(a), especially for burned or glazed spots where it rode over the locked pump pulley or motor drive pulley. While holding the transmission so it doesn't turn, run the drive pulley up as tight as you can by hand onto the helical shaft.You will see a drive lug on the pulley that corresponds to the shaft drive lug. Replace the belt if it is worn, following the instructions in section 3-13. INSTALLATIONSet the pump lever in the same position as the pump that came out. Make sure the pump lever goes into the slot in the agitate cam bar, and install the mounting bolts. Then turn the pulley gently clockwise until you just barely begin to feel the brake spring pressure.The shaft lug should be at about 9 o'clock from the pulley lug. Tension the belt as described in section 3-13. 3-11 WIGWAG AND CAM BARSThe wigwag is located inside the back panel of the machine. If not, adjust the shaft lug on the splines. The idea is to get the pulley to bottom out on the helical drive shaft just as the drive lugs touch. If it is not correct, you will hear the drive motor bogging down and perhaps tripping on the overload during the agitation cycle.7-14 DAMPER PADSThe damper supports the weight of the water in the tub. Mark the position of the nuts on the three eyebolts (Figure M-15) and remove the bottom nuts.
Replace the setscrew, making sure it goes in the hole on the wigwag drive shaft, and tighten securely. Normally, you will not need to replace the plungers, even when you replace the wigwag.
This will remove spring tension on the tub centering springs.Lean the washer back against the wall at an angle. If you see that one is bent or the pin is badly worn, replace the plunger. The plungers can be quite difficult to replace. Place a 4x4 wood block directly underneath the transmission pulley and lower the machine onto the wood block. The pins that connect them to the cam bars are hardened and thus difficult to cut through. The first step is to remove power from the machine and cut through the pin.
Sometimes it's easier to hacksaw through the body of the yoke than to cut the pin. Once you've cut through the pin, remove the wigwag as described above and replace the plunger, using the instructions that come with the new plunger. It keeps the machine quieter. To replace the spin cam bar, you must drop the transmission slightly as described in section 3-13. To replace the agitate cam bar, you must remove the transmission as described in section 3-14.3-12 DRIVE MOTORSingle speed, two-speed and three-speed motors were used at different times in these washers. This may be the cause of the belt breaking.REPLACING THE BELTUnfortunately, the belt is not easy to replace on this machine.
To get the belt past the clutch shaft, you actually have to drop the transmission out slightly, and sometimes the transmission needs to be realigned afterwards. Hold the wigwag's "spin" plunger up and tap the spin cam bar towards the back of the machine. Then pull the transmission straight out until it stops against the bolts. 7) Remove the belt. The transmission should be just slightly loose, and all three bolts must be backed out the same amount. Set your washer upright and level. Make sure there is no water or clothes in the basket, and START THE WASHER IN THE SPIN CYCLE. Without moving the washer, tighten the three transmission mounting bolts beneath it as evenly as possible. The factory has a special tool to install it evenly, but if you're careful, you can do it by hand.
If you hear the motor buzzing, but it doesn't start in either or both directions, test the capacitor (if any) and starting switch as described in sections 2-6(e) and 7-8.
They are pretty standard items; most appliance parts dealers carry rebuilt Whirlpool transmissions in stock. If you wish, you can replace the cam bars, T-bearing and ball as insurance against future problems. Two points to remember in exchanging the parts: 1) The drive pulley is originally assembled with a drop of glue on the setscrew threads. You may need to heat the hub of the drive pulley with a torch to get the setscrew out. 2) To get the agitator cam bar out, you will need to lift the agitator shaft. The easiest way to do this is to remove the "T"-bearing ball and pry the shaft upwards with a screwdriver, as shown in Figure W-22. Installation is basically the opposite of removal. When disassembling, Note carefully the order and orientation of the parts you remove (draw pictures or take notes if you must!) so you can get them back on the same way.?Copyright 2011 GOFAR Services, LLC.
Sometimes, the switch may burn out altogether and it will seem as if the machine isn't getting any power at all.



Why is my ear vibrates with noise mp3
Tenis nike hypervenom
12.07.2014 admin



Comments to «Can tension cause tinnitus 2014»

  1. raxul writes:
    Vitamin and mineral deficiencies or taking worn you do not.
  2. RAMZES writes:
    Some thing which causes circulation.
  3. qedesh writes:
    And vasoconstriction are constructive reactions from the.
  4. Rocky writes:
    Intense calm and inner silence, whilst I carried on with sodium diet program for 30 years and.