Diy door headboard,cherry coffee table set methode,free wooden patio table plans ana,2x4 furniture plans free 2014 - For Begninners

04.10.2015
September 23, 2013 by dailygnome 1 Comment Jason hung the barn door he made for the laundry room at the top of the stairs last weekend. Since we still have an old Maytag washer {still kicking and loud}, it’s nice to slide the heavy door shut to block out the noise {along with the piles of dirty laundry}. As DIY enthusiasts, it's safe to say we've got a keen eye for spotting smart, efficient and cost-effective ideas that are also appealing.
The coolest part about this project, aside from how great it looks of course, is that it was made from simple materials you could find at your hardware store. For guided directions on how to build your own sliding barn door, head over to Vintage Revival's step-by-step tutorial. Not only are these easy to install, but ambient lighting is a great way to set the perfect mood for an outdoor party.
Luckily for me, I have a very innovative fiance who came up with an amazing & inexpensive alternative for us! Tip: Once each flange is put on and the track is put together, put the flanges facing down on a flat surface to make sure they are even. Note: In our photo there is cardboard attached because we decided to spray paint after we installed it. Once your track is up you can create your sliders for the track by taking the clothesline spacers and removing the wheels. Assemble your sliders by sliding your straight bracket by a hole on the end onto your bolt. After the washer is on, slide on your wheel and finish it off with another washer and bracket. To attach your doors to the track (You will probably need two people to do this!) start by deciding what distance you want your doors you are hanging to be off of the floor. Once your doors are propped up, put your sliders over the bar where you want them to be, and mark where you are going to drill your holes through the slider with a pencil or pen.
Put your doors back up on whatever you used to prop them, and match your straight bracket holes over the holes you drilled in the door. Take your prop out from underneath and make sure your doors close evenly and slide smoothly!


Also, to make sure the doors stopped shut where they were supposed to and not move to far to one side or another, we added a couple of hose clamps to the inside so they close evenly. I don’t think you would want the door to cover your light switch if that is what you mean, but could probably go over a frame as long as the 90 degree elbows stuck out far enough. I would have never thought about this and I have some very large openings in our downstairs layout that would look beautiful with this!
Hi Michael, if you check out a home improvement store such as Home Depot, etc and ask them where their clothesline supplies is you should be able to find them.
Join us on Instagram and Pinterest to keep up with our most recent projects and sneak peeks!
So when we came across this DIY sliding barn door by Vintage Revivals, we had to share it with you.
This blogger just used some pipes and an old door found at her local architectural salvage store, along with a few other supplies for a total of just $75. And if you're looking for an easier DIY, be sure to flip through our slideshow below of projects you can finish in under an hour. Please keep in mind in the photos our track is already installed on our wall – this is because we did part of this project before I started this blog.
You need to be sure that each end and middle have a stud to support the weight of your doors.
Then connect your two 90 degree elbows on either end of the threaded pipes facing the same way. After the straight bracket is on the bolt you will need to put washers on – the amount of washers you need will depend on how thick your door is. We went with about an inch, and then used wood to prop up our doors against the wall for assembly.
Put a bolt through the sliders and the door and secure with a nut on the other side, tighten securely.
But I can assure you that it was inexpensive & certainly MUCH less pricey than the barn door hardware from the farm supply stores. My fiance has come up with something to help with that for those with little ones, should update soon.


The hose claps allow the doors to close evenly in the centre without going too far one way or the other – if that makes sense at all. We are almost finished making them from your tutorial, but we cannot find those metal clothesline spacers! We looked at a few tutorials, but they were either too-expensive or just not practical for us.
Write down your measurements and divide by 2, but subtract the rough sizes of your elbows and tee. Be sure not to tighten the nut up too tightly as it will cause the wheel to be unable to spin, but tighten it up enough to be secure. If this tutorial works out for you be sure to let me know – I’d love to see your results!
I would find it strange that they wouldn’t have the products to create a clothesline, how strange! Super proud of him – took a bit of trial and error, determination and attention to detail but so happy with the result. Just drape lights between hooks, making sure that the end plug is near an electrical source. Here is how it turned out…Now… Before we get started I wanted to ask you guys for a small favor! Linda CrandallThis weekend I took the plans from the SHANTY OPEN SHELF CONSOLE and modified it to become a wine cabinet. Linda CrandallI am using this plan to make a wine console by modifying the other door to wine bottle and stem wear holder. I noticed we use some of the same products – isn’t Gorilla Wood Glue the bomb?? Judy Clarksonso the pure bond takes the stain pretty well, I thought it was only paintable.



Diy make your own bathroom vanity
Wooden umbrella plans 02


Comments to “Diy door headboard”

  1. RADIK writes:
    Change into discouraged and annoyed and shortly retrofit under-flooring heat into current consists.
  2. BEKO writes:
    Inspired by nineteenth century American furnishings filled with excitement, hope, and, sure any woodworking undertaking to the.