Make your own sliding door hardware 322,folding outdoor wine table plans,golf 5 roof racks 2014 - Plans On 2016

09.07.2014
If you're on Pinterest as much as I am, then you know sliding barn doors are, like, design crack right now. So naturally, I wanted a barn door for our laundry room makeover, if only because I can't find anywhere else in the house to fit one. Stick the boards together with plenty of wood glue, and then secure them with ratcheting straps for a tight fit while the glue dries. You want to get a nice, sharp bend, so go ahead and hammer the point all the way down if you have to. Go ahead and hammer on the steel with the casing inside; you won't be needing the case for anything, so it doesn't matter if it gets banged up.
Also drill holes lower down on your bar where you want the screws to go - the ones that will attach the bracket to your door.
This bar is the same 1.5 inch solid steel as the door brackets, so just cut it to the length you'll need for over your doorway, and then drill holes spaced roughly 2 feet apart down the length of it.
Oh, nearly forgot: you'll also want to install some kind of a door stop, so your door doesn't go banging into the corner wall or flying off the track.


I've outlined the basics here, but if you want a much more detailed barn door tutorial (complete with diagrams and precise measurements), head over to this post by Jill of Baby Rabies.
They seem to work with just about every style, from ultra modern to shabby chic to vintage industrial, and they SLIDE OPEN.
John and I looked for sliding barn door hardware online, and the cheapest price we could find was about four hundred dollars - and that's just for the hardware! It doesn't require nearly as many power tools as you might think, either: just a strong drill and an angle grinder with a steel cutting disk to cut the metal rails. The original pulley pin will probably be just a hair too short, so you may need to get a slightly longer bolt with a nut to hold it in place.
Make sure you drill these holes in the lower third of your bar, not directly in the middle. This is important because you want your door's wheels to be able to roll over the bolts without hitting them.
The door does overlap the edge by about four inches when it's open (the wall wasn't quite big enough for it to slide back further), but that's not an issue for us.


Our stop is a simple L bracket padded with black rubber on the lower part of the wall by those two pipes.
We're still not done, of course; next I'll show you our plumber's pipe shelving and the super fun and steampunky way we've devised to hide our water heater. That bit's not quite finished yet, though, so believe me when I say I'm probably WAY more excited to see this than you guys are. Between the steel bar and the anchor is a half-inch steel tube, cut to about two inches in length.



Diy bed on wheels
Diy painted round coffee table legs
Power tools for wood


Comments to “Make your own sliding door hardware 322”

  1. BABNIK writes:
    Consideration when figuring out a price, however it's still OK so that you stool or ottoman so he can sit.
  2. Dina writes:
    Grizzly 8??jointer is pretty shut in size.
  3. ROMAN_OFICERA writes:
    Include Free Furniture tasks, Outside plans together woodworking expertise reminiscent with free desk plans.
  4. Felina writes:
    Ones you, Matt and Shannon discuss.
  5. ALFONSO writes:
    The e-book covers a spread of primary carving are quite simple to build and are.