Secrets of the dead killer flu pbs,the secret life of a video vixen,the secret 2007 watch online for free 4k - Videos Download

07.03.2016
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) -- The suspect, hands and feet shackled, fidgeted in his chair, chuckling at times as he confessed to a brutal killing. Israel Keyes showed no remorse as he described in merciless detail how he'd abducted and strangled an 18-year-old woman, then demanded ransom, pretending she was alive. The prosecutors had acceded to Keyes' requests: a cup of Americano coffee, a peanut butter Snickers and a cigar (for later). Confessing to Koenig's killing, Keyes used a Google map to point to a spot on a lake where he'd disposed of her dismembered body and gone ice fishing at the same time. In 40 hours of interviews over eight months, Keyes talked of many killings; authorities believe there were nearly a dozen. At the same time, incredibly, Keyes was an under-the-radar everyday citizen -- a father, a live-in boyfriend, a respected handyman who had no trouble finding jobs in the community. Keyes claimed he killed four people in Washington state, dumped another body in New York and raped a teenager in Oregon. In December, he slashed his left wrist and strangled himself with a sheet in his jail cell. But they know, too, that Israel Keyes' secrets are buried with him -- and may never be unearthed.
Keyes forced Koenig to his Silverado; he'd already bound her hands with zip ties and gagged her. By then, authorities had a blurry ATM photo and a pattern: Keyes was driving along route I-10 in a rented white Ford Focus.
Monique Doll, the lead Anchorage police investigator in the Koenig case, and her partner, Jeff Bell, rushed to Texas for a crack at Keyes. Authorities suspect Keyes started killing more than 10 years ago after completing a three-year stint in the Army at what is now Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma, Wash. Sean McGuire, who shared a barracks with Keyes, says they developed a camaraderie while spending some time together during grueling training in Egypt. Keyes, the second eldest in a large family, was homeschooled in a cabin without electricity near Colville, Wash., in a mountainous, sparsely populated area.
After leaving the Army, Keyes worked for the Makah Indian tribe in Washington, then moved to Anchorage in 2007 after his girlfriend found work here. Keyes also was meticulous and methodical, flying to airports in the Lower 48, renting cars, driving hundreds of miles searching for victims, prowling remote spots such as parks, campgrounds and cemeteries.
Shortly after Keyes confessed to Koenig's murder, the prosecutors told him they knew he'd killed others and said his computers were being searched. Nearly 10 months had passed since Bill and Lorraine Currier, a couple in their 50s, had disappeared. An Essex officer for 28 years, Murtie knew every inch of his community, including the location of that farmhouse. Several weeks later, when Murtie questioned Keyes by phone, he found him matter-of-fact when discussing how he'd killed the Curriers.
In the early moments of June 9, Keyes cut the phone lines and removed a window fan to enter the garage. Bill Currier had somehow broken the stool and was shouting, "Where's my wife?" Keyes hit him with a shovel, then shot him.
During the interviews, Keyes sometimes clammed up and threatened to stop talking if publicly identified as a suspect in the Curriers' murders. Keyes was conflicted -- he wanted his story out there but worried about the impact it would have on friends and family (he has a daughter believed to be 10 or 11), says Goeden, the FBI agent.


Months before Keyes' past was disclosed, Koenig believed his daughter was not his only victim. Meanwhile, investigators have used Keyes' financial and travel records to piece together a timeline of his whereabouts from Oct. Feldis, the prosecutor who heard Keyes' first confession, says it's likely the true scope of his crimes will never be known.
Capitol View The Thread Listen Live Program Schedule Station Directory Audio Help About Minnesota Public Radio Contact Us Shop Become a Member Volunteer Fundraising Credentials Terms of use Your privacy rights Public Inspection Files Minnesota Public Radio ©2016. By creating an account, you acknowledge that PBS may share your information with our member stations and our respective service providers, and that you have read and understand the Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.
In 1918, a flu pandemic ripped through the global population with such speed and virulence that by the end of the following year an estimated 40 million people would be dead. For years Israel Keyes lived two different lives: one, a below-the-radar father and carpenter, the other, by all indications, a meticulous serial killer.
State police investigators pause to allow a dog to inspect dirt and debris April 12, 2012, at a dig site off Vermont 15 near Lang Farm in Essex, Vt., in what Essex Police Chief Brad LaRose described as part of the ongoing investigation into the disappearance of Bill and Lorraine Currier, who went missing June 2011. ANCHORAGE, Alaska — The suspect, hands and feet shackled, fidgeted in his chair, chuckling at times as he confessed to a brutal killing. At the same time, incredibly, Keyes was an under-the-radar everyday citizen — a father, a live-in boyfriend, a respected handyman who had no trouble finding jobs in the community.
Keyes claimed he killed four people in Washington state, dumped another body in New York and raped a teen in Oregon. But they know, too, that Israel Keyes' secrets are buried with him — and may never be unearthed. Keyes' live-in girlfriend also was floored to learn of his double life, according to David Kanters, her friend. Keyes was conflicted — he wanted his story out there, but worried about the impact it would have on friends and family (he has a daughter believed to be 10 or 11), says Goeden, the FBI agent. As the two prosecutors questioned him, they were struck by his demeanor: He seemed pumped up, as if he were reliving the crime. Then they showed him surveillance photos, looked him in the eye and declared: We know you kidnapped Samantha Koenig. He said he robbed banks to help finance his crimes; authorities corroborated two robberies in New York and Texas.
Only once -- other than Koenig -- did he identify by name his victims: a married couple in Vermont. Keyes is seen as a shadowy figure in ski mask and hood outside Common Grounds, a tiny Anchorage coffee shack then partially concealed from a busy six-lane highway by mountains of snow. He hid her in a shed outside his house, turned on loud music so no one could hear if she screamed, then returned to the coffee shack to retrieve scraps of the restraints and get her phone. 29, Keyes withdrew $500 in ransom money from an Anchorage ATM, using a debit card stolen from Koenig's boyfriend (the two shared an account).
On March 13, nearly 3,200 miles from Anchorage, police in Lufkin, Texas, pounced when they spotted Keyes driving 3 mph above the speed limit.
The family moved in the 1990s to Smyrna, Maine, where they were involved in the maple syrup business, according to a neighbor who remembered Keyes as a nice, courteous young man. He headed out there that night with another detective, only to discover it had been demolished. Grabbing a crowbar, he smashed a window into the house and, wearing a headlamp to navigate the darkness, rushed into the Curriers' bedroom.


Going back to the car, he saw Lorraine Currier had broken her restraints and was running toward the road: Keyes chased and tackled her, forcing her back to the building. Unsolved homicides are being checked, too, to determine if Keyes was in the area at the time. Also contributing to this report were AP reporters Mark Thiessen in Anchorage, Alaska, Nicholas K. After confessing to killing a 18-year old woman in Alaska, Israel Keyes is suspected of killing Bill and Lorraine Currier. 4, 2012, in Anchorage, Alaska, shows video surveillance footage of Samantha Koenig, 18, making a cup of Americano coffee for Israel Keyes, shortly before he abducted her Feb. His body shook, they said, and he rubbed his muscular arms on the chair rests so vigorously his handcuffs scraped off the wood finish. He confessed to burning down a house in Texas, contentedly watching the flames from a distance. Koenig is shown handing Keyes a cup of coffee, then backing away with her hands up, as if it's a robbery. He left her in that shed, flew to Houston and embarked on a cruise, returning about two weeks later. In one case, he claimed a body was recovered and the death ruled accidental; he wouldn't say more.
Leads were still trickling in, but Murtie was surprised to hear authorities in Alaska had a man in custody who'd confessed to killing the couple and disposing of their bodies in an abandoned farmhouse. He then drove into New York state, and dumped the Curriers' stolen gun and parts of the weapon he'd used into a reservoir in Parishville, N.Y. The FBI is analyzing his two bloodstained pages, with writing on both sides, but they apparently don't contain victims' names. 16, a Dallas bureau press release stated Keyes was "believed to have committed multiple kidnappings and murders" across the country starting in 2001. These caches -- containing guns, zip ties and other supplies used to dispose of bodies -- were found in Alaska and New York. FBI agents on opposite ends of the country, joined by others, are working the case, hoping a timeline will offer clues to his grisly odyssey. The lights go out and Keyes next appears as a fuzzy image climbing through the drive-thru window.
He checked into a motel he'd stayed at in 2009 -- he buried weapons and supplies in the area at that time -- and began scouting a house that suited his purposes: No children or dogs.
Keyes showed no remorse as he detailed how he'd abducted and killed the 18-year-old woman, then demanded ransom, pretending she was alive. Investigators have used Keyes' financial and travel records to piece together a timeline of his whereabouts from Oct. His confession cracked the case, but prosecutors questioning him soon realized there was more, he has killed before.



Business process change definition
The secret circle renovada 2014
Secret lab movies online
Secret of long life quotes


Comments to «Secrets of the dead killer flu pbs»

  1. 123321 writes:
    Pool and mountaineering trails make this a magical out-of-class time.
  2. JOFRAI writes:
    The moment and not letting and.
  3. Joker writes:
    Only in meditation follow, however in all of your relationships, and strengthen your this whole non secular factor.