How do i change my daughters last name legally in canada,books on meditation reddit,a secret promise movie chinese,never tried the secret door lyrics - Try Out

04.10.2015
To understand ourselves it is important to understand our ancestors, and a part of them, and their heritage, lives on in us today. To the world the American Indians seemed like a forgotten people when the English colonists first arrived and began to occupy their lands. I want to give special thanks to my cousin, Mary Hilliard, for her assistance and encouragement in researching and preparing this book. Wherever possible I have tried to find at least two sources for the genealogical data, but this has not always been possible. I have also found Franklin Elewatum Bearce's history, Who Our Forefathers Really Were, A True Narrative of Our White and Indian Ancestors, to be very helpful. It is certainly possible that such a record may contain errors, but it is also very fortunate that we have access to this record as it presents firsthand knowledge of some of the individuals discussed in this book. 8 Newcomba€? Cpt.
Sometime before the colonial period, the Iroquoian tribes began moving from the southern plains eastward across the Mississippi River and then northeasterly between the Appalachians and the Ohio River Valley, into the Great Lakes region, then through New York and down the St.
Though they were neighbors and had similar skin color, these two groups of Indians were as dissimilar as the French and the Germans in Europe.
Federations, as well as the individual tribes, were fluid organizations to the extent that the sachem was supported as long as he had the strength to maintain his position. Belonging to a federation meant that an annual tribute had to be sent to support the great sachem and his household, warriors had to be sent if he called for a given number to go to war, and strictest obedience and fidelity was demanded. Some of these federations had as many as thirty member tribes supporting their Great Sachem, although many of these tribes would be counted by more than one sachem, as any tribe that was forced to pay tribute was considered as part of that Great Sachem's federation. Any member of the society who dishonored himself, in anyway, was no longer worthy of the respect of his people. When viewing the typical Indians of America, one would describe them as having a dark brown skin. They wore relatively little clothing, especially in summer, although the women were usually somewhat more modest than the men. The English resented the fact that the Indians wouldn't convert to Christianity as soon as the missionaries came among them. The various tribes of New England spoke basically the same language and could understand each other well. There are many words used commonly in our language today that were learned from these New England Indians: Squaw, wigwam, wampum, pow-wow, moccasin, papoose, etc.
Today there is little doubt that prior to Columbus's voyage, the Norsemen sailed to the coast of North America early in the eleventh century. We do not have a record of all of the European contact and influence on the Indians in the early years of exploration because the greatest exposure came from the early European fishermen and trappers who kept no records of their adventures, as opposed to the explorers. In 1524, Giovanni da Verrazano wrote the first known description of a continuous voyage up the eastern coast of North America. As the fur trade became increasingly more important to Europeans, they relied heavily on the Indians to do the trapping for them.
Another problem with which the Indians had to contend was the White man's diseases for which they had no tolerance nor immunity.
In the spring of 1606, Gorges sent Assacumet and Manida, as guides on a ship with Captain Henry Chalons, to New England to search for a site for a settlement. In 1614, Captain John Smith, who had already been involved in the colony at James Town, Virginia, was again commissioned to take two ships to New England in search of gold, whales or anything else of value. Dermer wanted to trade with the local Indians of the Wampanoag Federation and asked Squanto if he would guide them and be their interpreter. Derner was given safe passage through Wampanoag land by Massasoit and soon returned to his ship. When the Pilgrims left England in the Mayflower, their stated intent was to establish a settlement on the mouth of the Hudson River, at the site of present day New York City. The Pilgrims returned to the Mayflower and, after many days of exploration, found a more suitable location.
On March 16, 1621 the Pilgrims were surprised by a tall Indian who walked boldly into the plantation crying out, "Welcome! The Pilgrims gestured for Massasoit to join them in their fort but, he in turn, gestured for them to come to him. When the amenities were ended, the English brought out a treaty they had prepared in advance, which specified that the Wampanoags would be allies to the English in the event of war with any other peoples and that they would not harm one-another; and that when any Indians came to visit the plantation they would leave their weapons behind. After the ceremonies were ended, Governor Carver escorted Massasoit to the edge of the settlement and waited there for the safe return of Winslow. Part of Massasoit's willingness to make an alliance with the English must be credited to his weakened condition after suffering from the recent epidemics which left his followers at about half of the strength of his enemies, the Narragansetts. In June of 1621, about three months after the signing of the treaty, a young boy from the Colony was lost in the woods.
When the English could not find the boy, Governor William Bradford, (who replaced John Carver, who died in April) sent to Massasoit for help in locating the boy. That summer Governor Bradford sent Edward Winslow and Stephen Hopkins, with Squanto, to Pokanoket (Massasoit's own tribe, on the peninsula where Bristol, R.I. From this trip of Winslow's, we learn more about the daily life of the Indians in this area.
Massasoit urged his guests to stay longer but they insisted they must return to Plymouth before the Sabbath. Less than a month following this visit, Massasoit sent Hobomock, a high ranking member of the Wampanoag Council, to Plymouth to act as his ambassador and to aid the Pilgrims in whatever way they needed.
Hobomock and Squanto were surprised at what they heard, and quietly withdrew from the camp to Squanto's wigwam but were captured there before they could get to Plymouth. Although the Narragansetts and Wampanoags were historical enemies and continually feuding over land, they did not usually put hostages of high rank to death. Normally, treason was punishable by death and Massasoit would certainly have been justified in executing Corbitant for his part in the plot against him but, for some reason, Massasoit complete forgave him. Their first harvest was not a large one but the Pilgrims were.happy to have anything at all.
During the winter, a rivalry developed between Squanto and Hobomock, the two Indians who now lived continually at Plymouth. According to the treaty he had signed with Plymouth, they were to turn over to him any Indians guilty of offense. In June and July, three ships arrived at Plymouth with occupants who expected to be taken in and cared for. In the winter of 1622-23, Governor William Bradford made trips to the various Indian tribes around Cape Cod to buy food to keep the Pilgrims from starvation.
Next, Standish went to Cummaquid (Barnstable, MA.) where Iyanough was Sachem of the Mattachee Tribe. Thinking that Massasoit was dead, they went instead to Pocasset, where they sought Corbitant who, they were sure, would succeed Massasoit as the next Great Sachem.
Winslow describes their arrival, where the Indians had gathered so closely that it took some effort to get through the crowd to the Great Sachem.
Since the Pow-wow's medicine had not produced any results, Winslow asked permission to try to help the ailing Sachem. Their second Thanksgiving was combined with the wedding celebration of Governor Bradford and Alice Southworth. Because of Massasoit's honored position, more was recorded of him than of other Indians of his time.
Massasoit most likely became Sachem of the Pokanokets, and Great Sachem of the Wampanoags, between 1605-1615. The second son of Massasoit was Pometacomet, (alias Pometacom, Metacom, Metacomet, Metacomo or Philip.) Philip was born in 1640, at least 16 years younger than Alexander.
The third son, Sunconewhew, was sent by his Father to learn the white man's ways and to attend school at Harvard. When his two oldest sons were old enough to marry, Massasoit made the arrangements for them to marry the two daughters of the highly regarded Corbitant, Sachem of the Pocasset tribe. The tribes of Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, as well as some of the Nipmuck tribes of central Massachusetts, looked to him for Military defense and leadership.
Following the plagues of 1617, which reduced his nation so drastically and left his greatest enemy, the Narragansetts of Rhode Island, so unaffected, Massasoit was in a weakened position. In 1632, following a battle with the Narragansetts in which he regained the Island of Aquidneck, Massasoit changed his name to Ousamequin (Yellow feather) sometimes spelled Wassamegon, Oosamequen, Ussamequen. In 1637, the English waged an unprovoked war of extermination against the Pequot Federation of Connecticut, which shocked both the Wampanoags and the Narragansetts so much that both Nations wanted to avoid hostilities with the feared English. After hearing of the death of his good friend, Edward Winslow in 1655, Massasoit realized that his generation was passing away.
As Massasoit's health began to decline, he turned more and more of the responsibilities over to Alexander who was a very capable leader and who was already leading the warriors on expedition against some of their enemies. Massasoit was succeeded, as Great Sachem, by his son Alexander, assisted by his brother, Philip. The younger generation saw, in Alexander, a strong, new leader who could see the danger of catering to the English. Both Philip and Weetamoo were very vocal in their condemnation of the English and word of their accusations soon reached Plymouth.
Together, Philip and Canonchet reasoned that it would take a great deal of preparation for such a war.
Our story for this Buck family begins with the marriage of Davida€™s parents, Thomas Buck and Elizabeth Scott, on 4 May 1738 in Glastonbury, Connecticut [see Glastonbury Vital Records by Barbour, available on the Internet.] The record of this marriage does not provide any additional information about the ancestry of Thomas Buck, but it does tell us that Elizabeth was the daughter of Thomas Scott.
We know that these were the parents of our David Buck as his daughter, Elizabeth Buck Garlick (who we will frequently refer to as a€?EBGa€?) left a record in 1841 (in Nauvoo, Illinois) and again in 1872 (in Salt Lake City in the Endowment House).
Following their wedding in 1738, Thomas and Elizabeth Buck completely disappear from the local records. Fortunately their grand-daughter, Elizabeth Buck Garlick (EBG), lived long enough to be listed in the 1880 US Federal census for Springville, Utah. The birth-dates are unknown for several of these children, but since there was such a large gap between Thomas, Jr.
There was also a John Buck and a Joseph Buck who were closely associated with this family in Bedford County, but we have no document that establishes their relationship to the rest of this family. With all of the above as foundation for our story we will now present the documented history for our David Buck, Sr.
The very first item we can find for our Bucks in Bedford County is in the 1775 tax list where a Thomas Buck was listed as paying 7 pounds, 6, as a resident of Colerain Township in Bedford Co., PA. In the next yeara€™s tax recorda€”1776, we again find Thomas Buck, along with Jonathan Buck listed in Colerain Township of Bedford County. We have no tax records for 1777 & 1778, but in 1779 there was no Thomas Buck in Colerain Township. In 1780 we still find David Buck and John Buck paying taxes in Colerain Twp., and Davida€™s brother, Thomas Buck, Jr. The 6th Company, 1st Battalion of the PA militia was formed from the men of Providence Township in 1781, with George Enslow as Captain. We do not know any details about Davida€™s military service but we do know there were many British inspired Indian-attacks within the county where settlers were killed and their homes burned. By 1784 both David and Jonathan were located in Providence Township in Bedford Co., PA, and their brother Thomas was still in Hopewell, just a few miles north of Providence. In 1789 Jonathan Buck sold his land in Providence Township and moved to the western side of the County, and from there (in 1793) he moved to Tennessee. Note that most of the purchases above naming Thomas Buck were surely for the Captain Thomas Buck of Hopewell Twp., the brother of our David, Sr. David Buck, land deeded to him by Benjamin Ferguson and Zilah, his wife, for 45 pounds, that tract of land called Oxford Situate on the waters of Brush Creek also running by the land of Thomas Buck, Esq. Thomas Buck and wife Margaret, sold to George Myers, land in Providence Twp being rented by William Conners for $2,400., on Brush Creek joining John Allisona€™s survey and running by David Bucka€™s property. This is a very interesting entry as we know that the Captain, Thomas Buck (brother of our David Sr.) was the man who was married to Mrs. Before we continue with the Buck family, we need to take a sideways step to briefly discuss the Cashman family, as that brings in the wife of David Buck, Sr. This family lived for many years in Berks County, PA, and then in York Co., PA, before moving to Washington County, Maryland in 1777. We should mention here that by this time the old Germanic family name had seen a number of changes that show up in many of the documents.
Martina€™s oldest daughter, Catherine grew up in Pennsylvania and moved with her parents to Maryland when she was about 25 years old. David returned to his farm in Bedford County, PA with a new wife and four little step-children. While we are talking about close family members showing up in the temple records, there is one more that we should discuss at this point.
The 1800 federal census is also a bit bewildering (but then census records are not known for their accuracy). This entry make sense if there was only one Bumgardner boy still living in Davida€™s home and if he was between the ages of 10-16a€”which would be about right.


In 1808 there was another tax list which shows David with 247 acres in Providence Twp, with 1 horse and 2 cows.
His oldest son, Thomas, was already married and had been out of the house for about seven years before his father died. We dona€™t know how long Catherine Cashman Buck lived after the death of her husband but it appears she was still alive during the 1820 census as discussed above. The oldest child of our David Buck and Catherine Cashman (after her Bumgardner children) was Thomas Buck.
Very nearby lived the family of Michael Blue, who had a daughter, Elizabeth Blue, born 30 March 1788, in Providence Twp, making her just about two years older than Thomas.
Shortly after the birth of their youngest child the family moved to Van Buren, Pulaski Co., Indiana, where they were living in the 1860 census, and where Thomas died on 27 Feb. A number of local residents joined the Church at that same time which resulted in a backlash of hard feelings and persecution ensued, inducing many of them to sell their homes and move to Nauvoo, Illinois where the a€?Saintsa€? were gathering. With the other Saints, the Garlicks were forced to evacuate Nauvoo in 1846 and make their way across the state of Iowa to Council Bluffs. We are not sure when Susannah was born, but her fathera€™s will makes it clear that she was younger than Elizabeth (who was born in 1795a€”according to her own record) and older than Mary, who was born in 1800 (as found in several census records).
50 years old (making him about 12-13 years younger than Susannah, and his wife, a€?Susana€? was five years younger than Solomona€”born about 1815. Whether Susannah died young, or married and changed her last name, is unknown to us at this time. With a large gap between the first two children there could, and probably were, other children unknown to us at this time. In the 1870 census we do find David Jr.a€™s daughter, Catherine Buck living in Providence with her Aunt Mary Buck (both of her parents had died prior to that year). After the birth of this last child the family moved to Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio where we find them in the 1880 censusa€”except for their son, George, who would have been 13 in that census but does not appear with the family at that time.
This Jonathan Buck remained close to his extended family and traveled back and forth between Pennsylvania and Ohio on various occasions.
Note that this particular record does not say that Sarah was the daughter of Mary, but we learn that later on. In the Ancestral File (LDS FHC) Mary has been sealed numerous times to a man by the name of Amos Jones.
In the 1860 census, we find Saraha€™s mother, Mary Buck, living with her son-in-law and his two little girlsa€”Marya€™s grand-daughters.
Within the next decade (per the 1870 census) Jacob Foore had remarried and begun an additional family, so Mary moved into a home of her own and also took in her niece, Catherine Buck, with her little daughter, Amanda, who we have discussed above. This concludes the presentation of the documented life of David Buck, Sr., his wife, Catherine Cashman, and their family. Aunt Mary Buck is well, Catharine too, neather one of them lives with me now since last spring. Yours truly, write to me again and tell me all the news and I will give you all the news then.
It is with pleasure that I drop you a few lines to inform you we are all well at the present time and hope and trust these few lines may find you the same. I must tell you where we live, we live near Gapsvill and I thought I would write a few lines to you all.
Times is very dull here now all though there is plenty of everything but fruit, there is none at tale, only what is shipped here.
I can't tell how Aunt or Catharine is gitting along for I have not had a letter from either one for five months or more, I can't tell why it is as I have written to both of them and got no answer. One of my boys married a girl here and they have gone to keeping house here, so if my letter does not come to hand in time he can lift it and remail. I am boarding, I don't keep house anymore and I received your picture and I thought I had thanked you for it in my letter long ago, if not I am very much obliged to you for it. I did not see Dasey Garlick when I was East, she was away from home the day I went to see her and I had so many places t go I did not get around again. I seen Telitha (Catharine) Garlick two but only to speak to her as met her on the road one day she is married to Wesley Clark, one of Elias Clark's boys.
It appears that there is going to be plenty work to do this summer, lots of large buildings to go up this summer.
Temple there was completed, an Endowment House was erected in which sacred ordinances could be performed. The a€?Joseph Garlica€? listed as a€?heira€? and proxy for the males above, was EBGa€™s son. Abigail Jones 2nd cousin {Daughter of Capt.
Thomas Buck nephew {EBGa€™s brother, Thomas, md. David Buck nephew {EBGa€™s brother, David, Jr.
John Buck cousin {Son Thomas Buck & ELiz. At first I was very skeptical of this record as it was a family tradition passed down for many generations.
She was very fond of her Grandmother, Freelove, knew all about her and stated on several occasions that Freelove's Mother was Sarah Mauwee, daughter of Joseph Mauwee, Sachem of Choosetown, and not Tabitha Rubbards (Roberts). Massasoit was the Sachem of this tribe, as well as being the Great Sachem over the entire Wampanoag Federation, which consisted of over 30 tribes in central and southeastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket. Welcome, Englishmen!" It was a cold and windy day, yet this Indian, who introduced himself as Samoset, Sachem of a tribe in Monhegan Island, Maine, wore only moccasins and a fringed loin skin. 1787 a€“ Thomas Buck applied for 400 acres including an improvement (house or barn) on the south side of Raystown Branch of the Juniata River on both sides of Brush Creek, adjoining Alisona€™s Survey, in Providence. 1789 a€“ Thomas Buck applied for 100 acres on the southeast side of Warrior Ridge, adjoining a survey of James Hunter on the north and by a survey of Barnard Dougherty esq. And since the times have got so hard in the West I am glad I did not go, but I will come and see you all yet if all goes right but I can't say when. John Buck told me I could write a piece in his letter and I am very thankful to write with him as we have not your address. I would have answered before now but was still thinking of being closer to you before this time but am about fixing to move back again to the old home place in Pennsylvania. I have had work all winter in a wholesale house where it is heated with gas, as warm as wood care.
20121 Kings 8:28 -- But please listen to my prayer and my request, because I am your servant. She obtained her copy of Zerviah Newcomb's Chronical from Zerviah's original diary, in the hands of Josiah 3rd himself.
This year’s theme: “Cotton Sacks and Freedom Quilt Narratives” substantiates the viability of the sweat equity investment made through labor and cultural contributions by Cotton Pickers and other Plantation Workers. The reason is that the man that was to buy my farm, backed out and I had made sale on the 27th day of March and sold everything to come and then after that man backed out I was to sell to another man and his wife died just two days before the time was for us to start and that knocked me all wrong all that I had and the balance of the company before I could rent again. My wife has been sick nearly ever since we have been in Ohio and is not sadis ficte [sic satisfied] to go any farther west and she now has the agure [ague] and two of my children has got it and I have concluded to take them where the Agure seldom comes any more, that is in Pennsylvania where they was born.
The themometer was at one time 14 degrees below zero, that was perty cold, but they have had two feet of snow on the level back at our old home place this winter.
The following evening, Friday November 13, the “Cotton Pickers Ball” shall be held at 7:00pm, in da’ House of Khafre, located at 300 Main Street, Indianola. Buck a visit now, so must bring these few lines to a close by asking you to please write soon as this reaches you. Bearce's Great-aunt, Mary Caroline, lived with Josiah III and Freelove Canfield Bearce for several years, listened to their ancestral stories, and made her own personal copy of Zerviah's diary supplement. Lawrence to what is now known as Lake Champlain where his party killed several Mohawks in a show of European strength and musketry.
All are encouraged to attend both events in costume attire worn in the cotton fields, such as “overalls and straw hats, etc.”The 1st Annual Historical Narrative Competition enhances this year’s Symposium. 1843, David Garlick also passed away at the age of 63 and was buried in the old Pioneer Cemetery on the SE corner of that city. Corn up here, the folks that has corn is just pulling the ears off leaving the foder so that stops the work from off the farms hands so there is no work to do. William is clerking in a grocery store and drives a delivery wagon for the store part of his time. Maybe you can mind old Peter Weaverling that used to live east of my father, it is one of his boys she married, sister to Daisy Garlick. Mississippi Delta high school seniors and MVSU students will compete for a trophy and gift card provided by Khafre, Inc and Lost Pizza, Company. All projects must be delivered to the MVSU Social Sciences office “T” by 5:00pm November 5th, (or call organizers to arrange for pick up). Garlick was then baptized for John and Jacob Bumgardner and the record calls him a a€?half nephewa€? of those two men. He further told them that Massasoit, the Great Sachem of the Wampanoags, was at Nemasket (a distance of about 15 miles) with many of his Counselors. Professor, Public Policy, MVSU; Dr Alpha Diarra, National Cotton Spokesman of Mali, West Africa. Local storyteller Helen Sims will pay tribute to “the Spirit of Mama Lula.” Hollandale folk artist Dorothy Hoskins will showcase recent multi-media work on Cotton Pickin’ and Sharecropping in the American South.
The University is driven by its commitment to excellence in teaching, learning, service, and research--a commitment resulting in a learner-centered environment that prepares critical thinkers, exceptional communicators, and service-oriented, engaged, and productive citizens. MVSU is fundamentally committed to positively affecting the quality of life and creating extraordinary educational opportunities for the Mississippi Delta and beyond. KHAFRE, Inc.
Honoring the legacy of  “grandmamma-nem” in a university setting gives artistic and academic license to the pursuit of gaining more scholarship and international acceptance, of the contributions and sweat equity made by the people who picked cotton throughout the American South,” said Professor C.Sade Turnipseed, Executive Director of Khafre, Inc.
As part of Khafre, Inc’s historic preservation efforts, a permanent marker will be placed on the MVSU campus in honor of cotton pickers from the Mississippi Delta, and those who worked the repurposed cotton plantation for higher learning, MVSU.The Symposium is free admission. Khafre, Inc is all about building monumental programs that allow reflection, reconnection, and renewal. This year’s theme: “Cotton Sacks and Freedom Quilt Narratives” will stimulate a day of discussion about historic preservation, leading-edge research, innovative practices, and foundational values. The agency and resistance of these narratives will also reflect on the subtle and continuing impact of cotton on life in the Delta and throughout the South.
The one-day event concludes with a good old fashion “black-tie” (or period-piece costume) “Cotton-Pickers’ Ball and Ancestral Celebration” at da’ House of Khafre located at 300 Main St. Julianne Malveaux; and, introduction by award-winning poet Chinaka Hodge the volume offers a balanced view of what our children face day-to-day, on the streets of America. Over two hundred years ago, the Akan Nation (West Africa) established the Adinkra Symbols to visually communicate a system of living for African people to observe and learn.
Amazingly, just as with other inspired and spiritual writings, drawings, etc., the symbols are beautiful design concepts with meanings still relevant today. They bring clarity and resolve to the question, “What do we (the village) have to do to show support and love for each other and ultimately save ourselves and one another?” The experiences of today’s youth culture demonstrate a fundamental disconnect, to most people of previous generations. The young writers selected for this publication masterfully describe the challenge in dealing with today’s world. Because, it offers tribute to the “original” mother and her instinctual knowing of the spiritual paths that her children (all children) must take to find their way out of harm's way. Revealed, in this collection of writings are a wonderful array of short stories, poems and proverbs that present a familial insight born by the great liberator of liberators, Harriet Tubman! By Writers of the 21st Century is an affiliate of Young Publishers Network (YPN) and Khafre, Inc a 501(c)(3) organization working in the Mississippi Delta to improve the welfare and healthy living environments of children in America and around the world.### Thank You Mr. Born in a cabin on a cotton plantation outside Berclair, Mississippi in 1925, his entire life, much like the lives of so many others from the Mississippi Delta, was spent in service to others.
Unfortunately, for most of his contemporaries (colleagues, family of friends) they never received the accolades, appreciation, or respect for their life-long work as cotton-pickers in the American South.
David Matthews, MS Congressman Bennie Thompson, MS Senator Thad Cochran, National Parks Director Dr Jon Jarvis, Mr.
Theodore Turnipseed, Sr., and millions of others understand the importance of sharing, and erecting a statue and National Park dedicated to the countless field workers of the American South. Though unrecognized and unappreciated, these people worked from sun up to sun down tilling, planting, chopping, picking and spinning cotton, in the blazing hot sun … This and many other horrifying conditions of the historic Mississippi Delta evoked the music we call “the Blues.”On May 21, 2014, during the last year of his life Mr. King accepted our call to become the “Honorary Chair” of Khafre, Inc, a Mississippi-based 501(3) not-for-profit organization.
Maya Angelou as the Honorary Chair of the Cotton Pickers of America and the Sharecroppers Interpretive Center project.
The plan is to build a thirty-foot high monument on twenty acres of cotton land along Highway 61, just outside the historic Black town Mound Bayou, MS. This is a historically rare opportunity to transform many lives in the Delta and engage conversations about race and social inequities in America.
Sade Turnipseed is the Executive Director of Khafre, Inc and teaches American History at Mississippi Valley State University, in Itta Bena, the birthplace of Mr.
This year’s theme: “Cotton Sacks and Freedom Quilts Narratives” will stimulate a day of discussion about historic preservation, leading-edge research, innovative practices, and foundational values.


No one has ever “officially” said “thank you” to the people in the American South, who literally tilled the way to the economic greatness for many countries and regions around the world.
Somewhere along the way the respect and honor for their hard-earned sweat-equity investment in the wealth of others was lost and buried in the bloodstained, tear-soaked soils of the American South.
Something “monumental,” needs to happen…like a National Park named the “Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center” along the Blues Highway 61.
Once the Monument is installed, the organizers’ plan is to turn it over to the federal government for the protection and honor that only this country can provide. It shall serve as a permanent reminder and ever-present sign of respect for those whose hope for a brighter day wore thin, while working from kin to kain’t (can’t see in the morning to can’t see at night).The world must be reminded of the work ethic held by the people in the South…in most instances it was an honorable legacy … the tragedy is they were never properly compensated, nor thanked.
King, (aka: The King of the Blues) will join the effort to build a National Monument in the Mississippi Delta. King understands, as do all members of the Khafre, Inc family, that a healing will come through recognition and a true recounting of the history of cotton and its impact in the South.In September, 2009, Khafre, Inc, based in Indianola, Mississippi, embarked upon a journey designed to thank the sons and daughters of the South who helped, albeit it without accolades, fanfare, or even recognition, build the cotton empire that fueled the American economy for nearly two centuries. The impetus for the project: Cotton Pickers of America and Sharecroppers Interpretative Center (hereafter referred to as the Cotton Pickers Monument Complex) is the need to thank those who toiled in the Delta soil for generations without the pay, appreciation, or the dignity they deserved. The Cotton Pickers Monument Complex would not only help heal wounds that have festered for decades, but would also help to empower the generations of family members who have been negatively impacted by this unfortunate era in American history.
This is truly a historic endeavor that has the rare opportunity of actually transforming lives, communities, and the conversations about race in America and throughout the world.           These deeply held convictions of education and empowerment are keys to improving the quality of life for all within the Delta.
They have helped to catapult Khafre into numerous projects, which are all connected to the vision and mission of this value-driven and movement-oriented organization that is designed to provide historical, health related, and cultural education and outreach to the communities of the Mississippi Delta.
Khafre has already helped young people successfully publish literature, prepare for careers in the television and radio broadcast industry, produce staged events and engage in healthy behaviors through diet and exercise, all with the assistance of grant dollars and strategic partnerships.The crowning work of Khafre remains the Cotton Pickers Monument Complex, a dream, which is coming closer to fruition, day by day, because of the unprecedented support of Mr.
We have also received Congressional acknowledgment and endorsement from United States Congressmen, Bennie Thompson and Danny Davis, official endorsements from United States Senators, Thad Cochran and Roger Wicker, and expressed support from Dr John Jarvis, National Parks Director. Carroll Van West and Rebecca Conard from Middle Tennessee State University’s History Department, along with the ongoing partnership with Mississippi Valley State University, has proven a significant benefit to our overall project. We are now ready to raise the $26 million dollars to make the Cotton Pickers Monument complex a reality. We look forward to hearing from you and to welcoming your partnership in the building of this long overdue and much needed monument.It is time!Most sincerely,C. The goal is to obtain as much first-hand information as possible relating to the development of America’s Cotton Kingdom (aka the Delta).In the aftermaths of completing the academic study for a Doctorate in Public History at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), Professor C.
Turnipseed’s theory that perceptions of sharecropping, tenant farming, etc, will be altered in ways that are beneficial to the legacy of the American South when the memory of elders are shared. The monument site is envisioned to become a National Park; and thereby “the place” for memory and community sharing in the Mississippi Delta, for educational, economic development, and international tourism purposes. King and former honorary chair Dr Maya Angelou who are determined to improve the legacy and social-economic status of Mississippi Delta residents.
The purpose of the organization is to provide educational, lifestyle and cultural programs, build monuments and memorials to honor, celebrate, and recognize the rich and complex history of the Mississippi Delta and to positively impact the quality of life of those living in the Delta, especially the disproportionately poor African American community. There is no documented official acknowledgment of the people who tilled the path to America’s greatness. Somewhere along the way buried in the tear-soaked soils of the American South, the respect and honor for their hard-earned investment was lost. The Cotton Pickers of America Monument, Sharecroppers Interpretive Center, and Cotton Kingdom Trail make the case for building a National Park that offers a small token of appreciation for their tireless uncompensated work. Sade Turnipseed is the founder of Khafre, Inc., which has developed the Cotton Pickers of America Monument, the Sharecroppers Interpretive Center, and the Cotton Kingdom Historical Trail, among many other projects. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center in Indianola and the former cultural arts director for the Mississippi Action for Community Education--MACE (producers of the MS Delta Blues and Heritage Festival) in Greenville. Turnipseed is the recipient of several community service and arts advocacy awards, and she was an independent candidate for mayor of the city of Indianola in 2013.
For the past eight years Turnipseed was the host of “Delta Renaissance,” a cultural arts talk show focusing on the arts, education, and political issues in the Mississippi Delta. Winter Building Wednesday, June 18: Former Secretary of State Dick Molpus talks about his experience during the Philadelphia civil rights murders of 1964.
Wednesday, July 2: Filmmaker Wilma Mosley-Clopton will show and discuss her new film, "Did Johnny Come Marching Home?" about people of African descent who fought to free themselves in the Civil War. Wednesday, September 25: Author Robert Blade will talk about his book, "Tupelo Man," a biography of George McLean. I whole-heartedly agree with the editor that the African American community has proven to the world an uncanny, though unreciprocated, ability to be forgiving of past deeds of injustice, brutality and cruelty at the voting polls, and socially in their community service groups, churches and everyday lives.
This point should not be lost on the fact that many of those injustices happened here, in Indianola, Mississippi, to some amazingly strong and resilient individuals like Fannie Lou Hamer and all those who came before her.
But, I can’t help but wonder why the White community isn’t reciprocating and showing the same confidence and trust in racial relations?As Smith indicates, the incumbent received “between 32 and 37% of the votes in the three wards with large Black majorities, despite going up against two black opponents, with strong followings. That’s impressive for a white candidate in a city and region with a history of racially divided politics.” I agree.
When we examine the voter polls in the wards that are predominately African American, reflected is a general evenness for all candidates, be they Black or White. The same, however, cannot be said about the two wards that reflect the primarily White community. I submit to you the following:In wards I, and II, which are the two wards with the largest white population of voters, we see results that reflect an uncompromising resistance to acceptance and change. With an overall total of 952 votes cast: 732 went to the White candidate and 220 for the two Blacks, combined)…check that!
Surely, it cannot be left up to one segment of the community, and not the other.I truly wish Smith had stressed this very critical point, instead of throwing shade on the outcome of a campaign I have yet to wage. And for the record, as a citizen, it is my right to be afforded the opportunity to run a fair and unbiased race for mayor, without subtle suggestions that it is a waste of my time, as inferred in his editorial. But, then again maybe he knows more than I about how citizens of wards I and II will ultimately vote. And to also trust that the leaders of this community will look out for their best interest, politically, economically and socially. After all we live in a community that is 84% African American with a poverty rate that is fast approaching 40% and a public school system that is in deplorable condition, both physically and academically, even under the watchful eye of the government, yet there is no outrage…from either the White side, or the Black side of town.
And, I have never believed it was necessary to wait until political season to demonstrate my commitment to the people in my community.
If, by chance I am truly embraced by all members of all wards of this city, I believe people will witness an amazing transformation in a relatively short period of time. It’s “almost” like magic…I predict things will begin to unfold in a substantive way like the neighborhoods will brighten, crime decreases and the impoverished mindset disappears. And I am passionate enough to find the tools to help remedy the concerns that create stagnation and distrust. Please remember, we are a people who come from a very long tradition of women who made a way out of no way.My overall ambition and hope for this city is to develop a strategic plan that enables a steady stream of culturally enriched projects that insures economic development for the future growth and safety in this city. So programs that not only engage everyone, but present real opportunities for career enhancements and social activities are critical. King Museum that I visualized and administered) Thanks Carver Randle, Sr for that wonderful quote. I just wish he read my bio, or googled me, before publishing doubts about my abilities for success. For the past three years, I have been sitting relatively quietly completing the doctorate in history.
Now, I am ready to shake up this town with some bold ideas and ever increasing standards for excellence.
I look forward to being a significant force in this community, by helping the White community too recognize the benefits of building relationships that they can trust in leadership positions. We MUST work together to improve our community—by encouraging EVERYONE to clean on our streets, bayou, parks, etc. We have some huge unmet challenges here in Indianola, and how YOU decide to vote On December 10, 2013, is vital to our success.
Also, please be sure to come to this year's event in your overalls, or cotton pickin' clothes.
The event is the impetus that gave rise to the “Remigration Home from Chicago to Mississippi” cultural movement organized by music promoters Gus Redmond and Robert Terrell. Legendary blues and gospel performers Otis Clay, Syl Johnson and Marshal Thompson (founder and lead singer of the ChiLites); along with promoter Gus Redmond will lead the way back home to Mississippi in an effort to support the Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center project in the historical Cotton Kingdom AKA the Mississippi Delta.
Though the Ball is a “Black Tie Affair” Overalls or other “cotton pickin” attire are encouraged and expected.“I am so pleased that we have partnered with Khafre to host an event of this magnitude,” said Dr.
The discussions and historical presentations will reflect cutting-edge research, innovative practices and foundational values. Additionally, two noted scholars from Mali’s Cotton Manufacturing and Distribution will present via Skype.MVSU participants in the program include Dr.
John Jones, interim provost.As part of the celebration, Khafre plans to erect a permanent marker on the site in honor of cotton pickers from the Mississippi Delta and in commemoration of the significance of this historical event. This will be a day of stimulating discussion about historic preservation, leading-edge research, innovative practices, and foundational values.
The two-day event concludes with a good-old-fashion “black-tie” (or period-piece costume) “Cotton-Pickers’ Ball,” on October 18, 2013.
This year Khafre, Inc in conjunction with Mississippi Valley State University shall organize the USA’s premier interdisciplinary professional meeting on cotton, sharecropping, and its cultural significance. The deadline is September 6, 2013.Plan to join us in Itta Bena, Mississippi!This is your chance to catch up with old friends and colleagues at The Valley, make important new contacts, discuss the latest in cultural management, stay current with research findings in the historic preservation field, and connect with people who share your core values. We invite all community-based experts in any field to become a part of the challenge to address issues of: unemployment, entrepreneurship, illiteracy, poor self-esteem, teen pregnancy, obesity, hopelessness, communication skills, journalism and creative writing, etc.
Situated on the bayou waterfront at 103 and 105 Main Street, in historic downtown Indianola, da' House is the place where folks come together in the spirit of unity and love for Mississippi Delta culture, particularly its blues, spirituals and teacakes! On the historical Wall of Fame are signatures by musicians from Ghana, Senegal, Nigeria, Norway, Belguim, China, Japan, France, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire and Mississippi, of course. Beginning Friday, June 1, 2012, at 7 pm, the folks at da' House will be carrying on in grand teacake style, until Sunday June 3rd, around midnight. Celebrating da love that is shared all around the world for da Delta music, art and culture. The 2nd Anniversary Celebration is dedicated to Deltas own David Honeyboy Edward, David Lee Durham, David Thompson and Mississippi Slim. These legendary bluesmen have recently joined the ancestors and will be honored by several local artists and civic leaders: Mickey Rogers, Dr. These artists and many others will perform on da historical Front Porch stage where the legendary bluesman Sam Chatmons music room door is gracefully hinged. The door, the traditional quilts, the African art, the sweet smell of Soul Food and the Delta cotton provide a rural sophistication and ambiance that is reminicient of the culture and folk art once owned and coveted by grandmamma-nem. Indeed, it is "The home for artful giving, music and songs," as Chicago-based Blues promoter Lynn Orman Weiss described da' House on her most recent visit to the Delta.
And, since da' House is located at the epicenter of the Cotton Kingdom, visitors can expect that authentic soothing, and often times healing, Mississippi Delta experience to be dosed up in abundantly royal fashion, every time they come to da' House! Co-owners Robert Terrell and C.Sade Turnipseed extend a personal and heartfelt invitation for everyone to come on out to da House and help celebrate two-years of Delta art, music and culture. She is also the first African-American female president to lead a Mississippi public university. Since assuming her position on January 1, 2009, she has launched The Valley Renaissance, the institutions five-year strategic plan, which is pictorially depicted by the African Adinkra symbol of a Sankofa a bird that flies with his head facingbackwards as he advances forward without getting off track.
Grammy-winning blues musician David "Honeyboy" Edwards, believed to be the oldest surviving Delta bluesman and whose roots stretched back to blues legend Robert Johnson, died early Monday, Aug.
Maya Angelou agreed to graciously lend her name to the Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center project that is in development, in the Mississippi Delta. C.Sade Turnipseed, Founder of the Monument project and Executive Director of Khafre, Inc, recently made the announcement in a community meeting held at da House of Khafre, in Indianola.
Our teams collective effort honors the sacrifices made by millions of Americans and purposefully gives dignity back to the legacy of those who spent their entire lives working, tirelessly to build this country.Dr. Smith Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University, joins a long and growing list of American citizens, who have also expressed the desire to support this project and demonstrate their respect and gratitude to every man, woman and child that picked cotton and were never thanked, nor properly compensated as enslaved workers or as sharecroppers, throughout the American south.The Khafre, Inc team is composed of a governing Board of Directors, a Steering Committee, a Board of Advisors and several political and community leaders that include faculty members from the History Department at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU). The governing Board selected world-renowned monument designer, Ed Dwight, to develop the thirty-foot statue and sculptural park. It offers educational workshops, seminars and conferences for the entire community that celebrate Mississippis culture and its contributions to world history, including music, cuisine, writing, andotherartistic expressions. Turnipseed is also the host of Delta Renaissance, the number one cultural arts television talk show in the Delta, which airs weekly on WABG-TV, WABG-Radio and Delta Fox-10 television networks.Plans are also underway to incorporate the completed work into the National Parks Services, to insure prosperity and proper maintenance of the Monument. To help the Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center be included as part of the National Parks System, please sign the online petition. To have name(s) of family members included in the Monument, download a Legacy Brick application; both petition and application are available on the Khafre, Inc. Sato returns to the Front Porch Stage solo, on Sunday March 6th, at 6pm, to kick off the Cultural Competency workshop series. These are on-going cultural appreciation classes presented for the first time in the Delta, by Khafre, Inc (a Mississippi-based non-profit organization).Sato, who was born and raised in Japan, will introduce to American audiences his interpretation of Mississippi Delta Blues and perform on one of his traditional instruments called a Samisen.




Guided imagery using colors
How to gain confidence ehow
Secret things movie watch online free viooz
Meditation practice books


Comments to «How do i change my daughters last name legally in canada»

  1. Victoriya writes:
    In yoga, we imagine that those that.
  2. FK_BAKI writes:
    Ends in such extreme repercussions, there.
  3. Ramincik writes:
    The time period Vipassana means to see issues care during the period of the.
  4. rumy22 writes:
    Third, one can be part of an organized.
  5. NASTYA writes:
    The religious prescription right here.