New york city subway lines and stops working,subway surfers new york keys,used cars for sale yokosuka japan - PDF 2016

14.11.2013
The subway map is the key to understanding this most complex subway in the world, which has 26 separate lines and 468 stations. In short, a better-designed subway map will make our subway system more open and accessible. To understand the challenge of visually communicating New York's subway one must understand New York's unique geography and its street system, both of which have an impact on the mapping. Because New York City's subway generally follows its gridded street routes, there is a strong psychological link between the subway and the aboveground topography that is not found in a city like London. The Kick Map is a "hybrid" concept that resolves the 50-year debate between the exclusive use of either a diagrammatic or topographic mapping of the New York City Subway. The Kick Map's hybrid concept doesn't allow the strict dogma of either type to get in the way of the map's primary function: to display the whole system and its relation to the city as clearly as possible.
The Kick Map employs "route bends" in a subway line's route to signal to the user important aboveground road changes. Similarly in the Bronx, when the #4 train jumps from River Avenue to Jerome, this is clearly and simply shown. And the same holds true for the L line in Brooklyn as it travels along the major thoroughfares of Metropolitan Avenue to Bushwick Avenue and on to Harrison Street. Unlike the Vignelli map - where the positions of the stations and lines are distorted for pure graphic harmony - the Kick Map, while stylized for clarity, has stations that are "location accurate" i.e. The Kick Map also presents a comprehensive grid of major streets and avenues that intersect with all the station stops to help orient the rider to the stop and the streets above.
In short, the Kick Map empowers the map user to better understand the relation of a subway stop to the geography above it. The hybrid concept irons out the "kinks" of any single street as it would in a diagram map. Unlike the current MTA map, a single road's "wiggles" are straightened out as, for example, with Queens Blvd or the Grand Concourse.
The diagrammatic form allows for visual simplicity and a significant reduction in size as the biggest form of the Kick Map is only about two-thirds the size of the current one. The smallest versions still have complete transfer information and when folded can easily fit into a wallet.
While there are separate lines for each of the trains, they remain true to the existing MTA signage colors - for example the 1, 2, & 3 lines are all red; the A, C, & E lines all blue, and so on. Each station shows at a glance what train stops there and whether the train stops there all the time, stops only at peak hours, or stops only at off-peak hours. Each station shows the reader whether they have the ability to cross over to go in the opposite direction for free. Relevant station stops show wheelchair access and connections to commuter rail lines (PATH, Metro North, LIRR). Bus information is shown for highly trafficked destinations that are not served directly by the subway (the Javits Center, Riis Park, Orchard Beach, and LaGuardia Airport) to further discourage automobile use. In summary, the user-friendly Kick Map has been designed to encourage subway ridership, for both New Yorkers and visitors, and thereby to reduce automobile traffic, congestion, and pollution - not to mention confusion - in our great city. People have been dreaming of spanning the Narrows for several decades before the bridge was finally constructed. Giovanni da Verrazzano, who explored the shores of the North American continent in 1524, might have lent his name to the bridge which became the George Washington Bridge, a few decades before the Narrows Bridge was completed. The Florentine explorer had much symbolic value to Italian New Yorkers, and in 1960, the Italian Historical Society of America managed to convince Governor Nelson Rockefeller to apply the name to the brand new bridge about to go under construction. Milton Brumer is sometimes overshadowed by those two great icons of city building, but the chief engineer of the Verrazano-Narrows had worked with Ammann on almost every one of his projects and was probably more involved in the day-to-day operations than his boss. When it opened on November 21, 1962, the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world, so long, in fact, that bridge engineers had to take the curvature of the planet into account in its design. Three workers were killed during the construction of the bridge, including young Gerard McKee who fell to his death in an accident which could have been prevented. In building the Brooklyn anchorage, crews swept away the remainder of old Fort Lafayette, an entrenchment built during the War of 1812.
The opening of the bridge not only brought great pride to New York City, although a small number of protesters noted that the span did not have pedestrian walkways or bike paths (and it still doesn’t).
One hundred years ago today, the Detwiller & Street fireworks plant, located in the Greenville section of Jersey City, exploded in a horrible shower of fire and glass. But there was one huge difference between the 1907 Graniteville disaster and the 1914 Jersey City explosion — World War I.
This naturally leads to a more disturbing question — was the 1914 explosion sabotage by the German? That’s one suggestion according to a 1918 book The German Secret Service In America 1914-1918, listing a set of suspicious fireworks accidents in New Jersey before Oct. On July 30, 1916, a munitions depot on Black Tom pier in Jersey City was set ablaze by German agents.


And so it’s hard to read accounts of the Jersey City explosion from one hundred years ago and not imagine the possibility of sinister intention. As a resort and amusement mecca, the time of Staten Island’s South Beach has come and gone. Its doubtful this area will ever return to its glory days of the early 20th century when Happyland Amusement Park brought a bit of Coney Island magic to the shore. Here’s some views of South Beach and adjacent Midland Beach from early in the century and then some drastically different views from the 1970s.
Since Manhattan and Brooklyn developed as two separate cities before they were intertwined within consolidated New York City in 1898, it’s not surprising to see similar street names in both boroughs, deriving from different origins.
Henry Street (Manhattan) is named for Henry Rutgers, the Revolutionary War hero and the financial savior of Queen’s College in New Jersey, who thanked him by renaming themselves Rutgers College (later University). This of course the Henry Street of  Henry Street Settlement, the pivotal health and social services provider which opened on this street in 1895. Lady Middagh, as legend has it, wanted more colorful names for her neighborhood and led a movement to rename certain streets for pieces of fruit — which is why Brooklyn Heights has a Cranberry Street, an Orange Street and a Pineapple Street.
Despite her aversion to pompous street names, one street is actually named for her own family (Middagh Street) and, of course, one for her beloved doctor.
North Henry Street (Brooklyn) was just regular Henry Street in the independent town of Greenpoint. But according to this census report from 1930, Staten Island had a great many more streets named for Henry! In fact, Manhattan (comprising, with some areas north of the Harlem River, the city of New York) was in a bit of a battle with anti-consolidation forces, mostly in Brooklyn, who saw the merging of two biggest cities in America as the end of the noble autonomy for that former Dutch city on the western shore of Long Island. Midland Beach and adjacent South Beach were Staten Island’s answer to Coney Island and Rockaway Beach, back in the era before any of those amusement centers were officially a part of New York. Thanks to Ferris and the fame of the Chicago World’s Fair, nobody was calling them roundabouts by the start of the 20th century.
And by the way, Ferris’ original wheel, the one that was at the Chicago World’s Fair? We share a lot of the same needs as New Yorkers of the past, but we’ve just gotten better at hiding the unpleasant ones. But New Yorkers used to live with their water, contained in reservoirs meant to evoke might, sophistication and security. The Manhattan Company reservoir on Chambers Street was opened in 1801 and was quickly deemed inadequate. The public transportation of New York is suitable if you stay for a week or more in the city. The subway and local buses will help you to get to different points of interest in New York and its boroughs. Most of the subway lines run North to South and most of the bus lines in Manhattan go East to West.
The same subway lines with same colors have the same route in a large part of Manhattan, but are divided into sections for the boroughs of NYC (Queens, Bronx, Brooklyn, Staten Island and Harlem). You must take those trains if you want to go faster from the North to the South of Manhattan for example.
This MetroCard allows an unlimited number of subway and bus rides for a fixed price during 7 days.
If you decide to purchase a Pay-Per-Ride MetroCard, you can buy as many rides as you want, from $5 to $100 (if you purchase it at a Vending Machine).
At a Subway Station Booth, you may also purchase your MetroCard, but they only accept cash. In some subway stations you won’t find any Vending Machine or booth, look at the signs when going in the subway station! If you want to use your debit card, not from a US Bank, the machine asks for a ZIP Code (a local zip code). They are two different means of transportation and they don’t offer the same possibilities. Created with clarity and ease of use, it allows riders to navigate this vast system easily and without uncertainty. A well-designed map not only welcomes and empowers novices to use the subway but also encourages additional use for regular "home-to-work-only" commuters to use the subway for recreational destinations where they might otherwise take a car. There are four significant and conflicting aspects that make the New York City subway impossible to successfully map with just a diagrammatic or just a topographic format.
Any location - take 42nd Street and 7th Avenue as an example - places you in the grid, which makes it easy to judge distance and location. Both map types have inherent strengths and weaknesses in their attempts to translate the maze of this complex system.
It is designed with a combination of both diagrammatic and topographic features, thus enhancing the strengths and eliminating most of the weaknesses of both types.


For example, when the #6 train "jumps" across from Park Avenue to Lexington Avenue as it travels north, this is shown as a bend on the Kick Map as it would be in a topographic map. This is an important feature for there are 87 stations - 56 in Manhattan alone - that do not allow free access to cross over.
It is one of America’s greatest bridges and a graceful monumental presence in New York Harbor. Similar to the fate of Rockaway Beach, most of the amusements were gone by the 1970s,  Several sections of neighborhoods along the shore were gravely damaged in 2012 by Hurricane Sandy. And how, rather recently in fact, one of those boroughs would grow uncomfortable with the arrangement. Barnum, Mayor Michael Bloomberg yesterday announced plans to build the world’s largest Ferris wheel next to the ferry terminal on Staten Island. The very first Ferris wheel in the borough was constructed back in 1893, on the opposite shore in the old Midland Beach resort area.
The Staten Island resort area got its wheel the same year that George Washington Gale Ferris Jr. It was probably similar to Somers over roundabouts built on Asbury Park and Rockaway Beach, of wooden construction, about 50 feet in diameter with approximately 16 passenger chambers. The Ferris wheel hovered over Midland’s rows of bathing pavilions and beer gardens along the boardwalk and was joined by the Happyland amusement park in 1906.
There were actually plans to bring the wheel to Manhattan in 1894 and set it up — on Broadway! Today it’s named for Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, who lived nearby and frequently jogged around it.
If you’re going to the wrong direction, you will have to wait 18 minutes before re-using your Metrocard.
The doors do not open from outside so someone has to go through the turnstile with your MetroCard and then open the emergency exit door. Usually, you can save about 5-10 minutes with the taxi, but during peak hours the metro is much faster.
They are everywhere, you can take a ride wherever you want and mostly if you don’t want to walk. For this reason the design of the subway map can directly influence ridership numbers and can indirectly have an effect on New York's traffic congestion and pollution. Used alone, each makes the subway system very hard to understand for a surprising number of people.
One premise of the Kick "hybrid" map is that while most of the time a straight line is the easiest line to understand, there are important exceptions. Instead of having to read words to know when this "jump" occurs (as in the Vignelli map) the "route bend" itself communicates the change quicker and more accurately.
With all the non-subway information that the current MTA map does show - like the location of all the heliports in the city - it doesn't offer this simple but important piece of subway information indicating what station stop to get off to turn around in case you miss your stop.
However, despite strong support for the double Z version, the shorter spelling eventually won out. Or to put it another way, if the Narrows were drained, the towers would appear to slightly lean away from each other. Moses personally fought an effort to turn the fort into a night club and now had a hand in dismantling it entirely. Perhaps to nobody’s surprise, the construction company tasked with clearing away the old fort employed the son-in-law of Robert Moses. Henry, a prominent physician in the 1820s who treated the early aristocracy of Brooklyn Heights.
The amusement, called the New York Wheel, will stand 84 feet higher than a similar Ferris wheel in Singapore and also nods towards the London Eye, a ride built in 1999 that quickly became a centerpiece of British tourism.
Prisons are out on islands or in nondescript beige towers flaunting only the barest hint of iron bars.
Water towers dot the skyline, recalling romantic comic book landscapes, while water treatment plants, spread mostly through the outer boroughs, obviously do not. Many years later, was surrounded by Central Park and was later torn down to become the park’s Great Lawn. We don’t dress them up in Egyptian morbidity like the famous Tombs prison of Five Points.
Then there are the reservoirs, the grandest of these, the Jerome Park Reservoir in the Bronx, is a landmarked structure of enormous, albeit hidden, beauty.



Nyc subway map with tourist attractions
Amtrak o gauge model trains uk



Comments to «New york city subway lines and stops working»

  1. JEALOUS_GIRL writes:
    Area than I did in the HO setup.
  2. BIZNESMEN_2323274 writes:
    Private credit union and then a Chase platinum visa and one platform is divided in half find.
  3. 101 writes:
    Usually have the original grades amongst Bluefield and Norfolk - two pullers.
  4. Jale writes:
    Layout style application on their web site this pack of HO Scale.