How to know my idea number in ap,reverse lookup ip address to hostname query,reverse phone lookup 1800 numbers,how to find voter id number in india - Easy Way

25.07.2014
Anne Juliana Gonzaga became a Servant of Mary following the death of her husband, Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria in 1595, after receiving a vision of the Madonna, to whom her parents had prayed to cure her of a childhood illness? At Disputations this time, the 1940 BSI dinner photograph plus a new key to it, but there because the key -- though better than the one in my BSJ Christmas Annual -- is still incomplete, and potentially contentious in some cases. Received, from William Hyder BSI, a copy of a€?Aunt Claraa€? Clarified: Unearthing the Original Tune of a€?We Never Mention Aunt Claraa€? in the Year of Its 80th Anniversary. Read: in the January 6th Wall Street Journal, a€?Grappling With Historya€? about an a€?Artist and Empirea€? exhibition at Londona€™s Tate Gallery that would have had Dr.
Also read, at Arts & Letters Daily a few days ago, this review of Michael Dirdaa€™s latest book about books, from the Weekly Standard.
Next montha€™s BSI weekend will include the annual BSI Special Meeting at The Coffee House club on W.
On the 16th, I promised an announcement next time of something new coming to this website, something I hope of considerable interest to followers of the BSIa€™s history.
So Edgar Smith was a very familiar figure to the Irregulars of his era, and to readers of my BSI Archival History series so far. Eventually I hope to issue the completed entirety as another BSI Archival History volume in print, updated by additional research along the way, along with any information readers of the serialization may send me.
The final two essays about Conan Doyle biography from the second edition of my book The Quest for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Thirteen Biographers in Search of a Life. The next two essays about Conan Doyle biography from the second edition of my book The Quest for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Thirteen Biographers in Search of a Life.
The first two of half a dozen essays about Conan Doyle biography by me and other Baker Street Irregulars which constituted new material of a second edition, in 1997, of my 1987 book The Quest for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Thirteen Biographers in Search of a Life. New York in the summer of 1939: several minutes of lovely color movie of the city, filmed in 16mm Kodachrome by a French tourista€”my thanks to Susan Dahlinger BSI for sending it to me. Would a top executive of General Motors deign to see a fledgling, wet-behind-the-ears devotee of the Master?
As I entered I encountered two secretaries furiously typing with intense looks on their faces. During the time she was out of the outer office, I took a furtive glance at the papers being typed so assiduously.
Periodically during our meeting, one of the secretaries would pop in to check something in the BSJ copy, and to tell Mr. I was chatting with Russ Merritt BSI, professor of film at the University of California at Berkeley, about RKO Radio Pictures, my favorite movie studio of the 1930s and a€?40s, and telling him about H.
The next chapter of my Great Alkali Plainsmen history, this time about my own ten years running it from long distance, in Washington D.C.
Started, at Books, my 1988 history of The Great Alkali Plainsmen of Greater Kansas City, without which I would probably have never gotten into all this BSI history stuff. Russell Merritt BSI provided us a link to the podcast of the BBC Promsa€™ August 16th concert a€?Sherlock Holmes: a Musical Mind,a€? of music from Holmes movies and television from Basil Rathbonea€™s Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror to the present day. At Disputations, some thoughts prompted by my review of Russell McLauchlina€™s two books about what planted the seeds of Baker Street Irregularity in that first generation. At Essays, a 1996 Five Orange Pips paper about Richard Hughes, the legendary Australian foreign correspondent in East Asia, and The Baritsu Chapter he co-founded in 1948, with some additional material. A question from Nicholas Utechin BSI about the New Series BSJ in the early 1950s, and my answer at Ask Thucydides.
A retrospective review by me of two works by the late Russell McLauchlin BSI, founder of The Amateur Mendicant Society of Detroit. And some information below about the availability of my chronological BSI Archival History volumes, now that the first five and my BSJ Christmas Annual about the 1940 BSI dinner are out of print.
I was horrified, by the way, to see used copies of my historical novel Baker Street Irregular for sale for up to $188!A  Ita€™s still in print for less than a quarter of that! Ia€™ve been able to restore the photographs for my and David Galersteina€™s Spring 2004 Baker Street Journal article about Edgar W. A photograph of Jay Finley Christ has been added to my paper a€?Hounds Bounding: The Unleasing of Jay Finley Christa€? in the Essays section. If I were to describe vividly my reaction to reading Baker Street Irregular side by side with your volume of explanation, you would accuse me of gushing. First of all, you will be amused and proud to learn it was difficult to maintain my method of alternating chapter and notes.
You had hinted that there were many facts among the fiction, but I was still surprised by the extent of the truth of the story. Also at Reviews is one by Donald Yates BSI of Christopher Music BSIa€™s new book out of the Amateur Mendicant Society archives.
Under Essays, here, is a discovery about Christopher Morleya€™s hideaway office at 46 West 47th Street, New York, at which a great deal of literary work and management of the BSI was conducted from 1938 on. A long-time member of The Great Alkali Plainsmen of Greater Kansas City is University of Kansas film studies professor John Tibbetts, who has followed Sherlock Holmes in movies for many years. At Links are a new selection of current items along with some additions to the continuing list, notably the one for the late Donald Libeya€™s John H. Last time I reported below about this 1933 photograph of Chicago literary men at Schlogla€™s, which also appeared in the revived Saturday Review of Literature in January.
Starrett hoped Bob Casey would become a charter member of The Hounds of the Baskerville (sic) when it was founded in 1943, but it didna€™t happen. I have talked before (and will again) about Schlogla€™s, the teutonic Chicago restaurant on Wells Street that was the local Mermaid Tavern for its literary and journalistic circles, and for Vincent Starrett and The Hounds of the Baskerville (sic) what Christ Cellaa€™s was to Morleya€™s Three Hours for Lunch Club and the early BSI. When this book began to be written the hands of the big wall clock at Schlogla€™s had already advanced to half past two, and as I looked up at the great disc of the pendulum, somnolently swinging back and forth like an animated moon, I saw reflected within its highly polished surface a merry and leisurely company that gave no signs of going home.
We may never recover that copy of the book, but we shall speak again, and again, of Schlogla€™s.
In the revived organ featured below, I write about the New York Police detective who protected Christ Cellaa€™s speakeasy while the BSI gestated there, and why he said a€?To hell with Sherlock Holmes!a€? in his 1930 book You Gotta Be Rough (published by a charter member of the BSI). And in the article I wondered: a€?Did Mike Fiaschetti ever sit at that table in Christ Cellaa€™s kitchen while Chris Morley was there with his friends gassing about Sherlock Holmes? THE Cavaliere Fiaschetti, Chevalier of the Crown of Italy, otherwise Big Mike ofA the New York Police Department, found the right collaborator when he narrated his memoirsA to Prosper Buranelli. I take it as proven that Mike Fiaschetti, former chief of the Italian Squad in the New York Police Department, is a rattling good narrator, and Mr. His account of the detective business is rather different from the romantic fictioneera€™s.
Natural shrewdness, obstinacy, and guts are presumably the foundation qualities for detecting, as most likely for anything else; but the central necessity, according to Mike Fiaschetti, is a wide acquaintance among stool pigeonsa€”i. I was interviewed yesterday by a researcher at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government for a case study on the role weblogs played in the downfall of Trent Lott. Another cool thing about driving to NY is when you get close enough to see big green Interstate highway signs that say New York City. We're getting close to June 14, when, last year, to people who read this site I just disappeared. Ed Cone links to a story from Mark Tosczak, a NY Times stringer, on getting credit for his work.
I've given Tim Bray his share of grief, but in this piece about the state of CSS, he nails it. Four years ago: "Salon (justifiably) brags that they've matured to the point where they could send a reporter to Yugoslavia.
Cory Doctorow reports on an Apple update that makes it so that iTunes can only stream to people on the same subnet. On Thursday I'm giving a keynote at the Open Source Content Management conference, or OSCOM.
There's been a bit of discussion about my last DaveNet piece, mostly users talking about what they're willing to pay, as if they have all the power.
The power of the software developer not to develop is largely silent, so people don't consider it.
A professional software organization for a well-supported product has 10-20 people, maybe as many as 30 to 40. Let's say you spend 100 hours a year using a piece of software and assume your time is worth $50 per hour. I don't know if this means anything but there are no stories on Google News about Colorado Governor Bill Owens's veto of the state "Super-DMCA" law. Robert Wiener writes to say that searching for Colorado and veto gets a bunch of hits on Google. Speaking of Google, I was kind of bored and wanted to see how my investment in John Doerr was doing, so I fired up Google, and lo and behold, my story is #3.
I wonder why some weblogs so openly say things that are just plain wrong, that are so easily refuted, without presenting the opposing data, or even suggesting it might exist with a disclaimer like imho, or ymmv, or ianal. Most places I don't expect journalism, but some places I do, and they disappoint often enough to make it noteworthy. One thread on a respected blogger's site gives the whole weblog tools market to one of the companies. BBC: "Jodi Plumb, 15, from Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, was horrified to discover an entire site had been created to insult and threaten her.
Ellen Ullman: "To listen to Mr Engelbart that day almost five years ago was to realize that the computer industry, when it started, was not simply about becoming a chief executive or retiring on stock options at 35. Sjoerd: "It is noisy outside, and 2 riot police cars are racing by, because ADO Den Haag has won the 1st division soccer leage.
Flying over Boston or NY it's astonishing how much real estate is used to house dead people.
I was sitting in a law school cafeteria yesterday thinking how far away I was from the threat of terrorism. Ben Edelman, a Harvard Law student and fellow at Berkman, has been studying Gator, one of the leading advertising servers.
Marketing Profs: "Blogs offer the human voice, which can be loud, controversial, and even wacky.
A few people have suggested asking people to send Google API keys they aren't using and rotate them to work around the fatal flaw.
BTW, some people said the Nikon took better pics than the Sony I use now, but I don't think so.
Evan Hansen: "Paralyzed by fears of piracy, the record labels have taken years to get their act together for online distribution. Bloki is "a Web site on which you can create Web pages, right in your browser, with no additional software required. Microsoft's decision to support RSS without arguing over what it is looks smarter every day. Scoble, who works at Microsoft now, says he likes using a desktop app to write his internal weblog. Disclaimer: I've been trying to work on weblog-tool compatibility issues with Google for the last few weeks.
DESCRIPTION: This is the largest map of its kind to have survived in tact and in good condition from such an early period of cartography.
These place names are in Lincolnshire (Holdingham and Sleaford are the modern forms), and this Richard has been identified as one Richard de Bello, prebend of Lafford in Lincoln Cathedral about the year 1283, who later became an official of the Bishop of Hereford, and in 1305 was appointed prebend of Norton in Hereford Cathedral.
While the map was compiled in England, names and descriptions were written in Latin, with the Norman dialect of old French used for special entries. Here, my dear Son, my bosom is whence you took flesh Here are my breasts from which you sought a Virgina€™s milk.
The other three figures consist of a woman placing a crown on the Virgin Mary and two angels on their knees in supplication.
Still within this decorative border, in the left-hand bottom corner, the Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus is enthroned and crowned with a papal triple tiara and delivers a mandate with his seal attached, to three named commissioners. In the right-hand bottom corner an unidentified rider parades with a following forester holding a pair of greyhounds on a leash.
The geographical form and content of the Hereford map is derived from the writings of Pliny, Solinus, Augustine, Strabo, Jerome, the Antonine Itinerary, St.
As is traditional with the T-O design, there is the tripartite division of the known world into three continents: Europe, Asia, and Africa. EUROPE: When we turn to this area of the Hereford map we would expect to find some evidence of more contemporary 13th century knowledge and geographic accuracy than was seen in Africa or Asia, and, to some limited extent, this theory is true.
France, with the bordering regions of Holland and Belgium is called Gallia, and includes all of the land between the Rhine and the Pyrenees. Norway and Sweden are shown as a peninsula, divided by an arm of the sea, though their size and position are misrepresented.
On the other side of Europe, Iceland, the Faeroes, and Ultima Tile are shown grouped together north of Norway, perhaps because the restricting circular limits of the map did not permit them to be shown at a more correct distance. The British Isles are drawn on a larger scale than the neighboring parts of the continent, and this representation is of special interest on account of its early date. On the Hereford map, the areas retain their Latin names, Britannia insula and Hibernia, Scotia, Wallia, and Cornubia, and are neatly divided, usually by rivers, into compartments, North and South Ireland, Wales, Cornwall, England, and Scotland. THE MEDITERRANEAN: The Mediterranean, conveniently separating the three continents of Asia, Africa and Europe, teems with islands associated with legends of Greece and Rome. Mythical fire-breathing creature with wings, scales and claws; malevolent in west, benevolent in east. 4.A A  For bibliographical information on these and other (including lost) cartographical exemplars, see Westrem, The Hereford Map, p. 10.A A  For bibliographical information for editions and translations of the source texts, see Westrem, The Hereford Map, p. 11.A A  More detailed analysis of these data can be found in my a€?Lessons from Legends on the Hereford Mappa Mundi,a€? Hereford Mappa Mundi Conference proceedings volume being edited by Barber and Harvey (see n.
16.A A  Danubius oritur ab orientali parte Reni fluminis sub quadam ecclesia, et progressus ad orientem, . 23.A A  The a€?standarda€? Latin forms of these place-names and the modern English equivalents are those recorded in the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World, ed. From the time when it was first mentioned as being in Hereford Cathedral in 1682, until a relatively short time ago, the Hereford Mappamundi was almost entirely the preserve of antiquaries, clergymen with an interest in the middle ages and some historians of cartography. FROM THE TIME when it was first mentioned as being in Hereford Cathedral in 1682, until a relatively short time ago, the Hereford Mappamundi was almost entirely the preserve of antiquaries, clergymen with an interest in the middle ages and some historians of cartography. Details from the Hereford map of the Blemyae and the Psilli.a€? Typical of the strange creatures or 'Wonders of the East' derived by Richard of Haldingham from classical sources and placed in Ethiopia.
Equally important work was also being done on medieval and Renaissance world maps as a genre, particularly by medievalists such as Anna-Dorothee von den Brincken and Jorg-Geerd Arentzen in Germany and by Juergen Schulz, primarily an art historian, and David Woodward, a leading historian of cartography, in the United States. The Hereford World Map is the only complete surviving English example of a type of map which was primarily a visualization of all branches of knowledge in a Christian framework and only secondly a geographical object. After the fall of the Roman empire in the 5th century, monks and scholars struggled desperately to preserve from destruction by pagan barbarians the flotsam and jetsam of classical history and learning; to consolidate them and to reconcile them with Christian teaching and biblical history.


There would have been several models to choose from, corresponding to the widely differing cartographic traditions inside the Roman Empire, but it seems that the commonest image descended from a large map of the known world that was created for a portico lining the Via Flaminia near the Capitol in Rome during Christ's lifetime.
Recent writers such as Arentzen have suggested that, simply because of their sheer availability, from an early date different versions of this map may have been used to illustrate texts by scholars such as St. Eventually some of the information from the texts became incorporated into the maps themselves, though only sparingly at first. A broad similarity in coastlines with the Hereford map is clear in the Anglo-Saxon [Cottonian] World Map, c.1000 (#210), but there are no illustrations of animals other than the lion (top left). The resulting maps ranged widely in shape and appearance, some being circular, others square. A few maps of the inhabited world were much more detailed, though keeping to the same broad structure and symbolism. Most of these earlier maps were book illustrations, none were particularly big and the maps were always considered to need textual amplification. From about 1100, however, we know from contemporary descriptions in chronicles and from the few surviving inventories that larger world maps were produced on parchment, cloth and as wall paintings for the adornment of audience chambers in palaces and castles as well as, probably, of altars in the side chapels of religious buildings.
A separate written text of an encyclopedic nature, probably written by the map's intellectual creator, however, was still intended to accompany many if not all these large maps and one may originally have accompanied the Hereford world map.
These maps seem largely to have been inspired by English scholars working at home or in Europe. The most striking novelty, however, was the vastly increased number of depictions of peoples, animals, and plants of the world copied from illustrations in contemporary handbooks on wildlife, commonly called bestiaries and herbals. Mentions in contemporary records and chronicles, such as those of Matthew Paris, make it plain that these large world maps were once relatively common. At about the same time that this map was being created, Henry III, perhaps after consultation with Gervase, who had visited him in 1229, commissioned wall maps to hang in the audience chambers of his palaces in Winchester and Westminster. The Hereford Mappamundi is the only full size survivor of these magnificent, encyclopedic English-inspired maps. An inscription in Norman-French at the bottom left attributes the map to Richard of Haldingham and Sleaford.
Smith a€“ Ia€™m loath at this point to call it a biography, hence the title that Ia€™ve adopted -- has been a work in progress a long time: too long, as other books and the irregularities of life had to be given priority at different times. Smitha€™s ancestry, parents and birth, his growing up and early education in Brooklyn, early work in business along with college by night school, and the World War.
Smith that, by the way, when he was finished with the present interview, he might wish to return calls from the CEO of General Motors and the Secretary of Commerce.
The next several weeks were spent happily reading and rereading the manuscript and the books Mr. I did not find any copies there of Irregular Memories of the a€?Thirties, which has always been the scarcest. Conan Doyle, Nineteenth Century Mana€? from the 2014 Saturday Review of Literature, and a€?The Hound Upon My Bookshelf,a€? my essay about the great BSI and collector Vincent Starretta€™s first edition of The Hound of the Baskervilles, from The Caxton Cluba€™s 2011 volume of essays Other Peoplea€™s Books.
It was a thoroughly engrossing experience, and now I want other authors to supply me with a side volume for my favorite books, though many of them are dead. I have read the novel twice already, but several times in this reading I noticed I was in the second or even third chapter before I returned to the notes -- your plot still pulled me insistently along. I hope everyone will enjoy Sources and Methods, and Baker Street Irregular as well even more. Don Yates was active in this superlative scion society himself for many years, and out of his personal archives has provided a 1955 Detroit Free Press photostory about the AMS.
It appears here in the form it took for a handout at the May 5, 2015, Morley Birthday Lunch of The Grillparzer Club of the Hoboken Free State.
Schlogla€™s was for Vincent Starrett what Christ Cellaa€™s speakeasy in New York was for Christopher Morley, and it was a favorite of Morleya€™s as well.
Grotesque and disproportionate the scene, distorted in this concave mirrora€”a strip of olive-colored ceiling above and a flare of light from cut-glass chandeliers, then a strip of brown which I identified as the paintings indigenous to a tavern, then tables and chairs, and men bent over the polished wood in all sorts of easy attitudes. Between thema€”I like to imagine them sitting down for long evenings over plentiful ravioli and asti spumantea€”they have put together a grand book.
Buranellia€™s skill and charm have made this a€?essay in constabulary biographya€? a work of eminent satisfaction.
He tells how he first got into the police by cribbing from a young Irishman who sat next to him in examination. There's something for everyone, whether you like Bill Gates or Richard Stallman, or neither. Bragg's colleagues on the national staff had exchanged phone calls and e-mail messages, angered by comments from Mr. As OSCOM starts, the issues of interop betw content management tools is very hot in the open source world thanks to work by Paul Everitt and Gregor Rothfuss. Using my wingy-dingy new search engine, I found a great reference, a mini-article entitled Oh Lieberman, which should have been entitled Oy Lieberman. Sure the original author may toil at a money-losing labor-of-love long past the point where it has been proven not to be viable, but what about the people he or she is not hiring, the manual writers, testers, more programmers, a sales person, a marketing person perhaps, to work on ease of use and to keep the website current. So when you hear yourself complaining about software quality, think about how much money the developer of the product has to fully support it. They link to one press release from the Music Indistry (sic) News Network commending the governor for the veto. BTW, I wasn't thinking Google might have been holding back, I was thinking the newspapers were.
Microsoft's developer program was kaput, everyone who was anyone wanted to develop for the Web, and that led them to Netscape and Sun, and away from Microsoft. Being in a dead software market is no fun, even when you haven't signed on with the dying platform vendor. He's got a Web app that simulates a Gator client, and sends messages back to Gator asking for ads to display on certain sites.
Somehow MS has taught its people not to care about issues that are not related to success or failure of products.
I've noticed that it colors how I think about them, not in a positive way, and felt I should disclose that, since I write about them here on Scripting News.
The circle of the world is set in a somewhat rectangular frame background with a pointed top, and an ornamented border of a zig-zag pattern often found in psalter-maps of the period (#223). Show pity, as you said you would, on all Who their devotion paid to me for you made me Savioress. Olympus and such cities as Athens and Corinth; the Delphic oracle, misnamed Delos, is represented by a hideous head.
James (Roxburghe Club) 1929, with representations from manuscripts in the British Library and the Bodleian Library, and a€?Marvels of the Easta€?, by R. The upper-left corner of the Hereford Map, showing north and east Asia (compare to the contents on Chart 3). 1), however, call attention to a remarkable degree of accuracy in the relationship of toponymsa€”for cities, rivers, and mountainsa€”both in EMM and in Hereford Map legends.A  On the Asia Minor littoral, for example, one passage in EMM links 39 place-names in a running series, 23 of which are found in Chart 4 (and visible, in almost exactly parallel order, on Fig.
5, above).A  Treating islands separately from the eartha€™s three a€?partsa€? follows the organizational style adopted by Isidore of Seville, Honorius Augustodunensis, and other medieval geographical authorities. Note Lincoln on its hill and Snowdon ('Snawdon'), Caernarvon and Conway in Wales, referring to the castles Edward I was building there when the map was being created.
In England, a detailed study of its less obvious features, such as the sequences of its place names and some of its coastal outlines by G. The Psilli reputedly tested the virtue of their wives by exposing their children to serpents. The cumulative effect has been to enable us at last to evaluate the map in terms of its actual (largely non-geographical and not exclusively religious) purpose, the age in which it was created and in the context of the general development of European cartography. The Old and New Testaments contained few doctrinal implications for geography, other than a bias in favor of an inhabited world consisting of three interlinked continents containing descendants of Noah's three sons. This now-lost map was referred to in some detail by a number of classical writers and it seems to have been created under the direction of Emperor Augustus's son-in-law, Vipsanius Agrippa (63-12 BC) for official purposes. As the centuries went by, more and more was included with references to places associated with events in classical history and legend (particularly fictionalized tales about Alexander the Great) and from biblical history with brief notes on and the very occasional illustration of natural history. Note also the Roman provincial boundaries, the relative accuracy of the British coastlines (lower left) and the attention paid to the Balkans and Denmark, with which Saxon England had close contacts.
Some, often oriented to the north, attempted to show the whole world in zones, with the inhabited earth occupying the zone between the equator and the frozen north.
They were never intended to convey purely geographical information or to stand alone without explanatory text. Often a 'context' for them would have been provided by the other secular as well as religious surrounding decorations.
For many maps continued to be used primarily for educational, including theological, purposes. They reached their fullest development in the thirteenth century when Englishmen like Roger Bacon, John of Holywood (Sacrobosco), Robert Grosseteste and Matthew Paris were playing an inordinately large part in creative geographical thinking in Europe. In most, if not all of these maps, the strange peoples or 'Marvels of the East' are shown occupying Ethiopia on the right (southern) edge, as on the Hereford map.
Exposure to light, fire, water, and religious bigotry or indifference over the centuries has, however, led to the destruction of most of them. Both are now lost but it seems quite likely that the so-called 'Psalter Map', produced in London in the early 1260s and now owned by the British Library, is a much reduced copy of the map that hung in Westminster Palace. Despite some broad similarities in arrangement and content, however, there are very considerable differences from the Ebstorf and the 'Westminster Palace' maps in details - like the precise location of wildlife, the portrayal of some coastlines and islands, or in the recent information incorporated. I said that I would not think of asking, but he insisted on giving me a few recent examples of the Writings About the Writings, and then proceeded to hand me a typescript copy of his essay a€?The Adventure of the Worst Man in London,a€? which he signed. Smith had given me, and recounting to my associates in The Creeping Men my glorious encounter with this wonderful person. This week I cast a wider net, and did find one copy for sale at the Amazon website -- for an utterly appalling $2000 (plus shipping). This time, perhaps because I was reading with intent, I noticed how well you delineated among the Irregulars in the tone and rhythm of their speech. I was also impressed by the extent you used real events from [Elmer Davisa€™s] Office of War Information, and two types of cryptanalysis, sliding Woody into them neatly.
They might linger here for hours, unaware that the deepening gray outdoors was brought on by something more unalterable than soot; unmindful, too, of the pounding of iron wheels high up on iron trestles, or the clanging of street cars, or the churning roar of motor trucks.
I had explored them all and traveled up and down their carte du jour; I had indulged in delights gustatory and olfactory, and bewailing the fact that America had no cuisine worth the name, I had come back reluctantly only to find Schlogla€™s within three hundred yards of the desk where I performed my daily task. The portrait of Fiaschetti that emerges is attractive indeed: a€?a Renaissance bravo turned into a New York policeman,a€? with the vehement gestures of Italy and the hard jaw of a Center Street cop. To me it was the day I quit smoking, and also the day I checked into the hospital (when I wrote that post I didn't know for sure I'd have to go into the hospital, but I wasn't surprised when I did). In my talk yesterday I said this was a species of software developer with a lot of power, a beast of the 80s, extinct this century.
Before that I told the story of how XML-RPC came to be, and how Eric Raymond liked it so much. By making my position public about the equivalent issues in the weblog world, I will be joining with them in requesting that we put aside our differences (I'm not sure there are any) and establish a set of principles on how we build from here. Financiers invested, and gave back to the university so the next generation of technology entrepreneurs could be educated, nutured and launched." It wasn't clear that financiers invested in the companies started by the students, not in the work done at the universities. He met up with the proprietor of that site at a place in NYC called Alt.Coffee on Avenue A in Manhattan.
How about a couple of tech support people (so they can take a vacation once in a while, it's a tough job). When you buy a new computer you probably pay a few hundred dollars for software, most of it going to Microsoft.
How much self-respect is there in paying nothing for software that leverages so much of your time?
So even if you don't want to pay for the time-leverage software delivers, would you pay money to keep your money safe?
Is it based on features, or any deep understanding of how the products work, or the economics of the market? Hosting is a tricky business, as we found out, there are ISPs who now host MT sites that must somehow be included in their plans, yet there seems to be no mention of them in the FAQ. Here's how I like to look at it -- formats and protocols are tools, details; the important thing is functionality delivered to users.
In Phrygia there is born an animal called bonnacon; it has a bulla€™s head, horsea€™s mane and curling horns, when chased it discharges dung over an extent of three acres which burns whatever it touches. India also has the largest elephants, whose teeth are supposed to be of ivory; the Indians use them in war with turrets (howdahs) set on them.
The linx sees through walls and produces a black stonea€” a valuable carbuncle in its secret parts.
A tiger when it sees its cub has been stolen chases the thief at full speed; the thief in full flight on a fast horse drops a mirror in the track of the tiger and so escapes unharmed.
Agriophani Ethiopes eat only the flesh of panthers and lions they have a king with only one eye in his forehead.
Men with doga€™s heads in Norway; perhaps heads protected with furs made them resemble dogs. Essendones live in Scythia it is their custom to carry out the funeral of their parents with singing and collecting a company of friends to devour the actual corpses with their teeth and make a banquet mingled with the flesh of animals counting it more glorious to be consumed by them than by worms. Solinus: they occupy the source of the Ganges and live only on the scent of apples of the forest if they should perceive any smell they die instantly. Himantopodes; they creep with crawling legs rather than walk they try to proceed by sliding rather than by taking steps. The Monocoli in India are one-legged and swift when they want to be protected from the heat of the sun they are shaded by the size of their foot. Flint, a€?The Hereford Map:A  Its Author(s), Two Scenes and a Border,a€? Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 6th ser. Nevertheless, it placed a somewhat misleading emphasis on the map's geographical 'inaccuracies', its depiction of fabulous creatures and supposedly religious purpose, all clothed in what for the layman must have seemed an air of wildly esoteric learning and near-impenetrable medieval mystery. Recent research suggests this is a reference to African traders in medicinal drugs who visited ancient Rome. Today, with the map in the headlines of the popular press, it may be time to give a brief resume of what is currently known about it and to attempt to explain some of its more important features in the light of recent research. In the eyes of some (but by no means all) theologians, a fourth inhabited continent, the Antipodes, would implicitly have denied the descent of mankind from Noah, and the depiction of such a continent was deemed to be heretical by them. It was based on survey and on military itineraries and reflected the political and administrative realities of the time.
Where space allowed, reference was also made to important contemporary towns, regions, and geographical features such as freshly-opened mountain passes.
Most of the maps, however, like the Hereford Mappamundi, depicted only that part of the world that was known in classical times to be inhabited and they were oriented with east at the top.


Traces of the maps' classical origins could regularly be seen in, for instance, the continued depiction of the provincial boundaries of the Roman Empire (which are partly visible on the Hereford map) and for many centuries by the island of Delos which had been sacred to the early Greeks being the centre of the inhabited world.
They and the texts that they adorned continued to be copied by hand until late in the 15th century and are to be found in early printed books. God dominates the world and the 'Marvels of the East' occupy the lower right edge of the map, as they do on the Hereford map. Together they would have provided a propaganda backdrop for the public appearances of the ruler, ruling body, noble or cleric who had commissioned them, and some may have been able to stand alone as visual histories.
The Hereford map, as an inscription at the lower left corner tells us, was certainly intended for use as a visual encyclopedia, to be 'heard, read and seen' by onlookers. Because of the maps' size, they were able to include far more information and illustration than their predecessors.
More space was also found for current political references and information derived from contemporary military, religious and commercial itineraries. Today, the earliest survivor, dating from the beginning of the thirteenth century, is a badly damaged example now in Vercelli Cathedral, probably having been brought to Italy in about 1219 by a papal legate returning from England. We know from Matthew Paris that the Westminster map was copied by others, and it is likely to have had a lasting influence even though the original was destroyed in 1265. A Latin legend in the bottom right corner of the Hereford map refers to the 5th century Christian propagandist Orosius as the main source for the map, but as we have already seen, it incorporates information from numerous ancient and thirteenth century sources and adds its own interpretations of them. The map is an outstanding example of a map type that had evolved over the preceding eight centuries. Christopher Morley was a member of The Coffee House (founded 1915 by Vanity Fair editor Frank Crowninshield and literary friends of his), in the 1920s and early a€™30s before the Great Depression got him by the throat (and pocketbook). As much as that, I liked reading about the reasons that emerged for some of your choices -- it all made the novel much richer. They were placid and comfortable even as that old patron at the third table, un vieux, if ever there was one, who had sat in that self-same chair thirty years or so, save for the time lost in the distraction of home and business, partaking of his hasenpfeffer with paprika, etwas ganz feines, pulling lazily at his long filler havana, sampling now and then his goblet of RA?desheimer. Fiaschetti, who is still only in the middle forties, was the son of a Roman bandmaster and is himself a musician. We learn that false whiskers and the analysis of cigar ashes play comparatively little part in the grim routine. Indeed there is none of the Philo Vance esthete about Mike; this book would cause the cultured Vance many a painful shuddera€”partly, perhaps, because it is written so much better than any of Mr. You trade freedom for information, says Fiaschetti, and remarks with his seasoned wisdom of the world that freedom is always a valuable commodity. That's all there is to it, except when you really want to get it you should let just a hint of an R back.
Shortly after my reappearance, Seth Dillingham said something really nice and very memorable. Apparently he went over his allotted time, I wanted to ask him to comment on the opportunities for open source projects to integrate with commercial software.
I polished my skills as a user, and watched other people learn weblogs, saw what they got, and didn't.
Then I hazarded a guess that if Eric had dinner with Bob Atkinson, one of the co-designers of XML-RPC, that they'd agree on a lot, and probably enjoy each others' company, even though Bob is a senior guy at (you guessed it) Microsoft. I've tried to explain the issues in non-technical terms, yet of course as soon as words like APIs and XML appear a lot of ordinary people tune out. Some of them are great writers and have passion for the truth and aren't serving the same masters that the bigtimes at WSJ, NYT and CNN. It's about a 20-minute drive to the office, not as convenient as living in Cambridge, but very sweet.
If you pay nothing for software, you probably won't die from it, but you may lose data, you're virtually certain to waste time, and at some point, money.
I have data that contradicts theirs, fairly superficial stuff -- why, on investigation didn't they uncover it?
If there are any busdev people I need to talk with at Google, I guess now's the time to do that. From its literal meaning in Greek it also signifies the plant ox-tongue, so called from its shape and roughness of its leaves. Conventionally holds a mirror in one hand, combing lovely hair with the other According to myth created by Ea, Babylonian water god. The large city at the top edge is Babylon (its description is the map's longest legend [A§181). 12-30.A  The conservator Christopher Clarkson drew my attention to the gouge in the Mapa€™s former frame. Talbert (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000), which I employ throughout my book, but with the caution that in dealing with the manuscript culture of medieval Europe, it is misleading and anachronistic to speak of a€?standarda€? or a€?correcta€? spellings, especially of geographical words. Casual visitors to the dark aisle where it hung could see only a dark, dirty image which they were encouraged to view in a pious, but also rather condescending manner. Crone of the Royal Geographical Society, revealed that despite the antiquity of many of the map's sources much was almost contemporary with the map's creation and was secular.
Much of the text that follows is an amplification of information panels and leaflets prepared for the British Library's current display of the map.
Most medieval mapmakers seem to have accepted this constraint, but world maps showing four continents are not uncommon: notably the world maps created by Beatus of Liebana (#207) in the late 8th century to illustrate his Commentary on the Apocalypse of St. It may have incorporated information from an earlier survey commissioned by Julius Caesar and, to judge from some early references, it may originally have shown four continents. These texts owed much to classical writers, particularly Pliny the Elder (23-79), who himself derived much of his information from still earlier writers such as the fifth century BC Greek historian Herodotus.
As befitted the encyclopedic texts that they illustrated, the maps became visual encyclopedias of human and divine knowledge and not mere geographical maps. Many were purely schematic and symbolic, showing a T, representing the Mediterranean, the Don and the Nile, surrounded by an 0, for the great ocean encircling the world, sometimes with a fourth continent being added. It was only from about 1120 that Jerusalem took Oclos' place as the focal point of the map, as it does on the Hereford Mappamundi. They retained and expanded the geographical and historical elements of the older maps - coastlines, layout and place names on the maps frequently reveal their ancestry - but to them they added several novel features. Inscriptions of varying lengths amplified the pictures and sometimes contained references to their sources. Much better preserved, until its destruction in 1943, was the famous Ebstorf world map of about 1235. It is difficult to account otherwise for the striking similarities in detailed arrangement and content between the Psalter world map, the recently discovered 'Duchy of Cornwall' fragment (probably commissioned in about 1285 by a cousin of Edward I for his foundation, Ashridge College in Hertfordshire) and the Aslake world map fragments of about 1360.
In many of its details it particularly resembles the Anglo-Saxon World Map of about 1000 and the twelfth century Henry of Mainz world map in Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Thirty yearsa€”that went back almost to antiquity in Chicago, where the calendar began anno incendi, in fact this very house had remained unchanged since the day that it was reared upon smoldering embers and charred walls, and if one dug deep enough the spade would strike bricks and debris that are all that remain to tell of the great firea€”as in ancient Troy.
For sixteen years he was a New York police detective, and in his six yearsa€™ command of the Dago Squad he sent twelve murderers to the chair.
Also, reading the highway signs I kept seeing Oxford, which I wanted to write as a hex number: oXF08D.
And for sure, on May 31, 2002 I had chest pain, and was in denial on how sick I really was. I asked other people for ideas of what made weblogs different from professional pubs and Wikis. They still are, but after SOAP and XML-RPC they could just as easily be running on a server farm.
And most of them don't have websites, yet, largely because it is too complicated and expensive to have one.
And if you pay $10 or $20 to use a piece of software, the software isn't paid for if the software isn't generating enough money to be fully supported or developed.
Why don't a small number of users of the popular weblog tools work together to create an authoritative review of the category and show us how the products compare.
It takes better pictures than the Nikon if I actually have it with me when I see something photo-worthy. Unfortunately I don't have any money to pay them for this, but I'm afraid that's what they're going to want to talk about.
Crone points out that this reference has special significance because Augustus had also entrusted his son-in-law, M. Sometimes identified with Sirens, the mythical enchantresses along coasts of the Mediterranean, who lured sailors to destruction by their singing. Amazon means a€?without a breast,a€? according to tradition these women removed the right breast to use the bow. At the right edge, a looping line shows the route of the wandering Israelites in their Exodus from Egypt; it crosses the Jordan to the left of a naked woman who looks over her shoulder at the sinking cities of Sodom and Gomorrah in the Dead Sea (she is Lot's wife, turned into a pillar of salt [A§254]. 400), a text that was often attended during the Middle Ages by diagrammatic a€?mapsa€? illustrating the concept.A  See also David Woodward. Others delved into the question of its authorship, which had previously been assumed to be obvious from the wording on the map itself. The medievalized depiction on the bottom left corner of the Hereford world map of 'Caesar Augustus' commissioning a survey of the world from three surveyors representing the three corners of the world may be based on a muddled - and religiously acceptable - memory of these classical events.
Even though the inscriptions on the maps gradually became more and more garbled and the information more and more embellished, distorted, and misunderstood, they nevertheless retained their tenuous links with ancient learning.
More than simple geographical shorthand, such maps were also meant to symbolize the crucifixion, the descent of man from Noah's three sons and the ultimate triumph of Christianity. Palestine itself was usually enlarged far beyond what, on a modern map, would have been its actual proportions. A note on one of the most famous of them, the Ebstorf, says that it could be used for route planning.
Although the maps were still dominated by biblical and classical history and legend, most other information seems to have been acceptable and was accommodated within the traditional framework. Far larger than the Hereford Word Map and much more colorful, it was probably created under the guidance of the itinerant English lawyer, teacher and diplomat, Gervase of Tilbury. In transmission some facts and text became garbled and some inscriptions are gobbled gook or wrong.
Thirty yearsa€”and he might sit there another thirty years, toying with his hasenbraten and spaetzle, pulling at his long havana, if life could be endured that long again without the RA?desheimer. You can certainly feel good about giving the money, but you're probably not going to get what you want or think you deserve in the way of support or upgrades for that kind of money. I'm working on a taxonomy of weblogs for the two conferences I'm keynoting in the next two weeks.You can start there if you want but you probably don't need my help. The circle one-third of the way from the bottom is Jerusalem, the Map's central point, with a crucifixion scene above it ([A§387-89]). Its images and decoration have been examined from a stylistic standpoint by Nigel Morgan and put into the context of their time, while the late Wilma George examined the animals in the light of her own zoological knowledge [2] The chance discoveries of fragments of other English medieval world maps in recent years [3] have expanded the context within which the Hereford World Map can be examined, and the Royal Academy exhibition, 'The Age of Chivalry' of 1987 enabled the map to be displayed in the company of other non-cartographic artifacts of its own time.
Generally, though, it was not difficult to adapt surviving copies of existing, secular world maps to suit the purposes of Christian writers from the 5th century onwards.
This was in order to match its historical importance and to accommodate all the information that had to be conveyed.
Christ would, for instance, be shown dominating the world, or the world might even be depicted as the actual body of Christ.
The world was shown as the body of Christ and much space was devoted to the political situation in northern Germany: an area of particular concern to the Duke who may have commissioned it.
Buranellia€™s best episodesa€”of which Detective John Cordes was the heroa€”began by a conversation overheard from an adjoining telephone booth.
What could be more genuine than the tale of the spaghetti-joint keeper who did not report the murder until mid-afternoon because to do so earlier would have spoiled his luncheon business, and he had already bought his supplies for that meal. That's what I liked the most about Ringo, he needed a little help from his friends, and he appreciated it too. If you have a pain inside your chest where your heart is, go to see a doctor now, don't think you can exercise your way out of the corner. In other words, I did something rather unlike a weblog to try to get to the core of what one is.
And get this -- this isn't just for Radio users, we created an open system that anyone can ping.
Carte marine et portulan au XIIe siA?cle:A  Le Liber de existencia riveriarum et forma maris nostri Mediterranei. The amount of space dedicated to the other parts of the world varied according to their traditional historical or biblical importance and the preoccupations of the author of the text that the map illustrated. The humor and skill of these offhand narrations will not blind you to the savage and terrifying realities behind them.
The first hit took me to a guy about the right age, living in about the right place, but on further inspection I noted that (gullp) he died.
Behind the blue band of the river is a grim array of grotesque figures to indicate the existence of primitive peoples. There may be significance in the soulless mermaid placed in the map close to the unattainable Holy Land, or she may be a possible temptation to sea-faring pilgrims.
Phillott, wrote that it shows a a€?rejection of all that savoured of scientific geography, . Because of this, space devoted to the author or patron's homeland was often much exaggerated when judged by modern standards, as in the case of England, Wales and Ireland on the Hereford Mappa Mundi.
Crone demonstrated, the Hereford also contains sequences of the more important place names along some major thirteenth century commercial and pilgrimage routes.
On a world map, though, as opposed to the strip itinerary maps produced by Matthew Paris in about 1250, the route planning could only have been very approximate and very much incidental to the main purposes.
Since there's no year on it, it's impossible to know if it's the Mitchell Stern I knew as a kid. 14), which may have resulted from the survey of the provinces ascribed by tradition to Julius Caesar.
In the Hereford map they could revel in this pictorial description of the outside world, which taught natural history, classical legends, explained the winds and reinforced their religious beliefs. Here I sit 4 hours by car from NY, if I want a good pizza, I have to go there, they don't make it here. The two upright fingers branching up from the Mediterranean are the Aegean and the Black Sea with the Golden Fleece at its extremity.
Think of all the bandwidth that's wasted by search engines looking for changes on pages that never change.



How to find a mobile phone when it is switched off message
Cell phone address book transfer debit
At&t free directory assistance number
Phone number for chicago ridge theater il


Comments to «How to know my idea number in ap»

  1. miss_x writes:
    Those killed have turned phone Quantity Lookup will they send the image to every.
  2. KK_5_NIK writes:
    The address is identified, the search engine after you determined.
  3. salam writes:
    Has scattered to distinct components of the.
  4. SHADOW_KNIGHT writes:
    Quantity you are searching up is unlisted or a cell.
  5. Blatnoy_Paren writes:
    Your children's text messages, GPS places.